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How to address a cover letter?

I'm sure that you had to create a cover letter at some point in your job search. And like most other job seekers, you probably came across this problem: "How to address a cover letter?"

Most of the time, you have no idea who is going to read the cover letter.

So, how to address a cover letter without a name?

Hiring managers get roughly 100-200 resumes every day. And, they are already under a lot of pressure to sort the resumes.

On top of that, if they get cover letters that do not have proper formatting and do not address the hiring manager in the cover letter header, mark my words; they will surely throw your resume away.

In a resume cover letter, minute details make or break your chance of being hired.

So, you need to make sure that you know how to address cover letter correctly.

Don't worry!

In this blog, we will tell you everything you need to know about:

  • Who to address cover letter to?
  • How to address a cover letter without a name?
  • How to find out who to address a cover letter to?
  • How to address an email cover letter?
  • How to address a cover letter for internal position?
  • What should you not do when addressing a cover letter?
  • Example of Proper Cover letter address format?
  • Some common question about how to address cover letter

Who to Address a Cover Letter To?

Ideally, you need to address your cover letter to hiring managers , not the recruiters .

In many job postings, the name or email address of the hiring manager is given.

If you are lucky enough to find such job listings, then you are sorted. You can write a personalized cover letter addressing the hiring manager directly.

Unfortunately, not many job listing sites give the name and email address of the contact person.

Do not quit and send the cover letter without a name.

Go to the company website/about page and see if it has the list of staff.

That way, you can probably get the hiring manager's name or someone from the talent acquisition department to whom you need to address your cover letter.

The critical aspect is to do a lot of research .

Suppose you still don't find any name or contact information of anyone in the hiring department. In that case, you can also address your cover letter to someone in authority in other departments, such as the senior manager or the head of the department you are applying for.

It is a hundred times better to address your cover letter to someone in the organization than not addressing it at all.

At least, this way, they will understand that you are not throwing rocks in the dark. You have done your research and have good ideas about the organization.

Also Read: How to write a stellar cover letter in 2022?

How to Address a Cover letter Without a Name?

There are plenty of generic cover letter salutations you can use in your cover letter. These generic cover letter salutations eliminate the need to know the name of the contact person.

The only drawback is that you have no option to personalize your cover letter.

A survey conducted by Saddleback College has seen that only 8% of hiring managers are ok with a cover letter without name. But 92% of hiring managers prefer to have some address in the cover letter.

  • Dear Hiring Manager (40%)
  • Dear Sir/Madam (27%)
  • To Whom It May Concern (17%)
  • Dear Human Resources Director (6%)

However, we don't recommend you to use to whom it may concern in your cover letter address.

Instead, the best general salutation can be "Dear Hiring Manager."

If you want to personalize the address, you can address your cover letter to the specific department you are applying for. For example, "Dear Digital Marketing Department."

How to Address Cover Letter When You Don't Know Hiring Manager's Gender?

There will be times when you will find the gender-neutral name of the hiring manager. In that case, altogether avoid using gender-specific cover letter addresses. Instead, address with their both name and last name in the salutation like this:

  • Dear John Doe,
  • Dear Charlie Brown ,
  • Dear Taylor Paisley,
Hiration Pro Tip : In this type of gender-neutral name, you can search for the person on Linkedin to find out their gender. Alternatively, you can search on the company page or call the company reception to get more information about the hiring manager.

How to Address Cover Letter When You Know Hiring Manager's Gender?

If you know the hiring manager's gender, things will be much easier for you. For men, you can address the hiring manager with "Mr.," but things get a bit tricky for female hiring managers.

Imagine this,

You have addressed the hiring manager with "Miss.," and if she turns out to be married, it will not look good on your part. You definitely do not want to offend your hiring manager.

Instead of "Miss" or "Mrs.," use " Ms.," which does not focus on their marital status.

  • Dear. Ms. Moore,
  • Dear Miss Jane,
  • Dear Mrs. Black,

Should You Address the Hiring Manager With Only Their First Name?

If you know the hiring manager personally, only then can you use their first name to address the cover letter. Else, address the letter with their full name.

How to Use Professional Titles When Addressing a Cover Letter?

If the hiring manager has a professional or academic title, don't forget to address them by their title. You can write the full title like this:

  • "Dear Doctor Taylor,"

Or you can use the abbreviated form like this:

  • Dear Dr. Taylor ,
  • Dear Sgt. Park,
  • Dear Prof. Hoverman,
  • Dear Principal Fury,

Also Read: How long should a cover letter be?

How Do You Find Out Who to Address a Cover Letter To?

If you don't find the hiring manager's name and contact information on the job description, don't just leave it like that! Do some research and put some effort into finding the name and email id of the hiring manager.

It may take some extra effort, but it shows that you are interested in this job. This section will tell you everything you need to know about finding the hiring manager's name and to who you address a cover letter.

Call the Company

Calling the company to ask for a hiring manager's details is the best way to accurately determine the hiring manager's name and number.

  • Call the company desk
  • State who you are and why you are calling
  • Tell that you are applying for a job position and confirm who the hiring manager is for addressing in the cover letter.
  • Most of the time, the hiring manager will happily give you the information you need.
Tip : When taking their name, ask for the spelling of the hiring manager's name. You do not want to screw up the spelling.

If the company desk refuses to give information for any reason, don't worry; we have four other ways in our arsenal.

Network With People Working With Prospective Employer

The second best way to get the hiring manager's name and contact information is to connect with your prospective employer's employees.

This way, you can ask your connection to refer you to the hiring manager or ask for the hiring manager's contact information when a job becomes available.

It is easier than you think.

Just do a quick Linkedin search and see the employers active on Linkedin.

Now, slowly start engaging with the person you want to connect with.

After a couple of days, send them a personalized connection request and slowly build a rapport.

You do not want to ask right out for reference after introducing yourself. Instead, add some value to the conversation, and show genuine interest in them.

This process takes some time, but the connection you will make with these people will take you a long way in your professional journey.

Read the Job Description Carefully

It is a sad truth that most job seekers do not read the job description carefully. In this way, they miss vital information and potentially the hiring manager's contact name and details.

Most of the job descriptions contain the email address of the hiring manager at the end. And you can easily find the name of the contact person with the email address.

Most professional email ids contain the name of the person and the company name. For example, [email protected] has two parts- Judy.M and hiraiton.com.

And if you search on Google by the first part of the email address "Judy.M" and the company name, there is a high chance that you will find the Linkedin profile of the respective person. And you can get to know other information about them as well.

Find Out Who Will Become Your Superior or Manager

Many job descriptions include the details about the reporting manager. In such cases, you need to address your cover letter to the reporting manager.

You can find more information about the reporting manager by a quick Linkedin search with the reporting manager's job title and the company.

If the company is larger, there may be multiple individuals with the same job title. In that case, you can further narrow down your search by location.

Do an Online Search

Another easy way to search for the hiring manager is by simply doing a Google search. Google will show you the most relevant results for your search query. Example: See in this example how the first result itself answered your question.

Example-Cover-letter-address

Also Read: How to address a cover letter without name?

How to Address a Email Cover Letter?

We live in a digital age now.

Nowadays, most candidates send email cover letters to the hiring managers. And hiring managers get 100s of email cover letters daily.

To stand out from these 100s of email cover letters, you need to make sure your email cover address is perfect.

1. Subject Line of Email Cover Letter

The first thing the hiring manager will see is your email cover letter subject line. So, never leave the subject line blank.

Hiring managers sort the email cover letters by the job title. And if your cover letter does not have a subject line, it will not show in the hiring manager's list.

Here is an example cover letter subject line :

Subject line: Job Application for Video Editor Position, Ref: Hanna Moore

2. Address the Cover Letter in the Correct Way

The rules of a formal cover letter and an email cover letter salutation are similar. You can refer to the previous section of this blog to know more about it. Here is an example of an email cover letter address

  • "Dear Mr. Doe,"

Note : Recent trends have seen many job seekers do not include "Dear" in the salutation. You can do that too. There is nothing wrong with it.

Also Read: How to start a cover letter for maximum impact?

How to Address a Cover Letter for Internal Position?

If you address the cover letter to higher management or hiring manager, always use their name to address in the cover letter.

luckily, since it's an internal position, you can easily find the name of the person by asking your colleagues.

What Not to Do When Addressing a Cover Letter

Even if you did everything right on your resume and cover letter, starting it wrong may cost you a chance to get a call for an interview.

Let's see what you should not do when addressing a cover letter.

Do Not Address the Cover Letter to the Recruiter

" Recruiters do not read cover letters. "

Recruiters only sort the resumes by keywords and forward the same to the hiring managers.

This is the golden rule you need to keep in mind when addressing a cover letter. Always address the cover letter to the hiring manager.

Do Not Address the Cover Letter to an Ex. Hiring Manager

Company websites do not get updated regularly. If a hiring manager leaves the company, you may still find their name and contact information on the website or other third-party websites. So, be extra careful when addressing a cover letter.

