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  • Icebreaker speech [Toastmasters]

Icebreaker speech for Toastmasters

Help to master your icebreaker step by step (with examples) from topic choice, to preparation, to delivery

By:  Susan Dugdale  

Congratulations! You've made a decision to become a better communicator and joined Toastmasters International, the worldwide educational organization specializing in communication, public speaking and leadership skills.

And now you have an icebreaker speech to prepare! ☺

Use the page index to find what you need quickly

  • What is a Toastmasters ice breaker speech? - Its time allocation and purpose
  • How to find a topic and structure your speech - 5 ways to find a topic you really want to talk about, with examples
  • How to brainstorm to easily generate ideas to fit your topic, with an example
  • How to take the ideas from your brainstorm and transform them into the words you'll actually say. Before and after examples for each of the 4 main points forming the body of the speech, and the transitions between them.  
  • How to write the conclusion of your icebreaker , with an example
  • How to write the introduction, with an example
  • An example icebreaker speech - full text, with audio
  • What to expect of yourself when you give your ice breaker - 5 tips to help
  • How your icebreaker will be evaluated - an explanation of the evaluation process
  • Links to official Toastmaster icebreaker resources   

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What is a Toastmasters ice breaker speech?

Essentially the icebreaker is an introductory speech of 4 - 6 minutes long. *

It's the first prepared speech you give as a member of a Toastmaster's Club, and the first project on your chosen Toastmaster Pathway. ( For more about the eleven Toastmaster Pathways. )

Image: paper boat sailing through ice floe Text: Master your Toastmaster Icebreaker speech. 5 ways to choose a topic & prepare your speech

What's the purpose of an icebreaker speech?

The purpose of the speech is twofold.

  • For the club members its purpose is to help them get to know you. They want to find out who you are as a person and what your speaking strengths and aspirations are. That will help them, help you reach them.
  • For you, the speaker, the main purpose is to  begin the process of becoming a competent, confident communicator. That is, learning to be comfortable while out of your comfort zone, sharing and being your authentic, beautiful, vulnerable self in front of others. Your icebreaker marks an official starting point on your quest to become a better public speaker, regardless of the Pathway option you have selected. It's the first assignment on all eleven of them!

* When I gave my own ice breaker speech, I think I set a new club record: 9 plus minutes long! Way, way over the time limit.

I attempted to share the complete, and fascinating, story of my entire life! (I'm exaggerating, but you get the picture.)

I hadn't realized a sliver, a small slice, was all I had room for because I hadn't timed myself when I practiced my speech at home. Luckily for me, they were very kind about it.

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What will the topic of your icebreaker be?

Colorful label: 5 ways to find an icebreaker speech topic

Below are five ways of finding a topic for your first speech. The one you choose will also help you structure your speech. 

The subject matter of your icebreaker is simple. It is about you: who you are.

You'll find it's reasonably easy to tell which way, or method, of the five will be best for you. It's the one triggering a rush of ideas and personal stories.

The topic you settle on should be one you feel comfortable talking about in front of the people at your Toastmasters club, whom as yet, you don't know very well.

1. Chronological - a timeline

A chronological topic is a timeline of carefully selected past experiences that have shaped your life from birth to the present time.

For instance, a potent childhood memory - one that you can still see, hear and feel today, followed by something from your high school days or your college years, and then maybe something about significant friendships/relationships, hobbies or interests and a workplace event.

2. How I got here

This topic is about looking back, isolating, and sharing the series of events leading to you standing in front of a Toastmaster audience giving your icebreaker speech.

For example:

  • being asked to be best man at a friend's wedding, delivering the speech adequately but not as well as you would have liked 
  • wanting to speak up at work but lacking the courage to do so 
  • realizing that not addressing the anxiety you felt around speaking in public was holding you back from many of the things you wanted to do.

3. Themed ideas 

These are topic suggestions united by a common thread.

Pick one that resonates and see where it takes you. Ideally you want three main points - all of them linked to the theme you've chosen.

