Brought to you by:

McGraw-Hill Education

The Walt Disney Company

By: Frank T. Rothaermel, Noorein Inamdar, David R. King

The case is set in February 2020 and the protagonist in the case is Disney CEO Bob Chapek. The case examines how Disney grew through the corporate strategies of vertical integration, diversification,…

  • Length: 21 page(s)
  • Publication Date: Feb 27, 2020
  • Discipline: General Management
  • Product #: MH0070-PDF-ENG

What's included:

  • Teaching Note
  • Educator Copy

$4.95 per student

degree granting course

$8.95 per student

non-degree granting course

Get access to this material, plus much more with a free Educator Account:

  • Access to world-famous HBS cases
  • Up to 60% off materials for your students
  • Resources for teaching online
  • Tips and reviews from other Educators

Already registered? Sign in

  • Student Registration
  • Non-Academic Registration
  • Included Materials

The case is set in February 2020 and the protagonist in the case is Disney CEO Bob Chapek. The case examines how Disney grew through the corporate strategies of vertical integration, diversification, and geographic expansion. It also focuses on the technological changes in the media entertainment industry. Impending streaming wars mean Disney will face even more formidable competition that may disrupt its reliance on leveraging billion-dollar franchises. In 2019, Disney closed its $71.3 billion acquisition of 21st Century Fox's entertainment assets. Disney is also rolling out its own new streaming service called Disney+, thus moving into the direct-to-consumer space. At the same time, Apple also announced is new streaming services, Apple TV+. With $60 billion in annual revenues in 2019, The Walt Disney Company is one of the world's largest media companies. As a diversified media company, Disney is active in a wide array of business activities, from movies to amusement parks as well as cable and broadcast television networks (ABC, ESPN, and others), cruises, retailing, and streaming.

Learning Objectives

Strategic Leadership and CEO Succession; Core Competencies; Innovation and Technology Strategy; Ecosystems and Platform Strategy; Vertical Integration; Diversification: Product-Market and Geographic; Economies of Scope; and Implementation of Strategic Initiatives

Feb 27, 2020

Discipline:

General Management

Geographies:

China, United States

Industries:

Media, entertainment, and professional sports

McGraw-Hill Education

MH0070-PDF-ENG

We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve your experience, including personalizing content. Learn More . By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies and revised Privacy Policy .

disney case study solution

The marketplace for case solutions.

Reawakening the Magic: Bob Iger and the Walt Disney Company – Case Solution

Reawakening the Magic: Bob Iger and the Walt Disney Company case study looks at how the company evolved after poor financial results amidst competition.

​David J. Collis and Ashley Hartman Harvard Business Review ( 717483-PDF-ENG ) February 28, 2017

Case questions answered:

  • Assess how effective is Disney’s corporate strategy. (Make sure to apply the different frameworks covered in the materials of this week).
  • What are Disney’s most valuable resources? Explain their role in creating a corporate advantage.
  • Why did Disney need to own Pixar rather than just renewing the contract (even if much less favorable terms for Disney)?

Not the questions you were looking for? Submit your own questions & get answers .

Reawakening the Magic: Bob Iger and the Walt Disney Company Case Answers

Executive summary – reawakening the magic: bob iger and the walt disney company.

In this case, I’ll shed light on the effectiveness of Disney’s corporate strategy whilst discussing the various frameworks that Walt Disney Company has opted for throughout the years.

Such tactical moves are not limited to vertical integration, horizontal integration, geographies, and diversification. And especially how the diversifications that Disney opted for had helped the company achieve synergy. Hence, it is a sustainable competitive advantage.

Also, I’ll be discussing Disney’s most valuable resources through doing a BCG matrix. Finally, I’ll give my insights on the reasons behind Disney’s move to acquire Pixar rather than just renewing the contract.

The case study chronicles incidents and events that happened with Disney under its CEO, Bob Iger. What is more is the set of actions to address the decline in Disney’s corporate image and tumbling stock prices.

Additionally, under the former CEO Michael Isner, the employees suffered from the micromanagement perspective of the entire process.

Question 1: Assess how effective is Walt Disney Company’s corporate strategy. (Make sure to apply the different frameworks covered in the materials of this week).

Disney, the business of Happiness without any age limit to its content, pleased consumers in all its segments and ages. Historically, through its corporate strategy, Disney was able to create and sustain profits for a long period of time. Apparently, these sustained profits are rooted in Disney’s focus on building and incorporating its synergies.

As a result, Disney created synergy across its different business units, which added value to the uniqueness of the variety of products offered, whether in the entertainment, mass media, or amusement parks. In fact, the Walt Disney Company has set its grounds through its intensive strategies of growth that are focused on differentiation, innovation, and creativity.

Disney has practiced the depth and breadth of its corporate strategy; it made all the decisions that would enable it to reach and sustain its long-term goals. Disney has opted to foster the holistic factors of diversification, vertical and horizontal integration, target various geographies, and expand globally. In fact, the aforementioned tactics have assisted Disney in sustaining its competitive advantage.

One of Disney’s most prominent corporate strategies is vertical integration. It started when Disney decided to select forward integration in its media content. For instance, Disney decided to integrate its movie production and its final distribution by acquiring ABC and, later, ESPN.

Through this acquisition, Disney was able to exploit further in the adjacent stages of its value chain. This has aided in creating value for Disney, especially as this further extended the boundaries quickly.

In addition, it helped expand its access to a wider level of distribution streams. These strategic tactics have allowed Walt Disney Company to spread its brands across different channels. Thus making it easier for consumers in their different segments to find Disney’s products.

Disney had also exerted a backward vertical integration, especially when it decided to acquire TV creators such as Lucas Films. This move has allowed Disney to own its first line in its operation.

Additionally, Walt Disney Company started to build hotels and travel agencies for its amusement theme parks, so instead of using other hotels, it decided to make its own hotels. Disney is an all-rounded firm.

To have more control over the quality, Disney, an all-rounded firm, decided to open hotels in its Disney parks. In fact, Disney has always sought to gain control over its amusement center, as any negative feedback might have drastic implications for the image of Disney.

Also, this backward vertical integration was created so that the minute visitors enter the park, all they see are Disneyland products and services. Accordingly, this aligned with Disney’s value proposition, as its consumers always come first.

Moving to horizontal integration, the Walt Disney Company has opted to increase its breadth to capture a larger market share. The perfect example of horizontal integration is Disney acquiring Marvel Entertainment. Marvel Entertainment operates in the same genre as Disney, as it’s in the business of creating characters, mainly superheroes.

Such a move was very strategic and well-studied for Disney’s future growth strategies. This gave Disney a new line of products and services in a new market segment that allowed it to expand its reach to other customer segments.

Additionally, Disney leveraged its existing strength in the entertainment platforms by using its movies to create franchises and platforms for its popular cartoons. Not only that, but it has also expanded from its core animation business into amusement parks, resorts, TV broadcasting, residential communities, etc.

Such diversifications allowed Disney to gain and use its existing competencies and resources to further expand its business. Hence, Disney has developed the capabilities required to support its sophisticated and well-rounded business. This well-established diversification has given Disney a competitive edge over any potential competitor.

Through Disney’s diversified operations, Disney was able to undergo some market developments, and hence, it aided in expanding its markets and outreach to global markets. Walt Disney Company has…

Unlock Case Solution Now!

Get instant access to this case solution with a simple, one-time payment ($24.90).

After purchase:

  • You'll be redirected to the full case solution.
  • You will receive an access link to the solution via email.
Best decision to get my homework done faster! Michael MBA student, Boston

How do I get access?

Upon purchase, you are forwarded to the full solution and also receive access via email.

Is it safe to pay?

Yes! We use Paypal and Stripe as our secure payment providers of choice.

What is Casehero?

We are the marketplace for case solutions - created by students, for students.

  • Harvard Business School →
  • Faculty & Research →
  • February 2021 (Revised January 2024)
  • HBS Case Collection

Walt Disney: Changing the World

  • Format: Print
  • | Language: English
  • | Pages: 18

About The Author

disney case study solution

Robert Simons

Related work.

  • September 2022 (Revised March 2023)
  • Faculty Research
  • Walt Disney: Changing the World  By: Robert Simons and Shirley Sun

Keeping the Eyes Busy: A Case Study of Disney+

  • Conference paper
  • First Online: 17 May 2022
  • Cite this conference paper

disney case study solution

  • Daniel Soares 13 ,
  • Hugo Freitas 13 ,
  • Joana Oliveira 13 ,
  • Luís Vieira 13 &
  • Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira 14  

Part of the book series: Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems ((LNNS,volume 469))

Included in the following conference series:

  • World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies

1956 Accesses

Ever since the arrival of streaming platforms, society has become more focused on understanding how to take the next step forward in terms of innovation. Streaming is now a new reality that is growing by the second, and businesses have begun to spend more money on streaming services in order to adapt and improve their products for this new era. This is also the case of Disney+, released at the end of 2019, which had an immediate unexpected growth upon its launch. In comparison to other streaming platforms, Disney+ had an easier debut because of its wide range of unique material available to watch. This study explores Disney+ as a brand, a streaming platform, its features and how they compare to others, as well as the company’s business model and revenue, all of which contributed to Disney+ ‘s current position among other streaming platforms. Regarding Disney+, a survey with 84 responses was conducted, and the results were analysed using descriptive and inferential (chi-square independence test) statistics. As the value of the calculated test statistic (11.24) (chi-square test) is higher than the value in the chi-square table, we conclude that there is a statistically significant association between age and being influenced by advertising.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Silva, R.: One year on from the start of the pandemic, streaming platforms count gains. https://forbes.com.br/forbes-money/2021/03/um-ano-depois-do-inicio-da-pandemia-plataformas-de-streaming-contabilizam-ganhos/ , Accessed 14 Nov 2021

Grand view research: video streaming market size, share & trends analysis report by streaming type, by solution, by platform, by service, by revenue model, by deployment type, by user, by region, and segment forecasts, 2021–2028. https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/video-streaming-market , Accessed 14 Nov 2021

Tan, M.: The downfall of blockbuser. https://medium.com/an-idea/the-downfall-of-blockbuster-da69f6c8a536 , Accessed 14 Nov 2021

Biznews. In depth SWOT analysis of disney | strengths weaknesses opportunities. https://biznewske.com/swot-analysis-of-disney/ , Accessed 19 Nov 2021

Sturgil, J.: Beyond the castle: an analysis of the strategic implications of Disney+. https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1554&context=honors , Accessed 15 Nov 2021

Alexander, J.: The Disney+ interface feels empty but elegant compared to Netflix. https://www.theverge.com/2019/8/26/20830219/disney-plus-hands-on-first-look-demo-design-d23-wars-pixar-marvel , Accessed 15 Nov 2021

Iqbal, M.: Disney plus revenue and usage statistics (2021). https://www.businessofapps.com/data/disney-plus-statistics/ , Accessed 15 Nov 2021

Trainer, D.: Disney’s strategy is working. https://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2019/12/11/disneys-strategy-is-working/?sh=5b78bbe456b0 , Accessed 16 Nov 2021

Bursztynksy, J.: Disney+ emerges as an early winner of streaming wars, expects up to 260 million subscribers by 2024. https://www.cnbc.com/2020/12/11/after-showing-massive-growth-disney-hikes-5-year-subscriber-goal-.html

https://biznewske.com/swot-analysis-of-disney/ , Accessed 16 Nov 2021

Bennet, S., Schweitzer, M.: Window at disney: a lifetime of brand desire, published by The MIT Press. http://childperformers.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/58.4.bennett.pdf , Acessed 16 Nov 2021

Katz, B.: Disney retools its streaming strategy after Disney+ shatter expectations. https://observer.com/2020/12/disney-investor-day-announcements-analysis-dieny-plus-hulu-hbo-max-netflix/ , Accessed 17 Nov 2021

Netflix Homepage. https://help.netflix.com/pt-pt/node/24926 , Accessed 19 Nov 2021

Disney+ Homepage. https://www.disneyplus.com/pt-pt?&cid=DSS-Search-Google-71700000079242388-&s_kwcid=AL!8468!3!500193775423!b!!g!!die%20hard&gclid=Cj0KCQiAkNiMBhCxARIsAIDDKNWgL3F0FKErShAIwf4h_W4WEWxcQk-KtvSl3fFLayC4ibXMfg_n5sQaAr55EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds , Accessed 19 Nov 2021

Pereira, M.: How Disney+ is giving netflix goosebumps: the marketing strategy decoded. https://www.martechadvisor.com/articles/customer-experience-2/disneyplus-marketing-strategy/ , Accessed 19 Nov 2021

Laporte, N.: How disney plus is winning by ripping up the streaming playbook. https://www.fastcompany.com/90607786/how-disney-plus-is-winning-by-ripping-up-the-streaming-playbook , Accessed 19 Nov 2021

Merchan, W.: Disney+ marketing in 2020: behind disney plus’ $525M digital advertising strategy. https://www.pathmatics.com/blog/disney-marketing-in-2020-behind-disney-plus-525m-digital-advertising-strategy

Oakshott, L.: Essential quantitative methods - for business, management, and finance, 6th edn. Macmillan International Higher Education, London (2016). Accessed 19 Nov 2021

Google Scholar  

Saunders, M.N.K., Cooper, S.A.: Understanding Business Statistics – An Active-Learning Approach. The Guernsey Press, Guernsey (1993). Accessed 19 Nov 2021

Download references

Author information

Authors and affiliations.