Spelling the Hiring Manager or Company Name Wrong

Do not sabotage your first impression by making a spelling mistake on the hiring manager's name or the company name. It demonstrates a lack of attention to detail.

Do Not Start With a Bland Greeting

Avoid using to whom it may concern cover letter address. It is very generic and shows utter laziness on your part. It projects that you did not put much effort into writing the cover letter.

Example of a Cover Letter Address Format

Here is an example of a proper cover letter address format:

Cover-letter-address

Frequently Asked Questions

How to address a cover letter to a large company.

If you have to address a cover letter to a large company, and you don't know the hiring manager's name, you can always address the cover letter to the department you are applying job to. For example:

  • Dear Finance Department
  • Dear Marketing Team
  • Dear Customer Service Department

Can I get creative with my cover letter address?

There is no restriction on being creative with addressing a cover letter. It is essential to research and understand who your audience is and if he/she will appreciate your creativity.

For example, if you do something creative with your cover letter salutation to apply in a creative field, it will get the hiring manager's attention.

On the other hand, if you apply for a technical position, you might hold off from showing your creativity on the cover letter address.

Should a cover letter address the company location?

It is a traditional practice to include the company address in the cover letter. Primary because it is a formal document, it would be better to add the company address before starting your cover letter.

Should a cover letter header include the candidate's address?

The candidate's address is an essential part of the cover letter. If not the whole address, at least City, Country should be mentioned in the cover letter. Example:

  • "Pine Bluff, AR"

This helps the hiring manager sort the candidates based on location.

Also, the Application Tracking Softwares sort the resumes and cover letters based on their locations. And if your location is not mentioned in the cover letter, it might get unnoticed by the ATS software.

Should a cover letter header, and resume header be the same?

Ideally, your cover letter header should be the name of the role you are applying for. And resume heading should be your current job title. For example, if you are currently working as a data analyst, your Resume headline should be something like:

  • "Jr. Data Analyst."

And you are applying for a Data Scientist position, then your cover letter heading should be,

  • "Data Scientist"

There is no hard and fast rule, but this is the approach we at Hiration follow, and it has been working for our clients.

You can also write the same heading for the cover letter and resume if you like. It has some added advantages. If the cover letter gets misplaced, it will be a lot easier to trace it back to the resume.

How to write the intro to a cover letter?

If you want to hook the hiring manager to read your cover letter, you need to write a professional intro explaining why you are applying and what role you are applying for.

You need to remember that hiring managers are often dealing with recruitment for more than one position. And it will help them if you specifically mention what role you are applying for.

Key Takeaways

With that, we have come to the end of this blog. By now, you should get all of your questions answered. But still, if you have any questions regarding how to address a cover letter and who to address a cover letter, let's go over the key takeaways of the blog:

  • Do not send the cover letter without addressing someone.
  • If you do not know who to address, call the company desk or go to LinkedIn to search the hiring manager's name.
  • If you do not know the name, you can address the cover letter with "Dear Hiring Manager,"
  • Alternatively, you can address the cover letter to the head of the department you are applying for. For example: "Dear Sr. Marketing Manager,"
  • Make sure to use accurate professional and academic titles with the name of hiring managers.
  • Do not use "To whom it may concern." It is old-fashioned and does not impress the hiring manager nowadays.

Go to Hiration career platform which has 24/7 chat support and get professional assistance with all your job & career-related queries. You can also write to us at [email protected] and we will make sure to reach out to you as soon as possible.

cover letter dear mrs

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How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

cover letter dear mrs

Options for Addressing a Cover Letter

  • Letter Without a Contact Person
  • Non-Gender-Specific Names

What Title to Use

  • Address an Email Cover Letter
  • Review a Sample Cover Letter

Before You Send Your Letter

One of the trickiest parts of writing a cover letter comes at the very beginning. Much of the time, you won’t know exactly who will read your letter. How do you address your cover letter when you don’t have the contact person’s name and/or gender ?

First of all, try to find out the name of the contact person. Some employers will think poorly of an applicant who does not take the time to learn the hiring manager’s name. Also, take care not to assume that you know the gender of the recipient based on the name. Many names are gender-neutral, and some hiring managers may identify as a gender other than male or female.

It’s also possible that you’ll do your research and still be unable to figure out to whom you are addressing your letter. In that case, it's better to be safe and use a generic greeting . It's also acceptable to start a letter without a greeting and start with the first paragraph of your letter .

You have a lot of options when addressing your letter. Learn more about the possibilities before you make your choice.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Contact Person

There are a variety of general cover letter salutations you can use to address your letter. These general cover letter salutations do not require you to know the name of the hiring manager.

In a survey of more than 2,000 companies, Saddleback College found that employers preferred the following greetings:  

  • Dear Sir/Madam (27%)
  • To Whom It May Concern  (17%)
  • Dear Human Resources Director (6%)
  • Leave it blank (8%)

Do keep in mind that terms like "To Whom It May Concern" may seem dated, so the best options may be either to use "Dear Hiring Manager" or not to include a greeting at all. Simply start with the first paragraph of your letter.

How to Address a Cover Letter for a Non-Gender-Specific Name

If you do have a name but aren't sure of the person's gender, one option is to include both the first name and the last name in your salutation, without a title that reveals gender:

  • Dear Sydney Doe
  • Dear Taylor Smith
  • Dear Jamie Brown

With these types of gender-ambiguous names,  LinkedIn  can be a helpful resource. Since many people include a photo with their profile, a simple search of the person's name and company within LinkedIn could potentially turn up the contact's photograph.

Again, you can also check the company website or call the company’s administrative assistant to get more information as well.

Even if you know the name and gender of the person to whom you are writing, think carefully about what title you will use in your salutation.

For example, if the person is a doctor or holds a Ph.D., you might want to address your letter to “Dr. Lastname” rather than “Ms. Lastname” or “Mr. Lastname.” Other titles might be “Prof.,” “Rev.,” or “Sgt.,” among others.

When you address a letter to a female employer, use the title “Ms.” unless you know for certain that she prefers another title (such as “Miss” or “Mrs.”).

“Ms.” is a general title that does not denote marital status, so it works for any female employer.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

Hiring managers get a lot of emails each day. Make it easy for them to scan your email and follow up by including a clear subject line and a signature with your contact information. It's important to address the email cover letter correctly, including the name of the person hiring for the position if you have a contact, to ensure that your letter gets noticed.

Subject Line of Email Message

Never leave the subject line blank. There is a good chance that if a hiring manager receives an email with no subject line, they’ll delete it without even bothering to open it, or it could end up in their spam mailbox. Instead, write a clear subject indicating your intentions.

List the job you are applying for in the  subject line of your email message , so the employer knows what job you are interested in. They may be hiring for multiple positions, and you will want them to identify the position you’re interested in easily.

How to Address the Contact Person

There are a variety of  cover letter salutations  you can use to address your email message. If you have a contact person at the company, address the letter to Ms. or Mr. Lastname. If you aren’t given a contact person, check to see if you can  determine the email recipient's name .

If you can’t find a contact person at the company, you can either leave off the salutation from your cover letter and  start with the first paragraph  of your letter or use a  general salutation .

How to Format the Salutation

Once you have chosen a salutation, follow it with a colon or comma, a space, and then start the first paragraph of your letter. For example:

Dear Hiring Manager:

First paragraph of the letter.

Body of Email Cover Letter

The body of your cover letter  lets the employer know what position you are applying for, and why the employer should select you for an interview. This is where you'll sell yourself as a candidate. Review the job posting and include examples of your attributes that closely match the ones they are looking for.

When you're sending an  email cover letter , it's important to follow the employer's instructions on how to submit your cover letter and resume.

Make sure that your email cover letters are as well-written as any other documents you send.

If you have attached your resume, mention this as part of your conclusion. Then finish your cover letter by thanking the employer for considering you for the position. Include information on how you will follow up. Include a closing, then list your name and your  email signature .

Your email signature should include your name, full address, phone number, email address, and  LinkedIn Profile URL  (if you have one) so it is easy for hiring managers to get in touch.

Firstname Lastname  Street Address  (optional) City, State Zip Code  Email  Phone  LinkedIn

Sample Cover Letter

This is a cover letter example. Download the cover letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

Sample Cover Letter (Text Version)

Mary Garcia 12 Rogers Avenue Townville, New Hampshire 03060 555-555-5555 mary.garcia@email.com

February 17, 2021

Franklin Lee

CBI Industries 39 Main Street Townville, New Hampshire 03060

Dear Mr. Lee:

I was excited to see your ad for the operations assistant position in your Townville offices.

I have five years of experience as an operations assistant/associate. In my most recent role at ABC Corp., I fulfilled orders, resolved customer issues, ordered supplies, and prepared reports. In previous roles, I’ve done bookkeeping, data entry, and sales support. Basically, anything your department needs to run smoothly, I can do – and most likely, I already have experience doing it.