  • Values - 3 important things I value most in my life
  • Seasons - Winter, Spring, Summer or Autumn (Fall) - activities, food, nature...
  • Love - my 3 greatest loves - food, family and music
  • Family - what family life means to me - acceptance, shelter, challenge
  • Celebrations - Christmas, birthdays, weddings, graduations - what they mean to me
  • Travel-journeying - local, national, international - what it means to me, what I've learned, interesting people I've met
  • Heroes - the different people who have inspired you - who they are, how they inspired and why
  • Sport - the role of sport in my life, the different ways it has made who I am for better or for worse
  • Friends - snapshots of the role of friendship in my life from the time I was a little kid to now
  • Dreams - what they are, how they've changed - refining and reaching them
  • Challenge - the 3 biggest challenges in my life so far
  • Sayings/quotations I live by - For example, "This too will pass" - 3 examples of times when "This too will pass" was the reminder needed.

4. Topical ideas for your icebreaker speech

This is a series of snapshots (topics) illustrating different and significant aspects of your life.

For instance:

  • your passion for organic gardening,
  • the pleasure you get from volunteering in your local high school's holiday program, and
  • how you have learned to live with a chronic health condition like myalgia encephalomyelitis (ME)

5. The event - a pivotal, life changing event

The core of this method is a major happening - one that completely disrupted and overturned life as you knew it.

Events affecting many:

  • a natural disaster - an earthquake, a fire, flooding, or a cyclone that destroyed where you lived.
  • a man-made disaster - a war, terrorism, a chemical or oil spill, transport failures, building collapses, arson...

Or a personal event affecting a smaller group of people, yourself and those close to you:

  • the unexpected loss of your job
  • the death of someone important to you
  • becoming dangerously ill
  • being the recipient of unexpected good fortune
  • being in an accident, and the path to recovery
  • meeting a mentor who opened your eyes to your own potential...

This speech has two parts: before the event, and, after it. 

What will you talk about? Brainstorming to pull together ideas 

Once you've chosen a topic, your next step is to begin generating the ideas you think you may like to cover in the main part of your speech - the body. The easiest and best way I know to do that, is to brainstorm.

An example of a brainstorm for an icebreaker speech.

How to brainstorm ideas for your icebreaker

Put your selected topic prompt in the center of a blank page or document just as I've done in my example above. Then free write.

Jot down all the ideas that come to you as quickly as you can, giving each of them their own space. Note as much as you need to trigger the thought or memory about it again, if you decide to use it.

Don't write full sentences or stop to get the spelling right.

If you need help to get going, try asking yourself 'how', 'when', 'why', 'what', 'when' and 'who' questions about your chosen topic.

For example: How did I get here? What happened? When did it happen? Why did it happen? Who was involved?

When you feel you've exhausted all the possibilities, stop. 

Reviewing and selecting your material

Review your ideas. Then select the 3 or 4 strongest, and most suitable of them, remembering that you:

  • only have 4-6 minutes to speak,  
  • still have to flesh these points out, 
  • need to add transitions to move smoothly between them,
  • and haven't added an introduction or a conclusion yet.

Some, even though you might like them, may have to go! 

What you choose will become the main points you make in the body of your speech.

An example icebreaker speech - step by step

In my step-by-step example below, I've used the prompt or topic suggestion 'how I got here'.  

How to get from brainstorming to a first draft

To illustrate the process of getting from brainstorm notes to a first draft of the body of your speech I've used the same points I put into the image of an example brainstorm above.

I've put them into the order I want to speak about them. Now they need more detail and transitions between them to enable the audience to follow you easily as you move from one point to the next.

To make the changes I made easier to see I've given you the 4 main points unworked, (as they are in the brainstorm image), and followed that with their reworked form.

Between each main point there's a transition - a sentence or two connecting them together to make it easier for listeners to follow. 

Once the first draft of body or heart of the speech is done, we'll move to adding the conclusion and the opening or introduction.

1st main point from brainstorm - unworked 

Best man at mate's wedding - tried to wing it. Jokes fell flat. Forgot several of the points I wanted to make. Rambled on a bit.

1st main point reworked

"A while ago, my best friend - the guy who has seen me through good times, bad and ho-hum in-between times since we were kids goofing around on skateboards being super cool, asked me to be his best man at his wedding.