Department of Languages and Cultures, University of Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal

Daniel Soares, Hugo Freitas, Joana Oliveira & Luís Vieira

INESC TEC, GOVCOPP, Department of Economics, Management, Industrial Engineering and Tourism, University of Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal

Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira .

Editor information

Editors and affiliations.

ISEG, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal

Alvaro Rocha

College of Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

Hojjat Adeli

Institute of Data Science and Digital Te, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

Gintautas Dzemyda

DCT, Universidade Portucalense, PORTO, Portugal

Fernando Moreira

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this paper

Cite this paper.

Soares, D., Freitas, H., Oliveira, J., Vieira, L., Au-Yong-Oliveira, M. (2022). Keeping the Eyes Busy: A Case Study of Disney+. In: Rocha, A., Adeli, H., Dzemyda, G., Moreira, F. (eds) Information Systems and Technologies. WorldCIST 2022. Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems, vol 469. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-04819-7_21

Download citation

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-04819-7_21

Published : 17 May 2022

Publisher Name : Springer, Cham

Print ISBN : 978-3-031-04818-0

Online ISBN : 978-3-031-04819-7

eBook Packages : Intelligent Technologies and Robotics Intelligent Technologies and Robotics (R0)

Share this paper

Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative

  • Publish with us

Policies and ethics

  • Find a journal
  • Track your research

MBA Knowledge Base

Business • Management • Technology

Home » Management Case Studies » Case Study: Walt Disney’s Business Strategies

Case Study: Walt Disney’s Business Strategies

Walt Disney Company is a $27 billion a year Global Entertainment giant which is an American based company was started by Walter Disney in venture with his brother named Roy O Disney in 1923. In 1928, Walt Disney created Mickey Mouse for which Walt wanted to call his character “Mortimer” but his wife convinced him to be called as “Mickey Mouse” and since then Mickey has been a classical hit for Walt Disney. In 1937 Disney presented their first feature full length Musical animated movie called “Snow white and the seven dwarfs” which is still a huge hit and remained in the hearts of its consumers forever.

Walt Disney recognizes what is customer value in Disney brand. They value a fun experience and homespun entertainment based on old-fashioned family values. Disney responds to these consumer preferences by leveraging the brand across different consumer markets. Let’s say that an American family goes to see a Disney movie together. They have a great time. They want to continue the experience. So Walt Disney offers Disney’s consumer products with multiple product lines aimed at specific age groups.

Walt Disney's Business Strategies

In 2003, Walt Disney came up with a movie called “Pirates of the Caribbean” which was a block buster hit at the box office. The movie was targeted for all the members of a family. In addition to the movie, Disney created a theme park ride, merchandising program, video game, TV series and comic books. In 2004, Disney presented the movie called “Home on the range” which was again a hit. Apart from the movie Disney created an accompanying sound track album, a line of toys for kids, clothing featuring the heroine, a theme park ride and a series of books. So Disney more often or not supports and promotes its movies with a host of secondary products attached to it.

Disney’s strategy is to build consumer markets for each of its characters, from classics like Mickey Mouse to snow white to new hits like Kim Possible. Each brand is created for a special age group and distribution channel. Disney has a large distribution channel. Baby Mickey Mouse and Disney babies target infants. Mickey Mouse is sold through the department and specially gift stores while Baby Mickey Mouse is a lower price option sold through mass-market channels. Disney’s Mickey’s stuff for kids targets boys and girls while Mickey unlimited targets teens and adults.

When it comes to TV channels, Disney has its own channel called the Disney channel which is the top prime time destination for kids’ age b/w 6 to 14. Disney has a pre school program called the “play house” which is targeted to small kids’ age b/w 2 to 6. Disney offers a Co-branded visa cards to adults. Card holders earn one dollar for every $100 charged to the card and the card holders can charge the card up to $75000 annually and then they can redeem the earnings for Disney merchandise or services, including Disney’s theme parks and resorts, Disney stores, Disney studios and Disney stage products. Disney has also been in Home depot offering a line of licensed kids’ room paint colors with paint swatches in the signature mouse and ears shape.

Disney also has licensed food products with its characters on its brands. For example, Disney provides a Yogurt called Yo-Pals yogurt which feature Winnie the Pooh and its friends. The four ounce yogurts are targeted to preschoolers who have an illustrated short story under each lid of the yogurt that encourages reading and discovery. Disney also has some imprinted cookies in vanilla and other flavors have impressions of its famous characters like Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck etc.

Disney has come up with a recent TV program character called KIM POSSIBLE, which is an integration of all of its consumer product lines. Kim possible is a typical high school going girl who in her spare time saves the world from evil villains. It is the number one rated cable program in its time slot and has spawned a variety of merchandise offered by the seven Disney consumer product divisions. The merchandise includes:

  • Disney Hard lines- stationery, lunchboxes, food products, room decor.
  • Disney Soft lines- sportswear, sleepwear, daywear, accessories.
  • Disney toys- action figures, wigglers, beanbags, plush, fashion dolls, poseables.
  • Disney Publishing- Diaries, junior novels, comic books.
  • Walt Disney records- Kim possible soundtrack.
  • Buena Vista Home Entertainment- DVD/video.
  • Buena Vista Games- Game Boy advance.

The success of Kim Possible is driven by action packed storylines which translate well into merchandise products in many categories. Today, the pervasiveness of Disney product offerings is staggering and all in all, there are over 3 billion entertainment-based impressions of Mickey Mouse received by children every year.

Porter’s Five Forces Analysis of  Walt Disney

Threat of New Entrants

Since the Walt Disney Company has been able to find a very unusual niche within the industry, the entrance barriers are high relatively. The company is able to grow over a long term period, and has to develop from the departments of Research and Development (R&D) , marketing, and finance. By depending on past experience, the company officials know to a large extent what the target customer wants.

Threat of Substitutes

The products or services are moderate to low. Other cartoon figures, theme parks, and movies can search the market in which the Walt Disney Company is operating in, but this is obviously representing a significant threat. The Walt Disney Company has placed price controls on many of its product lines already, and should be able to cope with other new competitors. However, by upgrading products and services, the threat alone of new entrants into the market requires the Walt Disney Company to hedge against such risk by simultaneously.

Bargaining Power of Suppliers

The suppliers are governed by a few companies as the Walt Disney Company is operating in a highly differentiated and unique industry with high switching costs associated with operations. Besides, they are most probably very concentrated. However, the Walt Disney Company is a unique company and important customer of many suppliers. Furthermore, the size of the company may be a great advantage certainly. The company will create a dependency relationship in the industry by being able to order large volumes of unique products from unique suppliers.

Bargaining Power of Buyers

The bargaining power of buyers is high in the service and in the entertainment industry. The customers have powers certainly since a large number of customers are needed to make the Walt Disney Company’s operations run smoothly. For example, if the price on a particular home video is too high, customers may be averse to spending the money needed to purchase the products. Another example is the entrance fee charged at the Walt Disney Company’s theme parks. Furthermore, the entertainment industry does not take the buyer money, even if it is planned in a way that it will make the buyer spend more. A majority of the Walt Disney Company’s product mix focuses on intangible returns of the buyer’s money. However, some customers may not realize that they are getting such a return may increase the bargaining power of the customers.

Rivalry among Existing Firms

It does not play a very important role in the Walt Disney Company’s external operational environment. Nevertheless, it is true that the company’s exit barriers are extremely high. Furthermore, capacity is expanded in extremely large investments. However, there are no closer direct competitors to the Walt Disney Company’s operations. Competitors such as “Lonely Tunes” retail stores do not appear to appoint themselves to expensive advertising campaigns in order to obtain market shares. Moreover, the Walt Disney Company’s products are highly differentiated. The switching costs are therefore quite significant. A multinational corporation such as the Walt Disney Company faces internal weaknesses and strengths, which can to a certain extent be controlled. The external forces such as opportunity and threats are more difficult to control, and the Walt Disney Company has to adopt and take advantage to those forces.

SWOT Analysis of  Walt Disney

There are four things a business should consider that are crucial to keep up with the competition and to give an accurate point of view on where they stand. The four things are Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats referred to as SWOT analysis . The SWOT analysis provides information that is useful in matching the firm’s resources and capabilities to the competitive environment in which it operates. When doing a SWOT analysis it is imperative to know that the Strengths and Weaknesses are internal reflections, while the Opportunities and Threats are external reflections.

The Walt Disney Company’s main strength is in its resources, its experience in the business, and its low-cost strategy. Besides, the company has developed clearly a very strong and well known “brand-name” through many years. The company has also been able to diversify its operations and products to hedge against decreasing sales in product lines. In recent years, it has categorized into Home Video, Film, merchandise, Radio broadcasting, Net-work television and in theme parks. It has also effectively diversified globally its operations from USA to Japan and Europe. The main strengths in internal resources relate to human resources and financial stability. Employees in the Walt Disney Company studies appear to be extremely creative and they have produced several box-office productions in these recent years. A company without new ideas is bounded in today’s competitive business environment . However, the low-cost corporate strategy is a benefit for the company. The company can control costs , and still produce quality goods and services. Financial risks have been minimized by sharing initial investment costs with a maximum number of outside participants.

Corporations always have internal weaknesses. The Walt Disney Company’s main weaknesses are the following: A very large work load, often changes in top-management, and high overhead expenditures. The company has 58,000 employees in 1991. This fact represents possible communications problems, and a high bureaucracy level through the corporation. The company’s work load will increase even larger, and the organizational structure has to be able to support an extension of the work load by varying into more businesses and niches. The company has a very frequently changes and its corporate officers makes the corporate structure even more difficult. There are many positive things that often changes, but the changes are also associated with resistance, and high expenses.

Opportunities

External opportunities should be recognized, analyzed, and responded to in a very early stage. The Walt Disney Company is facing several external opportunities. However, the external threats facing the company are out-numbering the opportunities. Opportunities include the following; positive government attitudes towards its operations, barriers of entry are significant, and include the entertainment industry itself. Legal and legislative forces are usually identified as negative external factors to the company. Furthermore, the French government contributed greatly in the Euro Disneyworld project in the Walt Disney Company’s case. The French government invested in the project to built communication facilities, and gave the Walt Disney Company tax relief’s on cost of goods sold accounts. In addition, since the barriers of entry into the highly specialized industry in which the Walt Disney Company is still operating, competition will find it difficult to penetrate the company’s highly diversified product or service mix. Therefore, large initial capital investments are required to enter the industry accordingly.

Major threats to the Walt Disney Company include the following; Over saturated markets, politics and economic aspects from a global perspective, and foreign competition. As the supply of products and services in the entertainment industry is starting to saturate the markets, competition will be more exciting, and only the most powerful companies will be able to survive finally. The Walt Disney Company has leveraged this risk to a certain level as it has diversified and globalized its operations, but still, the company is in the service/entertainment business. The Cable-giants such as Turner Broadcasting Systems (TBS) may not be able to manage the stress on its operation such as the Network-television division.

