Psychology in Education: General Track MA

Master of arts in psychology in education.

For students interested in the field of Clinical Psychology

Our Master of Arts degree is formally titled “Psychology in Education” for historical reasons, but is widely known as the premier MA program for students interested in the field of Clinical Psychology. The program provides foundational knowledge of psychopathology, treatment, theory, and research methods, with a range of courses in areas such as trauma, forensics, women's mental health, global mental health, and mindfulness practice. It is ideally suited for applicants who are looking to strengthen their academic background prior to applying to doctoral programs such as the Psy.D. or Ph.D. in Clinical or Counseling Psychology.

Please note: This program is not intended to prepare students for the independent practice of professional psychology and will not lead to licensure in New York State. Applicants interested in a license-eligible Master's level education are encouraged to consider the department's M.Ed. program in Mental Health Counseling.

The Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology at Teachers College is a world-renowned training ground for researchers and clinicians, particularly known for innovation in research, pedagogy and clinical practice. Students within the M.A. program experience the demands of a graduate-level education in Clinical Psychology while also exploring the multiple avenues available in the ever-growing mental health field beyond. Our mission is to provide students with a platform to clarify their interests and then direct themselves toward their next professional goals. The M.A. program exposes students to diverse perspectives and populations, and supports them with intensive academic advisement, so that they may discover the best fit for their unique abilities as they prepare for the next major step in their career development.

During their tenure, students are closely guided by M.A. program advisors, who are current Ph.D. students in Clinical Psychology. Advisors help students to clarify their academic goals, to gauge progress, and assist with professional development. Through the innovative M.A. program curriculum, which includes a combination of didactic instruction and experiential learning, students develop the critical thinking skills needed to interpret scientific knowledge, review traditional and contemporary treatment models, and engage in innovative research at research centers throughout New York City. By the end, students are abundantly prepared for the transition to doctoral level education in their chosen area of expertise.

A master's degree in psychology is a critical step toward the attainment of a doctoral degree. Our M.A. program is intended to focus a student's passion for clinical psychology in a direction that will help to realize their goal of attaining a doctoral degree. Our 10 concentration areas are designed to provide students with intensive didactics, and the Integrative Project allows students to pursue competence in a chosen topic area in earnest.

Students have the option to concentrate their studies in any of ten areas of study. Whereas most students choose one concentration, some organize their coursework around more than one.

  • Child & Family (Bodnar)
  • Clinical Psychology & Technology (Nitzburg)
  • Community Psychology & Integrated Health Services (Rosa)
  • Forensic Psychology (Mantell)
  • Global Mental Health & Trauma (Verdeli & Bonnano)
  • Neuropsychology (Waxman)
  • Psychotherapy (Farber)
  • Research Methods (Richardson)
  • Sexuality, Women & Gender (Athan)
  • Spirituality & Mind/Body Practices (Miller)

The M.A. program student body draws students from all over the world with the current class comprising students from over 30 countries and almost every state in the Union. Students are typically serious about pursuing doctoral degrees, and are excited by the opportunity to prove themselves in a rigorous learning environment.

The program has many dimensions; and is appropriate for students who have obtained undergraduate degrees in Psychology as well as for those with a limited exposure to the field. Some students use the program to enhance their current work (e.g., neuroscience, global mental health), while others use it to distill their interests within psychology (e.g., forensic psychology, computational methods). The M.A. program celebrates that our students are not of one voice. This diversity of perspectives is considered necessary to solve the very real-world problems they will encounter upon graduation. Each student has a unique contribution to make.

Two students chat inside a faculty member's office at Teachers College

Admissions Information

Displaying requirements for the Spring 2024, Summer 2024, and Fall 2024 terms.

Master of Arts

  • Points/Credits: 36
  • Entry Terms: Fall

Application Deadlines

Select programs remain open beyond our standard application deadlines , such as those with an extended deadline or those that are rolling (open until June or July). If your program is rolling or has an extended deadline indicated above, applications are reviewed as they are received and on a space-available basis. We recommend you complete your application as soon as possible as these programs can close earlier if full capacity has been met.

Application Requirements

Requirements from the tc catalog (ay 2023-2024).

Displaying catalog information for the Fall 2023, Spring 2024 and Summer 2024 terms.

View Full Catalog Listing

The program for the Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in Psychology in Education requires 36 points of coursework and the Integrative Project. The program has a simple structure, in which 18 credits (6 classes) must be completed within the Psychology in Education program (CCPX). An additional 9 credits (3 classes) of Breadth Requirement must be taken at Teachers College in other Programs or Departments (e.g,, Statistics in HUDM). Nine additional credits of Electives (3 classes) may be taken anywhere at Columbia University, including the Psychology in Education Program. Students typically take 3 classes per semester, over a period of 4 semesters. Although the degree can be completed in less time (e.g., 2 semesters, and 2 summer periods) it is advisable for students to allow themselves time to focus on independent research. Students may take up to five years to finish the degree program.

Transfer credits from courses taken outside of Teachers College are not accepted toward any M.A. degree program at Teachers College. Some CCPX classes may be restricted to doctoral students only. Please refer to the course schedule to determine which courses are open to M.A. students.

All students matriculating in the M.A. degree program are given a copy of the Student Handbook for the specific academic year in which they matriculate. The Handbook outlines these requirements in detail.

The Curriculum:

18 credits in Psychology in Education (within CCPX) 9 credits of Breadth (outside CCPX)

9 credits of Electives (Any graduate program at Columbia University)

 Integrative Project (Independent research project)

The Integrative Project

The Integrative Project is intended to be the culmination of a student's development in the Master's degree program and represents a substantial contribution to the field. Students are encouraged to meet with the Program Director as early as possible in the development of their project to review their proposal and to identify an appropriate Sponsor, who will be the person primarily responsible for evaluation of the finished work. For more information on the Integrative Project, please see the Student Handbook.

*The Program Director or the M.A. Program Assistants are available for consultation about course selection and about the Integrative Project.

*Please note: Clinical required and elective ‘topics’ courses (CCPX 4199) change each year. Information about these courses can be found in the M.A. Handbook but not in the Teachers College Catalog.

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Teachers College, Columbia University 328 Horace Mann

Contact Person: Rebecca Shulevitz

Phone: (212) 678-3267 Fax: (212) 678-8235

Email: shulevitz@tc.columbia.edu

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Our Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion works to create an inclusive environment that values diversity in academic medicine.

Education and Training

Columbia Psychiatry is teaching the next generation of clinicians and researchers through our residency, fellowship, and training programs.

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Would you like to help support our research? Learn about how to participate in clinical trials or research studies here at Columbia Psychiatry.

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Read about the world of psychiatric research, education, and patient care—and see what's happening here at Columbia Pyschiatry.

Clinical Psychology

To establish and support the professional identity, work-related activities, and professional development of clinical psychologists engaged in clinical activities at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC), NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (NYP), and New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI). Our goal is to make a significant contribution to clinical education and the development of clinical services within the Department of Psychiatry and the Medical Center. The OCP serves several important functions for Columbia Psychiatry, one of which is oversight of educational opportunities for clinical psychology trainees.

Education and Training:

1. To support training and oversee the development, organization, credentialing, and review of externships and postdoctoral fellowships

2. Maintain the APA accreditation of the Psychology Internship Program under the leadership of Yolanda Thomas, Ph.D.

Co-Directors:

Colleen C. Cullen, Psy.D.

Claude Ann Mellins, Ph.D.

Contact for Office of Clinical Psychology:

[email protected]

Colleen C. Cullen, Psy.D.  [email protected]

Claude Ann Mellins, Ph.D. [email protected]

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Departmental Office: 406 Schermerhorn; 212-854-3608 https://psychology.columbia.edu/

Directors of Undergraduate Studies:

Psychology Major and Concentration : Prof. Patricia Lindemann, 358E Schermerhorn Extension;  [email protected]  (Students with last names beginning A-J) Prof. Katherine Fox-Glassman, 314 Schermerhorn;  [email protected]  (Students with last names beginning K-S) Prof. Chris Baldassano, 370 Schermerhorn Extension;  cab2304 @columbia.edu  (Students with last names beginning T-Z)

Neuroscience and Behavior Major :

Psychology : Prof. Alfredo Spagna, 315 Schermerhorn; [email protected] (Students with last names beginning A-Z) Biology (CC) : Prof. Stuart Firestein, [email protected] Biology (GS) : Prof. Deborah Mowshowitz, 744 Mudd; [email protected]

Director of Instruction and Academic Affairs :

Prof. Caroline Marvin, 317 Schermerhorn;  [email protected]

Directors of Senior Thesis Research Intensive: Prof. Lila Davachi, 402 Schermerhorn; [email protected]

Prof. Nim Tottenham, 419E Schermerhorn; [email protected]

Preclinical Adviser: Prof. E'mett McCaskill, 415O Milbank; [email protected]

Administrative Manager: Joanna Borchert-Kopczuk, 406 Schermerhorn; 212-854-3940; [email protected]

Undergraduate Curriculum Assistant:  406 Schermerhorn; 212-854-8859; [email protected]

The  Department of Psychology  offers students a comprehensive curriculum in psychological science, including research methods, cognition, neuroscience, developmental, social, and clinical areas. The curriculum prepares majors for graduate education in these fields and also provides a relevant background for social work, education, medicine, law, and business. Psychology course offerings are designed to meet the varying needs and interests of students, from those wishing to explore a few topics in psychology or to fulfill the science requirement, to those interested in majoring in Psychology or in Neuroscience and Behavior .

Program Goals

The department's program goals start with the development of a solid knowledge base in psychological science. Consistent with the value psychology places on empirical evidence, courses at every level of the curriculum nurture the development of skills in research methods, quantitative literacy, and critical thinking, and foster respect for the ethical values that undergird the science of psychology.

Most of these program goals are introduced in  PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY , the recommended first psychology course required for all majors that satisfies the prerequisite for most 2000 -level courses. These goals are extended and reinforced in our statistics ( 1600 -level) and research methods ( 1400- level) research methods courses, as well as in the 2000 -level lecture courses and 3000 - and 4000 -level seminars. Each of the 2000 -level lecture courses enables students to study systematically, and in greater depth, one of the content areas introduced in PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY . These lecture courses are the principal means by which psychology majors satisfy the distribution requirements, ensuring not only depth but also breadth of coverage across three central areas of psychology: (1) perception and cognition, courses in the 2200s, (2) psychobiology and neuroscience, courses in the 2400s, and (3) social, personality, and abnormal psychology, courses in the 2600s. To complete the major, students take one or more advanced seminars and are encouraged to participate in supervised research courses, where they have the opportunity to explore research questions in depth and further develop their written and oral communication skills.

Research Participation

All qualified students are welcome to apply to join a research lab and contribute to ongoing projects. Students may volunteer to work in a lab, register for supervised individual research ( PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research), or participate in the department’s Senior Thesis Advanced Research (STAR) Program . Information on faculty research is available on the departmental website. Students are advised to read about research laboratories on faculty lab sites and visit the professor’s office hours to discuss opportunities. At the beginning of the fall term, the department also hosts a Lab-Preview event for students to learn about research opportunities for the upcoming semester.

Program Planning

Majors and concentrators in psychology and majors in neuroscience and behavior should begin planning a program of study as early as possible. All necessary forms and information are available in Program Planning Tips . All majors and concentrators in Psychology and majors in Neuroscience and Behavior should complete a Major Requirement Checklist  before consulting a program adviser to discuss program plans. At minimum, all students must submit a Major Requirement Checklist  prior to the start of their final semester, so that graduation eligibility can be certified.  Once the MRC is submitted, the Undergraduate Curriculum Assistant and the DUS's will review your curriculum plans and advise if changes need to be made.

The Department of Psychology offers a variety of advising resources to provide prospective and current undergraduate majors and concentrators with the information and support needed to successfully plan their programs. An overview of these resources is provided on the Psychology Undergraduate Advising Resources website .

Students are encouraged to consult with Peer, Faculty, and Program Advisers as they plan their course of study in Psychology or Neuroscience and Behavior. Faculty and Peer Advisers are important contacts for general advice on class choices, research opportunities, and post-graduation plans. For definitive answers to questions regarding major requirements and other aspects of your degree, including transfer credit, current and prospective majors should consult their Program Adviser (Director of Undergraduate Studies) or the Undergraduate Curriculum Assistant in the departmental office. Program Adviser assignments and contact information are provided on the departmental website. For additional information about program, faculty, peer, and pre-clinical advising, please see the Psychology Undergraduate Advising Resources website .

Email Communication

The department maintains an e-mail distribution list with the UNIs of all declared majors and concentrators. Students are held responsible for information sent to their Columbia e-mail addresses. Students should read these messages from the department regularly and carefully. They are intended to keep students informed about deadlines, requirements, events, and opportunities. Prospective majors or concentrators who would like to be added to the e-mail distribution list should contact the Undergraduate Curriculum Assistant in the departmental office.

Guide to Course Numbers

Course numbers reflect the structure of the Psychology curriculum:

  • The 1000 -level comprises introductions to psychology, introductory research methods courses, and statistics. PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY  is an introductory course with no prerequisites, which can  serve as the prerequisite for most of the 2000 -level courses.  PSYC UN1021 Science of Psychology: Explorations and Applications is an alternative version of PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY and fulfills the same requirements.  The  1400 s contain the research methods laboratory courses, and the  1600 s contain statistics courses; these two course types are designed to prepare students to be able to understand, critique, and conduct the types of research found in many psychology and neuroscience labs.
  • The 2000 -level comprises lecture courses that are introductions to areas within psychology; most require PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY  as a prerequisite.
  • The 3000 -level comprises more advanced and specialized undergraduate courses; most are given in a seminar format and require instructor permission.
  • The 3900 s are the courses providing research opportunities for undergraduates.
  • The 4000 -level comprises advanced seminars suitable for both advanced undergraduates and graduate students,  and require instructor permission . 

Subcategories within the 2000 -, 3000 -, and 4000 -levels correspond to the three groups in our distribution requirement for undergraduate Psychology majors:

  • Perception and cognition ( 2200 s, 3200 s, and 4200 s),
  • Psychobiology and neuroscience ( 2400 s, 3400 s, and 4400 s), and
  • Social, personality, and abnormal psychology ( 2600 s, 3600 s, and 4600 s).

Additionally, we designate Integrative and Applied courses using x800s (e.g., GU4880) and Advanced Topics in Psychology Research using the x900s (e.g., UN1910, UN1920, UN1930, UN1990, GU4930)

Note that Barnard psychology courses do not follow the same numbering scheme.

Senior Thesis Advanced Research

Starting in Fall 2021, we restructured the Honors program to become the Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis Advanced Research (STAR) program. This change is intended to expand the number of Psychology and Neuroscience & Behavior students we can accept into this rigorous training program. (Note that this change goes into effect for all new applicants; policies for students that have already been enrolled in ‘Honors’ will remain as they were prior to this change.)

Students with strong interests in psychological/neuroscientific research are encouraged to apply for admission to the Psychology Department's Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis Advanced Research program in the fall of their junior year or the equivalent, such that they will be able to participate in the three consecutive semesters (spring - fall - spring) that are required in the program. 

Important: Students will need to confirm that a professor has agreed to mentor them before being admitted into the program. Therefore, interested applicants should reach out to potential mentors to find a lab placement before applying. Tip: The best way to ensure finding a mentor is to get involved in that mentor’s research before asking if they can provide mentoring/supervision on your thesis. Please read through all the information below  before  submitting your application.

Students interested in engaging in a Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis: 

The series includes: 

  • Enrolling in a 3-semester Senior Thesis Advanced Research series, which includes a weekly seminar and research commitment, that must occur consecutively in your Junior year spring semester and Senior year (fall & spring), or equivalent [NOTE: this research course includes performing intensive, independent research with a lab mentor, writing a final thesis, and giving an oral presentation of the thesis at the end of the 3rd semester]
  • Enrolling in a one-semester methods course (PSYC UN1920, UN1420/21, UN1450/51, UN1455/56, UN1490/91) in any semester during undergrad (i.e., before or during the series). Students are strongly encouraged to complete this methods training during or before the spring of their junior year (or equivalent).

Students interested   in engaging in a Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis and aspiring to be eligible for Academic Honors in Psychology or Neuroscience and Behavior: 

All students aspiring to graduate with Academic Honors must enroll in the series described above. However, acceptance to and participation in this program does not automatically result in earning academic honors (see requirements for academic honors below).

Note the students majoring in Neuroscience & Behavior may earn academic honors through the Department of Biological Sciences instead. (Please check their website for more details on that process.)

Honors Requirements: 

The Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis Advanced Research program is open to students majoring in Psychology or Neuroscience & Behavior and includes the following: 

Senior Thesis Advanced Research Seminar ( UN3930 ): This is a two-hour, 1-4 credit course that meets biweekly, during which students present and discuss their ongoing research. Students in the course also attend the  Psychology Department's Colloquium Series , which features researchers from outside the Department speaking on a variety of topics in Psychology/Neuroscience. The seminar and colloquia always take place on Wednesdays from 4:10 - 6:00 p.m. Students in the Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis Advanced Research program enroll in this course during the spring of their junior year and during the fall and spring of their senior years, or the equivalent.

Senior Thesis Research: Starting in the spring of their junior year and continuing through senior year, all students in the Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis Advanced Research program conduct research under the supervision of a Psychology Department faculty member or a faculty member/principal investigator in a psychology- or neuroscience-focused lab outside the department, including at Barnard College, the Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia Business School, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, and other research institutions in the area.

Research Methods Course: To fulfill this requirement, students should complete a methods course (PSYC UN1920 The How-To's of Research; PSYC UN1420/21 Research Methods: Human Behavior; PSYC UN1450/51 Research Methods: Social Cognition & Emotion; PSYC UN1455/56 Research Methods: Social & Personality Psychology; PSYC UN1490/91 Research Methods: Cognition & Decision-making).

Senior Thesis: Students in the Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis Advanced Research program complete an original research project under the supervision of their faculty advisor. Senior students present their research orally at the last colloquium of the Spring term, and also submit a written senior thesis.

Eligibility for Academic Honors:  Students participating in the Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis Advanced Research program are also eligible to receive academic honors when they graduate, provided they 1) complete all components of the program, 2) earn a GPA in the major of 3.6 or higher at the time of graduation, and 3) are recommended by the Psychology department faculty. Please note that academic honors can be awarded to no more than 10% of the graduating class each year, so while only students who have participated in this senior thesis research intensive are eligible to receive academic honors, not everyone in the Senior Thesis Advanced Research program will receive academic honors. 

How to Apply: 

The application is due in mid fall, and decisions are communicated in time for admitted students to register to begin Psych/Neuro Senior Thesis Advanced Research-related classes in the spring. 

The application process comprises the following steps: 

  • Identifying a lab sponsor: If you think you might be interested in applying, you should start reaching out to labs that you’re interested in well in advance of the application deadline to see if they might have openings for research assistants and if they’d be willing to mentor you in your research. Keep in mind that mentoring a student is a significant commitment on the part of a professor, and so it may be difficult to identify a professor who can provide mentorship. Successful applicants typically demonstrate how their own research interests fall in line with those of their proposed sponsor and attest that their faculty member/PI has agreed to sponsor them. Once you have secured a position in a lab, you and your mentor will need to fill out the  mentor agreement form .   
  • Complete the online application: The application will be made available on our psychology department website , and comprises a few relatively short questions asking students to describe their previous coursework and research-related experiences and to write about their intended research interests.  