My other skills include:

  • Strong communication skills, in person, in writing, and on the phone
  • Excellent attention to detail and organization skills
  • Top-notch customer service
  • Experience in the industry and passion for the product
  • Adept at all the usual professional software, including Microsoft Office Suite

I’ve included my resume for your review. Please contact me if you have questions or would like to schedule an interview. Thank you for your consideration.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Mary Garcia

Review Cover Letter Samples: It’s hard to write cover letters from scratch. To make life easier – and to make sure you don’t forget any of those pesky formatting rules —start by reviewing cover letter samples . Sending an email version instead? Look at a few examples of email cover letters to get started.

Customize Your Cover Letter: Why personalize your cover letter every time you apply for a job? Because even similar job titles have different requirements. The goal of a cover letter is to show the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for this particular job. Customizing your cover letter will help you emphasize your skills and experience and how they fit with the job requirements .

Spell-Check Names: Before sending your cover letter, make absolutely sure that you have spelled the hiring manager’s name correctly. That is the kind of small error that can cost you a job interview.

Carefully Proofread Your Letter: Whether you're sending an email or uploading or attaching a printable cover letter, it's important to make sure that your cover letter and resume are written as well as any other business correspondence. If you can, have a friend proofread before you hit send, to pick up any typos or grammatical errors.

Saddleback College. " Your Resume is Your 1st Interview ," Page 14. Accessed Feb. 17, 2021.

How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024

Background Image

Yes, how you address your cover letter matters.

After all, this is the first thing the recruiter reads when going through your cover letter, and yes, there is a right and wrong way to do it.

In this article, we’re going to teach you how to address your cover letter in such a way that you leave a positive impression on any recruiter!

  • How to address a cover letter to a recruiter? (Casual or formal)
  • What title to use when addressing the hiring manager
  • How to address a cover letter without a contact person/to a company
  • How to address a cover letter without an address
  • How to address a cover letter in an email

How to Address a Cover Letter To a Recruiter (Casual or Formal)?

As we already mentioned, the way you address your cover letter is important because it is the very first thing recruiters see upon opening your cover letter. 

A well-formulated cover letter address means that you care enough to research the company (i.e. to find the hiring manager’s name and title) and that you show attention to detail. 

As such, you should always put some research into who you’re addressing your cover letter to and do so in a formal way.  

And yes, the formal part is important too. The recruiter isn’t your best friend - you want to maintain a sense of professionalism.

If this is how you address the recruiter in your cover letter:

  • What’s up Hiring Manager
  • Hi there Hiring Team

Then you say goodbye to the job.

Now, you’re probably wondering, how can I find out whom to address my cover letter to?

That’s what we’re about to teach you:

Who Am I Addressing My Cover Letter To?

Here are some tricks to find the full name of the hiring manager: 

  • Check the job listing. The job listing may have information about the recruiter or the department doing the hiring. Make sure to read through the entire job listing, as it might not be at an entirely obvious place.
  • Check the company website. Some websites feature the names of the hiring managers or heads of departments that may go through your cover letter. Alternatively, LinkedIn is another place where you can look for this information.
  • Check the company’s LinkedIn. You can look up who works in the company you’re applying for on their LinkedIn page.
  • Ask around. Do you have friends that work for the company? They could provide you with valuable inside info.

To avoid making a bad impression, head over to our guide on cover letter mistakes to learn about what NOT to do when writing your cover letter.  

job search masterclass novoresume

Addressing a Cover Letter With a Name

By now, you have probably found the hiring manager’s full name and gender. With this information available, it’s best to address the hiring manager formally, as follows: 

  • Dear Mr. Brown,
  • Dear Miss Fitzpatrick,
  • Dear Mrs. Lockhart,
  • Dear Ms. Walters,

If, for some reason, you are unsure about the person’s title, gender, marital status, or preferred pronouns, just address them using their entire name to avoid any mistakes. For example:

  • Dear Alex Brown, 
  • Dear Blair Fitzpatrick,
  • Dear Jesse Lockhart,
  • Dear Madison Walters,

Addressing someone with a title 

Now, if you found out that the hiring manager has a professional or academic title, then it’s more appropriate to address them using that title. If, for example, the hiring manager has a Ph.D., then it’s more respectful to address them as “Dr. Last Name,” instead of “Mr. Last Name.”  

Here are some professional titles and how they’re abbreviated: 

  • A professor is Prof. 
  • A reverend is Rev. 
  • A sergeant is Sgt. 
  • Honorable is Hon. 

If, however, you are uncertain about how a title is abbreviated, then avoid it altogether. 

Here are a few examples to give you an idea: 

  • Dear Prof. Welsch,
  • Dear Director Smith,
  • Dear Rev. Owen,

Dear Dr. Leonard,

When addressing women and you don’t know their marital status, always go with Ms., because it doesn’t comment on marital status. Some women prefer not to be addressed with Miss or Mrs. even when they’re married, so sticking with Ms. is the best choice. 

Want to learn more cover letter tips ? Our guide has all you need to ace your cover letter!  

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Contact Person

It might happen that, no matter how hard you search, you can’t find the name of the hiring manager or department head that will read your cover letter.

In that case, you can address your cover letter to the department, faculty, or the company.

  • Dear Software Development Hiring Team,
  • Dear Customer Service Department Hiring Team,
  • Dear Head of the Literature Faculty,
  • Dear Director of Marketing,
  • Dear Human Resources Recruitment Team,

Alternatively, if you don’t have enough information either about the department or the team, you can opt for addressing the cover letter directly to the company’s hiring staff, as follows: 

Dear [Company Name] Hiring Team 

Dear [Company Name] Recruiting Staff

If all else fails (meaning, you don’t know the name of the department head or even the exact department, in addition to the recruiter) then you can use one of the good, old-fashioned:

Dear Hiring Manager,

...but NOT the impersonal and way outdated “To whom it may concern” and “Dear Sir/Madam.” 

Starting a cover letter can be challenging. Our guide can show you how to start a cover letter that will get you results from the get-go. 

How to Format the Company’s Address

Before you reach the salutation, you have to make sure that the header with the recipient’s contact information is formatted correctly. 

It might not be the deciding point of whether you’ll secure an interview or not, but it will cost you points if it’s off. 

So, the first thing you want to do is add your name and surname on the upper left side of the cover letter. Underneath, you should write your professional title (if applicable), your email , and your phone number . 

Now, after you’ve also added the date, you should leave one more space and add the recipient’s contact information and, most importantly, the company’s address. 

It should look something like this on your cover letter: 

how to address a cover letter

When You Can’t Find the Company’s Address 

Some companies might have several addresses listed (as per their branches, for example), or even none at all. 

Since an application that doesn’t have an address line could end up lost or misplaced, make sure you do one of the following before skipping the company’s address completely:

  • Check all your resources, (pretty much like when you were looking for the hiring manager’s name) to find the company’s address. 
  • Use the company’s headquarter address. This is sometimes easier to find, especially if the company has several branches. 
  • Use the P.O. Box number for the company. This is not as specific as an actual address line, but if all else fails, it’s still something. 

Frequently, you’ll be asked to submit your job application (including your cover letter) electronically, or by email. In those cases, you can skip the address line altogether. 

Here’s how you’d go about addressing a cover letter in an email.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

If you’re sending your job application through email, chances are you’ll need to format your cover letter in the body of the email, or as an attachment along with your resume.

First and foremost when you’re addressing a cover letter in an email is the subject line, which should be between 6-10 words long. 

Considering that hiring managers receive countless emails daily, you want to make sure that yours is a job application immediately. And the way to do that is straight through the subject line, which should indicate exactly the position you’re applying for and your name so that it’s easier to find through the recruiter’s swarmed mailbox. 

Here’ what we mean by that:

  • Subject Line:   John Doe - Software Development Job Application 
  • Subject Line: John Doe - Job Application for Marketing Manager Position   
  • Subject Line: John Doe - Stock Manager Job Application 

Afterward, if you’re including your cover letter in the body of the email (as opposed to attaching it as a document), begin by using a salutation, add space, and start your letter. 

If someone referred you for the position, make sure to mention that in the subject line of your email as well as in your opening paragraph.  

So, let’s see how all the above plays out in practice: 

Subject Line: John Doe - Carl Jacob’s Referral for Software Developer

I was very glad that Mr. Jacobs, a long-time partner at your firm who also happens to be my mentor from college, referred me for the Software Developer position. 

Do you want your style, personality, and overall personal brand to shine through your application? With Novorésumé, you can match your cover letter with your resume to make a lasting impression! 

matching resume and cover letter

Key Takeaways 

And that’s all there is when it comes to addressing a cover letter! You should feel much more confident in doing so by now. 

Either way, let’s go over the main points we covered throughout the article: 

  • Your cover letter address should be formal and well-researched. Don’t address the hiring manager with “hey,” “what’s up,” “hi there,” or even the old-fashioned “Dear Sir/Madam” and “To Whom It May Concern.”
  • Always try to find the hiring manager’s full name and professional title through the company’s website, LinkedIn, by calling, or by asking someone who works there.
  • If you know the hiring manager’s name, go with “Dear Mr./Miss Last Name,” but if you’re unsure about their gender, marital status, or preferred pronoun, just address them using their full name.
  • If the recruiter has a professional or academic title, it’s more appropriate to address them using their title.
  • If you can’t find the contact person’s name, then address the department, faculty, or company (i.e. Dear Microsoft Hiring Team , or Dear Software Development Recruitment Team ).