Related Posts:

  • Case Study: Disney's Cultural Lessons From Tokyo and Paris
  • Case Studies on Debt Recovery Management
  • Case Study: The Enron Accounting Scandal
  • Case Study: The Rise and Fall of Nintendo Wii
  • Case Study on Business Ethics: Napster Copyright Infringement Case
  • Case Study of Euro Disney: Managing Marketing Environmental Challenges
  • Case Study: Disney's Diversification Strategy
  • Case Study: Why Did Euro Disney Fail?
  • Case Study: PepsiCo's International Marketing Strategy
  • Case Study: Marketing Strategy of Walt Disney Company

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fern Fort University

The walt disney studios change management analysis & solution, hbr change management solutions, strategy & execution case study | anita elberse, case study description.

In December 2015, Alan Horn, chairman of The Walt Disney Studios, celebrates the world premiere of Star Wars: The Force Awakens - only the latest in a string of big bets that he has overseen. Disney pursues a 'tentpole strategy' that revolves around at least eight big-budget movies each year -- most from its acquired labels Pixar, Marvel Studios, and Lucasfilm. In fact, Disney produces nearly twice as many tentpole movies as any other major Hollywood film studio, but fewer movies overall than all but one of its rivals. Box-office failures can be extremely costly, since Disney (unlike its rivals) chooses not to enlist the help of financing partners. Is Disney Studios pursuing the right number of tentpoles as well as the right mix of new versus existing properties, under the right financing structure? And will the tentpole strategy pay off-in the short and long run?

Change Management, Creativity, Product development, Strategy, Talent management , Case Study Solution, Term Papers

Order a The Walt Disney Studios case study solution now

What is Change Management Definition & Process? Why transformation efforts fail? What are the Change Management Issues in The Walt Disney Studios case study?

According to John P. Kotter – Change Management efforts are the major initiatives an organization undertakes to either boost productivity, increase product quality, improve the organizational culture, or reverse the present downward spiral that the company is going through. Sooner or later every organization requires change management efforts because without reinventing itself organization tends to lose out in the competitive market environment. The competitors catch up with it in products and service delivery, disruptors take away the lucrative and niche market positioning, or management ends up sitting on its own laurels thus missing out on the new trends, opportunities and developments in the industry.

What are the John P. Kotter - 8 Steps of Change Management?

Eight Steps of Kotter's Change Management Execution are -

  • 1. Establish a Sense of Urgency
  • 2. Form a Powerful Guiding Coalition
  • 3. Create a Vision
  • 4. Communicate the Vision
  • 5. Empower Others to Act on the Vision
  • 6. Plan for and Create Short Term Wins
  • 7. Consolidate Improvements and Produce More Change
  • 8. Institutionalize New Approaches

Are Change Management efforts easy to implement? What are the challenges in implementing change management processes?

According to authorlist Change management efforts are absolutely essential for the surviving and thriving of the organization but they are also extremely difficult to implement. Some of the biggest obstacles in implementing change efforts are –

  • Change management is often a lengthy, time consuming, and resource consuming process. Managements try to avoid them because they reflect negatively on the short term financial balance sheet of the organization.
  • Change efforts are often made by new leaders because they are chosen by board to do so. These leaders often have less trust among the workforce compare to the people with whom they were already working with over the years.
  • Change efforts are often targeted at making fundamental aspects in the business – operations and culture. Change management disrupts are status quo thus face opposition from both within and outside the organization.
  • Change efforts create an environment of uncertainty in the organization that impacts not only the productivity in the organization but also the level of trust in the organization.
  • Change management efforts are made when the organization is in dire need and have fewer resources. This creates silos protection mentality within the organization.

The Walt Disney Studios SWOT Analysis, SWOT Matrix, Weighted SWOT Case Study Solution & Analysis

How you can apply Change Management Principles to The Walt Disney Studios case study?

Leaders can implement Change Management efforts in the organization by following the “Eight Steps Method of Change Management” by John P. Kotter.

Step 1 - Establish a sense of urgency

What are areas that require urgent change management efforts in the “ The Walt Disney Studios “ case study. Some of the areas that require urgent changes are – organizing sales force to meet competitive realities, building new organizational structure to enter new markets or explore new opportunities. The leader needs to convince the managers that the status quo is far more dangerous than the change efforts.

Step 2 - Form a powerful guiding coalition

As mentioned earlier in the paper, most change efforts are undertaken by new management which has far less trust in the bank compare to the people with whom the organization staff has worked for long period of time. New leaders need to tap in the talent of the existing managers and integrate them in the change management efforts . This will for a powerful guiding coalition that not only understands the urgency of the situation but also has the trust of the employees in the organization. If the team able to explain at the grass roots level what went wrong, why organization need change, and what will be the outcomes of the change efforts then there will be a far more positive sentiment about change efforts among the rank and file.

Step 3 - Create a vision

The most critical role of the leader who is leading the change efforts is – creating and communicating a vision that can have a broader buy-in among employees throughout the organization. The vision should not only talk about broader objectives but also about how every little change can add up to the improvement in the overall organization.

Step 4 - Communicating the vision

Leaders need to use every vehicle to communicate the desired outcomes of the change efforts and how each employee impacted by it can contribute to achieve the desired change. Secondly the communication efforts need to answer a simple question for employees – “What it is in for the them”. If the vision doesn’t provide answer to this question then the change efforts are bound to fail because it won’t have buy-in from the required stakeholders of the organization.

Step 5 -Empower other to act on the vision

Once the vision is set and communicated, change management leadership should empower people at every level to take decisions regarding the change efforts. The empowerment should follow two key principles – it shouldn’t be too structured that it takes away improvisation capabilities of the managers who are working on the fronts. Secondly it shouldn’t be too loosely defined that people at the execution level can take it away from the desired vision and objectives.

The Walt Disney Studios PESTEL / PEST / STEP & Porter Five Forces Analysis

Step 6 - Plan for and create short term wins

Initially the change efforts will bring more disruption then positive change because it is transforming the status quo. For example new training to increase productivity initially will lead to decrease in level of current productivity because workers are learning new skills and way of doing things. It can demotivate the employees regarding change efforts. To overcome such scenarios the change management leadership should focus on short term wins within the long term transformation. They should carefully craft short term goals, reward employees for achieving short term wins, and provide a comprehensive understanding of how these short term wins fit into the overall vision and objectives of the change management efforts.

Step 7 - Consolidate improvements and produce more change

Short term wins lead to renewed enthusiasm among the employees to implement change efforts. Management should go ahead to put a framework where the improvements made so far are consolidated and more change efforts can be built on the top of the present change efforts.

Step 8 - Institutionalize new approaches

Once the improvements are consolidated, leadership needs to take steps to institutionalize the processes and changes that are made. It needs to stress how the change efforts have delivered success in the desired manner. It should highlight the connection between corporate success and new behaviour. Finally organization management needs to create organizational structure, leadership, and performance plans consistent with the new approach.

Is change management a process or event?

What many leaders and managers at the Disney Tentpole fails to recognize is that – Change Management is a deliberate and detail oriented process rather than an event where the management declares that the changes it needs to make in the organization to thrive. Change management not only impact the operational processes of the organization but also the cultural and integral values of the organization.

MBA Admission help, MBA Assignment Help, MBA Case Study Help, Online Analytics Live Classes

Previous change management solution.

  • Amazon.com, 2016 Change Management Solution
  • SGFE Cambodia (B): High-energy Char Briquettes for the Bottom of the Pyramid Change Management Solution
  • Multistrada Agro International: Non-Market Strategy in Indonesia Change Management Solution
  • The Hain Celestial Group Change Management Solution
  • Flying Beavers: An Innovative Approach to Wildlife Conservation Change Management Solution

Next 5 Change Management Solution

  • Lotus F1 Team Change Management Solution
  • The Marvel Way: Restoring a Blue Ocean Change Management Solution
  • Legal and Profitable? Spotify: The Challenges of an Online Music Service Change Management Solution
  • Reinventing Best Buy Change Management Solution
  • Huayi Brothers: Strategic Transformation Change Management Solution

Special Offers

Order custom Harvard Business Case Study Analysis & Solution. Starting just $19

Amazing Business Data Maps. Send your data or let us do the research. We make the greatest data maps.

We make beautiful, dynamic charts, heatmaps, co-relation plots, 3D plots & more.

Buy Professional PPT templates to impress your boss

Nobody get fired for buying our Business Reports Templates. They are just awesome.

  • More Services

Feel free to drop us an email

  • fernfortuniversity[@]gmail.com
  • (000) 000-0000

Problem Analysis of the Walt Disney Company Case Study

Introduction, problem analysis, recommendations, reference list, organization’s background and people involved.

The Walt Disney Company is a leading international entertainment center and media enterprise having subsidiaries all over the world. The operation and management of enterprise experience are carried out by the organization’s division Disney Parks and Resorts that is responsible for entertaining people and guiding those into the world of media culture (The Walt Disney Company, n. d. a).

Due to the fact that employees play the leading role in creating a favorable environment in entertainment center, this target audience should be carefully considered by human resources managers to enhance employees’ level of engagement.

Organization’s Purposes, Mission, Values, and Culture

The company’s purpose consists in introducing the people dimension in business sphere to meet Disney’s values and culture. Specifically, the human resource management department focuses on reinforcing the responsibility and commitment to people through such services as learning and development, talent acquisition, communication techniques, and employee services (The Walt Disney Company, n. d. b).

Specific attention should be paid to increased leadership for handling selection and recruitment processes effectively and contributing to ongoing retention and development.

Problem Identification

Judging from the above-presented information the company places a specific emphasis on leadership and supervision strategies for directing and motivating employees’ work.

The employees, in their turn, can take advantage of availability of direct support and, because all their actions are carefully controlled, subordinates might lack independence in making decisions, which can become critical under certain situations. As a result, leaders and managers prevail over employees’ steps of coping with their responsibilities and obligations.

Though employees have right to share their preferences and goals with supervisors, they still lack skills for cooperating in teams for solving the problems independently.

Specifically, the system of communication between the supervisor and employees, as well as between employees and guests, is well settled and, therefore, vertical management deprives employees of possibility to make decisions without informing their managers. Lack of responsibilities imposed on cast members creates a number of problems in terms of effective team management and employee engagement.

Discrepancies between Theory and Practice within the Organization

Effective human resource management should embrace a combination of theoretical frameworks applied to practice. It should also be constructed with regard to services and opportunities the employees can get while accomplishing their duties (Johns & Saks, 2005).

Judging from the case under analysis, it should be stressed that there is a certain inconsistency between the introduced employee engagement strategies and the ones that are still left unnoticed.

In particular, managers successfully meet the requirements of perceived organization support and positive reinforcement approaches, but fail to introduce techniques connected to motivated teamwork, job enrichment, and establishment of self-management working team.

Providing Meaningful Feedback on Performance

Excess accent on effective leadership and supervisions provides no perspectives concerning the opportunity for employees to increase their performance. In this situation, meaningful feedback can help the employees quickly adapt to a specific behavior for achieving the established goals (Phillips and Gully, 2011, p. 395).

The introduction of the feedback system can help employees become more team-focused for achieving the goals in a more effective way. More importantly, such an approach will increase employees’ incentives and motivations. For instance, the organization should create objectives the accomplishment of which is possible only under team working conditions.

At this point, employees can be encouraged to introduce their creative ideas directed at the improvement of the entertainment atmosphere, but the creative projects should be carried out in teams.

Such a technique can introduce a challenge for employees at first stages; on the other hand, cast members will have to encounter such aspects as responsibilities distribution, decision-making, and problem-solving. In addition, feedback on performance can be presented in the form of rewards contributing to more effective adjustment to a new teamwork environment.

Establishing Positive Relations and Healthy Competition between Co-Workers

Leadership and supervision practices imply well-coordinated communication between managers and employees. However, a healthy environment will be established with the introduction of favorable relations among co-workers.

According to Dutton and Ragins (2007), “…positive connections contributed to the shared emotions component of sense of community, because it was in moments of connecting that temporary employees shared positive and negative emotions” (p. 257).

Indeed, active interaction and successful communication provide a favorable ground sharing and gaining wider experience in communicating and negotiating with guests and managements. What is more important is that the established solutions impel employees to discover the points of similarities.

Due to the fact that job is a potential source for self-expression, the establishment of a healthy competitive environment is also indispensible to meeting those goals (Dutton and Ragins, 2007).