A great honor! Yeah, I'll do that. All good, I said.

And it was, until it came to the speech.

To be honest, I procrastinated and left it too late. I did read a whole lot of other people's best man speeches and I made myself some notes about what I thought would be good to share. I even found some jokes which I thought would be great to use.  

But did I practice?

No. I kept putting it off, telling myself I wanted to be authentically spontaneous. And I was, but not in the way I wanted. I forgot most of the points I wanted to make. Worse, I rambled on, and the jokes went down like lead balloons.

You know that saying about there being no such thing as a failure? That it's an opportunity to learn? That was one of those."

Transition between the 1st and 2nd main point

"The next, and second reason I'm here is the result of a reassessment of what I've been doing and where I'm going in my working life."

2nd main point from brainstorm - unworked

Have avoided applying for jobs I was interested in because they involved having to make presentations. Realize I am limiting myself.

2nd main point reworked

"It's a long story, and luckily for you, too long for a brief icebreaker speech. The short version is being honest with myself about why I've been avoiding applying for positions that would both fit and extend my skillset. These are jobs I know I'd enjoy! And I know I'd do well. 

So why haven't I applied for any of them?  Because they involved having to make presentations, having to speak in front of others. I was limiting myself out of fear."

Transition between the 2nd and 3rd main point

"And that fear, is what brings me to my third reason."

3rd main point from brainstorm - unworked

Have felt nervous about speaking in public for as long as I can remember. Hated having to make speeches at school. Used to feel sick, stammer, and blush when I made a mistake.

3rd main point reworked

"I've felt nervous about speaking in public for as long as I can remember.

I hated having to make speeches at school. I remember dreading going back after the holidays because inevitably the teacher would set a speaking task: 'what I did on my vacation' or 'what I love most about Christmas'. Begging to be allowed to say home did not work. My tough love parents would have none of it.

So, there I'd be standing in front of my classmates doing my best to not visibly shake, speak without stammering, or blush when I made a mistake."

Transition from 3rd main point to 4th main point

"I'm sharing this rather unflattering picture of myself as a person anxious to avoid being the sole focus of everyone's attention because I know, it's well passed its use by date."

4th main point from brainstorm - unworked

Want to speak up in meetings:  at work, at my kid's school etc,  want to contribute my ideas, to speak confidently and be listened to. Also want to set an example for my kids.

4th main point reworked

"Protecting myself by NOT doing something I rationally know will benefit me, and others, is no longer an option. I want to step up and speak up: at celebrations for family and friends, in meetings: at work, at my kid's school, and other places in the community. I want to contribute my ideas, to speak confidently and be listened to." 

Adding a conclusion to your icebreaker

Now that we've finished with the first draft of the body of the speech we're going to work on the conclusion. (After that we'll add the introduction.)

To end your first speech strongly,  briefly, sum up your major points and, if you wish, pop in a call to action or use a quotation before returning to your opening idea to close.

For more on how to memorably end a speech : 3 examples of strong conclusions (with audio), plus examples of weak endings: ones commonly used because the speech has not been adequately thought through and rehearsed.

Graphic: Stop talking. It's the end. Finish. Time's up. How to end a speech memorably.

In addition to the conclusion itself you need a transition to it to prime listeners the end is coming soon.

The transition below, foreshadows the close of the speech.

Transition from 4th main point to conclusion

"Now, with your help, I want to be the change I want to see in my world, for myself, and also for my kids. I want to set them an example they'll be proud of."

The conclusion or closing statement 

"Fellow toastmasters, thank you for being here for me. Thank you for listening. I've survived! The ice is well and truly broken, and my journey has begun."

Adding a greeting and an introduction to your icebreaker

Now let's move to the beginning: the introduction.

What can you say to grab the audience's attention immediately?  Ideally when you open your mouth to speak, the first thing that comes out of it has them riveted! They are all ears, leaning forward in their chairs, eager to know more. 

Your opening is an opportunity to make a great first impression, but how do you do that?

The answer to that, is that you experiment. Perhaps you try one or two, or even three openings before settling on one of them.