Related Readings: 

  • Do I Need a Cover Letter in 2024
  • Entry-Level Cover Letter
  • Cover Letter for Internship
  • How to Write a Cover Letter in 2024

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Cover Letter Salutation That Entices the Recruiter to Learn More About You

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In This Guide:

How to write the best cover letter salutation for maximum impact.

Cover letter salutation if you know the hiring manager's name

Why you should personalize your cover letter salutation

The absolute no-nos of cover letter salutations, cover letter salutation - takeaways.

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Quick Answer: "To write an outstanding cover letter salutation, keep it formal yet polite. Start with ""Dear (name)"" if you know the name of the HR or hiring manager. Use ""Dear HR Team"" or ""Dear Hiring Manager"" if the recipient is unknown. Always personalize the salutation to establish a connection and avoid vague openings like ""To whom it may concern"" or ""Dear Sir/Madam."" Remember, personalization and a formal tone are key."

Have you ever been slightly annoyed when someone forgot your name at a party 2 minutes after you introduced yourself, even though you also sometimes forget the names of people whom you just met?

Guess what – recruiters feel the same when their name is under the job ad, yet they get another Cover letter starting with “To whom it may concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam”.

In this article, you will learn how to craft impressive Cover letters, which land on “soft” ears, as you know how to address your reader the right way.

Here’s what you will learn from our expert Career advisors:

  • What is a great Cover letter greeting
  • How to create a connection via personalization
  • Ways to find the HR name
  • How to avoid common pitfalls in your Cover letter salutation
  • What opening lines you should stay away from

After nailing that attention-grabbing greeting, you can always get more free Enhancv tips with these Cover letter examples .

You are just a few minutes away from the insider secrets on how to “enter” and shine on the application “stage” with the perfect Cover letter salutation! Ready to dive in?

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You only get 7 seconds to make an outstanding first impression. As the Cover letter is in fact a sales document, the first impression is as crucial as in a meeting. The only difference is that in a Cover letter you can’t rely on the power of your polished, presentable persona, charisma, voice, or non-verbal body language. The only tool you have at your disposal to achieve massive effect is the written words. So you better use it right.

“How can I do that?” - you'd ask. Not to worry, we've got your back, and it is actually easier than it looks. Driving lasting impressions and stirring up interest is going to be entirely in your hands with our blog , which is fully packed with valuable Career advice.

In reality, commanding others ‘attention “from the first read” and sentence boils down to two factors:

  • Your Cover letter design
  • Your Cover letter salutation

These two elements determine for a millisecond the first and sometimes overall impression from your Cover letter.

Attractive design will play totally in your favor, as it is common knowledge that before delving in or reading diagonally any document, we scan it holistically from a bird's eye. Only afterward, our view “falls” on certain “gestalts' – visual details. The main rule here is to make your document pleasant to look at with the right mix of fonts, colors, and overall formatting.

Same with the design, with the introduction, there are several important guidelines one needs to have in mind.

Keep it formal

While you definitely want to come across as a friendly and likable person, when it comes to choosing the opening line, it wouldn’t hurt to be aware that you are not chatting your friends with an offer to go to the movies.

Sticking to the formal, respectful tone that acknowledges the distance between you and your reader (HR and/or Hiring Manager) is your best bet here. Shortening the distance by interjecting informal salutations may actually do you a disservice and create the opposite effect to what you aim for.

Hence, steer clear away from any openings like:

Be polite in your cover letter greeting

Have you heard the expression “Cordiality goes a long way”? Some researchers state that although the salutation “ Dear ” is not too personal and is, in fact, just a formal expression; it typically makes recipients more open to the communication sender.

Whenever you are in doubt about the greeting of your Cover letter, always use “Dear (name)” – this is the golden standard of official business communication. You cannot get that wrong!

Speak like a human to another human

Now let's delve deeper into what can trip you off! Like anyone, HRs are human beings too with their personality and unique individuality. So, they highly value being communicated to like a human, not like being just another part of a depersonalized organization.

This is an important point for you to consider when you turn your Cover letter into a flawless masterpiece. Let's face it, no one really likes generic mails. So when you write your next great Cover letter, write it, with the crystal clear thought that it will be read by humans, not by machines.

Otherwise, you risk “sounding” disinterested, cold, withdrawn, or uninspired for the role in question. Plus, your candidature may be experienced by the receiver like lukewarm water, rather than like the hot stuff that it actually is.

On the contrary, when you address your Cover letter in a way that acknowledges the HRs on a more personal level, you win them at “Hello”! And the good news is that you can do that, no matter if you know the HRs name or not (and you cannot find it).

Let's cover those two scenarios, so you are prepared in all possible cases!

Cover letter salutation if you know the hiring manager's name

Know the name of the responsible recruiter for that job ad you've got your eye on?! Sweet! Lucky you! Then you have an ace, and you definitely have to use it!

Start your Cover letter with a formal, polite, yet personal greeting including the name of the HR or Hiring Manager.

A few things to keep in mind, though!

Make sure to do a preliminary check of the first and last name of the contact person!"!

If you proceed with a semi-formal greeting after your company research and you have identified that the organizational culture allows it (for example in a start-up), you can just address the person by their first name:

  • Dear Antoana,

Those will do just fine!

Pay attention that the comma always comes after the name and not before it!)

However, if you go for the very formal communication style (for example for a Corporate or Governmental organization with a strict hierarchical structure), you d best use this format of salutation with the person s surname:

  • Dear Mr. Salomez,
  • Dear Mrs. Perruci,

When you use Mr., Mrs., and Ms. and the person has a first name from which you cannot identify their gender, do your proper Google research.

If that doesn’t retrieve any clear results either, it may be a good idea to check if you can identify the person on the company's website or on their social network channels (like LinkedIn). In case that also proves fruitless, it might be worth considering using the semi-formal format:

NB! It is not a common practice, but some hiring managers and applicants may use Mx. as a gender-neutral title. So note such versions:

  • Dear Mx. Richardson,

If the contact person is a woman and you are not sure of her marital status, you can use a marital-neutral title Ms.

Dear Ms. Petrova,

Go calmly with the title Mrs. only when you know for sure that the woman you are addressing is married:

Dear Mrs. Todorova,

Cover letter salutation for an unknown recipient

Your first resort should be to at least try to find out the name of the HR.

So what if you've searched in the ad on the job board, on the company website, and on their socials, but in vain?! Take heart! In that case, it is totally acceptable if you get in touch with the company – either by phone or email, express interest in the job role and kindly ask whom from the HR team you should address your application. And voilà! Then you just apply the above rules!

If that also doesn’t work for whatever reason, there's a smart way out, but how you approach it – can make or break your Cover letter!

The best way is to address it to the whole HR department while avoiding generalizations like the plague.

Example of a good greeting :

  • Dear HR Team,
  • Dear Hiring Manager,
  • Dear HR Professional,

Addressing the team still sounds professional and on point, without putting you in the treacherous waters of writing blurry, uncertain, generic Cover letter greetings like:

  • Dear Sir or Madam

Moreover, career experts believe that by using Dear HR Team , your Cover letter is much more likely to be forwarded faster to the right contact in the organization.

Why exactly does personalization in the job application matter so much?

In the times of rapidly developing personal and professional branding industries, generic is no longer a virtue. The more differentiated image a company or a job applicant has, the more he or she will be perceived as a rare find.

If aside from a strong personal and professional persona, the candidate demonstrates a profound ability to connect, well – that makes him or her already an over-the-top Acer.

Here exactly comes the meaning of using wise personalization in your Cover letter to establish a connection with the HRs in two aspects:

  • Personalization by revealing, without oversharing, some details and relevant hobbies you have, that represent you in a more social and friendly manner;
  • Personalization by respecting your recipient’s identity and individuality via addressing them by their name.

On a side note, let us make a disclaimer here – the fact that you personalize your Cover letter and know the individual contact of the HR does not mean you should start spamming them with questions for the position on LinkedIn or via email.

Or else – you risk dimming the good impression you have already created by your eye-catcher Cover letter.

Now that you have aced the game of writing a great connector Cover letter, let's take a look at a shortlist of a NO-NO Salutation of Cover letters that are dead-end for your application:

  • To whom it may concern

In this article, you learned that you need to:

  • Harness both the power of Design and professional Salutation to attract the HR to read further;
  • Keep a formal, polite, yet friendly tone that lets your personality shine, without over sharing;
  • Write genuinely for humans;
  • Always address the HR by their name, if it is mentioned in the job ad;
  • Try to find the right contact person, if you tonight know it;
  • Use “Dear (first name)” or “Dear (Mr., Mrs., Ms., Mx. surname)” - when in doubt about what tone you should keep;
  • Use marital-neutral title Ms., if the HR is a woman and you are not sure if she is married or not; otherwise, you can go with Mrs.;
  • Consider the gender-neutral title (Dear) Mx., in case you are not sure of the recipient's gender;
  • Avoid at all costs the vague and impersonal “To whom it may concern” or “Dear Sir or Madam”.