In fact, the idea of competition consists in creating opportunities for all employees to win, instead of one individual dominating at the expense of another employee (Dutton and Ragins, 2007). The proposed approach can help the company understand whether the level of employee recognition is sufficient for increasing performance and motivation.

Coping with Emotional Displays in Various Countries

Greater group cohesiveness can be achieved through better recognition of cultural diversity within the organization. In this respect, company’s success largely depends on the techniques it will introduce for managing diverse emotional displays as presented in various cultures.

People coming from different countries also expect specific reactions to their emotions due to peculiar values, personal needs, and social factors of subordinates. Cultural display principles are conceived in childhood to help people cope with their emotions and adapt those to different facial expressions.

In order to react properly to these displays, employers should take into consideration psychological analysis of different cultures presented in the working environment (Phillips & Gully, 2011, p. 149).

Due to the fact that the Walt Disney Company is a multinational organization, it should count the phenomenon of cultural diversity and analyze a variety of psychological portraits. Better recognition of emotional displays will significantly foster employees’ organized work in team.

However, information about psychological techniques should also be proliferated among the employees through specific training courses. At this point, the educational program should be directed at enhancing employees’ understanding of other cultures through representation of different behavioral and psychological patterns.

Appreciation of Theories With Regard To Feedback on Performance

Slight shift from leadership management to self-management in teams will help employees enhance their awareness that their work is highly appreciated. Theoretically, performance feedback will be more effective if it is conveyed in a positive manner, provided immediately after performance observation, and is specific to the behavioral patterns that are being established for feedback.

While presenting performance appraisal, it is important to introduce both objective and subjective means for measuring employee productivity and success. In this particular case, providing feedback on collective performance is much more appropriate because it enhances collaboration among the co-workers and fosters the accomplishment of the established goals.

The necessity to introduce rewards is also justified by theory of self-managed work teams. Such a system provides several benefits. First, because reward presupposed reduced supervision, greater responsibilities and independence in decision-making will be imposed. Second, the introduction of self-management can teach employees to act independent and solve difficult problems.

Self-determination and introduction of effective decision-making can deprive managers of the necessity to constantly monitor the work of the staff. Finally, the given approach contributes greatly to increasing employees’ competence, which, in fact, can increase a competitive advantage in general.

The organization under analysis can further develop new concepts and strategies based on the newly developed patterns of appraisal.

Theories Contributing To Enhancing Positive Relations between Co-Workers to Increase Employee Engagement

While evaluating the effectiveness of the ideas of enhancing positive relations, it is purposeful to refer to the theory of group cohesiveness and operant learning supporting the necessity to introduce positive and negative reinforcement, as well as create a healthy competitive environment. To enlarge on this issue, competition and reward systems define the extent to which a working team is ready to face challenges.

It also outlines the major psychological and ethical problems existing among employees within the identified organization. The approach will especially effective for the managing international issues and conflicts because failure to cooperate in team can lead to dismissal. In this respect, the negative reinforcement should also take place to tackle the problem employee engagement.

Due to the fact that operant learning theory implies reinforcement of behavior through punishment and reward, employee engagement can be significantly increased through the introduction of interdependent relations between subordinates. The approach is also congruent with the company’s philosophy because it strives to meet employees’ interests and choices, but in a very narrow-focused way.

Consequently, the main task of the managers is to foster independent decision-making through reinforcement of group liabilities. In case one member of the group is not able to contribute to the welfare of the department, the rest of the group should be responsible for the failure.

Introducing Theoretical Frameworks for Managing Cultural Diversity

It should be recognized that the problem of cultural diversity has now acquired a growing popularity. The issue concerns both customer management and employee engagement because these two dimensions are united by the purpose of enhancing human element.

In this respect, the entertainment services provided by the Walt Disney Company will be significantly advanced with the introduction of techniques managing emotional displays. The practical approach can be effectively carried out by referring to the theories of observational learning and behavior modeling training. The former is concerned with process of imitating various behavioral modes.

The practice is aimed at examining others’ behavior, analyzing the consequences of experience, evaluating the outcomes of choosing a specific behavior and imitating the mode to introduce favorable consequences. The former focuses on the introduction of an educational program directed at describing a set of behaviors that should be consider and providing patterns demonstrating how to use those models effectively.

The training is also connected with the presentation of social reinforcement and feedback to the trainees, as well as with taking measures to ensure the behavioral transformation with regard to organizational goals. In whole, both theories should contribute to better understanding of emotional displays and creating a more favorable environment for employee engagement.

Dutton, J. E., & Ragins, B. R. (2007). Exploring Positive Relationships at Work: Building a Theoretical and Research Foundation . NY: Routledge.

Johns, G., & Saks, A. M. (2005). Organizational Behavior: Understanding and Managing Life at Work . NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Phillips, J. and Gully, S. M. (2011). Organizational Behavior: Tools for Success . NY: Cengage Learning.

The Walt Disney Company. Business Standards and Ethics . Web.

The Walt Disney Company. Company Overview . Web.

  • Chicago (A-D)
  • Chicago (N-B)

IvyPanda. (2024, March 26). Problem Analysis of the Walt Disney Company. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-walt-disney-company-case-study/

"Problem Analysis of the Walt Disney Company." IvyPanda , 26 Mar. 2024, ivypanda.com/essays/the-walt-disney-company-case-study/.

IvyPanda . (2024) 'Problem Analysis of the Walt Disney Company'. 26 March.

IvyPanda . 2024. "Problem Analysis of the Walt Disney Company." March 26, 2024. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-walt-disney-company-case-study/.

1. IvyPanda . "Problem Analysis of the Walt Disney Company." March 26, 2024. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-walt-disney-company-case-study/.

Bibliography

IvyPanda . "Problem Analysis of the Walt Disney Company." March 26, 2024. https://ivypanda.com/essays/the-walt-disney-company-case-study/.

  • Walt Disney's Company Strategy
  • The Walt Disney Company
  • Walt Disney Company: Entertainment Legacy
  • Walt Disney Company's Global Rivals and Strategies
  • Success Story of Walt Disney
  • Walt Disney Company: Management Review
  • The Walt Disney Company: Human Resource Strategy
  • Walt Disney Company Corporate-Level Strategies
  • Walt Disney Company External Factor Evaluation
  • Strategy & Objectives of Walt Disney Company
  • A company Eli Lilly
  • American Red Cross Society
  • Infinity Software Company
  • Sabena Belgian World Airlines
  • Vodafone and Optus: Effective Service Delivery

Simplimba Logo

[Solved]Teaming at Disney Animation Case Study Solution

teaming at disney animation, teaming at disney animation case study solution

Teaming at Disney animation is a case study from HBR . The Case can be analyzed from the lens of organizational structure, People as an organization strategy, and using restructuring to remove organization silos.

Teaming at Disney Animation Case Introduction

Director of Systems at Walt Disney Animation Studios Jonathan Geibel walked through his department’s cubicle area. Geibel knew he was surrounded by a magical and inspiring place. Over the course of 75 years, starting with Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in 1937, Walt Disney Animation Studios created over fifty-three full-length animated features, the most recent being Frozen, which premiered in November 2013 and won the Academy Award® for Best Animated Feature in March 2014. Disney’s Frozen surpassed all other animated films in global box office earnings at the end of March 2014. Not too long ago in the studio’s 90-year history,

Walt Disney Animation Studios had become more structured and hierarchical, making it less than ideal for employees to collaborate across divisions on creative projects. Prior to John Lasseter and Ed Catmull’s tenure, this was the case. Despite this, the work was more multidisciplinary and dynamic than ever before, incorporating elements of state-of-the-art computer animation and creative storytelling. Geibel wanted to know how he and Ron Johnson, whom he had hired and worked with to re-envision the Systems group within Disney Animation, could facilitate a smoother workflow and higher productivity for the increasingly technical and imaginative projects being undertaken by the company. Geibel hired Ron Johnson, and the two of them rethought the Systems department.

In order to facilitate the efficient collaboration required for the production of compelling and engaging animated films, Geibel and Johnson had already implemented significant alterations to the organizational structure of the workplace as well as the physical environment. Now that the changes were in place, it was time to assess how well they were working and whether any tweaks were necessary.

For More solutions to Case studies like teaming at Disney animation, visit our case study solutions here

Teaming at Disney AnimationProblem Identification

What is the problem that geibel is trying to solve.

Geibel’s challenge in this project is to reorganize Disney’s Animation systems group in a way that will encourage creativity and better facilitate dialogue. The company had become more hierarchical and structured before John Lasseter and Ed Catmull took over, making it harder for employees from different departments to work together and generate new ideas.

The new administration of John Lasseter and Ed Catmull is responsible for these alterations. As far as Geibel is concerned, the company’s inability to accomplish much due to its current structure is a direct result of its management. Disney Animation’s work revolves around telling stories in fresh ways and employing state-of-the-art computer animation techniques. Considering how multidisciplinary and dynamic the operation had become, maintaining the same team organizational structure as before was a huge drain on resources. Therefore, it was necessary for the company to create a new teaming system that would facilitate open dialogue between workers.

For ten years, Geibel had worked for the company in various capacities, including Senior Systems Engineer and Production Engineering Lead, gaining valuable experience in leading technical teams. Because of the knowledge he gained during that time, he is now able to appreciate the value that teams can bring to an organization. If the company was going to succeed, he believed, it would be because someone came up with a new way of structuring the company that would bring the team closer together. Similarly, Geibel’s ability to foster cooperation across Disney departments is hampered by the existence of artificial boundaries.

Currently, it is difficult to carry out responsibilities efficiently because groups do not have well-defined roles.

The company’s inability to adapt to new market conditions can be attributed in part to the rigidity of the current organizational structure. According to Geibel and Johnson, the company should redesign its work processes and the offices it occupies to encourage more interaction and cooperation among workers. It was difficult for workers to work together on projects because the old organizational structure did not foster the growth of effective team structures

To Geibel’s mind, the key to fixing this issue is fostering a spirit of teamwork. He is set on getting his team to work as one solid unit so that they can increase their output. To this end, Geibel proposes setting up system groups that communicate with one another and work together to solve any problems that arise.

Why is this a problem?

In the Disney workplace, you can expect a dynamic and ever-changing environment. So, Geibel had to make those changes to make animation production easier and more streamlined. This need to improve team dynamics was a direct result of the company’s adoption of CGI. This happened because finishing the animation required a lot of work from a lot of people working together.

The way the company is managed has been changing, so it’s time to rethink the company’s structure. Several people, for instance, worked to perfect cinematic lighting. The organization of the systems group within Disney Animation was another area of weakness prior to 2010. The managers oversaw and coordinated the various projects from the comfort of their offices on the second floor. They hardly ever got to talk to the people who worked in the software and systems department but were essential to the making of the animations. Assigning people to groups led to the development of task boundaries, which impeded communication and cooperation among team members. The workplace was divided, making it hard to improve how resources were distributed.

These alterations were necessary for Disney Animation to better manage the increasing volume and complexity of its creative and technical output. There had been significant changes to the company’s working environment, and so the business strategy needed to be adjusted accordingly. More and more people from various backgrounds are working together to solve problems because of the proliferation of digital tools.

Coordination of this sort became necessary because increasing productivity required workers to learn to work together effectively. Before Geibel took charge, it was unclear who did what on the team. They struggled to keep things running smoothly due to being constrained by the established parameters, and their expansion was slowed by inefficient task allocation. In order to advance, Geibel had to make adjustments and form groups with distinct responsibilities. Taking this step would allow the company to accomplish more and encourage a culture of innovation across all departments.

Teaming at Disney Animation Old vs. New Structure at Disney Animation

How and why does the “old disney animation” organization (i.e., the historical animation group as it was founded and lasted for decades – pre-computerization) differ from disney animation in 2013 [guide: be sure to compare and contrast how teams are structured, the nature of work, the role of managers, team governance, processes, office design, and the culture].

The major difference between both structures could be found in the reporting structures. In the old structure, 50 person department would have reported to a functional manager. The functional managers in turn would report to the director of systems. This resulted in the development of internal silos. Even conventional reporting structures would mean 15-20 persons reporting to single functional manager which was an impediment to the free flow of ideas that was required for a creative organization. Nevertheless, in 2013, Disney Animation teams had a different organizational structure.