Think about the purpose of this speech. Think about how you felt about getting ready for it? Put some of those thoughts down, and then play with them.

The introduction I've prepared below came from thinking through the body of the speech. It contains references to public speaking anxiety, and because this is a first speech in front of people who have clearly survived the ordeal of giving their own icebreaker speeches, I decided to use that experience. It's easy to understand and relate to!

It opens with a rhetorical question which immediately engages the audience. That's followed by an invitation/instruction to further that engagement by nodding in agreement. And finishes thanking them for their response.

For more on opening a speech effectively: How to write a speech introduction| 12 of the best ways to start .

Immediately following the introduction is the transition taking us to the first main point in the body of the speech.

(Note how the word 'survival' is returned to in the conclusion. It returns listeners to the starting place - completing the circle.)

Introduction to this sample icebreaker speech 

"Would you be surprised to know I nearly didn't make it here tonight?

I wonder how many of you experienced a moment or two of panic before giving your icebreaker speech. Just nod to let me know."

{ The speaker   pauses - and looks around at the audience nodding their heads. }

"Thank you, that's very reassuring. You've survived, so probably I shall too."

Transition to body of speech and first main point.

"I am here wobbling rather nervously in front of you for three main reasons which I'll share with you.

Here's the first."

The complete icebreaker speech example

And now here is the whole speech - introduction, body and conclusion without all the section headings, explanations and asides. I've given it a title: 'Stepping up to speak out'.

It's 617 words long and will take approximately 4 minutes to say depending how slowly or quickly you speak.  (For more on the number of words per minute in a speech .)

Listen | audio of example ice breaker speech 

If you'd like to listen to a recording of it, click: " Stepping up to speak out" . The voice you'll hear belongs to me: Susan .

Image: Stick figure eagerly bounding upstairs. Text: Example icebreaker speech - Stepping up to speak out.

Stepping up to speak out

Would you be surprised to know I nearly didn't make it here tonight?

I wonder how many of you experienced a moment or two of panic before giving your icebreaker speech. Just nod to let me know. {pause - look around}

Thank you, that's very reassuring. You've survived, so probably I shall too.

I am here wobbling rather nervously in front of you for three main reasons which I'll share. 

Here's the first.

A while ago, my best friend - the guy who has seen me through good times, bad and ho-hum in-between times since we were kids goofing around on skateboards being super cool, asked me to be his best man at his wedding. A great honor! Yeah, I'll do that. All good, I said.

To be honest, I procrastinated and left it too late. I did read a whole lot of other people's best man speeches and I made myself some notes about what I thought would be good to share. I even found some jokes which I thought would be great to use.

But did I practice? No. I kept putting it off, telling myself I wanted to be authentically spontaneous. And I was, but not in the way I wanted. I forgot most of the points I wanted to make. Worse, I rambled around in circles and the jokes went down like lead balloons.

You know that saying about there being no such thing as a failure? That it's an opportunity to learn? That was one of those.

The next, and second reason I'm here is the result of a reassessment of what I've been doing and where I'm going in my working life.

It's a long story - too long for a brief icebreaker speech. The short version is being honest with myself about why I've been avoiding applying for positions that would both fit and extend my skillset. These are jobs I know I'd enjoy! And I know I'd do well. 

So why haven't I applied for any of them?  Because they involved having to make presentations, having to speak in front of others. I was limiting myself out of fear. 

And that fear, is what brings me to my third reason.

I've felt nervous about speaking in public for as long as I can remember.

I hated having to make speeches at school. 

I remember dreading going back after the holidays because inevitably the teacher would set a speaking task: 'what I did on my vacation' or 'what I love most about Christmas'. Begging to be allowed to say home did not work. My tough love parents would have none of it.

So, there I'd be standing in front of my classmates doing my best to not visibly shake, speak without stammering, or blush when I made a mistake.

I'm sharing this rather unflattering picture of myself as a person anxious to avoid being the sole focus of everyone's attention because I know, it's well passed its use by date. 