Did we get you turned on for crafting your very own stunning Cover letter?! Then check how you can do that with ease and class in our Cover letter help section!

Also keep an eye on our blog, as we regularly upload new articles to empower you to manage your career like a PRO.

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How to Address a Cover Letter to Recruiter or Hiring Manager

5 min read · Updated on November 24, 2021

Lisa Tynan

Knowing how to effectively address a cover letter makes you a very visible and appealing candidate.

Did you know that the cardinal rule of cover letters is personalization? It impresses a hiring manager or recruiter because it tells them you took time to research the specific information for the letter rather than sending a generic version.

What many people forget, however, is that the greeting or salutation in a cover letter must also be personalized with the hiring professional's first and last name whenever possible.

There are several effective ways to find the hiring manager's name for your greeting — and some acceptable back-up strategies when you can't. Either way, knowing how to address a cover letter effectively can prevent you from ending your hiring chances before they even begin. 

When you know the hiring manager's name

More often than not, you'll be given the name of the hiring professional or the manager that you'll work for. Whoever it is, use their full name (first and last name) in the greeting. 

If you cannot definitively tell the gender of the hiring person, do not use a gender-based title such as “Mr.” or “Ms.” in the greeting. Instead just use the person's full name.

For example, Alex Johnson could be male or female. To avoid a gender mistake, use Dear Alex Johnson, Hello Alex Johnson, or simply Alex Johnson .

However, professional titles such as “Professor” or “Dr.” are definitely acceptable as a cover letter salutation and should be used as a sign of respect. Be on the lookout for these and other titles to include.

How to find a hiring manager's name for your cover letter

If you're not given the name of the hiring manager, here are some effective ways to discover their name by using:

The job description: Check this document for the hiring manager's name. While it's not generally listed, you never know. If it's not obvious, there's also a trick to quickly discover an email in the job description that might contain the name; while in the document, press Ctrl +F or run Command + F and search for the @ symbol.

An email address: If you discover an email address, it may not have a full name but rather a first initial and last name or just a first name like [email protected] or [email protected] . A Google search combining the person's name as shown in the email and the company name might find you the person's full name.

 A LinkedIn post: A name connected to the LinkedIn job posting is probably that of the hiring professional who posted it, so use that name in your greeting.

The supervisor's title: It's more likely that a job description will list who the new hire will report to — such as the director of accounting — without listing a name. In this case, there are several search options:

Search the company's website for listings of staff members by title.

Run an advanced LinkedIn or Google search for all directors of accounting at that specific company.

Check with your network for someone who might know the person's name or search the appropriate professional networking sites.

Contact the company by phone or email. Tell them you're applying for [job title] and want to address your cover letter to the right person.

In the end, this research can be the difference between making a great first impression and getting noticed for the position — or getting totally ignored by the hiring manager. 

Acceptable options in lieu of a name

If you try the steps above and come up empty, there are still some alternative greeting options that will put you in a professional light.

The idea is to show that you've read the job description and tailored your greeting based on the company department where the job is located, the hiring manager's title, or the team with which you'll potentially work.

Some good examples include:

Dear Head of Design

Hello IT Department

Dear Accounting Manager

To Company ABC Recruiter/Hiring Professional

Hello Marketing Hiring Team

Dear Customer Support Hiring Group

Dear Human Resources

If you still can't find any specific name or department information, go with “Dear Hiring Manager.” It sounds professional and it's not gender-specific. In fact, a recent survey of over 2000 companies by Saddleback College showed that 40 percent preferred “Dear Hiring Manager” as the best greeting when a manager's name can't be found. 

“Dear Sir or Madam” is another option that works because it's gender-neutral and respectful. However, it sounds a bit old-fashioned and may signal a hiring professional that you're an older worker or just not aware of other greeting options. It's perfectly acceptable, but the better choice is “Dear Hiring Manager.” 

In the end, an actual name or any of the alternative examples will let you stand out from the crowd, so do your best to find and use those whenever you can.

Never leave the greeting blank

Whatever information you may or may not find, it's important to never leave your greeting line blank.

A blank greeting line can make you come across as lazy or rude, or imply that you simply don't understand how to write a cover letter — all of which will immediately put you out of contention for the job. There's no reason to leave the greeting blank when there are so many options that can be used effectively.

When you spend the time and effort to personalize your cover letter, you don't want to come across as “just another candidate” by using a generic greeting or no greeting at all.

A personalized greeting will impress any hiring professional, increasing the chance they'll read your entire cover letter — and ask you for an interview.

Not sure if your cover letter is cutting it? Our writers don't just help you with your resume . 

Recommended Reading:

Do Hiring Managers Actually Read Cover Letters?

5 Things to Say in Your Cover Letter If You Want to Get the Job

How To Write a Cover Letter (With Example)

Related Articles:

How to Create a Resume With No Education

From Bland to Beautiful: How We Made This Professional's Resume Shine

See how your resume stacks up.

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10 Best Ways To Address A Cover Letter Without A Name

  • Cover Letter Format
  • Salutation and Greeting
  • Who To Address When Unknown
  • How To Start A Cover Letter
  • How To End A Cover Letter
  • Best Cover Letter Font And Size
  • Cover Letter Spacing
  • Cover Letter Length
  • Key Elements Of A Cover Letter
  • How To Write An Address
  • Official Letter Format
  • Cover Letter Opening

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Cover letters consume a fair amount of time in the application process, as the more personalized they are, the better. With the majority of the application process being automated and online now, the hiring manager ’s name can end up being an unknown quantity. If you don’t know the hiring manager’s name and don’t know what to do, then this article will help you.

If the hiring manager’s name is unknown, then you have a few options. The best, of course, is to find out what their name is and address the letter to them. But if that all fails, then there are proper ways to address a cover letter to an unknown recipient.

Key Takeaways:

Try to find the name of the person you are addressing using the job listing, company website, or contacting the company.

Don’t assume someone’s martial status and avoid using “Miss” and “Mrs.” whenever possible.

Avoid assuming gender, even if you do know the person’s name.

Use a professional and appropriate greeting and avoid sounding like you would when addressing your friend.

Who to Address Cover Letter To if Unknown

How to address a cover letter if you don’t know the recipient’s name

Why is addressing a cover letter correctly important, how to find out who to address your cover letter to, example cover letter, addressing a cover letter faq, final thoughts, expert opinion.

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There are a few rules to follow when addressing a cover letter: be professional, polite, and concise. That means that even if you don’t know the recipient’s name, you want to maintain the same professional tone in the letter and avoid overly stilted language or being too informal.

Here are some guidelines to follow when addressing a cover letter:

If you can find out the hiring manager’s name, do so. That means that you should spend time looking over the company website, checking LinkedIn profiles, or even calling the company.

Don’t assume the hiring manager’s gender. This is especially true when you don’t know their name. But even if you do find out the person’s name, avoid gendered language until you’re sure how they identify. Some people will put preferred pronouns in email signatures or on their LinkedIn profiles, so it might be a good idea to check.

Maintain a professional tone. There’s a common style and formality to business letters. Make sure that your cover letter has that tone. it’s different than a letter you’d write to a friend, and being too familiar with your writing can be off-putting to hiring managers.

Avoid assuming the person’s title. This applies to both marital status, such as using Mrs. or Miss, but also whether they have a doctorate. In general, unless this is someone you know, avoid using either Mrs. or Miss, because it can cause offense, even if used correctly.

Make sure you include a salutation. Even if you don’t know who you’re addressing, leaving one off entirely can end up either looking like a mistake or that you didn’t personalize the letter at all.

Be as specific as possible. Even if you can’t find out exactly who the hiring manager is, make sure to be specific in your greeting. Use Dear Marketing Hiring Manager rather than just Dear Hiring Manager if you’re applying for a marketing position.

Also, while HR is most often in charge of hiring, it’s best not to just address the HR department unless you know that they’re the ones who’ll be in charge of your application. Not every business has HR take care of all hiring tasks, especially if it’s a smaller company.

Examples of how to address a cover letter:

Dear Sir or Madam

Dear Hiring Manager

Dear Talent Acquisition Team

Dear [Company Name] HR Department

Dear [Company name] Hiring Manager

Dear Human Resources Manager

Dear Human Resources Department

Dear [Company Name] Recruiter

Dear [Department Name] Hiring Manager

Dear [Department Name] Hiring Team

Here are some examples of how NOT to address a cover letter:

Good Morning

To Whom It May Concern

Dear Mrs. Smith

Hi Sebastian!

Hey Sales Team

Addressing a cover letter correctly shows professionalism, diligence, and politeness. All of these are good for an employee to have and show you to be someone that’s worth investing further time in. While finding the proper person to address can be a chore, it helps you in several ways because:

Hiring managers get myriad applications. Remember that you aren’t the only one applying for a job. While you want to make your application stand out from the crowd if you can, you don’t want to stand out in a negative way — that’ll ensure you don’t get the job.