Geibel has developed semi-independent groups throughout the company consisting of between two and six persons in each group. The capabilities that each individual member of the team possesses played a role in the selection process. The head of a team will seek advice and authorization from the members of the team who are considered to be technical subject-matter experts. In addition, depending on the requirements of the situation, workers in a team might be assigned either primary or secondary duties.

When workers on a team are assigned big tasks, the worker is entrusted with a significant amount of responsibility for the team as a whole. The development of a team’s technical and soft skills might benefit from the addition of individuals with complementary skills. In addition, each team is led by a manager who is accountable for the advancement of individual careers, the funding of technological advancements, and the coaching of the team. The leaders of groups are entrusted with the responsibility of directing their teams in the right direction and overseeing their day-to-day operations.

Because the offices are so close to one another, the employees are able to readily collaborate and share ideas in order to discover effective solutions to any problems that may arise. The fact that everyone was in the same location encouraged impromptu brainstorming among the group. In addition, we have reserved spots in our technical areas for more casual get-togethers, so that our employees won’t have to walk around while crucial conversations are taking place. The location of the managers’ offices is crucial to the operation of the system. They were able to demonstrate better leadership to their subordinates after leaving the isolation of their offices and interacting more closely with them.

After the “dailies” system was put into place, it became much simpler for workers to think up original concepts. It’s because they were much too forthcoming with their managers about the ongoing initiatives they were working on.

What is your assessment of the effectiveness of this alternative approach?

The new structure in the company provided room for innovation. Group members found it easy to communicate with each other as their working space was closely connected. Team members thus found it easy to share ideas and solve any issue faster. The office setting promoted information communication, which was crucial in facilitating innovativeness as problems were solved faster. Such an organizational structure also made it easy for managers to share information with ease.

It is because their offices were also in the same working environment as the other group members. This was unlike before were their offices were upstairs where employees could not communicate with them easily. The changes brought by Geibel in the organizational structure of Disney Animation were crucial in making the company provide more and better products to its customers. The changes were also vital in making the company adjust to the ever-changing technology in this industry.

What was the impact of Disney’s acquisition of Pixar in 2006, and how did this influence top leadership in the company to think differently?

After acquiring Pixar in 2006, the company made a dramatic change in its approach to animation. While in charge, Andy Hendrickson was able to guide the company in the direction of hiring people who would inject a spirit of innovation throughout the company. It was also in 2010 that Geibel was hired as Disney Animation’s director of systems, a position made possible by the acquisition. As part of his efforts to make the company more innovative, Geibel restructured the way it was run by establishing specialized teams.

The acquisition also enlightened Disney Animation’s upper management, causing them to modify their approach to human resource management. They banded together into teams and developed close relationships with one another within those groups, allowing for more effective dialogue. The acquisition also helped bring the company’s leaders closer to their staff, which boosted communication on both the formal and informal levels. Changes of this nature were essential to enhancing the functioning of the organization.

Teaming at Disney Animation: Implementation

How did geibel and johnson implement a new structure at disney animation.

Utilizing both the latest research and insights from a wide range of other sources, Geibel and Johnson came up with the best possible strategy for the country. Because of this, they were able to devise a plan that would benefit the country the most. They developed several hypotheses and tested them to learn more about the problems that the business was experiencing.

More importantly, the theories showed Geibel and Johnson where they needed to improve so that their business could thrive. After that, the two of them came up with a plan for leading the team that included no more than six other people. Teams were led by individuals who not only saw the big picture but also understood their place in it. These leaders were also responsible for supervising the team captains under them. Employees with the required level of technical expertise could move up the corporate ladder thanks to the availability of these positions.

Seeing these individuals as leaders, Geibel and Johnson believed they could effect the necessary shift within the company. In the previous configuration of the organization, the roles of team leaders and personnel managers were essentially interchangeable. These two people also proposed the concept of a primary and secondary team. Each worker was expected to take on a primary responsibility in one of the groups, in addition to secondary responsibilities in the other groups.

Direct supervisors or team leaders had to join in on the work alongside their subordinates and reportees in order to foster the development of trusting relationships within the group. Members of the team have been given the chance to learn more about the day-to-day business activities of Disney Animation thanks to the new organizational structure that has been implemented. As a result of the staff’s increased creativity and the business’s efforts to improve communication, the company was able to develop new animations.

Evaluate their approach to change

Their plan for transformation was motivated by the need to improve communication and innovation by bringing management closer to the teams. To achieve this objective, Geibel and Johnson needed to assess whether or not a reorganization of the groups and their roles was necessary. They knew the existing systems department’s structure was flawed and that it needed a lot of work in order to function effectively. Worker communication and knowledge sharing suffered as a result of the artificial barriers imposed by the traditional units. As a result, managers had less time to build relationships with their teams.

Because of this, we broke the team up into six-person groups to facilitate better communication and the sharing of information. Workplace communication was also fostered by the relaxed atmosphere. Employees were better able to discuss their individual animation projects with one another because of the confined nature of the workspace. They found it much easier to communicate and collaborate with their staff after moving their offices closer to where the teams were working.

They wanted to make a difference in the systems group, so they went looking for answers everywhere they could. For instance, the Matrix Model data ensured a systematic rollout of changes, making it simpler for staff to adjust to the new norm. Geibel and Johnson were also cognizant of the need to employ a compact self-sufficient team with members having specialized knowledge in relevant areas.

The minimum group size is six people, all of whom are experts in the same field. The system applied the same requirements to the management, as well. They were organized in the same hierarchical subsets as their subordinates. Overall, the approach taken by Geibel and Johnson was fruitful because it was grounded in established scientific principles. They were cognizant of the need to break the project down into manageable chunks that would be assigned to workers according to their specific areas of expertise. Geibel and Johnson knew that moving managers to be in closer proximity to their employees would boost productivity in the workplace.

Teaming at Dinsey Animation: Evaluation of the Teaming Model and Replicability

What is your assessment of the new team structure – i.e., the new structure for disney animation’s systems group.

The newly implemented team structure at the company promotes open communication and brainstorming. The organizational structure of Geibel places a premium on teamwork at all levels of the company. Team captains and upper management will appreciate the system’s streamlined channels of communication with their subordinates. The employees’ self-assurance was boosted by the fact that management did not meddle in their projects. Geibel, Johnson, and the rest of the management team backed off and let the teams handle their own business. It was requested that staff share any ideas that could help Disney Animation be more imaginative.

The reorganized Disney Animation department has made it easier for employees to do their jobs. This resulted because management did not severely restrict employees’ freedom of thought. Another benefit for the system groups was that they shared office space with the managers. System group members found it easy to think of and implement novel solutions in such a setting.

The group’s leaders consistently adopted the members’ ideas. A positive side effect of the revised organizational structure at Disney Animation was an increased openness to new ideas, which I feel obligated to note. Groups of workers were taught how to collaborate effectively on projects and how to come up with novel ideas for the business. The new leadership was also beneficial because it fostered teamwork, which in turn increased output across the board.

Would this structure work in your organization? Why or why not? In what environments is this structure best suited?

The structure could be used by any group. It is becoming increasingly common for companies to encourage their employees to take on more responsibility by giving them more autonomy at work. When employees believe that their management has created a conducive workplace for them, they are more likely to take initiative and work hard. They’re more productive because they’re given the leeway to come up with innovative solutions and the authority to put them into action with the backing of upper management. At Disney Animation, the new organizational structure is set up so that constant informal and formal communication is the norm.

Since everyone is in the same place, it’s easy for supervisors to talk to each other and work together. When workers feel like their bosses believe in them, they experience the same level of intrinsic motivation seen in any other business. That’s why I’m confident that the office space provided to workers elsewhere can be successfully implemented in my own company.

Since workers would have more chances to boost one another’s morale and enthusiasm for individual effort, which in turn would boost both innovation and output. This organizational model proves most effective in the highly creative Product Design team. Workers’ ability to think for themselves is fostered by the organizational design, which bodes well for the creation of truly original products. Staff in such an organization enjoy the backing of encouraging superiors, which in turn helps them develop the confidence they need to do better work.

If you have any questions or comments on the case study, please write us a note

Follow us on Quora or LinkedIn

Samrat Saha

Samrat is a Delhi-based MBA from the Indian Institute of Management. He is a Strategy, AI, and Marketing Enthusiast and passionately writes about core and emerging topics in Management studies. Reach out to his LinkedIn for a discussion or follow his Quora Page

TheCaseSolutions.com

  • Order Status
  • Testimonials
  • What Makes Us Different

Walt Disney case Harvard Case Solution & Analysis

Home >> Finance Case Studies Analysis >> Walt Disney case

disney case study solution

  9-Cell Industry Attractiveness/Business Strength Metric for the Walt Disney

Industry Attractiveness

The above 9-Cell Industry Attractiveness/Business Strength Matrix shows the strengths and industry attractiveness of the business units of the Walt Disney. The resort and parks business units have the high industry attractiveness and strong competitive position (business strength) as compared to the other business units of the company. The media network business unit has the high industry attractiveness and the strong business strength /competitive position. The studio entertainment has the average market attractiveness and has the weak business strength /competitive position. The interactive media although has average industry attractiveness but it has better competitive position and is growing as a strong business unit The consumer product has low industry attractiveness and weak business strength/competitive position as compared to the other four business units of the Walt Disney.

9-Cell Industry Attractiveness/Business Strength Matrix shows that the park and resorts media networks are the strongest business unit of the Walt Disney.

Yes, Walt Disney’s portfolio exhibits good strategic fit .The Walt Disney is one of the most recognizable entertainment company of the world. It has the wide range of unique product portfolio. The company has gain expertise in technology to catch up and to potentially takeover their competitors. For example the cost that was incurred long ago by the studio was to develop the characters like Mickey Mouse and Cinderella and now is continuously generating returns for the company in gaming/video productions, theme parks and hotels/cruise ships. The assets are deployed by the company across all business units in order to drive high shareholders value.

Walt Disney has the Strong customer service, Media Networks and Broadcasting division. The Growth from cable and satellite operators is creating even more potential for Disney to make money with their network. The company has the opportunity to invest in building new theme for their parks in order to satisfy the increase in theme park attendance, guest spending, and hotel occupancy.

The financial ratios of 2011 shows increase in the financial performance of the company as compared to the year 2012.The liquidity ratios of the company increased from the year 2001 to 2011 that includes the current ratio and quick ratio. Similarly the profitability ratios that is Gross profit margin, net profit margin, return on asset, return on asset and return on investment, the Walt Disney shows increase from the year 2010 to 2011 whereas operating profit margin shows decrease in the year of 2011 as compared to the year 2010.The sales and net income growth ratios also shows increase in the performance of the company. The debt ratios which includes debt ratio and debt to equity ratio also shows increase as compared to the year 2010. The overall financial performance of the company shows increment in the year 2011 as compared to the year 2010(see excel file).

The company should improve their advertising strategies to promote the entertainment that should target more mature customers. The company should also build new attractions in every park and resort to stay appealing to their customers. Expansion into international markets seem favorable for the Walt Disney so it should search new markets and expand its business in foreign developed countries  which will help the company to improve and increase the shareholders value. The company should price the products in a way that can cater the need of all the social classes in the product markets. In order to improve Walt Disney can also remove the Interactive Media Segment as this business unit is losing the money and has lower operating profit.

SWOT Analysis:

Strengths  

The strength of the Walt Disney includes:

  • Walt Disney has strong diversification of the products.
  • It has the strong brand recognition.
  • Walt Disney has great abilities to responsiveness to the new and different markets.
  • Each business unit of the company has creative process  

The weakness of the Walt Disney includes:

  • High research and development cost.
  • High sunk cost
  • High risk factors

Constant up graduation.................................

This is just a sample partial case solution. Please place the order on the website to order your own originally done case solution.

Related Case Solutions & Analyses:

disney case study solution

Hire us for Originally Written Case Solution/ Analysis

Like us and get updates:.