Requirements for Admission to Graduate Programs in Psychology

Most graduate programs in psychology, including those in clinical psychology, require:

Students should also take a variety of more advanced undergraduate courses and seminars. Students interested in PhD programs in any area of psychology are strongly encouraged to participate in a research lab and may wish to enroll in PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research. Students are also encouraged to apply for the Senior Thesis Advanced Research program  in the early fall of their junior year. 

Students interested in clinical psychology should obtain experience working in a community service program in addition to supervised individual research experience. Students should consult the department's pre-clinical adviser, Prof. E'mett McCaskill , and attend the department's pre-clinical advising events for more information. Additional resources to help prepare students for graduate study in psychology, and for careers in clinical psychology, are available on the Department of Psychology’s website . Students may also sign-up for the preclinical advising listserv  to receive emails about events and relevant information.  

Online Information

The Department of Psychology  website  provides access to a wide variety of information for majors and prospective majors. Among other useful resources, students will find syllabi posted for most lecture and lab courses and for many advanced seminars. Students should read the on-line course syllabi prior to registering for psychology courses. For assistance in finding all necessary resources, students should contact the undergraduate curriculum assistant ( [email protected] ).

Science Requirement

PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY ,  PSYC UN1021 Science of Psychology: Explorations and Applications ,  PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior  (no longer offered), and any PSYC course in the 2200 - or 2400 -level may be used to fulfill the science requirement.

2600 -level and some other psychology courses, including  PSYC BC1001 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY  and other Barnard psychology courses, may not be used to fulfill the science requirement.

All  3- and 4-point courses numbered in th e 32 xx, 34xx, 42xx, and 44xx can  partially fulfill the science requirement .  With prior departmental approval, some additional courses may also be used to partially fulfill the science requirement.  For more detailed information regarding psychology courses that may be applied toward the science requirement, see the Core Curriculum section in this bulletin.

With prior departmental approval, 3- and 4-point courses numbered in the 32xx, 34xx, 42xx, and 44xx, and some additional courses, may partially fulfill the science requirement. For more detailed information regarding psychology courses that may be applied toward the science requirement, see  Core Requirements  in the General Studies bulletin.

Evening and Columbia Summer Courses

The department normally offers at least one lab course in the late afternoon with evening labs. A number of other courses are occasionally offered in late afternoon and evening hours. No more than one quarter of the courses required for the major are normally available in the evening. Working students may find early morning (8:40 a.m.) classes, as well as Summer Session offerings, helpful in completing degree requirements.

Any course offered by the Psychology Department during the Summer Session is applicable toward the same major requirement(s) as the corresponding course of that same number offered during the academic year. For instance, PSYC S1001D The Science of Psychology  meets the same major requirements as does PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY .

See Academic Regulations—Study Outside Columbia College  in this Bulletin for additional information.

See Summer Courses for policies governing Summer Session courses.

  • Niall Bolger
  • Lila Davachi
  • Geraldine Downey
  • William Fifer (Psychiatry, Pediatrics)
  • Norma Graham
  • Tory Higgins
  • Donald C. Hood
  • Nikolaus Kriegeskorte
  • Janet Metcalfe
  • Kevin Ochsner (Chair)
  • Rae Silver (Barnard)
  • Daphna Shohamy
  • Herbert Terrace
  • Nim Tottenham
  • Sarah M.N. Woolley 

Associate Professors

  • Jon Freeman
  • Valerie Purdie-Greenaway
  • Randy Auerbach (Psychiatry)

Assistant Professors ​

  • Christopher Baldassano 
  • Larisa Heiphetz Bianca Marlin
  • Sarah Canetta (Psychiatry)
  • Yunglin Gazes (Neurology)

Lecturers in Discipline

  • Katherine Fox-Glassman
  • Patricia Lindemann
  • Caroline Marvin
  • Alfredo Spagna

Adjunct Faculty

  • Usha Barahmand
  • Jennifer Blaze
  • Jeffrey Cohen
  • Irit Felsen
  • David Friedman
  • Hannah Hoch
  • Nora Isacoff
  • Trenton Jerde
  • Svetlana Komissarouk
  • E'mett McCaskill
  • Michele Miozzo
  • Michael Naft
  • Jenna Reinen
  • Svetlana Rosis
  • Ayanna Sorett

Guidelines for all Psychology Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors

Double majors/concentrations.

All students attempting to complete double majors, double concentrations, or a combination of a major and a concentration should consult the college rules for double counting of courses . 

Overlapping Courses

Students cannot receive credit for two courses—one completed at Columbia and one at another institution (including Barnard)—if those courses have largely overlapping content. For example,   PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY  is similar in content to introductory psychology courses offered at many other institutions, including Barnard; only one such course will receive credit. Similarly,  PSYC UN2630 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY  and  PSYC BC1138 Social Psychology  have overlapping content; only one will receive credit. Please refer to the table of Overlapping Courses  for a partial list of courses at Columbia and Barnard that are known to overlap.

Grade Requirements for the Major

A grade of C- or higher must be earned and revealed on the transcript in any Columbia or Barnard course, including the first, that is used to satisfy the major requirements. The grade of P is not accepted for credit towards the Psychology major , Psychology concentration , or Neuroscience and Behavior major . Courses taken on a Pass/D/Fail basis may not be used to satisfy the major or concentration requirements unless the grade of P is uncovered by the Registrar's deadline. Students may petition to have their P/D/F grades uncovered after the registrar's deadline for the following three courses only:  PSYC UN1001 Science of Psychology, PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain, & Behavior (no longer offered), and PSYC UN1610 Introductory Statistics for Behavioral Scientists. Courses taken for a P grade may not be used to satisfy the major or concentration requirements, except for P grades earned in the Spring 2020 semester.

Major Requirement Checklist 

Prior to the start of their final semester, all seniors must submit a Major Requirement Checklist showing all major courses they have taken and those they plan to take. The Psychology department evaluates each checklist to determine whether or not the course plan completes the major requirements and then notifies the student accordingly. If the student's course plan changes, or if it does not satisfy the major requirements, a revised checklist must be submitted. Departmental approval of an accurate and up-to-date checklist will help ensure completion of all major requirements on time for graduation. 

Major in Psychology

Please read Guidelines for all Psychology Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors above.

The Psychology Major requirements changed in 2020. Students entering an undergraduate degree program at Columbia in Fall 2020 or later must complete the new major requirements. Students who entered Columbia prior to Fall 2020 may choose to complete either the new major requirements or the old ones.

New Major Requirements (for students entering Columbia Fall 2020 or later) 

Students must complete 11 courses in Psychology or an approved cognate discipline. To count toward the major, a course must be taken for 3 or more points. At least 6 of the 11 courses must be in the Columbia Psychology Department.

These 11 courses must include:

  • Introductory Psychology Course
  • One Statistics course
  • One Research Methods course
  • One Group I Course
  • One Group II Course
  • One Group III Course
  • One course meeting the Seminar requirement
  • One course meeting the integrative/applied Special Elective requirement
  • Enough PSYC electives to complete 11 courses

Each course may fulfill only one of these major requirements. See below for details on each of these requirements.

Old Major Requirements (for students entering Columbia prior to Fall 2020) 

Students must complete 30 or more points to complete the Psychology Major. Those 30 points must include:

  • Enough PSYC electives to complete 30 points

 See below for details on each of these requirements. Note that no course may be counted twice in fulfillment of the major requirements. 

The Introductory Psychology Course

  • PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY

A Statistics Course

Select one of the following:

  • PSYC UN1610 STATISTCS-BEHAVIORL SCIENTISTS
  • PSYC UN1660 Advanced Statistical Inference
  • STAT UN1001 INTRO TO STATISTICAL REASONING
  • STAT UN1101 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS  (formerly STAT W1111 )
  • STAT UN1201 CALC-BASED INTRO TO STATISTICS  (formerly STAT W1211 )

A Research Methods Course

  • PSYC UN1420 RESEARCH METHODS - HUMAN BEHAVIOR
  • PSYC UN1450 RESEARCH METHODS - SOCIAL COGNITION & EMOTION
  • PSYC UN1455 RESEARCH METHODS: SOCIAL/PERSONALITY
  • PSYC UN1490 RESEARCH METHODS - COGNITION/DECISION MAKING

Majors are strongly advised to complete the statistics and research methods requirements, in that order, by the fall term of their junior year. Students are advised to verify the specific prerequisites for research methods courses, most of which require prior completion of a statistics course.

Distribution Requirement

One course (3 points or more) must be taken from each of the following three groups (in addition to the introductory, statistics, and research methods courses described above):

Group I—Perception and cognition: courses numbered in the 2200s, 3200s, or 4200s.  

Group II—Psychobiology and neuroscience: courses numbered in the 2400s, 3400s, or 4400s. Also PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior  (no longer offered).

Group III—Social, personality, and abnormal: courses numbered in the 2600s, 3600s, or 4600s .   

As of Fall 2019, Research Methods courses no longer fulfill any of the Group distribution requirements.   

Seminar Requirement

In addition, students must complete one course meeting the Seminar requirement. A seminar course must be taken for 3 or more points.

All courses offered through the Columbia Psychology Department and numbered in the 3200s, 3400s, 3600s, 4200s, 4400s, and 4600s count toward the seminar requirement. Not all Barnard courses taught in a seminar format fulfill this requirement—see Barnard Courses, below, for more information.

Seminars are usually taken in the junior and senior year as a culmination of the major program , but any students who have met the prerequisites and gain the instructor’s permission to join the course may enroll . Enrollment in all seminar courses requires the instructor's permission; students are advised to contact instructors at least one month prior to registration to request seminar admission. Note that honors, senior thesis research intensive, and supervised individual research courses ( PSYC UN3910 HONORS SEMINAR ,  PSYC UN3920 HONORS RESEARCH , PSYC UN3930 Senior Thesis Advanced Research Seminar, and PSYC UN3950 Supervised Individual Research) will not meet the seminar requirement.

For those completing the new major requirements, no course may be counted twice in fulfillment of the above major requirements: separate courses must be taken to fulfill the seminar requirement and each distribution group.

Special Elective (for the New Major requirements)

For students entering Columbia in Fall 2020 or later, one course must be taken to fulfill the integrative/applied Special Elective.

The Special Elective encompasses a wide range of courses: those that cut across and connect different sub-disciplines within psychology; those that integrate psychology with other disciplines; those that apply psychology to real-world problems; those that dig deeper into advanced statistics and methods topics; and those that offer hands-on experience with psychology research.

The following courses are pre-approved to count toward the Special Elective requirement. If you would like to count a course that does not appear on this list, please contact your  Program Advisor   prior to enrolling.

  • PSYC UN3950 SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH or PSYC UN3920 HONORS RESEARCH (taken for 3 or 4 points) or PSYC UN3930 Senior Thesis Research Intensive Seminar
  • PSYC UN1910 Research Ethics in Psychology  
  • PSYC UN1930 Behavioral Data Science  
  • PSYC UN1990 Global Behavioral Science  
  • PSYC UN3615 Children at Risk (Lecture)
  • PSYC GU4612 Frontiers of Justice
  • PSYC GU4930 Fundamentals of Human Brain Imaging: from theory to practice
  • STAT UN2102 Applied Statistical Computing
  • STAT GU4243 APPLIED DATA SCIENCE
  • PSYC BC1088 THE SCIENCE OF LIVING WELL
  • PSYC BC2175 Addictive Behaviors (overlaps with PSYC 2460 Drugs & Behavior)
  • PSYC BC3155 Psychology and Law
  • PSYC BC3465 Field Work & Research Seminar: Toddler Center
  • PSYC BC3466 FIELD WORK & RESEARCH SEMINAR: TODDLER CENTER
  • PSYC BC3473 CLINICAL FIELD PRACTICUM
  • PHIL V2400 Psychology and Philosophy of Human Experience
  • NSBV BC3387 TOPICS IN NEUROETHICS

Additional psychology courses ("electives") must be taken for a total of 30 points (or 11 courses for the new major requirements). 

Once a student has met the specific requirements of the major, any other psychology or approved cognate courses they take to complete the 30-point (or, for students entering Columbia in Fall 2020 or later, the 11-course) minimum constitute electives.

As described below, these may include a limited number of research courses, transfer courses, and Barnard psychology courses not approved for specific requirements.

No course may be counted twice in fulfillment of the above major requirements.

Research Credits

No more than 4 points of  PSYC UN3950  Supervised Individual Research or PSYC UN3920 HONORS RESEARCH  may be taken in any one term, and no more than 8 points total of research and field work courses ( PSYC UN3950 SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH , PSYC BC3466 FIELD WORK & RESEARCH SEMINAR: TODDLER CENTER , PSYC BC3473 CLINICAL FIELD PRACTICUM , PSYC BC3592 Senior Research Seminar and PSYC BC3599 Individual Projects ) may be applied toward the major. See below for further restrictions on applying Barnard courses toward the psychology major. Under the new 11-course major, research courses must be taken for 3 or 4 points in order to count toward the major; a maximum of 2 such courses may be applied towards the major. (See below for further restrictions on applying Barnard courses toward the psychology major).

Barnard Courses

For students completing the 30-point major: No more than 9 credits in Barnard courses (or a combination of transfer and Barnard credits)  may be applied toward the major.

For students completing the 11-course major: A maximum of 5 courses counted toward the major may be from outside Columbia ("outside Columbia" includes both Barnard and transfer courses).

The table of approved Barnard psychology courses  indicates which courses have been approved for specific requirements of the psychology major. Courses not on the approved list may only be applied toward a specific requirement with prior written approval from one of the directors of undergraduate studies . Psychology courses not on the approved list for a specific requirement may be applied as elective credit toward the 30 points for the major (or towards the 11 courses needed for the new major requirements).

As of Fall 2019, Barnard Lab courses do not count towards the Research Methods requirement of the Psychology Major or Concentration.

Non-Psychology Courses

For students completing the 11-course major: Some courses offered outside of Psychology departments can count toward major requirements (e.g., courses taken in the Statistics Department; cognate courses offered through Philosophy, Business, Law, etc.). A maximum of 2 such non-PSYC courses may be applied toward the major. Courses offered in the Barnard Psychology or Neuroscience departments do not count toward this limit.

Transfer Credits

For students completing the 30-point major: No more than 9 transfer credits (or a combination of transfer and Barnard credits) will be accepted toward the psychology major.

For students completing the 11-course major: No more than 3 transfer courses can be applied toward the psychology major. Any transfer courses thus applied count toward the limit of 5 courses from outside Columbia.

Approval of transfer credits on a student’s Entrance Credit Report toward general requirements for the B.A. degree does not grant approval of these credits toward the psychology major. Students must apply for written approval of transfer credit towards the major by submitting the  Major Requirement Substitution Form . This form, along with additional information about transfer credits can be found on the Transfer Credit page of our website . To be approved for the major, a course taken at another institution should be substantially similar to one offered by the department, the grade received must be a B- or better, and the course must have been taken within the past 8 years. As noted above, if two courses overlap in content, only one will be applied towards the major. With the exception of approved Barnard courses, students should consult with one of the directors of undergraduate studies before registering for psychology courses offered outside the department.

Students who have completed an introductory psychology course at another institution prior to declaring a psychology major should submit a Major Requirement Substitution Form to verify whether or not this course meets departmental standards for major transfer credit. If transfer credit toward the major is not approved, the student must enroll in PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY or  PSYC UN1021 Science of Psychology: Explorations and Applications  or  PSYC BC1001 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY to complete this major requirement.

AP Psychology Transfer Credit

As of Fall 2019, the Psychology Department will accept a score of 5 on the AP Psychology exam, or a score of 7 on the Higher Level IB Psychology exam, to meet the Science of Psychology requirement. The AP/IB Psychology exam does not count as a course or toward a student’s points total for their program; students placing out of the Science of Psychology requirement in this way will need to take an additional course to fulfill the required number of courses or points for their program.

The College Board Advanced Placement (AP) statistics scores do not satisfy the statistics requirement.  Students who have completed AP statistics may opt to take a more advanced statistics course to fulfill this requirement with the approval of one of the directors of undergraduate studies .

Major in Neuroscience and Behavior

Please read  Guidelines for all Psychology Majors, Concentrators, and Interdepartmental Majors  above.

The department cosponsors an interdepartmental major in neuroscience and behavior with the Department of Biological Sciences. For assistance in planning the psychology portion of the neuroscience and behavior major, refer to the Program Planning Tips website and use the appropriate major requirement checklist .

No course may be counted twice in fulfillment of the biology or psychology requirements described below. Many graduate programs in neuroscience also require one year of calculus, one year of physics, and chemistry through organic.

Required Courses

In addition to one year of college general chemistry, eleven courses are required to complete the major—six from the Department of Biological Sciences and five from the Department of Psychology. For the definitive list of biology requirements, see the Department of Biological Sciences website .

*NOTE: For students entering in Fall 2024 or later, two biology elective courses will be required. For students entering prior to Fall 2024, one biology elective course will be required. 

Required Chemistry Courses

One year of college chemistry is required prior to taking Introductory Biology.

Required Biology Courses

  • BIOL UN2005 INTRO BIO I: BIOCHEM,GEN,MOLEC
  • BIOL UN2006 INTRO BIO II:CELL BIO,DEV/PHYS
  • BIOL UN3004 NEUROBIO I:CELLULAR & MOLECULR
  • BIOL UN3005 NEUROBIO II: DEVPT & SYSTEMS
  • Two additional 3000 - or 4000 -level biology course from a  list approved by the biology adviser  to the program. *NOTE: For students entering in Fall 2024 or later, two biology elective courses will be required. For students entering prior to Fall 2024, one biology elective course will be required.*
  • BIOL UN3006 PHYSIOLOGY
  • BIOL UN3019 Brain Evolution
  • BIOL UN3022 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
  • BIOL UN3025 NEUROGENETICS
  • BIOL UN3031 GENETICS
  • BIOL UN3799 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF CANCER
  • BIOL UN3041 CELL BIOLOGY
  • BIOL UN3073 CELLULAR/MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY
  • BIOL UN3193 STEM CELL BIOL & APPLICATIONS
  • BIOC UN3300 BIOCHEMISTRY
  • BIOL UN3404 The Global Threat of Antimicrobial Resistance
  • BIOL GU4034 BIOTECHNOLOGY
  • BIOL GU4035 SEMINAR IN EPIGENETICS
  • BIOL GU4075 BIOLOGY AT PHYSICAL EXTREMES
  • BIOL GU4080 ANCIENT AND MODERN RNA WORLDS
  • BIOL GU4082 Theoretical Foundations and Applications of Biophysical Methods
  • BIOL GU4260 PROTEOMICS LABORATORY
  • BIOL GU4290 BIOLOGICAL MICROSCOPY
  • BIOL GU4300 DRUGS AND DISEASE
  • BIOL GU4305  Seminar in Biotechnology
  • BIOC GU4323 Biophysical Chemistry I
  • BIOC GU4324 Biophysical Chemistry II
  • BCHM GU4501 BIOCHEM I-STRUCTURE/METABOLISM
  • BIOC GU4512 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
  • BIOL GU4510 Genomics of Gene Regulation
  • BIOL GU4560 EVOL IN THE AGE OF GENOMICS  

Required Psychology Courses  

  • PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY  or  PSYC UN1021 Science of Psychology: Explorations and Applications  
  • PSYC UN2430 COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE or PSYC UN2450 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE  or  PSYC UN2470 Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology
  • Students who have previously taken PSYC UN1010 Mind, Brain and Behavior  (no longer offered) may use that course to fulfill this requirement.  