Individual people ultimately decide who gets hired. While the application process can feel faceless, formless, and impersonal, there are actual people at these companies that sort through resumes . And people form first impressions.

It shows that you’re willing to go the extra mile. Think about what the admired traits are in employees. If you’re willing to put in the additional effort or work to get a superior result, then that’s the sort of employee companies want to have to work for them.

It’s less impersonal. Of course the hiring process is somewhat impersonal. You’re petitioning people you don’t know and that don’t know you. But if you address a letter to Dear Hiring Manager, it doesn’t have the same effect as addressing it directly to the person.

Despite the importance of properly addressing a cover letter, not every company makes it easy for applicants to do. If the hiring manager’s name isn’t immediately apparent, then there are some other options open to you before addressing the cover letter to an unknown recipient.

Check the job listing. One simple way is to look at the application and double-check that the hiring manager’s name isn’t on the main listing. Sometimes the information isn’t on the application, but rather on the job listing. If it isn’t there you will then have to start doing a little bit more investigative work.

Check LinkedIn. You can check on LinkedIn and on the company’s website to find the hiring manager’s name. If nothing shows up, then you will have to start contacting someone at the company to find out.

Contact the company. Now, this does not mean you should contact some random person at the company who lists the company’s name on their profile. Find the contact information for the HR department, for someone who works in HR, or for the head of the department you are trying to work in and ask them if they know the name of the hiring manager for your application.

Sometimes, they will not give this information, simply so that the hiring manager can stay anonymous and not get a billion emails from applicants. This situation is more likely to happen with massive companies like Google or Apple.

If they give you a name, use it. If they don’t, then you will have to then move on to the next step of figuring out how to address a cover letter to an unknown person.

How to write a cover letter

Dear Sales Team Hiring Manager, As a fan of XYZ Inc.’s impressive technology products, I was ecstatic to see an opening for a Junior Sales Representative . After reading the job description, I am confident that I’m the right person for the job. With 4 years of experience selling cloud computing products and services, I would bring a unique perspective to the role. In my current role as a Sales Representative at ABC Corp., I’ve created technology presentations for all my clients, driving interest in new product sales and subscriptions by 84% year-over-year. Additionally, I’ve reduced the cost of customer acquisition by over 15% and consistently topped sales quotas by over 20% since starting at ABC. I know XYZ has amazing products and services that I would be honored to promote and sell. With my background in cloud computing, I would be able to hit the ground running and communicate your product’s benefits to customers. Please contact me if you have any further questions about my application or resume. I look forward to speaking with the Sales Team more about the role in an interview. Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely, Malia Freeman [email protected] 555-777-9999

How do you address a cover letter to an unknown recipient?

Address your cover letter to “Hiring Manager” or “[Department Name] Hiring Manager.” Always do whatever you can to try to find the name of the person you’re addressing, but if you can’t, address it to the generic position or team you’re trying to get in contact with.

Is To Whom It May Concern rude?

Yes, To Whom It May Concern can be considered rude. Not everyone will agree that it’s rude, but many people do find it rude, or at least impersonal and lazy on a cover letter, so it’s best to avoid this greeting

Is it okay to use Dear Hiring Manager?

Yes, it is okay to use Dear Hiring Manager as a cover letter greeting. It’s always best to address your cover letter to someone by name if you can find it, but many times you can’t. In this case, “Dear Hiring Manager,” is an appropriate greeting.

Who is the best person to address a cover letter to?

The best person to address a cover letter to would be the hiring manager. This should be their first and last name if you know it, but “dear hiring manager” is acceptable if you are unsure of their name.

The rule of thumb was to use titles such as Mr. or Ms. However, it’s also important not to assume the hiring manager’s gender. If you don’t know the person’s preferred pronouns, then it’s best to just use their full name.

If you don’t know the recipient’s name, how would you close the letter?

Sincerely or Regards are considered formal, professional closings for letters. If you’re writing a cover letter to someone you don’t know, it’s best to remain professional and polite. A sign-off such as best wishes will likely come off as too familiar.

If you are applying for a job and writing a cover letter, make sure you take the time to look over all the details in the cover letter. Not taking the time to look for the recipient of a cover letter or using a professional greeting will look lazy. ​ Your greeting is a small part of the cover letter. However, it’s one of the most important pieces because it’s the first thing the hiring managers will read. Using an appropriate generic greeting will set the tone for your cover letter, making you sound professional and willing to put in the effort to make your cover letter flawless. ​ Now that you know how to address a cover letter if the reader is the recipient is unknown, check out our other articles about cover letters and the job application process.

Applying for jobs can be stressful and tedious, but taking the time to learn tips on how to improve your application will help put you one step closer to landing your dream job .

Georgetown – Writing Cover Letters for Government

  • Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown

cover letter dear mrs

Vimari Roman Career Strategist Coach Be Productive Coaching

My recommendation is to always send a customized cover letter when applying for any job and when in doubt, address your letter to the hiring team using “Dear Hiring Team.” In most cases the application will end up on a recruiter’s or an HR Business Partner’s desk, and if they like your cover letter and resume, then they will pass it on to the hiring manager or the hiring team. By addressing your letter to the “team” you’ve got everyone covered and they will all feel as if the letter was written directly to them.

Expert Tip To Find Contact Infoformation

cover letter dear mrs

Sally Mikhail Founder of Recruit Petra LLC

Use LinkedIn to find out who to address your cover letter to you with a search of company personnel on the company careers page . However, if you are sending out a cover letter to an unknown hiring influence, you can address it to “Dear Hiring Team” or “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown Tip

cover letter dear mrs

Chelsea Jay Certified Resume Writer and Career Coach

Make sure that you review the company’s “About Me” or “Staff” to view their leaders which often lists direct managers, HR professionals, and executive leadership staff. If you know what department you’ll be working for, I recommend addressing the leader of that department. If the website is for a larger organization and does not list individual staff, I recommend utilizing LinkedIn. You can do a quick company search and find employees who are currently working there. You may even find the original posting with the hiring manager’s name attached.

If you cannot find the hiring manager’s name based on the posting, I recommend taking time to learn more about the specific department you’ll be working in. For example, if you discover that you’ll be working in the Communications department, the next step would be to learn about the specific team you’ll be part of. If you find out that it is the Public Affairs team, I encourage you to address “Public Affairs Team” at the beginning of your cover letter.

If you’re up for a bolder approach that is sure to get attention, address someone on the executive leadership team. I recommend addressing the President or Vice President of the organization (they should be easy to find since they are often the “face” of the organization). Of course, address them with a salutation along with their first name, last name, and title. In the beginning of the cover letter make sure to distinguish what department and position you are applying for. For example, Dear Mr. John Smith, President.

As an applicant, your goal is to stand out and showcase that you are informed and willing to go the extra mile (by doing research!).

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Heidi Cope is a former writer for the Zippia Career Advice blog. Her writing focused primarily on Zippia's suite of rankings and general career advice. After leaving Zippia, Heidi joined The Mighty as a writer and editor, among other positions. She received her BS from UNC Charlotte in German Studies.

Matt Warzel a President of a resume writing firm (MJW Careers, LLC) with 15+ years of recruitment, outplacement, career coaching and resume writing experience. Matt is also a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR) with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Marketing Focus) from John Carroll University.

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Sender's Address in a Cover Letter

Salutation in a cover letter, if you know the person's name:.

When applying for a job, it is very important to know the name of the addressee and address him/her personally.

Dear Ms / Miss / Mrs / Mr / Dr + Nachname

Example: Dear Mr Miller

Dear first name + surname

Example: Dear Chris Miller

If you don't know the person's name:

If despite all efforts you cannot find out the addressee's name, the only possibility is to use one of the following salutations:

Punctuation after the Salutation

In British English, don't use any punctuation mark or use a comma.

Example: Dear Mr Miller or Dear Mr Miller,

In American English, use a colon:

Example: Dear Mr. Miller:

Ms, Miss or Mrs?

  • Mrs – to address a married woman
  • Miss – to address an unmarried woman (rarely used now)
  • Ms – to address a woman whose marital status you don't know; also used to address an unmarried woman

Note : The abrreviations Mr, Mrs etc. are usually written without full stops (Mr) in British English and with full stops (Mr.) in American English.

How to Address a Woman in a Cover Letter

Have you ever wondered how to address a woman in a cover letter if you’re unsure of her marital status? Should you include her maiden name or suffix? Should you be formal or informal?

Addressing women properly is a common challenge even for experienced writers. A cover letter is a formal business communication, which means that it is more appropriate to use formal salutations.

Writing a cover letter can be testing. Not only does it need to stand out among the other applicants, but you must sound professional and address your potential employer by their gender. But how do you know what the right way is to address women?

In this article, we’re going to discover how to address a cover letter to a woman, and take a closer look at some general dear sir or madam cover letter tips.

How to Address a Cover Letter to a Woman: Ms.