Protecting myself by NOT doing something I rationally know will benefit me, and others is no longer an option. I want to step up and speak up: at celebrations for family and friends, in meetings: at work, at my kid's school, and other places in the community. I want to contribute my ideas, to speak confidently and be listened to.

With your help, I want to be the change I want to see in my world, for myself, and also for my kids. I want to set them an example they'll be proud of.

Thank you for being here for me. Thank you for listening. I've survived!  The ice is well and truly broken and my journey has begun. 

What to expect of yourself - 5 tips that may help

1. ask for help - talk to your mentor.

If you want help to get started, ask for it. As a new member you will have been assigned a mentor, usually one of the club's senior members.

Your mentor is someone you can talk to about any concerns you may have. Don't be shy. They've volunteered to help people like yourself. They expect and want to. Ask.

2. Be real in your expectations about yourself 

Don't expect yourself to be stunningly eloquent, effortlessly amusing and assured. While there's always an outside chance you may be, commonsense says otherwise.

This is the beginning of your Toastmaster journey, and beginners generally have things to learn. That's why you're here and preparing an icebreaker!

It's more than OK to be where you are. It's wonderful. Because you've made the commitment to become a better speaker.

3. Use a little self-deprecating humor

If you can, use a bit of humor. Don't take yourself so seriously you lose sight of the potential to poke a little gentle fun at yourself.

Self-deprecating humor used carefully lets your audience know you see and understand yourself. It creates connection. You'll be laughed 'with'. 

For example: "My goodness, what fun I've had with this icebreaker! My fridge has never been so clean. Three times in the last two weeks.

My bedroom closet has been sorted. And I've devised an amazing, color-coded filing system for all the useful brochures we collect whenever we go on vacation. They were higgledy-piggledy in a box covered with dust on the top shelf in the garage. 

I stun myself with what I'll do when there's something important, new and challenging to be done."

Please do not publicly beat yourself up

Healthy self-deprecating humor is not publicly parading what you perceive as your heinous physical, character, or mental flaws, and whipping yourself for them. That will disturb your audience.

No one likes to hear or see a person set themselves up to be laughed 'at'. It's very uncomfortable.

4. Rehearse - practice your speech

Run through your speech out loud several times and then,  once you're familiar with the flow of it, record it and/or video yourself using your phone.

When you play it back, you'll hear, and see, where you need to make adjustments, and you'll find out if you've got too much to say or too little. 

You have between 4 - 6 minutes to make your speech. That's approximately somewhere between 480 words if you are a slow speaker and 960 words, if you speak for longer and at a faster rate.

If you find your speech is over the time allowance, or under it, you'll want to sort it out well before you go to your club meeting.

If you're inclined to get anxious about presenting, rehearsal will help. Because you've 'done' your speech multiple times before delivering it for the club members, you'll feel less pressured. For your own sake, please make the time to practice. 

For more: How to practice public speaking | 9 'fabulously' (☺) effective ways

5. What to do if you 'um' and 'ah', and get flustered

Losing your place in your notes or cue cards, if you're using them, or something as simple as mispronouncing a word, might be enough to trigger a rush of panicky feelings.

In a situation where we already feel pressured, our hyper-sensitized mind can quickly turn minor blips into major stumbling blocks.  The very best thing you can do for yourself is to stop. Take several very large deep breaths , and then, keep on going.

Please do not apologize. You have nothing to apologize for. You are a learner, a beginner, and beginners make mistakes. That's how we progress.

Albert Einstein quote: Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.

The people at your Toastmaster club fully understand that giving your icebreaker speech can be daunting, because they've been where you are. They're on your side! They want to help you achieve your public speaking goals and will do everything they can to help. 

How your icebreaker speech will be evaluated

Part of the value of joining a Toastmaster's Club is getting constructive evaluations of each assignment you complete. That starts with your icebreaker.

An experienced fellow club member will be asked to watch and listen carefully as you present your first speech. Their task is to take notes which they will use as the basis of a verbal evaluation they'll deliver later in the meeting. * (You'll also receive a written one from them at the end of the meeting.) 

Put any anxiety about being evaluated aside

If you're nervous about being evaluated, particularly about getting personal feedback in public, don't be. You will definitely not be pilloried, laughed at or made to feel inadequate in any way.