    3. One statistics or research methods course from the following:

  • ​ PSYC UN1450 RESEARCH METHODS - SOCIAL COGNITION & EMOTION PSYC UN1455 RESEARCH METHODS: SOCIAL/PERSONALITY
  • STAT UN1101 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS  (formerly  STAT W1111)
  • STAT UN1201 CALC-BASED INTRO TO STATISTICS  (formerly  STAT W1211)
  • Please note, STAT UN1001 does not count towards the Neuroscience & Behavior major.  

    4. One additional 2000 - or 3000 -level psychology lecture course from a list* approved by the psychology adviser   to the program: 

  • PSYC S2210Q Cognition: Basic Processes
  • PSYC UN2215 Cognition and the Brain  or  PSYC S2215D Cognition and the Brain
  • PSYC UN2220 COGNITION: MEMORY AND STRESS
  • PSYC W2225 Attention and Perception
  • PSYC W2230 Perception and Sensory Processes
  • PSYC UN2235 THINKING AND DECISION MAKING  or  PSYC S2235Q Thinking and Decision Making
  • PSYC UN2250 Evolution of Cognition
  • PSYC UN2280 Developmental Psychology
  • PSYC UN2420 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
  • PSYC UN2430 COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
  • PSYC UN2440 Language and the Brain
  • PSYC UN2450 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE  or  PSYC S2450Q Behavioral Neuroscience
  • PSYC UN2460 DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR
  • PSYC UN2470 Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology
  • PSYC UN2480 The Developing Brain
  • PSYC UN2481 Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
  • PSYC S2490D Evolutionary Psychology
  • PSYC UN2620 ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR  or  PSYC S2620Q Abnormal Behavior
  • PSYC UN2690 Frontiers of Justice * Please make careful note of this list, as courses not listed here will not count towards the P4 requirement.  

    5. One advanced psychology seminar from a list approved by the psychology adviser  to the program:​​

  • PSYC W3265 Auditory Perception (Seminar)
  • PSYC UN3270 COMPUT APPROACHES-HUMAN VISION
  • PSYC UN3280 Seminar In Infant Development  or  PSYC S3280D Seminar in Infant Development
  • PSYC S3285D The Psychology of Disaster Preparedness
  • PSYC UN3290 Self: A Cognitive Exploration (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4202 Theories of Change in Human Development
  • PSYC GU4222 The Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4223 MEMORY & EXEC FUNCT:LIFESPAN
  • PSYC GU4224 Consciousness and Cognitive Science
  • PSYC GU4225 CONSCIOUSNESS & ATTENTION
  • PSYC GU4229 ATTENTION AND PERCEPTION (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4232 Production and Perception of Language
  • PSYC GU4235 SPECIAL TOPICS IN VISION
  • PSYC GU4236 Machine Intelligence
  • PSYC GU4239 COG NEURO NARRATIVE FILM
  • PSYC GU4242 Evolution of Language (seminar)
  • PSYC GU4244 LANGUAGE AND MIND
  • PSYC GU4250 Evolution of Intelligence, Cognition, and Language (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4265 AUDITORY PERCEPTION
  • PSYC GU4270 COGNITIVE PROCESSES
  • PSYC G4272 Advanced Seminar in Language Development
  • PSYC GU4280 CORE KNOWLEDGE
  • PSYC GU4281 The Psychology of Curiosity
  • PSYC GU4282 The Neurobiology and Psychology of Play
  • PSYC G4285 Multidisciplinary Approaches to Human Decision Making (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4287 DECISION ARCHITECTURE
  • PSYC GU4289 THE GAMES PEOPLE PLAY:PSYCH OF STRAT DEC
  • PSYC S3410Q Seminar in Emotion
  • PSYC W3435 Neurobiology of Reproductive Behavior (Seminar)
  • PSYC UN3445 THE BRAIN AND MEMORY
  • PSYC UN3450 Evolution of Intelligence, Animal Communication, & Language /  PSYC G4450 The Evolution of Intelligence & Consciousness (Seminar)
  • PSYC UN3481 CRITICAL PERIODS IN BRAIN
  • PSYC W3484 Life Span Development: Theory and Methods
  • PSYC UN3496 NEUROSCIENCE AND SOCIETY  or  PSYC S3496Q Neuroscience and Society
  • PSYC W4415 Methods and Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4420 Animal Cognition (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4430 Learning and the Brain (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4435 NON-MNEMONIC FUNC OF MEMORY SYSTEMS
  • PSYC GU4440 TOPICS-NEUROBIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR  or  PSYC S4440Q Topics in Neurobiology and Behavior
  • PSYC G4460 Cognitive Neuroscience and the Media (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4470 PSYCH & NEUROPSYCH OF LANGUAGE
  • PSYC GU4480 PSYCHOBIOLOGY OF INFANT DEVPT
  • PSYC GU4482 Neural Plasticity
  • PSYC G4485 Affective Neuroscience (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4486 Developmental and Affective Neuroscience (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4490 Inheritance (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4491 The Parental Brain
  • PSYC G4492 Psychobiology of Stress
  • PSYC GU4493 Stress and the Brain
  • PSYC G4495 Ethics, Genetics, and the Brain
  • PSYC GU4496 Behavioral Neuroimmunology
  • PSYC GU4498 BEHAVIORAL EPIGENETICS
  • PSYC S3610D The Psychology of Stereotyping & Prejudice
  • PSYC UN3615 Children at Risk (Lecture) (Seminar)
  • PSYC UN3620 SEM-DEVELOPMNTL PSYCHOPATHOLGY
  • PSYC UN3623 TOPICS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSYC UN3624 Adolescent Mental Health: Causes, Correlates, Consequences
  • PSYC UN3625 CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY  or  PSYC S3625D Clinical Neuropsychology Seminar
  • PSYC UN3655 Field Experimentation Methods for Social Psychology
  • PSYC UN3661 Happiness Studies Seminar
  • PSYC UN3671 Motivation Science
  • PSYC UN3680 SOCIAL COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE /  PSYC GU4685 SOCIAL COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
  • PSYC UN3691 Interpersonal Cognition Seminar: Close Relationships, Identity, and Memory
  • PSYC UN3693 Stress in an Interpersonal Context
  • PSYC GU4615 PSYCH OF CULTURE & DIVERS
  • PSYC GU4627 Seminar in Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Related Disorders
  • PSYC GU4630 ADV SEM CURRENT PERS THRY
  • PSYC GU4635 The Unconscious Mind (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4645 CULTR,MOTIVATN,PROSOCIAL BEHAV
  • PSYC GU4646 Socio-Ecological Psychology
  • PSYC GU4670 THRY-SOCIAL/PERSONALITY PSYCH
  • PSYC GU4672 MORAL PSYCHOLOGY
  • PSYC GU4673 Political Psychology
  • PSYC GU4682 FAQS ABOUT LIFE:APPL OF PSYC RSCH TO EVE
  • PSYC GU4685 SOCIAL COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
  • PSYC GU4686 Barriers and Levers for Behavior Change
  • PSYC GU4690 SOCIAL FACTORS & PSYCHOPATHLGY
  • PSYC GU4695 Psychology of Close Relationships (Seminar)
  • PSYC GU4880 In Service of Equity: Examining Developmental Science through the Lens of Policy

Note:   Students wishing to use a seminar course not listed above to meet the P5 seminar requirement must contact their psychology adviser before enrolling to request permission for an exception. Generally speaking, permission for such exceptions is only granted when there is a compelling case related to the student’s research or area of study. Students requesting permission to use a course not on this list must ensure that their substantive coursework in the seminar (generally their final paper) is on a neuroscience-focused topic.  

Transfer Credit for Psychology Courses Taken Elsewhere  

Students should consult a psychology adviser before registering for psychology courses offered outside the department. With the adviser's approval, one, and only one, course from another institution, including Barnard, may be applied toward the psychology portion of the Neuroscience and Behavior major. Students who wish to obtain credit for a course taken at Barnard or at another institution should complete the Major Requirement Substitution Form . To be approved for the major, the course should be substantially similar to one offered by this department and approved for this major, and the grade received must be a C- or better if from Barnard, or B- or better if from another institution.  As of  Fall 2019, the Psychology department accepts a score of 5 on the AP Psychology exam, or a score of 7 on the Higher Level IB Psychology exam, to meet  the PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY requirement. The AP/IB Psychology exam does not count as a course or toward a student’s points total for their program; students placing out of the Science of Psychology requirement in this way will need to take an additional course -- approved by the Psychology adviser --  to fulfill the required number of courses for their program.

Exceptions to Biology Requirements  

Any exceptions must be approved in advance by a biology adviser and students must receive an email notification of that approval. Students may substitute Barnard College courses only with prior permission from a Biology Department adviser.

Concentration in Psychology

The Psychology Concentration requirements changed in 2020. Students entering an undergraduate degree program at Columbia in Fall 2020 or later must complete the new concentration requirements. Students who entered Columbia prior to Fall 2020 may choose to complete either the new concentration requirements or the old ones.  

New Concentration Requirements (for students entering Columbia Fall 2020 or later) 

Students must complete 7 courses in Psychology or an approved cognate discipline. To count toward the concentration, a course must be taken for 3 or more points. The following requirements must be met: 

1. PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY  or  PSYC UN1021 Science of Psychology: Explorations and Applications

2. A Statistics or Research Methods course ( PSYC UN1610 STATISTCS-BEHAVIORL SCIENTISTS , STAT UN1001 INTRO TO STATISTICAL REASONING , STAT UN1101 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS , STAT UN1201 CALC-BASED INTRO TO STATISTICS , or a Research Methods course in the PSYC 14xx's)

3. E ither  3 courses in one group,  or  1 course in each of the 3 groups: Group I - Cognition & Perception; Group II - Psychobiology & Neuroscience; Group III - Social, Personality, & Abnormal

4. Additional elective courses in psychology to complete the 7-course requirement   

Restrictions on research credits, Barnard credits, non-psychology courses, and transfer credits are modified from those of the psychology major as follows:

  • No more than 2 transfer courses from other institutions can be applied toward the concentration.
  • No more than 3 total courses from outside Columbia (Barnard and/or transfer) can be applied to the concentration.
  • A maximum of 1 non-PSYC course can count toward concentration requirements (e.g., courses taken in the Statistics Department; cognate courses offered through Philosophy, Business, Law, etc.).
  • No more than 1 semester of   PSYC UN3950 SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH or other supervised research course (taken for 3 or 4 points) can count towards the concentration. 

Except as noted above, other regulations outlined in the  Psychology Major section  regarding grades, transfer credits, and overlapping courses also apply toward the Psychology Concentration  

Old Concentration Requirements (for students entering Columbia prior to Fall 2020)

A concentration in psychology requires a minimum of 18 points, including PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY  or PSYC UN1021 Science of Psychology: Explorations and Applications  and courses in at least two of the three groups listed under “Distribution Requirement” for the psychology major.

Restrictions on research credits, Barnard credits, and transfer credits are modified from those of the psychology major as follows:

  • Only 4 points total may be applied toward the concentration from research or field-work courses, including:  PSYC UN3950  Supervised Individual Research, PSYC UN3920 HONORS RESEARCH   PSYC BC3466 FIELD WORK & RESEARCH SEMINAR: TODDLER CENTER , PSYC BC3473 CLINICAL FIELD PRACTICUM , PSYC BC3592 Senior Research Seminar , and PSYC BC3599 Individual Projects ;
  • Only 5 points from Barnard (including PSYC BC1001 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY ) may be applied toward the concentration.
  • Only 5 points total (including any Barnard points) from approved psychology courses taken at other institutions may be applied toward the concentration.

Except as noted above, other regulations outlined in the  Psychology Major section  regarding grades, transfer credits, and overlapping courses also apply toward the Psychology Concentration

PSYC UN1001 THE SCIENCE OF PSYCHOLOGY. 3.00 points .

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement Enrollment may be limited. Attendance at the first two class periods is mandatory.

Prerequisites: BLOCKED CLASS. EVERYONE MUST JOIN WAITLIST TO BE ADMITTED Prerequisites: BLOCKED CLASS. EVERYONE MUST JOIN WAITLIST TO BE ADMITTED Broad survey of psychological science including: sensation and perception; learning, memory, intelligence, language, and cognition; emotions and motivation; development, personality, health and illness, and social behavior. Discusses relations between the brain, behavior, and experience. Emphasizes science as a process of discovering both new ideas and new empirical results. PSYC UN1001 serves as a prerequisite for further psychology courses and should be completed by the sophomore year

PSYC UN1021 Science of Psychology: Explorations and Applications. 3.00 points .

UN1021 offers a broad introductory survey of psychological science, discussing relations between the brain, behavior, and experience, with regard to topics including: sensation and perception; learning, memory, language, and cognition; emotions and motivation; development, personality, health and well-being, and social behavior. The course emphasizes science as a process of discovering both new ideas and new empirical results -- and the ways in which psychological research can be used to address real-world challenges

PSYC UN1420 RESEARCH METHODS - HUMAN BEHAVIOR. 4.00 points .

Attendance at the first class is mandatory. Fee: $70.

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010 , and a statistics course ( PSYC W1610 or the equivalent), or the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 and a statistics course ( PSYC UN1610 or the equivalent), or the instructor's permission. Corequisites: PSYC UN1421 Introduction to the techniques of research employed in the study of human behavior. Students gain experience in the conduct of research, including design of simple experiments, observation and measurement techniques, and the analysis of behavioral data

PSYC UN1421 RESEARCH METHODS-HUM BEHAV LAB. 0.00 points .

Limited enrollment in each section.

Corequisites: PSYC UN1420 Corequisites: PSYC UN1420

PSYC UN1450 RESEARCH METHODS - SOCIAL COGNITION & EMOTION. 4.00 points .

Attendance at the first class is essential. Priority given to psychology majors. Fee: $70.

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 and a statistics course ( PSYC UN1610 or the equivalent), or the instructor's permission. Corequisites: PSYC UN1451 An introduction to research methods employed in the study of human social cognition and emotion. Students gain experience in the design and conduct of research, including ethical issues, observation and measurement techniques, interpretation of data, and preparation of written and oral reports

PSYC UN1451 RESEARCH METHODS - SOCIAL COGNITION & EMOTION - LAB. 0.00 points .

Corequisites: PSYC UN1450 An introduction to research methods employed in the study of human social cognition and emotion. Students gain experience in the design and conduct of research, including ethical issues, observation and measurement techniques, interpretation of data, and preparation of written and oral reports

PSYC UN1455 RESEARCH METHODS: SOCIAL/PERSONALITY. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 and a statistics course ( PSYC UN1610 or the equivalent), or the instructor's permission. Corequisites: PSYC UN1456 Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 and a statistics course ( PSYC UN1610 or the equivalent), or the instructors permission. Corequisites: PSYC UN1456 Methodology and procedures of personality and social psychological research and exercises in data analysis and research design. Ethical issues in psychological research. Statistical concepts such as parameter estimation and testing, measurement reliability and validity, merits and limitations of correlational and experimental research designs, and empirical evaluation of theories

PSYC UN1456 RESEARCH METHODS:SOCIAL/PERSONALITY. 0.00 points .

Corequisite: PSYC UN1455

PSYC UN1490 RESEARCH METHODS - COGNITION/DECISION MAKING. 4.00 points .

Corequisites: PSYC UN1491 Corequisites: PSYC UN1491 Prerequisites: Science of Psychology (PSYC 1001) or Mind, Brain, - Behavior (PSYC 1010) or equivalent intro psych course, plus an introductory statistics course. Introduces research methods employed in the study of the cognitive and social determinants of thinking and decision making. Students gain experience in the conduct of research, including: design of simple experiments; observation and preference elicitation techniques; the analysis of behavioral data, considerations of validity, reliability, and research ethics; and preparation of written and oral reports. Note: Fee: $70. Attendance at the first class is essential

PSYC UN1491 RESEARCH METHODS - COGNITION/DECISION LAB. 0.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 ) and ( PSYC UN1610 or STAT UN1001 or STAT UN1101 or STAT UN1201 ) Or equivalent introductory psychology and statistics courses. Corequisites: PSYC UN1490 Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 and ( PSYC UN1610 or STAT UN1001 or STAT UN1101 or STAT UN1201 ) Or equivalent introductory psychology and statistics courses. Corequisites: PSYC UN1490 Required lab for PSYC UN1490

PSYC UN1610 STATISTCS-BEHAVIORL SCIENTISTS. 4.00 points .

Lecture and lab. Priority given to psychology majors. Fee $70.

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 Recommended preparation: one course in behavioral science and knowledge of high school algebra. Corequisites: PSYC UN1611 Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 Recommended preparation: one course in behavioral science and knowledge of high school algebra. Corequisites: PSYC UN1611 Introduction to statistics that concentrates on problems from the behavioral sciences

PSYC UN1611 STATISTCS-BEHAV SCIENTISTS-LAB. 0.00 points .

Corequisites: PSYC UN1610 Corequisites: PSYC UN1610 Required lab section for PSYC UN1610

PSYC UN1910 Research Ethics in Psychology. 4 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1001 ) or equivalent introductory course in psychology.

This course explores the ethical theory, principles, codes and standards applicable to research in psychology and the complexities inherent in ethical research practice. 

PSYC UN1930 Behavioral Data Science. 4 points .

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement

This course covers the basic skills and knowledge needed to address psychological research questions using data science methods. Topics cover the full scope of a behavioral data science research project including data acquisition, data processing, and data analysis.

PSYC UN1990 Global Behavioral Science. 4.00 points .

This course builds on fundamentals of psychological and behavioral science by exploring reproducibility and replication on a global level. Students will learn from a wide range of studies and their real-world implications

PSYC UN2215 Cognition and the Brain. 3 points .

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement Not offered during 2023-2024 academic year.

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 (recommended) or the instructor's permission.

How mental activities -- particularly human cognitive processes -- are implemented in the brain, with some emphasis on methods and findings of neuroscience. Topics include long term and working memory, attention and executive processes, concepts and categorization, decision making, and language.

PSYC UN2220 COGNITION: MEMORY AND STRESS. 3.00 points .

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement Attendance at the first class is mandatory.