When you’re unsure on how to address a woman in a cover letter, you can always rely on the trusty ‘’Ms.’’ title, followed by the hiring manager’s surname. This is the safe option as it allows you to avoid the mistake of incorrectly referring to her as ‘’Miss’’ or ‘’Mrs.’’ Trust us, referring to an unmarried woman as Mrs. or vice versa does not end well.

How to Address a Cover Letter to a Woman: Miss

Miss refers to a woman who isn’t married. If you’re going to use this title, ensure you do your research on the job posting itself and see if this title is listed anywhere. If you can’t find her title, try the company’s website and look on the ‘our team’ page to see if she’s listed there. If she isn’t? Well, go back to the safe option and use ‘’Ms.’’

How to Address a Cover Letter to a Woman: Mrs.

Finally, we have the all-famous Mrs. followed by her last name. Again, check out the job advertisement to ensure this is what she is referred to. If you don’t already know, Mrs. refers to a woman who is married or has kept her maiden name. Do your research, and if you’re still unsure, use ‘’Ms.’’

How to Address a Cover Letter to a Woman: First Name

You may find that on some occasions, you’re going to need to contact the employer before you send your cover letter. Once you have made that initial point of contact, the hiring manager may tell you to call her by her first name. If you do experience this, you can go ahead and address her by her first name in your cover letter as well.

Dear Sir or Madam Cover Letters – General Tips

dear sir or madam

Tip #1 If You Don’t Know the Hiring Manager – Guess

You could research all day and still not find anything about the hiring manager – it simply doesn’t exist online. If this is the case, then try and find a list of executives that work for the company. For example, you can use the head of the department for the position in which you’re applying for. At the end of the day, nobody is going to blame you for addressing the letter to somebody higher up.

Tip #2 Use a Formal Full Name Salutation

Phrases like ‘‘To Whom it May Concern’’ and Dear Sir or Madam cover letters are so overused, and way too generic. Remember, this is your opportunity to make a great impression, so make sure you show the company you did your research and find the name of your hiring manager. You could even try picking up the phone and simply asking who is in charge of the job posting.

In addition to this, if you’re 100 % sure that the culture of the company is a bit more casual, you can go ahead and use phrases like ‘’Hello’’ or, ‘’Dear’’ followed up by the managers first and last name.

Tip #3: Try to be Specific

Extensive searches, hours wasted, and you still can’t find anything, not even a single name – don’t worry. In this case, the company knows what it’s doing in terms of keeping the post and its employees private.

In this scenario, try your best to still be as specific as possible. You can use the heads title, depending on what kind of role you have applied for. Things like ‘’Marketing Manager’’ or ‘’Sales Manager’’ should be enough, and will show that you have written your cover letter with a certain audience in mind.

Still not sure how to address a woman in a cover letter? Let our text robot do the work for you !

Karen Maristani

Karen invented writing, the airplane, and the internet. She was also the first person to reach the North Pole. She has flown to Mars and back in one day, and was enthusiastically greeted by Aliens. She has also worked as a copywriter and journalist for many years and has helped hundreds of people writing the perfect job application.

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Business Letter Writing: Mrs, Miss or Ms?

How should you address a woman when you write a letter or email to her? Will she be offended if you write “Dear Madam” or “Dear Mrs + surname”?

Over the last few years, there have been some changes in standard greetings, and here are some general guidelines to help you choose between the three standard titles: Mrs, Miss, Ms.

Mrs, Miss, Ms?

The old distinction between married (“Mrs + surname”) and unmarried (“Miss + surname”) is generally irrelevant in business letters. As it doesn’t matter if a woman is married or not, use “Ms + surname”. Ms is pronounced (Mizz) and is used for all women.

For example:

“Dear Ms Jones”

If you are replying to a letter in which the woman has written her name as “Mrs + surname”, then it is fine to reply to her using “Mrs + her surname”.

“Dear Mrs Jones

Thank you for your letter…”

However, as explained above, if you receive a letter where the first name and surname are given, reply with “Dear Ms + surname”.

“Dear Ms Jones”.

We don’t generally write “Dear Miss + surname” to women – unless they have already written to you and ended their letter with this title. So if you receive a letter from a woman who has signed it “Miss + surname”, you can also use “Miss + surname” in your reply.

“Dear Miss Jones

Thank you for your enquiry about …”

If you are writing to a person in a company whose name you don’t know, you can start with “Dear Sir / Madam”. (This is because you don’t know if you’re writing to a man or a woman.)

“Dear Sir / Madam

I’m enclosing my CV for your attention…”

If you know for sure that the person is a woman (but you don’t know her name) you can write “Dear Madam”.

Avoid these other mistakes

1. Don’t write “Dear Mrs” on it own without any name afterwards. Remember: after titles like Mr, Mrs or Ms, we need a surname.

2. Don’t write “Dear Ms”, “Dear Miss” or “Dear Mrs” followed by the first name.

3. Don’t write “Dear Madame”.

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How to Address a Business or Professional Letter

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Letter Greeting Examples

Finding a contact person.

  • When You Don't Have a Contact Person

How to Address the Envelope

Professional communication skills.

In this era of texting and direct messages, it's sometimes hard to remember everything you learned in school about writing formal letters. You might go years in your career without having to write more than a  professional-looking email . However, professional letter writing is an important skill when you're job hunting, career networking, or sending other business-related correspondence.

When it comes to job searching, you need to pull out all the stops in looking professional. Casual just won't do when you're trying to impress a hiring manager and stand out from your competition. The first thing a potential employer sees is how the letter is addressed, so following the proper rules of addressing a letter or professional correspondence is essential for your career-related and business communications.

First and foremost, when you’re writing a letter or sending an email message for employment or business purposes, it's important to use formal language when addressing the individual you are writing to unless you know them extremely well.

If you’re unsure if you should use a formal or casual (first name) form of address, err on the side of professionalism and use the formal designation.

How to Address a Letter: Mr., Dr., Ms., or Mrs.

The appropriate title to use when writing to a man is Mr. For a woman, use Ms., even if you know the addressee's marital status. Ms. is more professional than  Miss or Mrs , which may appear to be outdated.

For a medical doctor or someone with a Ph.D., use Dr. as a title. Alternatively, you can also use “Professor” if you are writing to a university or college faculty member.

If you don't know the gender identity of the person you're addressing, use a gender-neutral greeting and simply include their first and last name, e.g., "Dear Tristan Dolan."

Many letter salutations are appropriate for business and employment-related correspondence, including:

  • Dear Mr. Smith
  • Dear Ms. Markham
  • Dear Kiley Doe
  • Dear Dr. Haven
  • Dear Professor Jones

Follow the greeting with a colon or comma, then use a line break and start the first paragraph of your letter. For example:

Dear Mr. Smith:

The first paragraph of the letter.

Alison Czinkota Â© The Balance 2018

You don't need to know the name of the person you're addressing, but it doesn't hurt, and in fact, it can make a positive impression especially if you're trying to score a job interview. Using a name can be a challenge as employers often fail to provide a contact name in a job advertisement, especially on large job search sites.

It’s worth trying to find the contact person because taking the time to discover that person's name will demonstrate personal initiative. It also shows an attention to detail that will speak well for you when your resume is being reviewed.

The best way to find the name of a contact at the company is to ask. If you're networking your way into a position, ask your network contact for the name and email address of the best person to talk to about the position. Barring that, call the main number of the company and ask the receptionist for the name and contact information of the human resources (HR) manager in charge of hiring (or the head of the such-and-such department, etc.).

If neither of those methods works, you can often uncover the information you're seeking by doing a little internet sleuthing. Start with the company's website and look for listed personnel. You'll often see an HR contact on the personnel page or company directory.

If that doesn't yield results, it's time to hit LinkedIn and do an advanced search for job titles and company names. In the process, you might even find another connection to the person you're looking for. That’s never a bad thing when you're trying to get a human being to look at your resume.

Sample Letter With a Contact Person

FirstName LastName Your Address Your City, State Zip Code Your Phone Number Your Email

Contact Name Title Company Name Address City, State Zip Code

Dear Mr./Ms. LastName,

I’m writing regarding your university’s upcoming student career networking event. I am interested in reserving a booth because we are looking to hire two new designers. 

The name of our company is Blue Fox Designs, and I would like to connect with some of your design and art students who will be graduating this year. We focus on contemporary home interior design and decoration. 

Please let me know if you have room at your event. You can email me at myname@anemail.com or call my cell phone at 555-555-5555.

Signature (for a hard copy letter)

Your Typed Name

When You Don't Have a Contact Person

If you don't have a contact person at the company, either leave off the salutation from your cover letter and start with the first paragraph or use a  general salutation . For example:

  • To Whom It May Concern
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear Human Resources Manager
  • Dear Sir or Madam ( be careful about using this one, it can sound antiquated )

Follow the general salutation with a colon, just like this:

Dear Hiring Manager:

Sample Letter Without a Contact Person

I am writing to inquire about the possibility of any job openings at Woodlynn Publishing. Specifically, I’m looking for a position as an administrative assistant. I have six years of experience as an administrative assistant at Wedgewood Realty in North Grove, but I’ll be moving to your area next month so I’m seeking a new position.