Harvard Case Solutions

Search Case Solutions

  • Accounting Case Solutions
  • Auditing Case Studies
  • Business Case Studies
  • Economics Case Solutions
  • Finance Case Studies Analysis
  • Harvard Case Study Analysis Solutions
  • Human Resource Cases
  • Ivey Case Solutions
  • Management Case Studies
  • Marketing HBS Case Solutions
  • Operations Management Case Studies
  • Supply Chain Management Cases
  • Taxation Case Studies

More From Finance Case Studies Analysis

  • Jiuding Capital: Private Equity Firm with Chinese Characteristics
  • Unilever Foodsolutions Journey (D): Progress And Lessons Learned
  • Loctite Corporation Industrial Products Group
  • Geneva Bank
  • BHP Billiton and Mozal (B)
  • Ericsson Hewlett-Packard Telecommunications (Introductory Note)

Contact us:

disney case study solution

Check Order Status

Service Guarantee

How Does it Work?

Why TheCaseSolutions.com?

disney case study solution

Our Guarantees

Zero plagiarism, best quality, qualified writers, absolute privacy, timely delivery.

Interesting Fact

Interesting Fact

Most recent surveys suggest that around 76 % students try professional academic writing services at least once in their lifetime!

Allow Our Skilled Essay Writers to Proficiently Finish Your Paper.

We are here to help. Chat with us on WhatsApp for any queries.

Customer Representative

Texas Business School Logo

  • Predictive Analytics Workshops
  • Corporate Strategy Workshops
  • Advanced Excel for MBA
  • Powerpoint Workshops
  • Digital Transformation
  • Competing on Business Analytics
  • Aligning Analytics with Strategy
  • Building & Sustaining Competitive Advantages
  • Corporate Strategy
  • Aligning Strategy & Sales
  • Digital Marketing
  • Hypothesis Testing
  • Time Series Analysis
  • Regression Analysis
  • Machine Learning
  • Marketing Strategy
  • Branding & Advertising
  • Risk Management
  • Hedging Strategies
  • Network Plotting
  • Bar Charts & Time Series
  • Technical Analysis of Stocks MACD
  • NPV Worksheet
  • ABC Analysis Worksheet
  • WACC Worksheet
  • Porter 5 Forces
  • Porter Value Chain
  • Amazing Charts
  • Garnett Chart
  • HBR Case Solution
  • 4P Analysis
  • 5C Analysis
  • NPV Analysis
  • SWOT Analysis
  • PESTEL Analysis
  • Cost Optimization

Euro Disney: The First 100 Days

  • Technology & Operations / MBA EMBA Resources

Next Case Study Solutions

  • Celebrity Cruises, Inc.: A Taste of Luxury, Portuguese Version Case Study Solution
  • Blizzard vs. bnetd.org: Managing Intellectual Property, Paul Grewal (Video) Case Study Solution
  • New Balance Athletic Shoe, Inc. (Abridged) Case Study Solution
  • Merv Griffin's Resorts Case Study Solution
  • Boat Building Exercise: Four Modes of Propulsion Case Study Solution

Previous Case Solutions

  • Club Med (A), Spanish Version Case Study Solution
  • Chartwell Technologies: Upping the Ante with Internet Poker Case Study Solution
  • Team New Zealand (B), Spanish Version Case Study Solution
  • Student Plays Fantasy Hockey (B) Case Study Solution
  • Salt Lake Organizing Committee: 2002 Olympics Case Study Solution

predictive analytics texas business school

Predictive Analytics

May 7, 2024

disney case study solution

Popular Tags

Case study solutions.

disney case study solution

Case Study Solution | Assignment Help | Case Help

Euro disney: the first 100 days description.

The Walt Disney Co. theme parks historically have thrived on the basis of a formula stressing excellent customer service and a magnificent physical environment. The formula has proven successful in Japan, as well as the United States. With the controversial opening of Euro Disney in France, however, there has become reason to doubt the international appeal of the formula. The case documents issues involved with Euro Disney. Examines the transferability of a successful service concept across international boundaries.

Case Description Euro Disney: The First 100 Days

Strategic managment tools used in case study analysis of euro disney: the first 100 days, step 1. problem identification in euro disney: the first 100 days case study, step 2. external environment analysis - pestel / pest / step analysis of euro disney: the first 100 days case study, step 3. industry specific / porter five forces analysis of euro disney: the first 100 days case study, step 4. evaluating alternatives / swot analysis of euro disney: the first 100 days case study, step 5. porter value chain analysis / vrio / vrin analysis euro disney: the first 100 days case study, step 6. recommendations euro disney: the first 100 days case study, step 7. basis of recommendations for euro disney: the first 100 days case study, quality & on time delivery.

100% money back guarantee if the quality doesn't match the promise

100% Plagiarism Free

If the work we produce contain plagiarism then we payback 1000 USD

Paypal Secure

All your payments are secure with Paypal security.

300 Words per Page

We provide 300 words per page unlike competitors' 250 or 275

Free Title Page, Citation Page, References, Exhibits, Revision, Charts

Case study solutions are career defining. Order your custom solution now.

Case Analysis of Euro Disney: The First 100 Days

Euro Disney: The First 100 Days is a Harvard Business (HBR) Case Study on Technology & Operations , Texas Business School provides HBR case study assignment help for just $9. Texas Business School(TBS) case study solution is based on HBR Case Study Method framework, TBS expertise & global insights. Euro Disney: The First 100 Days is designed and drafted in a manner to allow the HBR case study reader to analyze a real-world problem by putting reader into the position of the decision maker. Euro Disney: The First 100 Days case study will help professionals, MBA, EMBA, and leaders to develop a broad and clear understanding of casecategory challenges. Euro Disney: The First 100 Days will also provide insight into areas such as – wordlist , strategy, leadership, sales and marketing, and negotiations.

Case Study Solutions Background Work

Euro Disney: The First 100 Days case study solution is focused on solving the strategic and operational challenges the protagonist of the case is facing. The challenges involve – evaluation of strategic options, key role of Technology & Operations, leadership qualities of the protagonist, and dynamics of the external environment. The challenge in front of the protagonist, of Euro Disney: The First 100 Days, is to not only build a competitive position of the organization but also to sustain it over a period of time.

Strategic Management Tools Used in Case Study Solution

The Euro Disney: The First 100 Days case study solution requires the MBA, EMBA, executive, professional to have a deep understanding of various strategic management tools such as SWOT Analysis, PESTEL Analysis / PEST Analysis / STEP Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, Go To Market Strategy, BCG Matrix Analysis, Porter Value Chain Analysis, Ansoff Matrix Analysis, VRIO / VRIN and Marketing Mix Analysis.

Texas Business School Approach to Technology & Operations Solutions

In the Texas Business School, Euro Disney: The First 100 Days case study solution – following strategic tools are used - SWOT Analysis, PESTEL Analysis / PEST Analysis / STEP Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, Go To Market Strategy, BCG Matrix Analysis, Porter Value Chain Analysis, Ansoff Matrix Analysis, VRIO / VRIN and Marketing Mix Analysis. We have additionally used the concept of supply chain management and leadership framework to build a comprehensive case study solution for the case – Euro Disney: The First 100 Days

Step 1 – Problem Identification of Euro Disney: The First 100 Days - Harvard Business School Case Study

The first step to solve HBR Euro Disney: The First 100 Days case study solution is to identify the problem present in the case. The problem statement of the case is provided in the beginning of the case where the protagonist is contemplating various options in the face of numerous challenges that Disney Euro is facing right now. Even though the problem statement is essentially – “Technology & Operations” challenge but it has impacted by others factors such as communication in the organization, uncertainty in the external environment, leadership in Disney Euro, style of leadership and organization structure, marketing and sales, organizational behavior, strategy, internal politics, stakeholders priorities and more.

Step 2 – External Environment Analysis

Texas Business School approach of case study analysis – Conclusion, Reasons, Evidences - provides a framework to analyze every HBR case study. It requires conducting robust external environmental analysis to decipher evidences for the reasons presented in the Euro Disney: The First 100 Days. The external environment analysis of Euro Disney: The First 100 Days will ensure that we are keeping a tab on the macro-environment factors that are directly and indirectly impacting the business of the firm.

What is PESTEL Analysis? Briefly Explained

PESTEL stands for political, economic, social, technological, environmental and legal factors that impact the external environment of firm in Euro Disney: The First 100 Days case study. PESTEL analysis of " Euro Disney: The First 100 Days" can help us understand why the organization is performing badly, what are the factors in the external environment that are impacting the performance of the organization, and how the organization can either manage or mitigate the impact of these external factors.

How to do PESTEL / PEST / STEP Analysis? What are the components of PESTEL Analysis?

As mentioned above PESTEL Analysis has six elements – political, economic, social, technological, environmental, and legal. All the six elements are explained in context with Euro Disney: The First 100 Days macro-environment and how it impacts the businesses of the firm.

How to do PESTEL Analysis for Euro Disney: The First 100 Days

To do comprehensive PESTEL analysis of case study – Euro Disney: The First 100 Days , we have researched numerous components under the six factors of PESTEL analysis.

Political Factors that Impact Euro Disney: The First 100 Days

Political factors impact seven key decision making areas – economic environment, socio-cultural environment, rate of innovation & investment in research & development, environmental laws, legal requirements, and acceptance of new technologies.

Government policies have significant impact on the business environment of any country. The firm in “ Euro Disney: The First 100 Days ” needs to navigate these policy decisions to create either an edge for itself or reduce the negative impact of the policy as far as possible.

Data safety laws – The countries in which Disney Euro is operating, firms are required to store customer data within the premises of the country. Disney Euro needs to restructure its IT policies to accommodate these changes. In the EU countries, firms are required to make special provision for privacy issues and other laws.

Competition Regulations – Numerous countries have strong competition laws both regarding the monopoly conditions and day to day fair business practices. Euro Disney: The First 100 Days has numerous instances where the competition regulations aspects can be scrutinized.

Import restrictions on products – Before entering the new market, Disney Euro in case study Euro Disney: The First 100 Days" should look into the import restrictions that may be present in the prospective market.

Export restrictions on products – Apart from direct product export restrictions in field of technology and agriculture, a number of countries also have capital controls. Disney Euro in case study “ Euro Disney: The First 100 Days ” should look into these export restrictions policies.

Foreign Direct Investment Policies – Government policies favors local companies over international policies, Disney Euro in case study “ Euro Disney: The First 100 Days ” should understand in minute details regarding the Foreign Direct Investment policies of the prospective market.

Corporate Taxes – The rate of taxes is often used by governments to lure foreign direct investments or increase domestic investment in a certain sector. Corporate taxation can be divided into two categories – taxes on profits and taxes on operations. Taxes on profits number is important for companies that already have a sustainable business model, while taxes on operations is far more significant for companies that are looking to set up new plants or operations.

Tariffs – Chekout how much tariffs the firm needs to pay in the “ Euro Disney: The First 100 Days ” case study. The level of tariffs will determine the viability of the business model that the firm is contemplating. If the tariffs are high then it will be extremely difficult to compete with the local competitors. But if the tariffs are between 5-10% then Disney Euro can compete against other competitors.

Research and Development Subsidies and Policies – Governments often provide tax breaks and other incentives for companies to innovate in various sectors of priority. Managers at Euro Disney: The First 100 Days case study have to assess whether their business can benefit from such government assistance and subsidies.

Consumer protection – Different countries have different consumer protection laws. Managers need to clarify not only the consumer protection laws in advance but also legal implications if the firm fails to meet any of them.

Political System and Its Implications – Different political systems have different approach to free market and entrepreneurship. Managers need to assess these factors even before entering the market.

Freedom of Press is critical for fair trade and transparency. Countries where freedom of press is not prevalent there are high chances of both political and commercial corruption.

Corruption level – Disney Euro needs to assess the level of corruptions both at the official level and at the market level, even before entering a new market. To tackle the menace of corruption – a firm should have a clear SOP that provides managers at each level what to do when they encounter instances of either systematic corruption or bureaucrats looking to take bribes from the firm.

Independence of judiciary – It is critical for fair business practices. If a country doesn’t have independent judiciary then there is no point entry into such a country for business.

Government attitude towards trade unions – Different political systems and government have different attitude towards trade unions and collective bargaining. The firm needs to assess – its comfort dealing with the unions and regulations regarding unions in a given market or industry. If both are on the same page then it makes sense to enter, otherwise it doesn’t.