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or the instructors permission. Memory, attention, and stress in human cognition

PSYC UN2235 THINKING AND DECISION MAKING. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: an introductory course in psychology. Prerequisites: an introductory course in psychology. Models of judgment and decision making in both certain and uncertain or risky situations, illustrating the interplay of top-down (theory-driven) and bottom-up (data-driven) processes in creating knowledge. Focuses on how individuals do and should make decisions, with some extensions to group decision making and social dilemmas

PSYC UN2250 Evolution of Cognition. 3 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or the instructor's permission.

A systematic review of different forms of cognition as viewed in the context of the theory of evolution. Specific topics include the application of the theory of evolution to behavior, associative learning, biological constraints on learning, methods for studying the cognitive abilities of animals, levels of representation, ecological influences on cognition, and evidence of consciousness in animals.

PSYC UN2280 Developmental Psychology. 3.00 points .

CC/GS: Partial Fulfillment of Science Requirement Enrollment may be limited. Attendance at the first two classes is mandatory.

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or the equivalent. Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or the equivalent. Introduction to the scientific study of human development, with an emphasis on psychobiological processes underlying perceptual, cognitive, and emotional development

PSYC UN2420 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or a college-level biology course, or the instructor's permission.

Introduction to behavioral systems, evolution of behavioral traits, and analysis of behavior. Topics include reproductive and social behavior, mating systems, competition, cooperation, communication, learning, development and the interplay of genes and environment.

PSYC UN2430 COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or equivalent introductory course in Psychology Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or equivalent introductory course in Psychology This course provides an in-depth survey of data and models of a wide variety of human cognitive functions. Drawing on behavioral, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging research, the course explores the neural mechanisms underlying complex cognitive processes, such as perception, memory, and decision making. Importantly, the course examines the logic and assumptions that permit us to interpret brain activity in psychological terms

PSYC UN2440 Language and the Brain. 3 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 , or the instructor's permission.

Introduction to psychological research on human language and communication and to brain mechanisms supporting language processing. Topics include comprehension and production of speech sounds, words and sentences; reading and writing; bilingualism; communication behavior.

PSYC UN2450 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or the instructors permission. Examines the principles governing neuronal activity, the role of neurotransmitter systems in memory and motivational processes, the presumed brain dysfunctions that give rise to schizophrenia and depression, and philosophical issues regarding the relationship between brain activity and subjective experience

PSYC UN2460 DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010 , or the equivalent. Prerequisites: PSYC W1001 or PSYC W1010 , or the equivalent. The effects of psychoactive drugs on the brain and behavior

PSYC UN2470 Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology. 3.00 points .

Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology is an intermediate-level lecture course, which explores how the analysis of lesion patterns extended across brain networks has offered invaluable insights on the relationship between brain and behavior and deepened our understanding of the causal relationships between brain lesions and their clinical consequences

PSYC UN2480 The Developing Brain. 3 points .

Brain development across the life span, with emphasis on fetal and postnatal periods. How the environment shapes brain development and hence adult patterns of behavior.

PSYC UN2610 INTRODUCTION TO PERSONALITY. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: an introductory psychology course.

A survey of the important methods, findings, and theories in the field of personality research.

PSYC UN2620 ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: An introductory psychology course. Examines definitions, theories, and treatments of abnormal behavior

PSYC UN2630 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3.00 points .

Surveys important methods, findings, and theories in the study of social influences on behavior. Emphasizes different perspectives on the relation between individuals and society.

PSYC UN2640 INTRO TO SOCIAL COGNITION. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: an introductory course in psychology or the instructor's permission. Prerequisite: An introductory psychology course. An introduction to basic concepts in social cognition, an approach to understanding social judgment and behavior by investigating the underlying mental processes. Topics include attitudes, identity, and prejudice, among others

PSYC UN2650 INTRO TO CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: none; some basic knowledge of social psychology is desirable.

A comprehensive examination of how culture and diversity shape psychological processes. The class will explore psychological and political underpinnings of culture and diversity, emphasizing social psychological approaches. Topics include culture and social cognition, group and identity formation, psychology of multiculturalism, stereotyping, prejudice, and gender. Applications to real-world phenomena discussed.

PSYC UN2670 Social Development. 3 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 , or the equivalent.

This lecture course introduces students to the study of typical human social development with a particular focus on genetic, familial and peer influences on the development of social behaviors during early childhood.

PSYC UN2690 Frontiers of Justice. 4.00 points .

Frontiers of Justice is designed to encourage students and equip them with the skills to become active and effective “Change Agents” within their academic institutions and larger communities. Oriented by the question, What does justice look like?, this course aims to raise political and social awareness and engagement with the challenges facing New York City and strengthen ties between Columbia University, disadvantaged communities, and city government agencies and community organizations. Through sharing ideas about how to make structural and systemic change in ways that integrate science, law, politics, history, narrative and community engagement, the course is intended to support students in working to break down racial and ethnic barriers and toward a more fair and just society

PSYC UN3270 COMPUT APPROACHES-HUMAN VISION. 3.00 points .

This course will be offered in Fall 2016.

Prerequisites: some background in psychology and/or neurophysiology (e.g., PSYC UN1001 , PSYC UN1010 , PSYC UN2230, PSYC UN2450 ; BIOL UN3004 or BIOL UN3005 ) is desirable. See instructor if you have questions about your background. Some background in mathematics and computer science (e.g., calculus or linear algebra, a programming language) is highly recommended. Prerequisites: some background in psychology and/or neurophysiology (e.g. PSYC UN1001 , PSYC UN1010 , PSYC UN2230, PSYC UN2450 ; BIOL UN3004 or BIOL UN3005 ) is desirable. See instructor if you have questions about your background. Some background in mathematics and computer science (e.g. calculus or linear algebra, a programming language) is highly recommended. Study of human vision--both behavioral and physiological data--within a framework of computational and mathematical descriptions. Please contact Prof. Graham by e-mail ([email protected]) if you are interested in this course

PSYC UN3280 Seminar In Infant Development. 3 points .

Prerequisites: a course in perception, cognition or developmental psychology, and the instructor's permission.

Analysis of human development during the first year of life, with an emphasis on infant perceptual and cognitive development.

PSYC UN3290 Self: A Cognitive Exploration (Seminar). 4 points .

Not offered during 2023-2024 academic year.

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 , or the equivalent, plus the instructor's permission.

What does it mean to have a sense of self? Is it uniquely human? Taking a cognitive perspective, we will discuss these questions as well as self-reflective and self-monitoring abilities, brain structures relevant to self-processing, and disorders of self. We will also consider the self from evolutionary, developmental, neuroscience, and psychopathological perspectives.

PSYC UN3445 THE BRAIN AND MEMORY. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 ) or Equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology and the instructor's permission Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 ) or Equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology and the instructors permission This seminar will give a comprehensive overview of episodic memory research: what neuroimaging studies, patient studies, and animal models have taught us about how the brain creates, stores, and retrieves memories

PSYC UN3450 Evolution of Intelligence, Animal Communication, & Language. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 , and the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 , and the instructors permission. A systematic review of the evolution language covering the theory of evolution, conditioning theory, animal communication, ape language experiments, infant cognition, preverbal antecedents of language and contemporary theories of language

PSYC UN3481 CRITICAL PERIODS IN BRAIN. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 or equivalent course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology.

The majority of our mental capacities—ranging from basic sensory functions to more advanced social, emotional and cognitive capabilities—take many years to develop and are highly influenced by environmental signals encountered during particular developmental ‘critical periods’. In this seminar we will explore examples of these periods across diverse brain systems and behaviors, ranging from vision and audition to social, emotional and cognitive development, by considering each example in the context of human brain function and behavior as well as at the level of more detailed neurobiological mechanisms underlying these changes elucidated by studies using non-human animal systems.

PSYC UN3496 NEUROSCIENCE AND SOCIETY. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: Science of Psychology (PSYC 1001) or Mind, Brain, & Behavior (PSYC 1010), or equivalent introductory psychology course. Students who have not taken one of these courses may also be admitted with instructor permission. This course investigates the ways in which research in human neuroscience both reflects and informs societal issues. Topics include how neuroscience research is interpreted and applied in areas such as healthcare, education, law, consumer behavior, and public policy

PSYC UN3615 Children at Risk (Lecture). 4 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1010 , PSYC UN2280 , PSYC UN2620 , or PSYC UN2680, and the instructor's permission.

Considers contemporary risk factors in children's lives. The immediate and enduring biological and behavioral impact of risk factors.

PSYC UN3620 SEM-DEVELOPMNTL PSYCHOPATHOLGY. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: at least two of the following courses: ( UN1001, UN1010, UN2280, UN2620, UN2680, UN3280 ) and the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: at least two of the following courses: (UN1001, UN1010, UN2280, UN2620, UN2680, UN3280) and the instructor's permission. Developmental psychopathology posits that it is development itself that has gone awry when there is psychopathology. As such, it seeks to understand the early and multiple factors contributing to psychopathology emerging in childhood and later in life. We will use several models (e.g. ones dominated by biological, genetic, and psychological foci) to understand the roots of mental illness

PSYC UN3621 Creativity and the Good Life. 4 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or equivalent introductory psychology course

Is it possible to make sense of something as elusive as creativity? Yes, it is. This seminar will review the latest science of creativity, and how creativity is relevant to everyday life, society, and the good life. A wide variety of perspectives within the field will be highlighted, including different theories of the creative process and ways of assessing creativity.

PSYC UN3623 TOPICS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1001 ) Instructor permission required. Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1001 ) Instructor permission required. A seminar for advanced undergraduate students exploring different areas of clinical psychology. This course will provide you with a broad overview of the endeavors of clinical psychology, as well as discussion of its current social context, goals, and limitations

PSYC UN3624 Adolescent Mental Health: Causes, Correlates, Consequences. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 and Prior coursework in Abnormal Psychology and Research Methods strongly preferred. Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 and Prior coursework in Abnormal Psychology and Research Methods strongly preferred. Adolescence is a peak period for the onset of mental disorders and suicidal behaviors. The seminar is designed to enhance understanding of topics including, prevalence, etiology, risk factors, mechanisms, prevention and treatment approaches, and ethical considerations related to clinical research

PSYC UN3625 CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: an introductory course in neuroscience, like PSYC UN1010 or PSYC UN2450 , and the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: an introductory course in neuroscience, like PSYC UN1010 or PSYC UN2450 , and the instructor's permission. Analysis of the assessment of physical and psychiatric diseases impacting the central nervous system, with emphasis on the relationship between neuropathology and cognitive and behavioral deficits

PSYC UN3661 Happiness Studies Seminar. 3 points .

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the field of happiness studies.  Drawing on research from the field of psychology, systems thinking, psychology, neuroscience, and other disciplines, the course explores key components of personal, interpersonal, and societal happiness.

PSYC UN3680 SOCIAL COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: at least two of the following courses: PSYC UN1001 , PSYC UN1010 , PSYC UN2630 , PSYC UN3410, PSYC UN3480, PSYC UN3485; and the instructor's permission. Social cognitive neuroscience seeks to integrate the theories and methods of its parent disciplines, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience. As such, it seeks to explain social and emotional behavior at three levels of analysis: The social level, which includes descriptions of experience, behavior, and context; the cognitive level, which specifies information processing (i.e. psychological) mechanisms; and the neural level, which specifies neural systems that instantiate these processes. The course begins with foundational concepts (multilevel analyses of behavior, converging evidence, the evolution of the human brain), which students use to analyze findings in number of core content domains (including emotional appraisal, emotion regulation, person perception, social affiliation and rejection, individual differences). Prerequisites: Course equivalents of at least two of the following courses (W1001, W1010, W2630, W3410, W3480, W3485) and/or the instructor's permission

PSYC UN3690 The Self in Social Context (Seminar). 4 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or UN1010 , or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission.

This course centers on understanding the self embedded in the social context. We will integrate knowledge from various areas of psychology (developmental, cognitive, social cognition) with a main focus in social psychology. This course will provide the opportunity to gain an understanding of research in the following areas: the development of self in a social context, the relationship between the self and the broader socio-cultural context, the impact of self-involvement on social/cognitive processes, and contemporary research on individual differences.

PSYC UN3691 Interpersonal Cognition Seminar: Close Relationships, Identity, and Memory. 4 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN2630 or PSYC UN2640 Instructor permission.1 course in research methods

What makes people ‘click’? How does interpersonal closeness develop? How do close relationships influence our thought processes, behaviors, and identities? How do our conversations with relationship partners change our memories of events and our perceptions of reality? And finally, what are the implicit and explicit cognitive mechanisms underlying these processes?

The primary objective of this course will be to provide you with the relevant literature, theoretical background, methodological proficiency, and critical thinking and communication skills to articulate your own answers to these questions, and to propose future studies in the field. 

PSYC UN3910 HONORS SEMINAR. 1.00 point .

Prerequisites: open to students in the honors program only. Discussion of a variety of topics in psychology, with particular emphasis on recent developments and methodological problems. Students propose and discuss special research topics

PSYC UN3920 HONORS RESEARCH. 1.00-4.00 points .

May be repeated for additional credit.

Prerequisites: open to students in the honors program only. Prerequisites: open to students in the honors program only. Except by special permission of the director of undergraduate studies, no more than 4 points of individual research may be taken in any one term. This includes both PSYC UN3950 and PSYC UN3920 . No more than 12 points of PSYC UN3920 may be applied toward the honors program in psychology. Special research topics arranged with the instructors of the department leading toward a senior honors paper

PSYC UN3950 SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH. 0.00-4.00 points .

1-4 points. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: the instructors permission. Except by special permission of the director of undergraduate studies, no more than 4 points of individual research may be taken in any one term. This includes both PSYC UN3950 and PSYC UN3920 . No more than 8 points ofPSYC UN3950 may be applied toward the psychology major, and no more than 4 points toward the concentration. Readings, special laboratory projects, reports, and special seminars on contemporary issues in psychological research and theory

PSYC GU4202 Theories of Change in Human Development. 4.00 points .

What are the agents of developmental change in human childhood? How has the scientific community graduated from nature versus nurture, to nature and nurture? This course offers students an in-depth analysis of the fundamental theories in the study of cognitive and social development

PSYC GU4222 The Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging (Seminar). 4 points .

Prerequisites: courses in introductory psychology and cognitive psychology; and the instructor's permission.

Comprehensive overview of various conceptual and methodologic approaches to studying the cognitive neuroscience of aging. The course will emphasize the importance of combining information from cognitive experimental designs, epidemiologic studies, neuroimaging, and clinical neuropsychological approaches to understand individual differences in both healthy and pathological aging.

PSYC GU4223 MEMORY & EXEC FUNCT:LIFESPAN. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission, plus PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 , or the equivalent. Optimal preparation will include some background in experimental design and statistics. Prerequisites: the instructors permission, plus PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 , or the equivalent. Optimal preparation will include some background in experimental design and statistics. Memory and executive processing are critical cognitive functions required for successfully navigating everyday life. In lifespan studies, both exhibit relatively long developmental trajectories followed by stasis and then relative decline in old age. Yet, neither memory nor executive function is a unitary construct. Rather, each is comprised of separable components that may show different developmental trajectories and declines or maintenance at older ages. Moreover, memory is malleable and is a reconstruction of past experience, not an exact reproduction. We will discuss a range of topics related to the development, maintenance and potential decline in memory and executive function from infancy through old age

PSYC GU4224 Consciousness and Cognitive Science. 4.00 points .

Our human experience is rich: the thrill of falling in love, the spark of a new idea, the zing of table salt, the sharpness of pain. For thousands of years, philosophers, artists, and religious scholars have tried to explain our subjective experience. More recently, neuroscientists and artificial intelligence experts have contributed to this discussion, weighing in on whether we are “more than meat” (as Descartes famously put it), and whether computers can ever be sentient. In this class, we will begin with the big questions and an interdisciplinary overview of consciousness, then delve into psychology’s role. Using literature from perception, memory, emotion, metacognition, attention, and symbolic development, among other areas of psychology, we will see what empirical evidence can tell us about who we are, what we are able to know, and why we even have an experience of the world at all

PSYC GU4225 CONSCIOUSNESS & ATTENTION. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission; some basic knowledge of cognitive science and neuroanatomy is desirable, but not necessary. Modern theories attempt to characterize the human mind in terms of information processing. But machines that process information do not seem to feel anything; a computer may for instance receive inputs from a video camera, yet it would be hard to imagine that it sees or experiences the vividness of colors like we do. Nobody has yet provided a convincing theory as to how to explain the subjective nature of our mental lives in objective physical terms. This is called the problem of consciousness, and is generally considered to be one of the last unsolved puzzles in science. Philosophers even debate whether there could be a solution to this problem at all. Students in this course may be recruited for participation in a voluntary research study. Students who choose not to participate in the study will complete the same course requirements as those who do, and an individual's choice will not affect their grade or status as a student in the course

PSYC GU4229 ATTENTION AND PERCEPTION. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 ) or Equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 ) or Equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology This seminar aims to provide an in-depth overview of neuroscientific knowledge regarding two critical cognitive functions: attention and perception. For each topic, results from behavioral studies are combined with those from recent neurocognitive approaches – primarily neuropsychological and functional brain imaging studies – that reveal the underlying neural networks and brain mechanisms

PSYC GU4232 Production and Perception of Language. 4 points .

Prerequisites: two courses in Psychology and the instructor's permission.

Topics include phonetic expression, motoric and perceptual organization, speech codes and memory codes, spoken word recognition, phrase formation, and the effects of context in perception and production.

PSYC G4230 Sensation and Perception (Seminar). 3 points .

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission; some background in perception is required.

Topics on the perception of space. Discussions, reviews, and recent literature.

PSYC GU4235 SPECIAL TOPICS IN VISION. 3.00 points .

This course will be offered in Fall 2016. May be repeated for additional credit.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Please contact Prof. Graham by e-mail ( [email protected] ) if you are interested in this course. Prerequisites: the instructors permission. Please contact Prof. Graham by e-mail ([email protected]) if you are interested in this course

PSYC GU4236 Machine Intelligence. 4.00 points .

This course will survey historical and modern developments in machine intelligence from fields such as psychology, neuroscience, and computer science, and from intellectual movements such as cybernetics, artificial intelligence, neural networks, connectionism, machine learning, and deep learning. The emphasis is on the conceptual understanding of topics. The course does not include, nor require background in, computer programming and statistics. A crucial aspect of the seminar is for students to become informed consumers of applications of artificial intelligence

PSYC GU4239 COG NEURO NARRATIVE FILM. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 or Equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 or Equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology This seminar will provide a broad survey of how narrative stories, films, and performances have been used as tools to study cognition in psychology and neuroscience

PSYC GU4242 Evolution of Language (seminar). 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or

This seminar will consider the evolution of language at the levels of the word and grammar, in each instance, phylogenetically and ontogenetically. Since humans are the only species that use language, attention will be paid to how language differs from animal communication.

PSYC GU4244 LANGUAGE AND MIND. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 and Preferably, an additional course in psychology, focusing on cognition, development, or research methods. Instructor permission required. Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 and Preferably, an additional course in psychology, focusing on cognition, development, or research methods. Instructor permission required. This seminar explores the relationship between language and thought by investigating how language is mentally represented and processed; how various aspects of language interact with each other; and how language interacts with other aspects of cognition including perception, concepts, world knowledge, and memory. Students will examine how empirical data at the linguistic, psychological, and neuroscientific levels can bear on some of the biggest questions in the philosophy of mind and language and in psychology

PSYC GU4250 Evolution of Intelligence, Cognition, and Language (Seminar). 3 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 or the equivalent, based on instructor assessment, plus one of the instructors' permission.