If you do have any opportunities available, please let me know. I’ve attached my resume for your consideration. My current manager, John Anderson, and two of my colleagues are very willing to provide references to attest to my qualifications.

You can contact me at myname@myemail.com or by phone at 555-555-5555. I look forward to hearing from you.

Use a business-sized (#10) envelope for all mailed correspondence, folding your letter into thirds.

  • Your return address ( name, street address, city, state, and zip code ) should be on the top left of the envelope.
  • Ensure that the recipient's name and address ( contact person, company, street address, city, state, and zip code ) are centered on the envelope.
  • Put the postage stamp on the top right corner of the envelope.

Properly addressing a business or professional letter isn’t a skill you’ll only need when you’re searching for jobs. Once you're employed, there will be times when you'll need to write letters that require  formal addresses and salutations .

IMAGES

  1. Dear Ms Or Mrs Cover Letter

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  2. Cover Letter Dear Mr Mrs

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  3. Dear Mr Mrs Cover Letter

    cover letter dear mrs

  4. Mrs ms cover letter

    cover letter dear mrs

  5. Cover Letter Salutation: 15+ Examples of Greetings

    cover letter dear mrs

  6. Dear Mr Mrs Cover Letter

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VIDEO

  1. A letter to my dear viewers (1/3)

  2. The Guilloteens

  3. Ms, Mrs, Mr, and what??

  4. A letter to my dear viewers (3/3)

  5. Flip Cartridge

  6. ازاى نبعت ميل فورمال بكل سهولة ( how can we send a formal mail )

COMMENTS

  1. How to Choose the Right Greeting for Your Cover Letter

    When to Use 'Dear' in a Cover Letter . It is appropriate to use "Dear" in most circumstances, such as when the potential employer is someone you know well, or they are a business acquaintance. ... Even if you know a woman is married, it is safer to use "Ms." as opposed to "Mrs.," as the latter may be offensive in certain ...

  2. How to Address a Cover Letter (With Examples)

    The headline on the image says, "Cover letter format" A woman sits at a table writing on a piece of paper. There's a simple cover letter represented by lines. On one side of the cover letter, there are labels for the sections of the cover letter. The labels are: 1. Date and contact information 2. Salutation/greeting 3. First, introduce yourself 4.

  3. Cover Letter Salutation: 15+ Examples of Greetings

    3. Keep it professional. Starting a cover letter with "Dear" is polite without being too formal, which is what makes it a good choice. Greetings that are overly casual are inappropriate for a cover letter salutation and should be avoided. Here are some examples of inappropriate greetings for a cover letter: Unprofessional greetings. "Hey,".

  4. How to Address Your Cover Letter in 2023

    Rule #1: Address your cover letter to the hiring manager using a formal, full-name salutation (if possible). For a cover letter, you should always default to addressing it to the hiring manager for the position you're applying to. Unless you know for sure that the culture of the company is more casual, use the hiring manager's first and ...

  5. How to Address a Cover Letter (and Who to Address)

    For example, "Reverend" and "Rev." are both fine. Here are some examples of a few different ways to address your cover letter: Dear Sam Jones, Dear Mx. Lopez, Dear Ms. Patel, Dear Prof. Tsai, If you're addressing your cover letter with "Dear" you should always use the hiring manager's last name.

  6. How to Address a Cover Letter: A 2022 Guide with 10+ Examples

    And if your cover letter does not have a subject line, it will not show in the hiring manager's list. Here is an example cover letter subject line : Subject line: Job Application for Video Editor Position, Ref: Hanna Moore. 2. Address the Cover Letter in the Correct Way.

  7. Cover Letter Salutation: Tips and Examples

    A cover letter salutation is the greeting that you use at the start of a cover letter. When you are writing a professional cover letter to include with your resume for a job application, the salutation you use should be a formal one. Since it is the first thing the recipient sees when they read the cover letter, it should be appropriately respectful and use the correct title and name.

  8. How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

    Mary Garcia 12 Rogers Avenue Townville, New Hampshire 03060 555-555-5555 [email protected]. February 17, 2021. Franklin Lee. CBI Industries 39 Main Street Townville, New Hampshire 03060. Dear Mr. Lee: I was excited to see your ad for the operations assistant position in your Townville offices.

  9. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024

    Dear Human Resources Recruitment Team, Alternatively, if you don't have enough information either about the department or the team, you can opt for addressing the cover letter directly to the company's hiring staff, as follows: Dear [Company Name] Hiring Team. Dear [Company Name] Recruiting Staff.

  10. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024 (with Examples)

    Ditch the cover letter salutation and start with your first paragraph. Expert Hint: Avoid Hello, Hi, Dear Sir or Madam, and To Whom It May Concern letters. They come off lazy and spammy. 3. Duck These Blunders in Addressing a Cover Letter "Dear Mrs. Bisonnette," Hey, my name's Jim! Avoid these common, deadly how to address a cover letter ...

  11. How To Address a Cover Letter

    As with cover letters sent in a more traditional manner, the salutation you use in your emailed cover letter should be professional and accurate. If you know the name of the person you're sending your cover letter to, address the letter to them using either their full name or 'Mr.' or 'Ms.' followed by their first and last name.

  12. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2024: Complete Guide

    Addressing a cover letter with "Hello" or "Hi" is a tad too informal for many companies. 2. Using Dear Sir or Madam. WRONG. Dear Sir or Madam, Don't use Dear Sir or Madam even if you're not sure who to address a cover letter to. It's a very outdated phrase, and it will make you look lazy.

  13. How to Write a Memorable Cover Letter Salutation

    Sep 8, 2022 • 9 min read. Quick Answer: "To write an outstanding cover letter salutation, keep it formal yet polite. Start with ""Dear (name)"" if you know the name of the HR or hiring manager. Use ""Dear HR Team"" or ""Dear Hiring Manager"" if the recipient is unknown. Always personalize the salutation to establish a connection and avoid ...

  14. How To Address A Cover Letter (With Examples)

    In the body. The first line of your email should address the recipient, which differs slightly from paper cover letters. In cover letters, you usually add a header that includes your name and contact information, the date, and the recipient's name and contact information. After addressing the recipient, you can add your full cover letter in the ...

  15. How to Address a Cover Letter to Recruiter or Hiring Manager

    Instead just use the person's full name. For example, Alex Johnson could be male or female. To avoid a gender mistake, use Dear Alex Johnson, Hello Alex Johnson, or simply Alex Johnson. However, professional titles such as "Professor" or "Dr." are definitely acceptable as a cover letter salutation and should be used as a sign of respect.

  16. 10 Best Ways To Address A Cover Letter Without A Name

    Not every business has HR take care of all hiring tasks, especially if it's a smaller company. Examples of how to address a cover letter: Dear Sir or Madam. Dear Hiring Manager. Dear Talent Acquisition Team. Dear [Company Name] HR Department. Dear [Company name] Hiring Manager. Dear Human Resources Manager.

  17. Cover Letter

    Salutation in a Cover Letter If you know the person's name: When applying for a job, it is very important to know the name of the addressee and address him/her personally. Dear Ms / Miss / Mrs / Mr / Dr + Nachname. Example: Dear Mr Miller. Dear first name + surname. Example: Dear Chris Miller

  18. How to Address a Woman in a Cover Letter

    How to Address a Cover Letter to a Woman: Mrs. ... Dear Sir or Madam Cover Letters - General Tips. Tip #1 If You Don't Know the Hiring Manager - Guess. You could research all day and still not find anything about the hiring manager - it simply doesn't exist online. If this is the case, then try and find a list of executives that work ...

  19. Letter and Email Salutations Examples (Plus Tips)

    Here are some salutations you can use for a cover letter. Dear [First and last name], Dear Mr. [Last name], Dear Ms. [Last name], Dear Dr. [Last name], Dear Prof. ... Ms. If you're unsure of their pronouns, you can use their first names or full names, depending on the formality of your letter. Example: Dear Mrs. Bloom, Dr. Pauly and Mr. Samson ...

  20. Business Letter Writing: Mrs, Miss or Ms?

    Avoid these other mistakes. 1. Don't write "Dear Mrs" on it own without any name afterwards. Remember: after titles like Mr, Mrs or Ms, we need a surname. 2. Don't write "Dear Ms", "Dear Miss" or "Dear Mrs" followed by the first name. 3. Don't write "Dear Madame". Next: How to Write a Letter or Email to your Boss.

  21. How to Address a Letter

    Many letter salutations are appropriate for business and employment-related correspondence, including: Dear Mr. Smith. Dear Ms. Markham. Dear Kiley Doe. Dear Dr. Haven. Dear Professor Jones. Follow the greeting with a colon or comma, then use a line break and start the first paragraph of your letter. For example:

  22. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    Middle paragraph (s) Closing paragraph. Letter ending and signature. Your cover letter should be one page long and use a simple, professional font, such as Arial or Helvetica, 10 to 12 points in size. Your letter should be left-aligned with single spacing and one-inch margins. Show Transcript.