Toastmasters love icebreaker speeches and the people who give them. They go out of their way to ensure their new members are nurtured and cared for. Afterall it's people like you, who keep the clubs going and successful. They need you, and they understand the delicate art of giving and receiving useful evaluations.

You, the person, giving the speech is not being evaluated. The speech you deliver is. That distinction and separation is stringently upheld.

* Part of the success of Toastmaster's is the way evaluations given. Everybody at the meeting hears them, which gives everybody an opportunity to learn from them. (And in true Toastmaster form, even the evaluations the evaluators give are evaluated! The Toastmaster ethos encourages reaching for excellence in every aspect of its operation.) 

What aspects will your evaluator be evaluating? 

If you know in advance who is going to be your evaluator, say hello, connect, before you give your speech.  Make some time to talk through the evaluation process with them.

Share what your goals are for your icebreaker, and what you'd particularly like them to watch out for. That will help reassure you that you're supported and in the right place to learn.   

The aspects you can expect your evaluator to comment on are your content and delivery.

Regarding your content:

  • How well structured was it? Was there an opening, a body and a conclusion?
  • Was it interesting for the audience?

About your delivery:

  • How comfortable did you appear to be in front of an audience?
  • Did you engage with your audience? Did you use eye content, appropriate facial expressions, gesture and body language ? 
  • Did you use vocal variety effectively ?
  • Did you speak clearly ?

Depending on your club, you may also get feedback (either verbal or written) from other audience members. All of it is valuable, even if you disagree with some of it!

You'll use it to help you decide what aspects to focus on in future speeches to become the better speaker you want to be. 

For more speech evaluation| giving and receiving meaningful feedback 

Links to official Toastmaster resources for icebreaker speeches 

What are Toastmaster Pathways? An introductory overview of the Pathway concept and each of the eleven paths. As an example, here's four of them: Presentation Mastery, Dynamic Leadership, Innovative Planning and Persuasive Influence. The first assignment on every path is giving an icebreaker speech. 

Overview of an icebreaker speech This link is to a video: the official Toastmaster's overview of an icebreaker speech. It very carefully segments the process into four parts - as you can see in the screen shot below.

Screenshot of Toastmasters' Icebreaker video

In addition to information about each part, you'll find links to useful printable documents for example, a speech outline worksheet to help you plan your icebreaker, and a sample evaluation form.

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Toastmasters Speech 1: The Ice Breaker

Thus, it is fitting that the first Toastmaster speech project is titled The Ice Breaker .

This article of the Toastmasters Speech Series examines the primary goals of this project, provides tips and techniques, and links to numerous sample speeches.

  • The Ice Breaker
  • Organize Your Speech
  • Get to the Point
  • How To Say It
  • Your Body Speaks
  • Vocal Variety
  • Research Your Topic
  • Get Comfortable with Visual Aids (coming next)
  • Persuade with Power
  • Inspire Your Audience

Why is This Speech Important?

The Ice Breaker speech has three aims:

  • Introduce yourself. Your ice breaker speech topic is you – something about your life, your job, your hobbies, your unique interests, your family, or any combination of these. You are an absolute authority on this topic, and everyone in the audience will learn something about you.
  • Begin to conquer the fear of speaking in front of a group. It is nervewracking when speaking in front of a new group. If you feel this nervousness, remember that a Toastmaster audience is always supportive and understanding. Nobody is grading you, and nobody will mind if you stumble through 99 “Um”s and “Ah”s. If you get up, say something, and sit down, you have succeeded in this project.
  • Provide a “base line” of your current strengths and weaknesses. Some new members have no public speaking experience, while others have years of presentations behind them. No matter where you fit into this spectrum, your goal is to improve from your starting point. This first speech helps club members gauge your current strengths so that they can make specific recommendations to help you improve.

Tips and Techniques

The Competent Communicator manual has a wealth of helpful advice. You can download a PDF version of the first project from the Toastmasters International website.