How did language evolve and why are human beings the only species to use language? How did the evolution of social intelligence, in particular, cooperation, set the stage for the origin of language and consciousness? We will explore how psychologists, philosophers, neuroscientists, anthropologists, biologists and computational scientists, among others, have collaborated during recent years to produce important insights in the evolution of intelligence, consciousness and language.

PSYC GU4265 AUDITORY PERCEPTION. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1010 PSYC UN1010 or equivalent; background in statistics/research methods recommended Prerequisites: PSYC UN1010 PSYC UN1010 or equivalent; background in statistics/research methods recommended How does the human brain make sense of the acoustic world? What aspects of auditory perception do humans share with other animals? How does the brain perform the computations necessary for skills such as soundlocalization? How do we focus our auditory attention on one voice in a crowd? What acoustic cues are important for speech perception? How is music perceived? These are the types of questions we will address by studyingthe basics of auditory perception from textbook readings and reviews, and reading classic and current literatureto understand scientific progress in the field today

PSYC GU4270 COGNITIVE PROCESSES. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: For undergraduates: one course in cognitive psychology or cognitive neuroscience, or the equivalent, and the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: For undergraduates: one course in cognitive psychology or cognitive neuroscience, or the equivalent, and the instructors permission. Metacognition and control processes in human cognition. Basic issues include the cognitive mechanisms that enable people to monitor what they know and predict what they will know, the errors and biases involved in self-monitoring, and the implications of metacognitive ability for peoples self-determined learning, behavior, and their understanding of self

PSYC GU4280 CORE KNOWLEDGE. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: For undergraduates: courses in introductory psychology, cognitive or developmental psychology, and the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: For undergraduates: courses in introductory psychology, cognitive or developmental psychology, and the instructors permission. Core Knowledge explores the origins and development of knowledge in infants and children, with an additional emphasis on evolutionary cognition. In this course, we will examine evidence from cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, comparative psychology, neuroscience, and linguistics to look at the childs conception of objects, number, space, language, agency, morality and the social world. We will look at which aspects of knowledge are uniquely human, which are shared with other animals, and how this knowledge changes as children develop

PSYC GU4281 The Psychology of Curiosity. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or equivalent introductory psychology course Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or equivalent introductory psychology course What is curiosity and how do we study it? How does curiosity facilitate learning? This course will explore the various conceptual and methodological approaches to studying curiosity and curiosity-driven learning, including animal and human studies of brain and behavior

PSYC GU4282 The Neurobiology and Psychology of Play. 4 points .

Play is a highly rewarding activity that is considered critical to cognitive, social, and emotional development. How do we define play and how do we study it? How does play help humans and other animals learn about their world and prepare them for adulthood? This course will examine the latest developments in the field of play from various methodological approaches to understand the relationship between play, learning, and normative development.

PSYC GU4287 DECISION ARCHITECTURE. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN2235 ) or an equivalent course on judgment and decision making ,AND the instructor's permission Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN2235 ) or an equivalent course on judgment and decision making ,AND the instructors permission This course reviews current research in the domain of decision architecture: the application of research in cognitive and social psychology to real-world situations with the aim of influencing behavior. This seminar will discuss recent and classic studies, both of decision theory and of applied decision research, to explore the effectiveness—as well as the limitations—of a selection of these behavioral “nudges.”

PSYC GU4289 THE GAMES PEOPLE PLAY:PSYCH OF STRAT DEC. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN2235 ) or equivalent course on judgment and decision-making Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN2235 ) or equivalent course on judgment and decision-making A seminar course exploring strategic decision making (also known as behavioral game theory). This course examines the psychology underlying situations in which outcomes are determined by choices made by multiple decision makers. The prime objective will be to examine the use of experimental games to test psychological theories

PSYC GU4420 Animal Cognition (Seminar). 3 points .

Prerequisites: For undergraduates: the instructor's permission.

Seminar concerning a nonverbal animal's use of internal representations of past experience as a basis for action. Topics include how representations are formed, what aspects of experience are encoded, how information is stored, and how it is used later to guide behavior.

PSYC GU4430 Learning and the Brain (Seminar). 4 points .

Prerequisites: courses in introductory psychology and/or neuroscience, and the instructor's permission.

What are the neural mechanisms that support learning, memory, and choices? We will review current theories in the cognitive neuroscience of human learning, discuss how learning and decision making interact, and consider the strengths and weaknesses of two influential methods in the study of human brain and behavior--functional imaging and patient studies.

PSYC GU4435 NON-MNEMONIC FUNC OF MEMORY SYSTEMS. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 ) or equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1010 ) or equivalent introductory course in neuroscience or cognitive psychology The past decade has produced an extraordinary amount of evidence that challenges the classic view of a “medial temporal lobe memory system”, namely, the idea that the medial temporal lobe plays a necessary role in long-term memory but not other cognitive functions. This course will introduce these challenges to the traditional perspective by exploring functions of the so-called memory system in domains outside of long-term memory

PSYC GU4440 TOPICS-NEUROBIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: the instructors permission. Examines current topics in neurobiology and behavior

PSYC GU4470 PSYCH & NEUROPSYCH OF LANGUAGE. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. A course in the psychology of language or linguistics is highly recommended.

This seminar surveys current theories of language production. We will examine psycholinguitsic and neuroimaging studies of word and sentence production conducted with monolingual and bilingual speakers, and individuals with acquired language impairments.

PSYC GU4480 PSYCHOBIOLOGY OF INFANT DEVPT. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 ) and a course in developmental psychology, and the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 ) and a course in developmental psychology, and the instructors permission. The focus of the seminar is on human development during the fetal period and early infancy. We will examine the effects of environmental factors on perinatal perceptual, cognitive, sensory-­motor, and neurobehavioral capacities, with emphasis on critical conditions involved in both normal and abnormal brain development. Other topics include acute and long term effects of toxic exposures (stress, smoking, and alcohol) during pregnancy, and interaction of genes and the environment in shaping the developing brain of high-risk infants, including premature infants and those at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

PSYC GU4482 Neural Plasticity. 4.00 points .

This seminar provides an overview of the mechanisms and behaviors associated with neural plasticity. Students will obtain a basic working knowledge of the different types of neural plasticity, and how these affect cognition and behaviors

PSYC GU4486 Developmental and Affective Neuroscience (Seminar). 4 points .

Prerequisites: courses in developmental psychology, and either research methods or affective neuroscience, and the instructor's permission.

Introduction to leading theoretical perspectives employed by developmental psychologists in the study of affective neuroscience. Exploration of the developmental brain and behavior relationships in humans and animal models of typical and atypical emotional behavior, with a critical reading of recent research findings in the field.

PSYC GU4490 Inheritance (Seminar). 4 points .

Prerequisites: basic knowledge of biology and neuroscience recommended; the instructor's permission required.

Explores the concept of inheritance and the mechanisms through which inheritance is mediated. Will focus on the generational transmission of physiology and behavior, but will also consider the inheritance of culture and language.

PSYC GU4491 The Parental Brain. 4.00 points .

This course will provide an overview of the field of parental and social biology, with an emphasis on changes in the adult rodent brain surrounding childbirth and caretaking behavior. We will explore how the experience of parenthood prepares the brain for survival of offspring. We will also discuss the dynamic between caregivers and parents in order to provide the structure necessary to rear young. This course will illustrate the fortitude of molecular, behavioral and circuit level investigations in concert to unveil mechanisms of social learning

PSYC GU4493 Stress and the Brain. 4.00 points .

This course will use clinical studies and experimental research on animals to understand the impact of stress during various periods of development on brain function and behavior. We will address the long- and short-term consequences of stress on cognition, emotion, and ultimately psychopathology through investigating how various stressors can induce neurobiological and behavioral outcomes through genetic, epigenetic, and molecular mechanisms in the brain

PSYC GU4498 BEHAVIORAL EPIGENETICS. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: basic background in neurobiology (for instance PSYC UN1010 , UN2450 , UN2460 , UN2480 , and GU4499) and the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: basic background in neurobiology (for instance PSYC UN1010 , UN2450 , UN2460 , UN2480 , and GU4499) and the instructors permission. This course will provide an overview of the field of epigenetics, with an emphasis on epigenetic phenomena related to neurodevelopment, behavior and mental disorders. We will explore how epigenetic mechanisms can be mediators of environmental exposures and, as such, contribute to psychopathology throughout the life course. We will also discuss the implications of behavioral epigenetic research for the development of substantially novel pharmacotherapeutic approaches and preventive measures in psychiatry

PSYC GU4612 Frontiers of Justice. 4.00 points .

Frontiers of Justice is designed to encourage students and equip them with the skills to become active and effective “Change Agents” within their academic institutions and larger communities.. Oriented by the question, What does justice look like?, this course aims to raise political and social awareness and engagement with the challenges facing New York City and strengthen ties between Columbia University, disadvantaged communities, and city government agencies and community organizations. Through sharing ideas about how to make structural and systemic change in ways that integrate science, law, politics, history, narrative and community engagement, the course is intended to support students in working to break down racial and ethnic barriers and toward a more fair and just society

PSYC GU4615 PSYCH OF CULTURE & DIVERS. 4 points .

PSYC GU4627 Seminar in Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Related Disorders. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: PSYC UN1001 or Equivalent introductory course AND PSYC UN2620 Abnormal Psychology or equivalent course in abnormal psychology strongly preferred. This seminar course will focus on the etiology and phenomenology of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and OCD-related disorders, as well as their evidence-based treatments

PSYC GU4630 ADV SEM CURRENT PERS THRY. 3.00 points .

Open to psychology graduate students and advanced undergraduate psychology majors.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Critical review and analysis of basic and enduring issues in personality theory, assessment, and research.

PSYC GU4635 The Unconscious Mind (Seminar). 4 points .

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission; some basic knowledge of social psychology is desirable.

Discussion of the unconscious mind from the perspective of social cognition, with an emphasis on both theoretical and empirical background, as well as current issues in measuring automatic processing. Topics include: implicit memory systems; unconscious attitudes, goals and behavior, emotions, and decision making; the activation and deactivation of knowledge systems; and priming.

PSYC GU4645 CULTR,MOTIVATN,PROSOCIAL BEHAV. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of Research Methods, Statistics, and Social Psychology, plus Instructors Permission. Reviews and integrates current research on three important topics of social psychology: culture, motivation, and prosocial behavior. Discussions and readings will cover theoretical principles, methodological approaches, and the intersection of these three topics. Students will write a personal research proposal based on the theories presented during the seminar

PSYC GU4670 THRY-SOCIAL/PERSONALITY PSYCH. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: the instructors permission. Comparison of major theoretical perspectives on social behavior. The nature of theory construction and theory testing in psychology generally. Exercises comparing the predictions of different theories for the same study are designed to acquire an appreciation of how to operationalize theories and an understanding of the various features of a good theory

PSYC GU4672 MORAL PSYCHOLOGY. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: Two courses in psychology, including at least one course with a focus on research methods and/or statistics, and permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: Two courses in psychology, including at least one course with a focus on social and/or developmental psychology, and permission of the instructor. Review of theories and current research on moral cognition and behavior. Topics include definitions of morality, the development of moral cognition, the role that other aspects of human experience (e.g. emotion, intentions) play in moral judgments, and the relationship between moral psychology and other areas of study (e.g. religious cognition, prejudice and stereotyping, the criminal justice system)

PSYC GU4673 Political Psychology. 4 points .

This seminar will explore what psychology (mostly social and cognitive) can tell us about politics. The class aims to provide a broad introduction to ideas and methods in the field of political psychology, as well as a deep understanding of a few specific topics.

PSYC GU4682 FAQS ABOUT LIFE:APPL OF PSYC RSCH TO EVE. 4.00 points .

Prerequisites: Two courses in psychology, with at least one focusing on statistics and/or research methods in psychology, and permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: Two courses in psychology, with at least one focusing on statistics and/or research methods in psychology, and permission of the instructor. Review of basic psychological research that is relevant to questions people frequently encounter during the course of everyday life. Potential topics for this seminar include research on decision-making, emotion, and/or interpersonal relationships

PSYC GU4685 SOCIAL COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: for graduate students, course equivalents of at least two of the following courses: PSYC UN1001 , PSYC UN1010 , PSYC UN2630 , PSYC UN3410, PSYC UN3480, and PSYC UN3485; and/or the instructor's permission.

An introduction to the emerging interdisciplinary field of social cognitive neuroscience, which examines topics traditionally of interest to social psychologists (including control and automaticity, emotion regulation, person perception, social cooperation) using methods traditionally employed by cognitive neuroscientists (functional neuroimaging, neuropsychological assessment).

PSYC GU4686 Barriers and Levers for Behavior Change. 4 points .

Prerequisites: ( PSYC UN1001 or PSYC UN1010 ) and prior coursework in research methods/statistics. A prior course related to social, applied, and cultural psychology or decision making will also be helpful.

Seminar course exploring individual, social, and cultural barriers and levers for behavior change, with a focus on social issues, such as motivating pro-environmental action, encouraging positive health behavior change, and promoting charitable giving. 

PSYC GU4690 SOCIAL FACTORS & PSYCHOPATHLGY. 3.00 points .

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Prerequisites: the instructors permission. Reviews and integrates current research on the role of social factors in psychopathology. The immediate and long-term effects of chronic and traumatic stressors originating outside the family (e.g. natural disasters, chronic poverty) and inside the family (e.g. family violence, divorce, parental psychopathology) on psychopathology

PSYC GU4695 Psychology of Close Relationships (Seminar). 3 points .

Prerequisites: Research Methods, statistics, social psychology, and the instructor's permission.

Introduction to leading theoretical perspectives employed by social psychologists in the study of close romantic relationships. Exploration of relationship-relevant constructs (e.g., love, commitment, intimacy, breakups) through the lenses offered by these different theories, and with a critical reading of recent research findings in this field.

PSYC GU4880 In Service of Equity: Examining Developmental Science through the Lens of Policy. 4.00 points .

Urie Bronfenbrenner (1974) wrote, “We have now come the full circle and returned to our starting point—issues of social policy as points of departure for the identification of significant theoretical and scientific questions concerning the development of the human organism as a function of interaction with its enduring environment-both actual and potential.” This course is designed to examine emotional and cognitive development through the lens of existing financial, social, and educational policies. We will examine the influence- on child development - of inequities in education, household socioeconomic status and poverty, neighborhood socioeconomic status and poverty, access to prenatal care, parental incarceration rates, and systemic racism

PSYC GU4930 Fundamentals of Human Brain Imaging: from theory to practice. 4.00 points .

Fundamentals of human brain imaging is a new advanced course open to undergraduates students from the Psychology, Neuroscience, Engineering, and Statistics Departments, that traces the key steps of the recent “neuroimaging revolution”, and introduces the various methodologies and associated analytic approaches that are now available in the field of cognitive neuroscience. Specifically, the course develops around three main questions, currently under-represented in our undergraduate curriculum: 1) What is the advantage to study human cognition using correlational methodologies (e.g., EEG, MEG, fMRI)? 2) Which is the particular contribution of each method in the understanding of brain/behavior relationship? 3) Which are the most common ways to approach the analyze the neuroimaging data? By promoting an inclusive environment and implementing active learning strategies, this course stimulates critical thinking and fosters collaboration among students from different departments

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The so-called “helping professions,” Psychology, Counseling, and Social Work are grounded in empathy, care, and transformation. Professionals in these fields work in clinical, industry, education, or community service settings. Working with individuals, groups, families or organizations, they:

  • advocate for clients
  • connect people with social services   
  • promote wellness
  • treat substance abuse
  • address family violence 
  • manage individual cases
  • educate patients  
  • develop treatment plans   
  • provide support for emotional distress

For some roles, graduate school, specialized credentials or clinical training is necessary. 

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

Check out the latest  Vault  guide to  Social Services  and  other related industries .

SAMPLE EMPLOYERS IN LIONSHARE

  • AHRC New York City
  • Center For Family Services
  • Harlem Children’s Zone
  • Heartshare Human Services
  • Nathan Kline Institute
  • New Alternatives for Children
  • NYC Department for the Aging
  • Phoenix House
  • The Fresh Air Fund
  • WellLife Network

Focus Areas in Psychology, Counseling, or Social Work

People interested in psychology may choose to begin their careers in an array of fields including marketing/advertising, communications, social services, education, research, healthcare, advocacy, case management, human resources, law, consulting or other business administration roles. Check our Majors page to see where recent Psychology and Neuroscience and Bevavior grads started out.

Here is a sample list of applied areas in this industry:

This range of professions include career counselors, genetic counselors, mental health counselors, rehabilitation counselors, and substance abuse counselors, among others. Counseling usually requires a master’s degree.  According to the American Counseling Association , Counselors empower diverse individuals, families, and groups to accomplish mental health, wellness, education, and career goals.

Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapists work with clients with physical, mental, or emotional disabilities to promote their functional skills, often in collaboration with doctors and other specialists. Working with clients one-on-one or in group settings, OTs address not only the physical, but also the psychological and social dimensions of their clients’ disabilities.

Psychiatrists complete medical training and specialize in mental health. The  American Psychiatric Association  describes psychiatry’s focus as “the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders, including substance use disorders.” Psychiatrists can assess both the mental and physical aspects of psychological problems.

Types of psychologists include clinical psychologists, developmental psychologists, experimental psychologists, organizational psychologists, school psychologists, and more. Psychologists typically hold a Ph.D., E.D.  or Psy.D. and may work with clients, groups, or organizations in teaching, counseling, research, or administrative capacities.

School Counseling

School counselors help students in grades K-12 to achieve academic success, college and career readiness and social/emotional development. Usually trained in school counseling, counselor education or counseling psychology, School Counselors must also be certified by the state in which they work. See the Education page for information on schools. 

Social Work

Social workers help individuals in need and communities to address social problems and challenge systemic social injustice. Social workers in direct practice counsel and advocate for clients as well as connect them with resources. Social workers in indirect practice develop, analyze, or administer policies or programs. Learn more about the Social Work profession from the National Association of Social Workers. 

Columbia University Resources

  • Join student organizations like the Barnard/Columbia Rape Crisis Anti-Violence Support Center  or  The Student Wellness Project .
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  • Learn about graduate programs and research at other Columbia schools, such as  Counseling & Clinical Psychology program at Teachers College  or  Columbia University School of Social Work .
  • Read about  Leah Samuels’ (CC’18) internship experience  at the Washington Heights Corner Project, where she learned about applying a human rights approach to working with drug users.

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Psychology certificate.

The Certificate in Psychology is a rigorous curriculum for students who are preparing for graduate study, but who did not major in the subject as undergrads. The program prepares students to advance their academic careers by providing the type of coursework that top graduate programs require, including research experience. 

The program provides valuable preparation for Psy.D. and Ph.D. programs, including psychology, education, management, public health, and social work. The Certificate can be completed in two semesters of full-time study, or longer, depending on your schedule.