Economic Factors that Impact Euro Disney: The First 100 Days

Social factors that impact euro disney: the first 100 days, technological factors that impact euro disney: the first 100 days, environmental factors that impact euro disney: the first 100 days, legal factors that impact euro disney: the first 100 days, step 3 – industry specific analysis, what is porter five forces analysis, step 4 – swot analysis / internal environment analysis, step 5 – porter value chain / vrio / vrin analysis, step 6 – evaluating alternatives & recommendations, step 7 – basis for recommendations, references :: euro disney: the first 100 days case study solution.

  • sales & marketing ,
  • leadership ,
  • corporate governance ,
  • Advertising & Branding ,
  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) ,

Amanda Watson

Leave your thought here

disney case study solution

© 2019 Texas Business School. All Rights Reserved

USEFUL LINKS

Follow us on.

Subscribe to our newsletter to receive news on update.

disney case study solution

Dark Brown Leather Watch

$200.00 $180.00

disney case study solution

Dining Chair

$300.00 $220.00

disney case study solution

Creative Wooden Stand

$100.00 $80.00

2 x $180.00

2 x $220.00

Subtotal: $200.00

Free Shipping on All Orders Over $100!

Product 2

Wooden round table

$360.00 $300.00

Hurley Dry-Fit Chino Short. Men's chino short. Outseam Length: 19 Dri-FIT Technology helps keep you dry and comfortable. Made with sweat-wicking fabric. Fitted waist with belt loops. Button waist with zip fly provides a classic look and feel .

The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution Analysis

The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution Analysis

by HBR Fifteen

The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution & Analysis. Get The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Analysis & Solution. Contact us directly at buycasesolutions(at)gmail(dot)com if you want to order for The Walt Disney Studios Case Solution, Case Analysis, Case... More

The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution & Analysis. Get The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Analysis & Solution. Contact us directly at buycasesolutions(at)gmail(dot)com if you want to order for The Walt Disney Studios Case Solution, Case Analysis, Case Study Solution. Anita Elberse Less

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution & Analysis The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution & Analysis. Our tutors are available 24/7 to assist in your academic stuff, Our Professional writers are ready to serve you in services you need. Every Case Study Solution & Analysis is prepared from scratch, top quality, plagiarism free. Authors: Anita Elberse Get Case Study Solution and Analysis of The Walt Disney Studios in a FAIR PRICE!! Steps for Case Study Solution & Analysis: 1. Introduction of The Walt Disney Studios Case Solution The The Walt Disney Studios case study is a Harvard Business Review case study, which presents a simulated practical experience to the reader allowing them to learn about real life problems in the business world. The The Walt Disney Studios case consisted of a central issue to the organization, which had to be identified, analysed and creative solutions had to be drawn to tackle the issue. This paper presents the solved The Walt Disney Studios case analysis and case solution. The method through which the analysis is done is mentioned, followed by the relevant tools used in finding the solution. The case solution first identifies the central issue to the The Walt Disney Studios case study, and the relevant stakeholders affected by this issue. This is known as the problem identification stage. After this, the relevant tools and models are used, which help in the case study analysis and case study solution. The tools used in identifying the solution consist of the SWOT Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, PESTEL Analysis, VRIO analysis, Value Chain Analysis, BCG Matrix analysis, Ansoff Matrix analysis, and the Marketing Mix analysis. The solution consists of recommended strategies to overcome this central issue. It is a good idea to also propose alternative case study solutions, because if the main solution is not found feasible, then the alternative solutions could be implemented. Lastly, a good case study solution also includes an implementation plan for the recommendation strategies. This shows how through a step-by-step procedure as to how the central issue can be resolved. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] 2. Problem Identification of The Walt Disney Studios Case Solution Harvard Business Review cases involve a central problem that is being faced by the organization and these problems affect a number of stakeholders. In the problem identification stage, the problem faced by The Walt Disney Studios is identified through reading of the case. This could be mentioned at the start of the reading, the middle or the end. At times in a case analysis, the problem may be clearly evident in the reading of the HBR case. At other times, finding the issue is the job of the person analysing the case. It is also important to understand what stakeholders are affected by the problem and how. The goals of the stakeholders and are the organization are also identified to ensure that the case study analysis are consistent with these. 3. Analysis of the The Walt Disney Studios HBR Case Study The objective of the case should be focused on. This is doing the The Walt Disney Studios Case Solution. This analysis can be proceeded in a step-by-step procedure to ensure that effective solutions are found. In the first step, a growth path of the company can be formulated that lays down its vision, mission and strategic aims. These can usually be developed using the company history is provided in the case. Company history is helpful in a Business Case study as it helps one understand what the scope of the solutions will be for the case study. The next step is of understanding the company; its people, their priorities and the overall culture. This can be done by using company history. It can also be done by looking at anecdotal instances of managers or employees that are usually included in an HBR case study description to give the reader a real feel of the situation. Lastly, a timeline of the issues and events in the case needs to be made. Arranging events in a timeline allows one to predict the next few events that are likely to take place. It also helps one in developing the case study solutions. The timeline also helps in understanding the continuous challenges that are being faced by the organisation. 4. SWOT analysis of The Walt Disney Studios An important tool that helps in addressing the central issue of the case and coming up with The Walt Disney Studios HBR case solution is the SWOT analysis. The SWOT analysis is a strategic management tool that lists down in the form of a matrix, an organisation's internal strengths and weaknesses, and external opportunities and threats. It helps in the strategic analysis of The Walt Disney Studios Once this listing has been done, a clearer picture can be developed in regards to how strategies will be formed to address the main problem. For example, strengths will be used as an advantage in solving the issue. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Therefore, the SWOT analysis is a helpful tool in coming up with the The Walt Disney Studios Case Study answers. One does not need to remain restricted to using the traditional SWOT analysis, but the advanced TOWS matrix or weighted average SWOT analysis can also be used. 5. Porter Five Forces Analysis for The Walt Disney Studios Another helpful tool in finding the case solutions is of Porter's Five Forces analysis. This is also a strategic tool that is used to analyse the competitive environment of the industry in which The Walt Disney Studios operates in. Analysis of the industry is important as businesses do not work in isolation in real life, but are affected by the business environment of the industry that they operate in. Harvard Business case studies represent real-life situations, and therefore, an analysis of the industry's competitive environment needs to be carried out to come up with more holistic case study solutions. In Porter's Five Forces analysis, the industry is analysed along 5 dimensions. • These are the threats that the industry faces due to new entrants. • It includes the threat of substitute products. • It includes the bargaining power of buyers in the industry. • It includes the bargaining power of suppliers in an industry. • Lastly, the overall rivalry or competition within the industry is analysed This tool helps one understand the relative powers of the major players in the industry and its overall competitive dynamics. Actionable and practical solutions can then be developed by keeping these factors into perspective. 6. PESTEL Analysis of The Walt Disney Studios Another helpful tool that should be used in finding the case study solutions is the PESTEL analysis. This also looks at the external business environment of the organisation helps in finding case study Analysis to real-life business issues as in HBR cases. • The PESTEL analysis particularly looks at the macro environmental factors that affect the industry. These are the political, environmental, social, technological, environmental and legal (regulatory) factors affecting the industry. • Factors within each of these 6 should be listed down, and analysis should be made as to how these affect the organisation under question. 7. VRIO Analysis of The Walt Disney Studios This is an analysis carried out to know about the internal strengths and capabilities of The Walt Disney Studios . Under the VRIO analysis, the following steps are carried out: Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] • The internal resources of The Walt Disney Studios are listed down. • Each of these resources are assessed in terms of the value it brings to the organization. • Each resource is assessed in terms of how rare it is. A rare resource is one that is not commonly used by competitors. • Each resource is assessed whether it could be imitated by competition easily or not. • Lastly, each resource is assessed in terms of whether the organization can use it to an advantage or not. • The analysis done on the 4 dimensions; Value, Rareness, Imitability, and Organization. If a resource is high on all of these 4, then it brings long-term competitive advantage. If a resource is high on Value, Rareness, and Imitability, then it brings an unused competitive advantage. If a resource is high on Value and Rareness, then it only brings temporary competitive advantage. If a resource is only valuable, then it’s a competitive parity. If it’s none, then it can be regarded as a competitive disadvantage. 8. Value Chain Analysis of The Walt Disney Studios The Value chain analysis of The Walt Disney Studios helps in identifying the activities of an organization, and how these add value in terms of cost reduction and differentiation. This tool is used in the case study analysis as follows: • The firm’s primary and support activities are listed down. • Identifying the importance of these activities in the cost of the product and the differentiation they produce. • Lastly, differentiation or cost reduction strategies are to be used for each of these activities to increase the overall value provided by these activities. Recognizing value creating activities and enhancing the value that they create allow The Walt Disney Studios to increase its competitive advantage. 9. BCG Matrix of The Walt Disney Studios The BCG Matrix is an important tool in deciding whether an organization should invest or divest in its strategic business units. The matrix involves placing the strategic business units of a business in one of four categories; question marks, stars, dogs and cash cows. The placement in these categories depends on the relative market share of the organization and the market growth of these strategic business units. The steps to be followed in this analysis is as follows: • Identify the relative market share of each strategic business unit. • Identify the market growth of each strategic business unit. • Place these strategic business units in one of four categories. Question Marks are those strategic business units with high market share and low market growth rate. Stars are those strategic business units with high market share and high market growth rate. Cash Cows are those strategic business units Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] with high market share and low market growth rate. Dogs are those strategic business units with low market share and low growth rate. • Relevant strategies should be implemented for each strategic business unit depending on its position in the matrix. The strategies identified from the The Walt Disney Studios BCG matrix and included in the case pdf. These are either to further develop the product, penetrate the market, develop the market, diversification, investing or divesting. 10. Ansoff Matrix of The Walt Disney Studios Ansoff Matrix is an important strategic tool to come up with future strategies for The Walt Disney Studios in the case solution. It helps decide whether an organization should pursue future expansion in new markets and products or should it focus on existing markets and products. • The organization can penetrate into existing markets with its existing products. This is known as market penetration strategy. • The organization can develop new products for the existing market. This is known as product development strategy. • The organization can enter new markets with its existing products. This is known as market development strategy. • The organization can enter into new markets with new products. This is known as a diversification strategy. The choice of strategy depends on the analysis of the previous tools used and the level of risk the organization is willing to take. 11. Marketing Mix of The Walt Disney Studios The Walt Disney Studios needs to bring out certain responses from the market that it targets. To do so, it will need to use the marketing mix, which serves as a tool in helping bring out responses from the market. The 4 elements of the marketing mix are Product, Price, Place and Promotions. The following steps are required to carry out a marketing mix analysis and include this in the case study analysis. • Analyse the company’s products and devise strategies to improve the product offering of the company. • Analyse the company’s price points and devise strategies that could be based on competition, value or cost. • Analyse the company’s promotion mix. This includes the advertisement, public relations, personal selling, sales promotion, and direct marketing. Strategies will be devised which makes use of a few or all of these elements. • Analyse the company’s distribution and reach. Strategies can be devised to improve the availability of the company’s products. 12. The Walt Disney Studios Strategy Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] The strategies devised and included in the The Walt Disney Studios case memo should have a strategy. A strategy is a strategy that involves firms seeking uncontested market spaces, which makes the competition of the company irrelevant. It involves coming up with new and unique products or ideas through innovation. This gives the organization a competitive advantage over other firms, unlike a red ocean strategy. 13. Competitors analysis of The Walt Disney Studios The PESTEL analysis discussed previously looked at the macro environmental factors affecting business, but not the microenvironmental factors. One of the microenvironmental factors are competitors, which are addressed by a competitor analysis. The Competitors analysis of The Walt Disney Studios looks at the direct and indirect competitors within the industry that it operates in. • This involves a detailed analysis of their actions and how these would affect the future strategies of The Walt Disney Studios . • It involves looking at the current market share of the company and its competitors. • It should compare the marketing mix elements of competitors, their supply chain, human resources, financial strength etc. • It also should look at the potential opportunities and threats that these competitors pose on the company. 14. Organisation of the Analysis into The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution Once various tools have been used to analyse the case, the findings of this analysis need to be incorporated into practical and actionable solutions. These solutions will also be the The Walt Disney Studios case answers. These are usually in the form of strategies that the organisation can adopt. The following step-by-step procedure can be used to organise the Harvard Business case solution and recommendations: • The first step of the solution is to come up with a corporate level strategy for the organisation. This part consists of solutions that address issues faced by the organisation on a strategic level. This could include suggestions, changes or recommendations to the company's vision, mission and its strategic objectives. It can include recommendations on how the organisation can work towards achieving these strategic objectives. Furthermore, it needs to be explained how the stated recommendations will help in solving the main issue mentioned in the case and where the company will stand in the future as a result of these. • The second step of the solution is to come up with a business level strategy. The HBR case studies may present issues faced by a part of the organisation. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] For example, the issues may be stated for marketing and the role of a marketing manager needs to be assumed. So, recommendations and suggestions need to address the strategy of the marketing department in this case. Therefore, the strategic objectives of this business unit (Marketing) will be laid down in the solutions and recommendations will be made as to how to achieve these objectives. Similar would be the case for any other business unit or department such as human resources, finance, IT etc. The important thing to note here is that the business level strategy needs to be aligned with the overall corporate strategy of the organisation. For example, if one suggests the organisation to focus on differentiation for competitive advantage as a corporate level strategy, then it can't be recommended for the The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution that the business unit should focus on costs. • The third step is not compulsory but depends from case to case. In some HBR case studies, one may be required to analyse an issue at a department. This issue may be analysed for a manager or employee as well. In these cases, recommendations need to be made for these people. The solution may state that objectives that these people need to achieve and how these objectives would be achieved. The case study analysis and solution, and The Walt Disney Studios case answers should be written down in the The Walt Disney Studios case memo, clearly identifying which part shows what. The The Walt Disney Studios case should be in a professional format, presenting points clearly that are well understood by the reader. 15. Alternate solution to the The Walt Disney Studios HBR case study It is important to have more than one solution to the case study. This is the alternate solution that would be implemented if the original proposed solution is found infeasible or impossible due to a change in circumstances. The alternate solution for The Walt Disney Studios is presented in the same way as the original solution, where it consists of a corporate level strategy, business level strategy and other recommendations. 16. Implementation of The Walt Disney Studios Case Solution The case study does not end at just providing recommendations to the issues at hand. One is also required to provide how these recommendations would be implemented. This is shown through a proper implementation framework. A detailed implementation framework helps in distinguishing between an average and an above average case study answer. A good implementation framework shows the Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email.

Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] proposed plan and how the organisations' resources would be used to achieve the objectives. It also lays down the changes needed to be made as well as the assumptions in the process. • A proper implementation framework shows that one has clearly understood the case study and the main issue within it. • It shows that one has been clarified with the HBR fundamentals on the topic. • It shows that the details provided in the case have been properly analysed. • It shows that one has developed an ability to prioritise recommendations and how these could be successfully implemented. • The implementation framework also helps by removing out any recommendations that are not practical or actionable as these could not be implemented. Therefore, the implementation framework ensures that the solution to the The Walt Disney Studios Harvard case is complete and properly answered. 17. Recommendations and Action Plan for The Walt Disney Studios case analysis For The Walt Disney Studios, based on the SWOT Analysis, Porter Five Forces Analysis, PESTEL Analysis, VRIO analysis, Value Chain Analysis, BCG Matrix analysis, Ansoff Matrix analysis, and the Marketing Mix analysis, the recommendations and action plan are as follows: • The Walt Disney Studios should focus on making use of its strengths identified from the VRIO analysis to make the most of the opportunities identified from the PESTEL. • The Walt Disney Studios should enhance the value creating activities within its value chain. • The Walt Disney Studios should invest in its stars and cash cows, while getting rid of the dogs identified from the BCG Matrix analysis. • To achieve its overall corporate and business level objectives, it should make use of the marketing mix tools to obtain desired results from its target market. Email us for Any Case Solution at: [email protected] Note: This article is just a sample and not an actual case solution. If you want original case solution, please place your order on the Email.

  • Related publications
  • Add to favorites

IMAGES

  1. Case solution for the walt disney studios by Harvard Case Study

    disney case study solution

  2. Calaméo

    disney case study solution

  3. Calaméo

    disney case study solution

  4. Free Disney Case Study Example

    disney case study solution

  5. Walt Disney Case Solution And Analysis, HBR Case Study Solution

    disney case study solution

  6. Disney case study

    disney case study solution

VIDEO

  1. Disney Case Files Episode 5 Detective Meg 🕵️‍♀️

  2. Disney case!

  3. Disney Case Files Episode 4 Detective Lady Tremaine 🕵️‍♀️

  4. Disney Case Files Episode 3 Detective Prince 🤴 Phillip 🕵️‍♂️

  5. Disney Case Study-A Marketing Excellence

  6. Solve the Case with Mira

COMMENTS

  1. The Walt Disney Company: A Corporate Strategy Analysis

    Disney is a publically traded company with 1.8 billion shares outstanding valued at almost $90 billion, as of November 2012. While both Fidelity Investments and The Vanguard Group both hold over 4% of the firm's stock, the largest single inside investor is Robert Iger, who owns a little over 1.1 million shares.38.

  2. The Walt Disney Company

    The case is set in February 2020 and the protagonist in the case is Disney CEO Bob Chapek. The case examines how Disney grew through the corporate strategies of vertical integration, diversification, and geographic expansion. It also focuses on the technological changes in the media entertainment industry. Impending streaming wars mean Disney will face even more formidable competition that may ...

  3. The Walt Disney Company Case Study Complete

    Case Study. By: Hope Miller. Hope Miller Summer II 2021. Strategic Management 4303 - D. Old Mission Statement. The Walt Disney Company aims to "entertain, inform and inspire people around the globe through the power of unparalleled storytelling, reflecting the iconic brands, creative minds and innovative technologies that make ours the world's premier entertainment company." (The Walt ...

  4. Disney at the crossroads of disruptive trends

    With the nomination of Kevin Mayer at the helm of DTCI in March 2018, Disney realized its intention to transition into a B2C company. However, it was going to be a long road for Mayer, who faced both external and internal challenges. The case explores Mayer's options to succeed in a rapidly evolving marketplace in which former partners and ...

  5. Reawakening the Magic: Bob Iger and Walt Disney

    Reawakening the Magic: Bob Iger and the Walt Disney Company - Case Solution. Reawakening the Magic: Bob Iger and the Walt Disney Company case study looks at how the company evolved after poor financial results amidst competition. David J. Collis and Ashley Hartman. Harvard Business Review ( 717483-PDF-ENG)

  6. The Walt Disney Company's Strategy in Context Case Study

    The case study selected for the investigation of strategic management and planning is devoted to the Walt Disney Company. It is one of the leading mass-media and entertainment corporations with the central office in the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California (Cieply, 2012). At the moment, it is considered the world's largest conglomerate ...

  7. The Walt Disney Studios

    Abstract. In December 2015, Alan Horn, chairman of The Walt Disney Studios, celebrates the world premiere of Star Wars: The Force Awakens —only the latest in a string of big bets that he has overseen. Disney pursues a "tentpole strategy" that revolves around at least eight big-budget movies each year—most from its acquired labels Pixar ...

  8. PDF CHAPTER 9 Case Study: The Walt Disney Company

    Case Study: The Walt Disney Company Having developed the Leadership Lifecycle over the preceding chapters, including the leadership roles that correspond with the phases of the organization's lifecycle, the dangers inherent in transitions from one phase to another, and how it is possible for some individual leaders to span

  9. Walt Disney: Changing the World

    Abstract. This case describes the rise of Walt Disney, founder of the worldwide entertainment company. The case describes how Disney, as a young artist, created memorable figures such as Mickey Mouse and went on to produce Academy-award-winning films and build the world's most popular theme park. Students will learn how Walt Disney navigated ...

  10. Keeping the Eyes Busy: A Case Study of Disney+

    The Walt Disney Company is a leading diversified international family entertainment and media enterprise that includes Disney Parks, Experiences and Products; Disney Media & Entertainment Distribution; and three content groups - Studios, General Entertainment and Sports - focused on developing and producing content for DTC, theatrical and linear platforms [].

  11. Managing Industry Disruption: Disney Plus Case Study

    In an era of disruption, Disney CEO Bob Iger led one of the world's most beloved brands to unprecedented success with the acquisitions of Pixar, Marvel, and Lucasfilm. Now, through case studies and lessons from 45 years in media, Bob teaches you how to evolve your business and career.

  12. Case Study: Walt Disney's Business Strategies

    Case Study: Walt Disney's Business Strategies. Walt Disney Company is a $27 billion a year Global Entertainment giant which is an American based company was started by Walter Disney in venture with his brother named Roy O Disney in 1923. In 1928, Walt Disney created Mickey Mouse for which Walt wanted to call his character "Mortimer" but ...

  13. The Walt Disney Studios Change Management Analysis & Solution

    Step 1 - Establish a sense of urgency. What are areas that require urgent change management efforts in the " The Walt Disney Studios " case study. Some of the areas that require urgent changes are - organizing sales force to meet competitive realities, building new organizational structure to enter new markets or explore new opportunities.

  14. Case Study Solution of The Walt Disney Company and Pixar, Inc.: To

    The Walt Disney Company and Pixar, Inc.: To Acquire or Not to Acquire? is a Harvard Business (HBR) Case Study on Strategy & Execution , Texas Business School provides HBR case study assignment help for just $9. Texas Business School(TBS) case study solution is based on HBR Case Study Method framework, TBS expertise & global insights.

  15. Problem Analysis of the Walt Disney Company Case Study

    The Walt Disney Company is a leading international entertainment center and media enterprise having subsidiaries all over the world. The operation and management of enterprise experience are carried out by the organization's division Disney Parks and Resorts that is responsible for entertaining people and guiding those into the world of media ...

  16. Teaming at Disney Animation Case Study Solution [7 Steps]

    The first step to solve HBR Teaming at Disney Animation case study solution is to identify the problem present in the case. The problem statement of the case is provided in the beginning of the case where the protagonist is contemplating various options in the face of numerous challenges that Animation Geibel is facing right now. Even though ...

  17. Solved EURO DISNEY: A Case Study The Walt Disney Company

    Operations Management questions and answers. EURO DISNEY: A Case Study The Walt Disney Company chose Paris, France, as the site of Euro Disneyland for many reasons. One was the success of Tokyo Disneyland. On April 15, 1983, the Walt Disney Company opened in Tokyo, Japan, their first theme park outside the United States.

  18. Walt Disney Company's Sleeping Beauty Bonds Harvard Case Solution

    Walt Disney Company's Sleeping Beauty Bonds Case Solution,Walt Disney Company's Sleeping Beauty Bonds Case Analysis, Walt Disney Company's Sleeping Beauty Bonds Case Study Solution, Problem Statement This case analyzes the biggest bond issue in the history of $ 300 million bonds by Disney with a maturity period of 100 years. The

  19. [Solved]Teaming at Disney Animation Case Study Solution

    Teaming at Disney Animation Case study solution. Teaming at Disney animation is a case study from HBR. The Case can be analyzed from the lens of organizational structure, People as an organization strategy, and using restructuring to remove organization silos. Contents hide. 1 Teaming at Disney Animation Case Introduction.

  20. Walt Disney case Case Solution And Analysis, HBR Case Study Solution

    Walt Disney case Case Solution,Walt Disney case Case Analysis, Walt Disney case Case Study Solution, Question 3 9-Cell Industry Attractiveness/Business Strength Metric for the Walt Disney High Industry Attractiveness The above 9-Cell Industry

  21. The Walt Disney Company Case Analysis and Case Solution

    The case study analysis and solution, and The Walt Disney Company case answers should be written down in the The Walt Disney Company case memo, clearly identifying which part shows what. The The Walt Disney Company case should be in a professional format, presenting points clearly that are well understood by the reader.

  22. Case Study Solution of Euro Disney: The First 100 Days

    Euro Disney: The First 100 Days is a Harvard Business (HBR) Case Study on Technology & Operations , Texas Business School provides HBR case study assignment help for just $9. Texas Business School(TBS) case study solution is based on HBR Case Study Method framework, TBS expertise & global insights.

  23. The Walt Disney Studios Case Study Solution Analysis

    Steps for Case Study Solution & Analysis: 1. Introduction of The Walt Disney Studios Case Solution The The Walt Disney Studios case study is a Harvard Business Review case study, which presents a simulated practical experience to the reader allowing them to learn about real life problems in the business world.