Here are a few other things which may help you:

“ Nobody expects you to be a world-class orator. Just do your best. ”

  • Ask for Help If you have a mentor, don’t hesitate to ask them for help. If you don’t, feel free to ask any other club member. Perhaps they can share what they spoke about for their Icebreaker. Perhaps they can help you select a topic. Perhaps you can practice it privately before the meeting. All other members have gone through the Ice Breaker before, and can provide words of encouragement .
  • Practice Helps You don’t need to practice the speech 35 times, and you don’t need to have it memorized. However, your nervousness will be reduced considerably if you give it a couple of practice runs out loud (even if your only audience is you).
  • Timing The recommended time for the Ice Breaker speech is four to six minutes. It may seem like a long time, but in later projects, you’ll start wishing you had much more time to deliver your message. Don’t worry too much about going under or over time. Just aim for somewhere in that range.
  • Notes There are no rules on the use of notes. If you need notes, use them. If you don’t need notes, don’t. Either way, don’t worry about it. It’s okay if you read your ice breaker from a script (just try to look up once in a while), if you refer to cue cards, or if you talk without notes.
  • Don’t Expect to be Winston Churchill This is your first challenge. Nobody expects you to be a world-class orator. Just do your best. Once you have established your “base line”, then you can aim to raise your skill level in future projects.
  • Speak Up and Slow Down Two common effects of nervousness are mumbling words and racing through the speech. Try to avoid these, but don’t worry if you can’t help it.
  • Humour Reduces Your Nervousness If you are comfortable incorporating humour into your ice breaker, go for it. The laughs from the audience will reduce your nervousness. An easy way to do this is to make a self-depracating joke at the start. (If nobody laughs, don’t worry about that either… it’s something to work on later.)
  • Apologizing You may feel an urge to apologize to your audience (e.g. for uttering too many “Um”s, for losing your place, etc.). There is no need to do so! Often, the audience doesn’t notice the little glitches, and it is much better for you to ignore them too.

Topic Ideas for Your Ice Breaker Speech

Although your broad topic is yourself, there are numerous angles to take, and several ways to organize your speech.

Don’t worry too much about the organization of the speech; later speech projects (especially #2 and #3) encourage you to focus more on that. However, having said that, one of these ideas may help you overcome writer’s block.

Idea #1: Chronological

For many people, a series of chronological snapshots of their life is the easiest to write and deliver.

Example: Ravi Singal takes this approach with his Ice Breaker: Why Me? Try Me!

Example : Oleg Kagan starts at birth in his Ice Breaker speech .

Idea #2: Topical

Discuss a series of elements of your life to provide a “sampling” of your life. For example, you could open up by talking about your family, then discuss your career, and conclude with your hobbies.

Example: Bob Cain addresses his love of travel, then photography, and then his career/education in his Ice Breaker speech . (video)

Idea #3: Common Thread

Select a common thread that runs through your life, and share brief stories where this common element appears. It might be a signature phrase, a philosophy that guides you, or even something obscure like peanut butter. (i.e. imagine stories through your life where peanut butter played a role)

My own Ice Breaker speech followed this general structure. It was titled “ Andrew of All Trades – Master of None ” and touched on several examples where I have breadth, but not depth of knowledge.

Example: Steph Corwin provides a great example with her Ice Breaker titled Swimming Through Life .

Idea #4: One Key Event

Focus on one critical event which took your life in a completely different direction.

Example: Tanya Huang talks about moving continents in Made in Taiwan, Calibrated in Canada .

Idea #5: How I Got Here…

A combination of #1 and #4, explain the series of decisions or events that brought you “here”, where “here” might be the place you currently live, the job you currently have, the life you lead, or the decision to join Toastmasters.

Example: Tracy Buxton does this wonderfully in her Ice Breaker titled I used to be June Cleaver, but I’m not sure who I am now .

Example: Jill Williamson also demonstrates this approach in the aptly titled How I Came To Be Here . (video)

More Examples of The Ice Breaker

Here are a few more sample written and video speeches which may provide inspiration for you.