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*Bureau of Labor Statistics,  BLS Psychologists

Valuable preparation for Psy.D. and Ph.D. programs, including psychology, education, management, public health, and social work.

Who should apply:

  • Recent graduates who wish to prepare for graduate school in a field related to psychology.
  • Professionals seeking a career change into a cutting-edge industry.

Lifelong benefits you receive as a Columbia graduate:

  • Access to a world-renowned system of libraries
  • A Columbia email address
  • Membership in a network of Columbia students, faculty and alumni

International Students:  Qualifies students on an F1 Visa to apply for  Optional Practical Training (OPT)  upon completion of the certificate.

Featured Faculty, Students & Alumni

Lydia roberts: from health care pr to a clinical psychology ph.d. with the help of sps lydia roberts, '20sps, leveraged her work in the psychology certificate program to pursue a ph.d. in clinical psychology. student postbaccalaureate students present research poster at society for personality and social psychology’s annual convention in new orleans their research poster was titled "assessing the role of psychological reactivity in the somatization of stress." student international student sophia armand gains new opportunities in psychology international student sophia armand leaves denmark for new york and lands opportunities in columbia's psychology research labs. related programs, narrative medicine.

Transform personal stories into better experiences and outcomes for both patients and caregivers.

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Use interdisciplinary approaches to analyze and address the most pressing bioethical challenges.

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Students: send videos of hyflex life at columbia send us a 15- to 30-second video showing what hyflex learning is like on campus. school keep moving forward with columbia your columbia education is unstoppable. student postbaccalaureate students present research poster at society for personality and social psychology’s annual convention in new orleans their research poster was titled "assessing the role of psychological reactivity in the somatization of stress." view all news connect with us.

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As admissions to our programs are highly competitive, we encourage you to apply as soon as possible. Learn more about the application process, deadlines, and requirements.

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Gain the knowledge and skills to help advance clinical psychological science.

As a clinical science program, we value research efforts and practice directed toward:

  • the promotion of adaptive functioning
  • assessment, understanding, amelioration, and prevention of human problems in behaviour, affect, cognition or health
  • the application of knowledge in ways consistent with scientific evidence
  • social justice advocacy as it relates to the field of clinical psychology.

We strive to incorporate core values of equity, diversity, and inclusion into all aspects of our work including research, teaching, practice, and the environment in which faculty and students work. As a program, we are dedicated to promoting mutual respect, understanding, fairness, and inclusion through constructive dialogue and equitable policies and procedures. We seek to respect and value visible and invisible differences that include identities such as race, ethnicity, heritage, culture, age, religion, sexual and gender diversity, disability status, social class, or language. Finally, we view our responsibility as clinical psychologists to include actively challenging the societal structures and barriers that perpetuate mental health disparities and inequities to services.

Our Students

Get to know our SMB Graduate Studies students, past and present.

2022 - 2023 Cohort

Sumaya ahmed.

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Sumaya Ahmed is a coach, writer, leader, and entrepreneur. She is the eldest daughter of immigrant parents who immigrated from Bangladesh. She was raised in Queens, NY and received her bachelors in Psychology and Biology from the University at Buffalo. With years of experience in the hospital and healthcare industry, Sumaya recognized the need for deep healing from within. After receiving five unique certifications, she launched her first business, Mindfully Sumaya LLC., through which she coaches souls to breakfree from subconscious blocks and align with inner peace. Sumaya means exalted, which is why the name was chosen to inspire others to elevate mindfully and to recognize the power of the subconscious mind.

Sumaya’s purpose is to empower souls to live authentically and to align themselves with love, peace, and freedom from within. As a first-generation Bangladeshi woman, Sumaya’s mission is to bring mental health awareness to minority communities, and to provide mindfulness practices along with other techniques to help people that are stressed, anxious, or depressed.

Sumaya is also the co-founder of FirstGenCEO LLC., a company designed to support first-generation souls to launch a successful business while receiving both mindset and business strategies. Currently she leads mindfulness workshops and meditation classes for corporate clients such as Google, Morgan Stanley, Uber, LinkedIN, and more.

Sumaya aims to live in a world where the youth is aware of mindfulness and spirituality. Through the SMBI Psychology in Education program she seeks the intellectual rigor and perspective required to bring these teachings and learnings to the generations to come.

You can connect with Sumaya by emailing her at [email protected].

Nicole Arndt

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

A Show-Me State native based in Brooklyn, NY, Nicole brings her Midwestern values to the City That Never Sleeps to offer executive leaders and entrepreneurs a fresh, creative, and inspired perspective.

As a Lecturer, Career Coach, and Industry Consultant at Columbia University, Nicole creates programs, partnerships, and career opportunities with wellness and social advocacy at their core.

While pursuing her education in the MA Spirituality Mind Body Program, Nicole is interested in strengthening the connection between corporate workspaces and our natural environment to celebrate the unity, beauty, and power inherent in the surroundings that bind us together.

She is currently editing her first book of poetry and is interested in new business ventures that protect, enhance, and promote her love of music, art, and innovation.

Michael Badulak

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

During his time at the University of Connecticut, Michael earned a Bachelor’s in Physics and another in Education before completing a Master’s in Education from the Neag School of Education. He taught the science of interconnection in physics and environmental science classes in Southern California and supported students in outdoor education trips to Yosemite National Park and volunteering on the Pacific Crest Trail. While utilizing classroom protocols which supported smooth-running classes and curious students, Michael helped students build habits to wash away common classroom dysfunctions. As a result, he felt surprised to witness the clarity of the only student needs which remained: healing from poor mental health. In wondering what could be done to address this crisis with broader strokes than individual counseling, Michael trained in and practiced Vipassana meditation for years and journaled daily until the dearth of self-love and connection to context in our youth came into focus. He was further blessed by a crippling motorcycling crash which granted him almost three years to explore his own relationship with himself and his body as he recovered from disuse of the right side of his body, using the focus and techniques of the Vipassana meditation he learned. He feels deeply grateful to be a part of the SMBI on a journey that has been equal parts overwhelming, informative, and transformative. Finally, as a first-generation Ukrainian-American, he hopes you consider Ukraine in your thoughts and actions as the Ukrainian people fight to recover themselves as a nation.

Tricia Brown

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

MaryPatricia S Brown is a cohort member at Columbia University's Spirituality, Mind, Body Institute. She graduated with a Bachelor's in English and Theology from Fordham University and   Tricia later returned as a fellow at Fordham’s School of Education graduating with a M. S. in Education. A   member of the Lawrence Public Schools Tricia has taught first, second and third grade and has trained in the Resolving Conflict Creatively Program and became a Trainer of Trainers. Tricia also participated in Teachers College’s Reading and Writing Project and invited to be become member of the their Leadership Group.   She proudly created the Peace Begins with Me Day program in Lawrence, which promotes kindness and service.   Each year students make peace blankets to be donated to children in New York area hospitals through Bundles of Love a charity created by a former student. Additionally, Tricia developed the Kindness Café at Number 2 School. The Kindness Cafe is a safe place where classes, small groups and staff come to practice mindfulness and meet for cooperative experiences in social-emotional learning competencies.

Lu Budzichowski

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Lu Budzichowski is a multi-faceted creative, entrepreneur, event planner, and wellness

instructor. Skilled at bringing together, organizing, and unifying many parts, she could be

described as a Weaver. From creative direction and copywriting to event planning and brand

activations, Lu has a penchant for visual and experiential story-telling. Luster Studios, Lu’s

evolving creative platform currently exploring content and event production, was born of her

background in fashion and modeling. After completing her Bachelors of Science in Fashion

Merchandising Management from The Fashion Institute of Technology a year early in 2015, she

gained experience in buying, sales, new business development, branding, PR, and events. She

then went on to launch two small businesses and a sustainable product line.

As a holist passionate about movement, transformation, and connection, Lu’s mission is to open

a community wellness space. Her own experience managing chronic health conditions and

disabilities inspired her path in the healing arts. She has completed yoga teacher trainings,

sound healing and hypnotherapy mentorships, and countless studies of trauma and healing

modalities. Currently, Lu is of service to social equity through volunteering teaching yoga and

meditation for The Phoenix (Sober Active Community), participating in her neighborhood’s

Mental Wellness Committee, and assisting a local, POC-owned business that is part of a

state-run economic empowerment program with community engagement. Her aim through the

SMBI program is to make spiritual practices and wellness services more accessible by

addressing financial barriers through innovative business models and stigma with

groundbreaking science and education.

Helene Connelly

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Helene is so excited to be a part of SMB and take this next step in her life journey. She has been on a holistic path since she was a young child, even teaching herself to meditate when she was 10. While following a more traditional work and family way of life, she has kept learning and studying various modalities. Helene is a Reiki Master and has studied Chakras, Feng Shui, Clutter Clearing, Life Coaching, Yoga, Spiritual Living, Satori, Karate, Wing Chun, and The Science of Well Being. She is excited to take all she has learned and tie it all together in SMB to bring it forward to help people in the future. She would love to help others find their inspiration to bring their dreams and aspirations into reality.

Helene and her family live in Connecticut. She has 2 stepchildren, 2 sons, a granddaughter, and fur babies. She has had a long career in advertising and marketing. Her love of travel has taken she and her family to the beaches of Bora Bora, the Waitomo caves of New Zealand, the libraries of Oxford, Canadian ice hotels and the restaurants of Venice and Paris.   She loves to cook and in general, she’d almost always rather be at the beach.

“Come to the edge," he said. "We can't, we're afraid!" they responded. "Come to the edge," he said. "We can't, we will fall!" they responded. "Come to the edge," he said. And so they came. And he pushed them. And they flew.”

―  Guillaume Apollinaire

Monica Contreras

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Monica Contreras was born and raised in Sonoma County, CA and has served as a force of change wherever she has seen a need that has yet to be addressed. From working to provide quality tutoring and mentoring programs for middle school kids while she was in high school, to helping to provide accurate and accessible information to her community throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, she continues to center her community in the work that she does and aspires to do. She is a First-Gen former foster youth who graduated from UC Santa Barbara with a B.A. in Sociology and Minors in Education and Applied Psychology.

Her Spiritual Practice is rooted in her Indigenous heritage that has been fostered and nurtured by her mother and grandmother, who’s Faith and Love have served as a continuous healing and encouraging force in her life. She believes that the integration of Spirituality and therapy is vital to the evolution and healing of humanity at the macro and micro level. Through the acceptance of energy work, divination, and other ancestral indigenous practices into counseling and therapy models, Monica believes that we can reconnect to our ancestors and all their power and formulate a better world for those who come after us.

She is a writer, Tarot Reader, Reiki Master, and Akashic Records Practitioner whose work is done with the intention of providing a space for peace, clarity, understanding, and revelation to be nurtured for those who feel called to work with her. She intends to bring those same foundational values with her as she pursues her goal of becoming a licensed therapist. She hopes to be able to assist in the fight to make quality therapy services more accessible and relevant to BIPOC communities everywhere through research, activism, and practice.

Selin Durak

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

I was born and raised in Istanbul, Turkey. Istanbul is a city so rich with history and culture that I had the opportunity to experience and interact with many different flavors of people from an early age. Since then, I have always had a growing curiosity and interest in how humans are so different yet similar. To look for the answers, I oriented my undergraduate studies in Psychology and Neuroscience degrees from Syracuse University. However, it was not enough to satisfy my curiosity; instead, my interest only grew more prominent. The more I learned, even more questions arose. I oriented to a place where it is not only people I am curious about, but it is the universe. I have realized that my search to understand why is an ever-going adventure. When I heard about the SMB program, it felt right that this was the next step in my search. I believe that the SMB program will not only grow my curiosity even further, but I will also learn new skills and knowledge so I can give back to the universe. I need to have the opportunity to be helpful to others, to have a function in this order because it satisfies my soul and my heart in depth. My exact path is not clear yet, but I have faith that it will clear along the way; the goal of helping others is in my mind.

Kristin Elam

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Kristin Elam grew up in Houston, TX and attended public school in the suburbs. Her childhood was spent dancing and trying to be an all-A student, but ultimately, her compassion for people is what led her to study Secondary English Education at Baylor University. While studying to become a teacher, she was a member of Baylor Dance Company, served as a Residential Assistant, participated in Chi Omega Fraternity, and studied abroad in Cusco, Peru. Right before graduating in March of 2019, Kristin experienced a life-altering, mental health break due to stress, lack of sleep, and unaddressed childhood trauma. The abrupt interference of poor mental health inspired Kristin to slow down and dedicate her life to counseling, deep reflection, and reconnecting with God in a more personal way. While pursuing the inner work to heal, Kristin taught eleventh grade English for three years in a quaint, small town. She taught American Literature, AP English Literature & Composition, remedial English classes, helped with the cheer team, and coached the Ready Writing academic team.

After graduating from TC’s SMB program, Kristin aspires to instill hope in people through teaching and counseling. She plans to utilize the program to study the science of how people can fall apart from the inside-out, research methods of recovery after psychological trauma caused by psychosis, and write about her personal story.

When she is not contemplating the meaning of life, you can find Kristin dancing, admiring nature, obsessing over cats, painting, snapping photos, decorating her home, hiking, studying with a severely overpriced coffee in hand, attending art shows or concerts, traveling, reading about psychology, researching random facts, or napping. Connect with Kristin at [email protected].

Faustine Fu

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Faustine (Shu) Fu graduated from Claremont McKenna College with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Economics. Previously, I worked at two newly founded international K-12 schools in China and many other educational startups and organizations. During my career and study in the education field, I’ve realized that many education problems are rooted not just in questions of curriculum and policies, but also in issues related to personal mindset. Also, as a firm Daoist believer and Buddhist practitioner, I’m reminded of a traditional Daoist medicine axiom, Zhi Biao Bu Zhi Ben—you must treat the root cause, not the symptoms as to how I see “Spiritual inner work.” SMBI represents the ideal environment for me to strengthen my foundations to come up with sustainable education and corporate solutions informed by spirituality.

Amanda Fuhrman

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Amanda Fuhrman is a non-practicing attorney previously with Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP and Skadden Arps. She left law to pursue public service, and became the Deputy Executive Director of Millennium Promise, a nonprofit founded by economist Jeffrey Sachs & Columbia Earth Institute, philanthropist Raymond Chambers and George Soros, focused on advancement of the UN Millennium Development Goals.  Amanda is currently a Trustee of Edible Schoolyard NYC, the Brooklyn Museum, and a member of the Child Advisory Council at NY Hospital.  She is also the co-founder of The FLAG Foundation and the FLAG Award for Teaching Excellence.

Krystal Gopeesingh

Krystal is a Trinidadian physician who in her own career has incorporated spiritual practices with allopathic medicine and desires to see this in the world. Her special interest is in women’s health and she is pursing alternative forms of medicine to support this. She believes that healing is multidimensional, and to live a healthy and happy life one must tend to not only the physical and metal body but the spiritual and emotional one as well.

Her current goal is to create a holistic medical model that encourages different forms of energy healing, breath work, plant allies and womb healing alongside western medicine. She is motivated to help others to connect deeply to themselves and to their sovereignty.

Her view is that everything in our daily life can be used as medicine, from food, to laughter to gratitude. She believes that pain and disease are physical manifestations of stagnant energy, repressed emotions and trauma that live within the body. There is innate wisdom that exists within just waiting to be remembered. Therefore, deepening a connection to intuition and spirit is an important aspect of healing and medicine.

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Iman Habel is a graduate of the University of California, Davis with a dual bachelor's degree in Psychology and International Relations. She has been a trauma recovery enthusiast for many years, focusing mainly on her own personal trauma and chronic illness recovery for the last couple of years. Iman Habel discovered the power of spirituality in her own healing journey and realized that combining an active healing tool such as sensorimotor psychotherapy with spiritual practices such as meditation and yoga, highly accelerates the progress of  internal healing and creates a stronger sense of self. She discovered that spirituality as a healing tool highly strengthens self-value, self-compassion, self-love, self-care and self awareness. Iman Habel uses the lessons she learned in her journey and continues to learn in her journey, on a day to day basis, to guide others in their own healing journeys.

She is the creator and author of the blog, Blissfully Healing at blissfullyhealing.com, documenting her experiences with chronic illness, mental health challenges, childhood trauma, and toxic relationships. She hosts 6 different support groups within the blog and invites people to share their stories to be featured on the Warrior Stories section of the blog. She is currently working on a podcast that will feature experts in various healing strategies and welcomes fellow warriors to share their stories on the platform.

Tiffany A. Johnson

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Tiffany A. Johnson is a proud Detroiter and graduate of Washington University in St. Louis (undergrad) and American University (Master’s of Arts in Teaching and Secondary Education). A lifelong lover of learning, she started her career as a middle school Humanities teacher in Washington, DC. She later moved to New York City and continued to teach and became a school administrator and member of Brooklyn’s Community Education Council. After transitioning from school-based roles, Tiffany served as a leadership development coach and Diversity, Equity and Inclusiveness (DEI) facilitator.

Outside of her professional pursuits, Tiffany constantly pursues her own spiritual growth and development, which has led her to recognize her passion for guiding others in their spiritual journey. Her work now centers on creating spaces for women/femmes + young people of color to heal and experience liberation in community. She also helps to lead a racial justice organization, called the Black Legacy Advancement Coalition . Tiffany is elated to join the SMBI master’s program and such an incredible community of spiritual scholars and activists. One of the quotes that grounds her and helps her love and lead through her core values of love, liberation and community is: “heal yourself to heal the world” adapted from late Detroit activist and movement leader Grace Lee Boggs.

Vyushti Jouhari

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Vyushti has had passion for understanding the mind ever since she was a young girl. Her desire to help those that were plagued by mental and emotional suffering pushed her into the field of psychology. Based on her own experience with mental health, she came to the understanding that spirituality underscored and went hand-in-hand with suffering.

After completing her undergraduate studies in Psychology, Sociology, and English, Vyushti worked as an Assistant Psychologist and Research Associate with a prominent Neuropsychologist in India. Now, Vyushti is determined to become a Clinical Psychologist that approaches the subject with a holistic perspective through the intersectionality of depth psychology, spirituality, and psychopathology.

Camille Khallouf

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Camille Khallouf is passionate about the intersection between individual healing and social transformation. She holds a B.A. from the University of Toronto in Political Science and Buddhist Psychology. Her entry to holistic care was through yoga but her passion lies in studying the cascade of physiological effects of contemplative practices and the implications on quality of life. She has worked as a Research Coordinator in Supportive Care (Princess Margaret Cancer Centre) and Psychiatry (Mount Sinai Hospital) evaluating the effects of mindfulness-based interventions for cancer patients and their formal caregivers. Her goal is to advance the scientific evidence on how mindfulness can change the perspective on pain and cultivate resilience under long-term survivorship and end-of-life care. She is determined to work towards closing the research gap between the need for and access to all-encompassing health initiatives to promote institutionally integrated approaches and augment the standard of care.

Camille has completed advance coursework in Ashtanga, Yin, Restorative, Prenatal yoga and yoga for cancer patients. As an experienced yoga instructor for under-served groups, she meets students’ rehabilitation needs to develop positive self/body image and improve health-related issues.

Sally Khomikh

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Sally is a writer, designer, and certified health & wellness coach based in the Bay Area. Born and raised in San Francisco, CA — Sally grew up with a deep connection to nature, spirituality, and access to holistic practitioners who have guided her down this path. After attending a rigorous art and design school, she was struggling to overcome various health challenges (including burnout, anxiety, and inflammation). She started experimenting with different approaches to find balance and restoration, ultimately leading her towards a life-long passion for wellness advocacy. In 2021, Sally received her post-baccalaureate certificate in health and wellness coaching from the Maryland University of Integrative Health. With a desire to find like-minded thinkers, Sally embarked on her journey to New York City with SMBI and Columbia University. Continuing to work in tech, Sally bridges her corporate experience and agility with her passion for health prevention — working with clients and building programs that ignite passion, restore inner peace, and empower individuals to take control of their health.  In her spare time, you can find Sally laughing with her SMB cohort, salsa dancing, enjoying the farmers market, or writing her monthly newsletter with a cup of tea.

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

I think I've always had an attuned ear for emotion, an extensive awareness towards empathy, and an ever-evolving appetite for inclusive environments and experiences that enrich our ability to connect and form communities. I’ve discovered a distaste for deflection, have dared to dive deeper into the conversations with myself / with others, and have developed a needed intensity towards uprooting intimate conversations, experiences, and authentic connections through mind-body based fitness. 

I currently seek a new approach to connect the mind to the body, the mind-body to the spiritual/self, and the unity and presence of all three to one’s highest potential. My work, grounded in my experience and background as an athlete, creatively combines the “aha” epiphanies found through meditation and the endorphins that enter the body/mind during a high-intensity interval workout with a gentle yet motivating intensity.

Though my academic background is extensive, stemming from Culver Military Academy to Tufts University and now stepping into his work here at Columbia, I’d like my credibility as a healer and psychologist centered around my ability to challenge my own mind-body presence through different experiences which seemingly sit on each separate side of the spectrum, some taxing the mind while others taxing the body. In my most recent mind-body based challenge, a 50-mile ultra-marathon, I found that it was not my body rejecting the pain and struggle, but that my biggest battle was within my mind.

My goal is to create an efficient mind-body based movement therapy that could be practiced and placed into high-performing individuals daily routine. By understanding how high-performers within athletics and the working world operate this mind-body based movement therapy meets high-achievers where they’re at making sure aspects of the body and mind are satisfied while creatively incorporating a deeper, and often unrealized, side of the self-necessary for peak performance and lasting success. I welcome you to engage and embark on my creation as I lead always with a beginner’s mindset, hoping to provide you with the right questions allowing you to find the answer and solution most fitting and personal to you!

Samantha Kraft

Sam is a full spectrum doula based in Brooklyn, NY. As a Doula she provide’s compassion, support, and resources to keep birthing people informed & comfortable throughout their labor process. Sam aims to combine science, spirituality, and psychology with each of her clients. She is fascinated with life and death and aims to offer support to those in need during these transitional times. Through mindfulness, physical movement, and creating community.

Anupriya Kukreja

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Hailing from New Delhi, India, Anupriya worked as a Behaviour science and

Conflict Resolution researcher for a few years before joining SMB. She currently

serves as the Editor-in- Chief of the APA Division 48 newsletter “The Peace

Psychologist” where she also introduced a section titled “Spirituality and Peace” in

Her spiritual journey started during her teenage years after her first tryst with

mental health issues, eventually leading her to experiment with practices like

Brahmakumaris and Buddhism.

Frustrated with the stigma around spirituality and spiritually informed

psychotherapy during her undergraduate days in Ashoka University, she found

SMB to be the right place for her spiritual, yet academic expression.

She plans to do a PhD in social and organisational psychology after this, aspiring

to be a researcher and political psychologist with a spiritual flavour. Anu is also

equally passionate about music, which she takes up in the form of electronic

music production and DJing. She is always up for conversations with international

students, especially around confusing subjects like F1 visa laws, STEM vs non-

STEM OPT, and career direction. She is reachable at [email protected] .

Becky Lallande

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Becky Lallande is a Dancer and Teaching Artist based in Washington, DC. She holds a BA in Religious Studies from the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia and has been working with youth in the arts for over 15 years. A lifelong dancer and coloratura soprano, she began dance and music lessons at age three and currently studies the philosophy and technique of Isadora Duncan. She is certified to teach the Duncan technique to children and has most recently been a company member of Word Dance Theater in Washington, DC.  Becky is an active Teaching Artist specializing in early childhood arts integration that supports creative resiliency through movement, imagination, and rhythmic exploration. She works with organizations such as the Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning in the Arts on strategies to integrate artful learning techniques into classroom curriculums that support social emotional development, and is a certified practitioner of Rainbowdance®, a research-based movement intervention with the goal of enhancing self regulation, self esteem, and social empathy from the Boston Children’s Foundation. Her graduate study interests include the relationship of spirituality and imagination in young children through music, movement, and play. She is also interested in perception, cognitive development, parapsychology, and the history of spirituality and mysticism in the field of psychology.

Saraswati Andrea Lee

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Saraswati Andrea Lee is an early childhood educator and certified Yoga and mindfulness instructor. She received her B.A. in Anthropology and Gender Studies from Princeton University and began her career in teaching soon after in 2011. She has taught in both public and independent schools in New Jersey.

In 2018 she was ordained into the Order of Yoga Life Ministers by her Guru, Reverend Jaganath Carrera. She currently serves as President and Co-Administrator of Yoga Life Society, a NJ-based organization founded by Reverend Jaganath, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Newark Center for Meditative Culture.

She complements her contemplative and service practices with time in the garden communing with the flora and fauna, chanting Kirtan, and watching classic films.

Jocelyn Leeguanyii

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Jocelyn is passionate in working with children ranging from early childhood aged children to adolescents. She believes that helping children throughout their development is a necessity as children are most vulnerable during this period. Emotional social development have great impacts in shaping children into the adult they will become, thus building their mental health will guide children to turn inwards and achieve greater success. As a result, this will help eschew from future mental struggles the children might encounter when they become independent individuals.

As a recent graduate of the mental health counseling program, Jocelyn has experiences helping children and adolescents address mental health emergencies through risk evaluation and crisis intervention, and provide cultural sensitive individual and family psychotherapy. She hopes to expand her knowledge and skills for a more holistic approach to healing others.

Jocelyn’s formal education includes a B.A. in Psychology from New York University, a M.A. in Counseling Psychology from Teacher’s College Columbia University, and Ed.M. in Mental Health Counseling from Teacher’s College Columbia University. She is excited to be currently pursuing a M.A. in Psychology in Education, Spirituality, Mind, Body concentration at Teacher’s College Columbia University.

Melanie Lown

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way.” - Viktor Frankl

After journeying through a life-changing diagnosis, Melanie (she/her) became acutely aware of how impactful an acknowledgment of the human experience can be within the medical landscape. Her journey awakened a deep understanding that discomfort can serve as a gateway to equanimity and prosperity through mind, body, and spiritual engagement.

Melanie is currently seeking a Master’s in Psychology with a concentration in Spirituality from Teachers College, Columbia University. She holds a BA in Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin and a BFA in Dance and secondary teaching certification. Most recently, Melanie served as the Lab Manager for the Imagination and Cognition Lab in the Psychology department at UT Austin. Before working in research, Melanie spent over a decade in event production, taught fine arts in public high schools, and served on the Texas Dance Educators Association board.

Her academic and research interests include the formation of one’s beliefs, the epigenetics of trauma and healing, and the compelling discipline of Positive Psychology.

Melanie resides in NYC with her husband and son. She enjoys reading, being with friends, and wandering the park with her beloved dogs.

Melanie’s contact: [email protected]

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Noof currently works for the oncology department at Mount Sinai and as a Clinical Research Assistant at Bellevue Hospital. Throughout her 25 th year which she refers to as her “Golden Year”, all the trauma she had faced, led her to go on a journey for some soul searching. From this, She had learned that something external cannot hold the power or key to her happiness. Coming from a Psychology background, Noof’s interest in spirituality gradually grew. Her fulfillment and her purpose in life is to follow, contribute, and expand on Dr.Miller’s work of Spirituality, Mind Body and Soul. She attained self-awareness and learned to assess things from an observer’s mind after becoming spirituality woke. Having this newfound sense of an understanding, she finally understands the truth of the nature of how reality truly works. Noof wants to gain the knowledge on how to assist others so that they can attune with themselves and use that spirituality to find purpose and fulfillment in their own lives

Emily McGill

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Emily McGill is a spiritual seeker, tarot reader, storytelling strategist, and a deep believer in the power of community.  After 15 years in New York City as a Broadway and entertainment publicist and communications consultant, self-exploration led to healing, evolution, and reading tarot cards professionally.

Currently enrolled in Columbia University’s Spirituality Mind Body Institute at Teachers College, Emily is pursuing a Master of Arts in Psychology in Education with a focus on spirituality. SMB is the first Ivy League graduate curriculum dedicated to merging spirituality and evidence-based research within the context of clinical psychology.

Emily has been invited to read tarot for virtual Burning Man, at Sony Hall and Brooklyn's dry speakeasy Club Curious, and has been featured by The Tamron Hall Show , NY Post , and Thrive Global . She writes Playbill’s Broadway Horoscopes and is developing her own tarot deck, The Broadway Tarot .

She’s the co-founder of S.N.O.B. (Sunday Night on Broadway) , a popup Broadway industry dance party, a founding member of PR collective Spiral5 , and a co-author of their course The Career Rebel’s Guide to Modern PR .

Among her 20 Broadway credits, Emily represented the Tony Award-winning productions of A Raisin in the Sun starring Denzel Washington, Memphis , Billy Elliot , and Disney's The Lion King (she’s basically the vacation swing in the Disney press office). Other clients included music, film, TV, and streaming projects for companies large and small (HBO and Amazon Studios, internet startups and non-profits. Plus male strippers. Yes, male strippers). EmilyMcGillEntertainment.com

Saima Misty

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

My name is Saima Misty, and my story began when I solidified the conviction to shift from being a victim of life to becoming the creator of it. I’m a firm believer that the current reality we experience is a physical manifestation of our subconscious beliefs, past traumas, and suppressed emotions. To me, inner work for outer change means transcending our lives beyond what we ever imagined by acknowledging the limiting beliefs that have become so second-nature, we don’t even realize they’re there.

I aspire to serve others by applying spirituality and mind/body modalities as a means of reclaiming mental health and creating fulfilling lives. My passions include being an advocate and source of love for those undervalued in our society. In my work as a behavior therapist for children on the autism spectrum, I find immense joy in connecting with each child as unique as they come. Although it’s my job to teach them, they’ve really taught me the most valuable lesson: there’s beauty in accepting everyone for who they are, regardless of the harm they’ve caused and irrespective of their differences. It’s my belief that every being contains a spirit within them that is waiting to be cultivated into the irreplaceable force they’re meant to become.

As a Bangladeshi American, I recognize how much the south Asian community suppresses the concept of mental health and it is my professional goal to nurture this aspect of my community back to life. Often overlooked in south Asian culture, I will continue to advocate for the normalization of individuality.

As Harris Dienstfrey writes, “the mind as a source of medicine is waiting to be explored” and I can’t wait to be a part of that paradigm shift.

Alivia Nickelson

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Nneka Okoli

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Nneka Okoli is a 2016 graduate from Pace University with a B.S. in Communications with a concentration in Psychology and Women’s studies. After graduation Nneka spent time at Google, Refinery29, and Taboola where she built diversity, equity, and inclusion programs such as Refinery29’s UnBothered and Taboola Black.

Through corporate diversity, equity, and inclusion programs Nneka began to incorporate wellness by partnering with organization such as Black Girls in Om. This partnership was the start of a path that would lead her to SMBI.

In 2020 Nneka completed her 200-hour yoga certification with Y7 and currently teaches chakra-based hot power vinyasa from a trauma-informed lens at Corepower Yoga.

Eager to continue a path to spiritual awakening Nneka is took a sabbatical from corporate America to pursue her studies full time. Upon graduation, Nneka will be open to opportunities in the diversity, equity, and inclusion space. Her mission is to radicalize corporate diversity, equity, and inclusion programs by integrating techniques rooted in spirituality and mindfulness.

Camila Ortega

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Camila grew up in a small town in the south of Chile, Los Angeles until the age of 18. Later, to pursue her university studies, she moved to the capital Santiago, and do her undergraduate studies at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, obtaining a Bachelor's degree in Psychology, with mention in I.O Psychology, in 2016. Also a musician by vocation, he has participated in several musical projects throughout much of his life, having studied Music Production during the same period. Music first and foremost.

Despite her initial training, Camila found her true passion for psychology in clinical-community work with vulnerable communities, particularly children and adolescents, working in various NGOs and state institutions in the service of restoring and repairing children's rights. At the same time, she studied a master's degree in Art Therapy, obtaining her degree in 2019 at the Universidad del Desarrollo. In this way, she began a path of multidisciplinary integration between healing and art, both musical and visual. Later, she developed as a family therapist with systemic approach, obtaining a certificate from the Institute of Research Unit in Intervention and Family Care, associated with the Universidade Da Coruña, Spain. Throughout her experience, she also realized the lack of spirituality as a transversal element in the development of psychology in its different areas.

Deeply passionate about different forms of artistic expression, she feels a profound calling to continue developing her clinical tools to put them at the service of children and their families. As an LGBT+ person, she recognizes the importance of developing in inclusive spaces where children have the right to be heard, seen and accepted, which is a pending debt of our society.

In SMB, she finds a profound space to continue building bridges, where spirituality takes a leading role in its transversal potential to question and challenge all spheres of our society, where the need for a paradigm shift in how to do things becomes urgent.

Jesse Paikin

Jesse Paikin is a rabbi, teacher, spiritual leader, and strategic thinker. From Toronto, Canada, he has worked as an educator across North America, Europe, and the Middle East, with a focus on classical Jewish texts, spiritual practices, and mussar - the traditional Jewish discipline of awareness-based spiritual and ethical development.

Most recently, Jesse held a Fellowship from the Jewish Emergent Network, a group of seven path‐breaking Jewish communities who have come together in the spirit of collaboration, through which he served as a rabbi at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in Washington, DC. Jesse is currently a Research Fellow with M², the Institute for Experiential Jewish Education , where he is researching and designing new pedagogies to influence the ways that Jewish educators teach spiritually.

Jesse has trained in psychotherapy and trauma-informed spiritual counseling at Toronto’s University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, and is a trained facilitator in convening courageous communication across divides, through Resetting the Table . He has a BA in Religious Studies from York University, an MA in Hebrew Literature from Hebrew Union College, and has also studied at the University of Toronto, New York University, Yeshivat Hadar, and the National Theatre School of Canada.

Before heading to graduate school and becoming a rabbi, Jesse worked with a nonprofit that ran youth educational travel programs around the world.

He’s also the creator and host of the short-form explainer podcast,  Shoot!  which features one big Jewish question each episode, plus answers with integrity and inspiration, and the untold stories behind the questions.

Alejandra Pena

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Alejandra is a passionate and impact-focused entrepreneur, community builder, and investor from Ecuador. She has a B.S in Economics and Business Administration with a concentration in Social Entrepreneurship from Northeastern University. Some of her past experiences range from launching a new loan product for Hispanic entrepreneurs with Kiva in San Francisco; consulting for a Microfinance in India; and directing a global fellowship for impact entrepreneurs in New York. She has been a Tedx Speaker, mentor, and judge in various entrepreneurship events around Latin America. In 2017 she Co-founded Aweik, an organization that aims to empower young Latin Americans to dream big and create meaningful enterprises in the region. Currently, she serves on the Board of Directors of GIG, a family business focused on the construction sector in Ecuador; leads the Ecuadorian chapter of Sigma Squared Society (a global community of young impact entrepreneurs); and is working towards earning a Master's degree in Psychology focused on spirituality mind and body from Columbia University. Her goal in the future is to create a digital and physical community and space in Latin America that promotes mental and physical well-being while rescuing ancestral knowledge from the Amazonian and Andean communities in the region.

David Perls

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Neil Prashad

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Neil Prashad was raised with a deep connection to Eastern Wisdom traditions . During his childhood and teenage years, Neil spent a lot of time studying meditation, mantra practice, contemplation, mindfulness, and exploration of the highest self at camps, ashrams, temples, monasteries, and sacred spaces around the world. Neil is a very successful speaker on the Ramayana, Bhagavad Gita, Vedas, Karma, Conscious choice making and Mindfulness at various platforms, globally.

Neil is passionate about yoga, meditation, writing, film, music, conscious enterprise, and all platforms that help the human collective in being a more just, sustainable, conscious, caring, and joyful society. He believes in the incredible work of the SMBI Institute at Columbia University . Neil produced a five-part film series entitled “On Life and Enlightenment with His Holiness The Dalai Lama and others.” He has also produced incredible spiritual music albums such as “Salutation, A life in Prayer, Sacred Offerings, A Breath of Life and more .” He is seen as a great thought leader in the field of mind-body connectedness and inner awakening.

Neil believes that inner work for outer change means:

  • It empowers you, increasing your confidence and authentic self, making you feel more at ease in your expression.
  • It heals, aligns, and upgrades you to your highest timeline.
  • It strengthens your sense of connection, your trust, clarity, energy, and joy.
  • It advances your intuitive accuracy, so that you can interpret and translate spirit more efficiently.
  • It activates dormant DNA and encoded wisdom within you, awakening forgotten aspects of yourself, so that you can advance beyond your current perception.
  • It grants you higher dimensional access to your own divine memory and information, opening your communication channels so that you can receive guidance and messages more clearly.

Neil Prashad can be reached on Instagram @neilprashad and email at [email protected]

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Maya fervently believes that our darkest moments are a visceral calling to awaken our intrinsic and indomitable strength of spirit. Her personal journey of suffering served as a powerful catalyst for healing and ignited her deep desire to help others. Stuck in the throes of debilitating depression, chronic anxiety, and a life-threatening eating disorder for years, Maya tried many conventional mental health interventions in her home country, Singapore, which invariably left her feeling more disconnected from herself. Determined to delve beyond symptom management and instead excavate the root of her suffering, she embarked on a quest to discover spiritually centered approaches to healing. This led her to Buddhist psychology and mindfulness meditation, which she has been practicing for a decade. Mindfulness planted the seeds of curiosity, compassion, and courage that have blossomed through daily practice and inspire Maya’s outer work.

During her undergraduate studies in psychology, she applied her passion for science through research on the Light Triad, the Quiet Ego, and mediating factors between mindfulness and eating disorders. She also served as a yoga teacher, a meditation teacher, and a holistic, integrative health coach. Maya’s lifelong mission is to guide others towards their inner light by weaving together the many transformative practices and frameworks she has trained in, such as intuitive eating, internal family systems, motivational interviewing, loving kindness meditation, and Shamanic healing. She empowers others to authentically celebrate and express their unique strengths, which she believes are both an expression of and a pathway towards their innate spirituality.

Amy Lee Ravelo

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Amy Lee Ravelo Amy Ravelo is a young educator emerging into Early & Special Education with fresh eyes and a hopeful outlook. She is passionate about education as a universal right and a vehicle of social & personal change. She is an emerging interventionist and activist for revolutionizing the way we think of education. Although born and raised in New York City, she’s a first-generation immigrant. Amy keeps her home culture of the Dominican Republic close to her heart and is witness to the importance of culturally responsive & sustaining teaching practices. A recent graduate from New York University, Amy received a Bachelor of Science in Early Education & Special Education with a concentration in Languages and Linguistics — studying Communicative Science Disorders. She completed over 500 hours of student teaching at various NYC DOE public schools. Through this, she honed her passion for early education, from theoretical works in creating an action research plan on student emotional wellbeing and school models to developing and implementing lesson plans, experiential activities, and unforgettable school memories. Writer, educator, psychoanalyst, and artist by chance.

Sarah Ritchie

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

For the last dozen years, Sarah Ritchie has worked as a Celebrant and Interfaith Minister, conducting weddings, funerals, baby blessings and other celebrations and rites of passage.  She was trained at the Celebrant Foundation & Institute as well, as One Spirit Interfaith Seminary in New York City.  Ritchie recently completed training as an end-of-life doula, pursuing programs at the New York Open Center and the International End of Life Doula Association (INELDA).

            Previously, she worked with undergraduate and graduate students at ICSC, supporting the academic and career development of 1,500 student members and coordinating leadership development programs with dozens of top-tier academic programs in various business fields.  Ritchie also served in program and public affairs positions at The Century Foundation, a progressive public policy operating foundation based in New York and Washington, D,C.  She was also the assistant director of the Center for the Study of the States at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government, a think tank associated with the State University of New York. 

Ritchie is a Phi Beta Kapp graduate of the University of Oklahoma, studying politics, history, and economics, with areas of concentration in social science research methodology and Congressional studies.  She earned an M.A. and M.Phil. at Yale University, focusing on American politics, political economy, and political psychology and studied at the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan.  She has served in teaching and mentoring roles at Duke University and Union College.

            A native Oklahoma, Ritchie wishes to work with college and graduate students in a spiritual capacity.   She is an avid sports fan, enthusiastic traveler, and lifelong learner.

Ariana Ariana Rodriguez

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Ariana Rodriguez, MSc, RD

Ariana Rodriguez is a Registered Dietitian, Certified Intuitive Eating Counsellor and Registered Yoga Teacher passionate about inclusive health messaging & education to help people feel GOOD in the skin they are in.

Ariana is best known for her zest for life, approachable nature and as the co-founder of Embody Health London - London’s leading Eating Disorder & Body Image nutrition clinic where she developed the EHL Method – an integrative approach to recovery.

She is also an Embodied Recovery Facilitator and Emotional Freedom Technique Practitioner who is trained in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy-Enhanced and Acceptance Commitment Therapy and holds a Neuro-Linguistic Programming Diploma.

Her mission is to move people away from guilt and shame towards a positive relationship with food, body, mind and soul to live a rich and fulfilling life.

In her spare time, Ariana can be found dancing, doing yoga, traveling to new places, reading a book and spending time with friends and family.

Danielle Russo

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

From a young age, Danielle discovered dance to be her most organic form of expression. Through movement, she was able to witness how creativity can help one find their identity. In her career, Danielle had the pleasure of working with companies like HBO, FX, MTV, Swarovski Crystals, and six:02. Her passion for dance developed into a love of teaching. She enjoys working with young artists to help them authentically express their creative voices. Currently, she is on faculty at Brickhouse NYC where she runs their contemporary fusion crew.

In 2022 Danielle graduated Summa Cum Laude from LIM College with a BBA in Visual Studies and a minor in Fashion Styling. While in her undergraduate program, Danielle was the first LIM student to win the Fashion Scholarship Fund grant for a design case study. An exciting project completed during her undergraduate program was working with Moxy Hotel on a mural for their Bowery location. She worked at Lafayette 148 as an intern in Business Information and then Design. Her hard work landed her a position on the design team as the Accessories and Styling Assistant. Upon graduation, Danielle was presented with an award for Excellence in Visual Studies by Wests Design Consultants USA.

Entering the SMB MA program Danielle plans to merge her love of arts with spirituality. She aspires to bring spirituality into pop culture to make it an evident part of everyday life. She seeks to help the next generation find their voice by inspiring them to live authentically.

Charlotte Scott

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Charlotte is a proud New Yorker, born and raised in NYC her entire life. Currently living in Brooklyn. She believes her city upbringing provided her a diverse education in school and outside of school that is hard to find anywhere else. Having graduated from The New School for Libral Arts in 2016 with a Bachelor of Arts degree, she has since expanded her education to yoga teaching. Her deep thinking and rich inner world drew her to philosophy and other forms of spirituality early on. She began practicing yoga intensely in 2011 and was 200hr certified with Ally Bogard by 2016. She has since completed multiple mentorships with master teachers and continues to grow through physical and metaphysical techniques. Now completing her Masters degree with Columbia for Counseling Spiritual Psychology, She hopes to become a health and spiritual coach. Emphasizing accessibility and women's health. Her goal is to draw together the Eastern healing techniques that she practices deeply, with the western techniques of psychology for a holistic approach. She believes our bodies can heal themselves with the right support, the right thoughts and the right regulation and that our own life is our own medicine. You will often find her taking class at Skyting Yoga, cooking at home or enjoying Rockaway Beach.

Chyrrl Sims

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Chyrrl Sims is a professional technical designer on the path of self-actualization and spiritual awakening. She longs to be a contributing force in the creation of a spiritually aware, positive and loving society. She believes that by awakening the spiritual connection we are born with, we can battle depression and anxiety as well as hatred and fear.

 Chyrrl is a recent graduate from the University of Arizona, where she studied Psychology. It was in 2017 that she discovered the SMBI program and her world was forever changed. With each and every course she took at the University of Arizona, she examined the information through a spiritual lens which brought a new sense of purpose into her life. She believes that the spirit within each of us plays a vital role in our health and overall well-being; that the mind and body cannot thrive if the spirit is broken. In this regard, she believes that “play” and spirituality are linked and that the act of “playing” can awaken the spirit within.

Upon graduation from the SMBI program, Chyrrl hopes to attain a doctorate degree in Psychology and eventually have her own private practice where, as a therapist, she would offer clients treatment options where spirituality and “play” are key components to therapy.

Chyrrl feels truly blessed to have been chosen as part of the 2021-2022, Teachers College, Columbia University, Spirituality Mind Body Institute’s cohort.

Josefina Streeter

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Josefina is a 29 years old chilean psychologist and bach flower practitioner that loves to learn, travel and volunteer.  She decided to become a psychologist with the intent to bring out the best in each person, explore their potential and help them find themselves. For the past six years, she has worked to eradicate gender violence and narrow the gap between men and women, empowering them by doing different kinds of volunteering, clinical psychology, and by working in public policies.

She has gone to Africa twice to work in different shelters with girls that have been victims of sexual, physical, and psychological abuse to show them they are not alone and that they can reshape their future. In Chile she worked at the Ministry of Women and Gender Equality as a direct advisor to the Minister. In addition, she got deeply involved with all the public institutions in Chile that focused their work on increasing equity and social justice like the National Women's Service, and a public non profit organization focused on women development.

Although Chile and Kenya are radically different countries, she realized that suffering is the same around the world. The experience of encountering poverty, inequality, and violence face to face transformed her, so working for the possibility of a better future was no longer an option: it became her life's goal.

Realizing that spirituality is an inherent part of being human and becoming aware of the human conexion despite the culture has opened her eyes, she aims to continue learning and incorporate more elements into her daily work by taking this SMBI Master.

Jami Streyle

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

Jami is a woman with profound life experience, a compassion to serve, and an insatiable desire to learn and teach.  She is dedicated to the education of spirituality in relation to the psychological and physical science of human nature, with God and the explanation of the seemingly unexplainable.  She has a vast medical background as a Registered Nurse, an extensive background in yoga and fitness, and continues to foster her spiritual gifts of praying in tongues, silent meditative listening, contemplative prayer, and breath work. She has also experienced angel and spiritual encounters, witnessed spiritual releases, and experienced prayer and deep meditation to a level that she didn’t know was possible. Studying the science and spirituality of our souls, electric energy, and how we are inherently connected to all living beings is one of her biggest passions. Her philosophy is that we are to facilitate understanding and growth in the mind, body and soul to create individual and social autonomy on a global scale.  Jami strives to help facilitate positive change for lasting transformations, social and spiritual justice, and interconnections in people, animals, cultures, and our environment.  Jami believes anything is possible with God, including a movement to truly create Heaven on Earth and empower spiritual world changers.  She is a self-declared environmentalist and an unapologetic vegan who is pro-life for all loving souls.  Jami lives in North Dakota and has three amazing children, six fun-loving dogs, and a love for the great outdoors.  She is currently a graduate student at SMBI Teachers College Columbia University in the Master of Science in Psychology Education Spirituality Mind Body program.

Adriana TranDaFIREscu

columbia university clinical psychology phd gre

I am Adriana TranDaFIREscu. I have always had a passion and dedication for the healing arts.

I believe in integrating conscious awareness into all facets of life. My awakening started with a voracious appetite to explore tools for self-improvement, parenting, health and wellness, and mindful philosophy. My education has intensified as I pursue a unique path of consciousness awakening to directly know the truth of my being. To this day, I integrate cutting-edge transformative work with scholastic pursuits, legal career, and family life.  

The evidence-based scientific approach of Spirituality, Mind and Body of the Psychology in Education Masters of Arts from Columbia University emerges as the pinnacle of the decades of my inner work. I hold a Juris-Doctor degree and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology. I am also an alternative dispute resolution legal Mediator. I am a Yoga, Mind-Body-Breath, Life-Coaching & Meditation certified instructor. I am also a certified Reiki Master. I studied plant-based nutrition through Cornell’s Center for Nutrition Studies.

I am privileged to have been featured among the most influential ethnic professionals in the USA.  My drive to transform my career from that of a counselor of the laws of man to a counselor of the spiritual laws emerged while giving the commencement speech to the undergraduate psychology department at SUNY Stony Brook. It is a humbling privilege to awaken seeds of extraordinariness into budding professionals, tomorrow’s leaders. 

I am dedicated to creating an approach to spiritual education for all stages of awareness. I hope to adduce multi-dimensional teachings of personal ethics to awaken the divine truth and provide tools to integrate spiritual principles into every day for a life of joy and purpose.  

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  4. My First Day of Graduate School at Columbia University

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  1. How to prepare for MPhil (GAT) & PhD (GRE) Admission Tests

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  5. Structural Racism and Social Determinants of Psychosis

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COMMENTS

  1. Clinical Psychology PhD

    Welcome to the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. The Clinical Psychology Program was founded in 1947-1948. It was APA-accredited in the first group of programs that were reviewed for accreditation in 1948 and that status has been uninterrupted.

  2. Frequently Asked Questions

    The range of the GRE scores for applicants who took the GRE prior to the August 1, 2011 revised scoring system was 640-750 for the verbal section and 600-800 for the quantitative section. Prior to the revised system, applicants scored an average of 664 on the verbal section and 760 on the quantitative section of the GRE.

  3. Clinical Psychology

    Our master's & doctoral programs in Clinical Psychology provide students with rigorous training in clinical science, clinical assessment, and intervention. ... Columbia University 328 Horace Mann. Contact Person: Rebecca Shulevitz. Phone: (212) 678-3267 Fax: (212) 678-8235. Email: [email protected].

  4. Clinical Psychology PhD

    The Clinical Psychology Program was founded in 1947-1948 and was APA-accredited in the first group of programs that were reviewed for accreditation in 1948. That status has been uninterrupted. Our most recent site visit from the APA occurred in 2021, and we have been accredited until June 2031.

  5. Clinical Psychology PhD

    All clinical psychology doctoral students are staff members in the Center after their first semester in the Program, and carry a regular caseload of clients. ... Teachers College, Columbia University 328 Horace Mann. Contact Person: Rebecca Shulevitz. Phone: (212) 678-3267 Fax: (212) 678-8235. Email: [email protected].

  6. Frequently Asked Questions

    15 Can I send my application materials to a postal address? 16 I submitted my on-line application to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. I am wondering about the status of my application. Can you tell me if my application is complete? 17 I am interested in visiting your Department and meeting with faculty. Is this possible?

  7. Applying to Grad School

    Applications for PhD and PsyD programs are generally due in December and Masters program applications are due in March. Generally speaking, psychology PhD programs accept applications from students who have completed a Bachelors degree. You will earn the MA as part of the PhD program. Most PhD programs work on a mentorship model where ...

  8. Prospective Students

    Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 108 Low Memorial Library 535 West 116th Street, MC 4303 Columbia University New York, NY 10027 (phone) 212.854.8903 (fax) 212.854.2863. A statement of academic purpose submitted on-line. GRE scores (official copies must be sent directly from ETS). If applicable, results of the TOEFL or IELTS examination.

  9. Preparing to Apply

    Columbia University in the City of New York Department of Psychology 406 Schermerhorn Hall 1190 Amsterdam Avenue MC 5501 New York, NY 10027. Department Reception Monday-Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm (212) 854-3608 (212) 854-3609 (fax) [email protected] Graduate Information Joanna Borchert-Kopczuk Undergraduate Information [email protected] Postbac ...

  10. Clinical Psychology PhD

    Contact Us. Box: 102 Teachers College, Columbia University 328 Horace Mann. Contact Person: Rebecca Shulevitz Phone: (212) 678-3267 Fax: (212) 678-8235 Email: [email protected]

  11. Graduate Program

    The focus of Columbia's graduate program in Psychology is on the training of Ph.D. students in research, teaching and scholarship in the areas of behavioral neuroscience, perception, cognition and social-personality psychology. This graduate program does not offer training in clinical psychology, school, counseling or industrial psychology.

  12. Psychology

    Nonsequential MAs and degrees in Clinical, Counseling, Organizational, Educational, and School Psychology are not awarded through this department. For information pertaining to application procedures for nonsequential MAs or degrees in the areas mentioned above, please contact Teachers College , 525 West 120th St., Room 146 Horace Mann, Box 302 ...

  13. Counseling Psychology PhD

    Doctoral Certification. Candidacy as a doctoral student expires after a certain number of years. Ph.D. candidates must complete all degree requirements within seven years of first entering the program (six years if they have an applicable master's degree or 30 points of advanced standing prior to doctoral admission).

  14. Psychology in Education: General Track MA

    Students within the M.A. program experience the demands of a graduate-level education in Clinical Psychology while also exploring the multiple avenues available in the ever-growing mental health field beyond. ... (3 classes) may be taken anywhere at Columbia University, including the Psychology in Education Program. Students typically take 3 ...

  15. Best Online Graduate Programs In Clinical Psychology [2024]

    Boston University. Boston, MA. 4 years. Online + Campus. Boston University's master of arts in psychology allows students to explore their interests in professional psychology and prepare for doctoral studies. The master's-level program does not qualify graduates for clinical licensure or practice.

  16. The Application

    Columbia University in the City of New York Department of Psychology 406 Schermerhorn Hall 1190 Amsterdam Avenue MC 5501 New York, NY 10027. Department Reception Monday-Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm (212) 854-3608 (212) 854-3609 (fax) [email protected] Graduate Information Joanna Borchert-Kopczuk Undergraduate Information [email protected] Postbac ...

  17. Department of Psychology

    Columbia's psychology department is one of the oldest and most influential in the United States, consistently ranking among top programs due to its world-renowned faculty and alumni. ... The Psychology PhD Podcast S01Ep01. Publications. Social influences on neurobiology and behavior: epigenetic effects during development. ... Columbia University

  18. Clinical Psychology

    Contact for Office of Clinical Psychology: [email protected]. Colleen C. Cullen, Psy.D. [email protected]. Claude Ann Mellins, Ph.D. [email protected]. The Office of Clinical Psychology contributes to clinical education and the development of clinical services within Columbia University's Department of Psychiatry and CUIMC.

  19. Faculty

    Department of Psychology 406 Schermerhorn Hall, 1190 Amsterdam Ave., MC 5501 · New York, NY 10027.

  20. Psychology < School of General Studies

    Undergraduate Curriculum Assistant: 406 Schermerhorn; 212-854-8859; [email protected]. The Department of Psychology offers students a comprehensive curriculum in psychological science, including research methods, cognition, neuroscience, developmental, social, and clinical areas. The curriculum prepares majors for graduate education in ...

  21. Admissions

    Graduate Preparation Applicants; Pre-College Students; Visiting Students; English Language Programs Applicants; Course Auditors; Columbia University Employees; Virtual Campus Tour; Breadcrumb. Academics; Certificates & Certifications; Psychology; Psychology Certificate Toggle sidebar menu visibility. Apply Now Request Information. Psychology

  22. Psychology, Counseling, & Social Work

    The so-called "helping professions," Psychology, Counseling, and Social Work are grounded in empathy, care, and transformation. Professionals in these fields work in clinical, industry, education, or community service settings. Working with individuals, groups, families or organizations, they: For some roles, graduate school, specialized ...

  23. Psychology Certificate

    Recent graduates who wish to prepare for graduate school in a field related to psychology. Professionals seeking a career change into a cutting-edge industry. Lifelong benefits you receive as a Columbia graduate: Access to a world-renowned system of libraries; A Columbia email address; Membership in a network of Columbia students, faculty and ...

  24. Clinical

    Gain the knowledge and skills to help advance clinical psychological science. As a clinical science program, we value research efforts and practice directed toward: social justice advocacy as it relates to the field of clinical psychology. We strive to incorporate core values of equity, diversity, and inclusion into all aspects of our work ...

  25. Our Students

    Currently enrolled in Columbia University's Spirituality Mind Body Institute at Teachers College, Emily is pursuing a Master of Arts in Psychology in Education with a focus on spirituality. SMB is the first Ivy League graduate curriculum dedicated to merging spirituality and evidence-based research within the context of clinical psychology.

  26. Online MS in Social Work

    Columbia's Master of Science in Social Work is one of the oldest and most esteemed MSW programs in the world. Columbia students have unparalleled access to rigorous training, innovative teaching, and proven methods to transform lives and lead society forward. Our Online Campus option combines all the benefits of the MSW program within an ...

  27. Clinical Mental Health Counseling (M.S.)

    The mission of the CMH Counseling program faculty is to prepare counselors who will ethically promote the emotional well-being of: Individuals (childhood through adulthood) Families. Diverse client populations located in urban, rural and international settings. Individuals admitted into the program learn in a dynamic, experiential environment ...

  28. Ph.D. Program Overview

    The Ph.D. program prepares students to conduct the highest level of sociological research. Graduates of the program go on to occupy research and teaching positions at top universities around the world as well as advanced positions in government and private industry. Alumni of the program include some of the most distinguished sociologists of ...

  29. College of Arts and Sciences

    Master of Arts in Psychology (Clinical) The Master of Psychology equips student with tools to interact with different client populations. Our psychotherapy techniques courses focus on the development of cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, brief, and client-centered psychotherapy skills. Students are exposed to a variety of other approaches (e.g., family systems, group) through coursework ...