Written Speech Examples

  • Words Have Power by Monkey Sri
  • My Enduring Purpose by Benjamin
  • Life is Like a Box of Chocolates by Kevin Chester Kuo
  • Interest-aholic by Didier Thizy
  • When I close my eyes by Shalabieh
  • My Name is Shay by Seamus McInerney
  • End Quote by Anna Min
  • I am Not Who I Thought I Was by Michael Harris

Video Speech Examples

  • 5 Years by Betsy Dewey
  • No, I was Not Named After a Charlie’s Angel by Farah Ulat
  • Life is a Beautiful Dance by Sharon Burt
  • Loves to Hear Herself Talk by Stephanie Bryant
  • Inspiration of My 9-11 Inspiration Video by Alex Johnson
  • Who Am I? The Reluctant Speaker by Paul Clausell

Next in the Toastmasters Speech Series

The next article in this series examines Speech 2: Organize Your Speech .

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43 comments.

Humor in ice-breakers is rare as speakers are anxious to get off the mark. And the fear, what if humor bombs ?

However, some of the most memorable ice-breakers I have watched had a streak of self deprecating humor in them.

Here are some samplers: Title of an ice-breaker : “Past imperfect.Present tense”.

Yet another speaker : “My attitude towards life is in my blood. B(e) Positive !

There was this girl Anisha Rasquinha who said ” Man of my dreams ? Nothing grand. I don’t expect him to come on a white horse. Just a BMW will do !” I still remember these speeches simply because of the subtle humor.

Good point, CK.

Toastmasters who approach their Icebreaker speech with significant fears are unlikely to attempt humor for fear it will not register.

I like your examples of humorous speech titles. Since the title is said by someone else, there’s no fear of the humor bombing. If the audience doesn’t laugh, no problem. If they do laugh, then it is a great way to start your first speech… with the whole audience smiling already!

I think I was into my 3rd speech before I made anyone laugh… and even then it was accidental. More on that in a future article.

are all toastmasters speech that people give are uploaded on youtube?

My personal favourite of a humorous speech opener in an ice breaker goes like this

” I feel the best way to break ice is to pour whisky over it. However, I will attempt a less exciting way for about six minutes !”

He had the audience in splits right from the word go and needless to add we tried his method of ice breaking after the meeting !

Hi, I am VP-PR at Lagoon Toastmasters in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. Your resources are very useful for the aspiring Toastmaster. I will be pointing fellow members to your site regularly. Keep up the good work!

Regards, Sailesh. Discover, Develop, Distinguish.

http://www.lagoontoastmasters.com

Aha! So you, Andrew, are the author of all the icebreaker tips! Thanks for the help and encouragement. I think I’ll get a bit more sleep than I thought I would when I first became aware of the extent of my obligation. After sweating alot, I’ll do fine (and may live to tell about it).

this was very helpful

Hi. I would just like to say that all these articles and videos have helped me. Wish me luck in my icebreaker!!!!!

Thanks for the great tips and examples! Had only 2 days to put my ice breaker together and your information was invaluable. I even won best speaker 🙂

Hello Andrew, Great description, thank you. We’ve added a link to your page in one of our posts to help out future members get a better sense of this. Regards, Alex Chan St-Lawrence Toastmasters (Montreal, Canada)

My Icebreaker Speech on cherished childhood memories. http://toastmasterspeeches.blogspot.com/2009/01/project-1-speech-ice-breaker.html

Hello, this is Monkey Sri. Thanks for linking to my blog! I’ve changed the URL, so you may want to update your link: http://thebioimp.blogspot.com/2008/06/words-have-power.html Thanks!

Excellent idea to share these tips and samples! I hope you get a chance to finish the series. It prodded me to post my own Ice Breaker (another example of “Common Thread”), along with other member contributions, on our club site: http://www.chamberclub540.com/sharables.htm

I used this site extensively for preparing my first speech for ToastMasters ,which I am going to deliver today .

Thanks a ton for nice and very useful features on this site.

Please keep up this work.

Here is my first speech – http://hr-universe.blogspot.com/2009/09/toastmaster-speech-1-ice-breaker.html

Regards Santosh

I agree totally. The first few minutes in any speech are crucial. If you only just fumble your way through, the rest of your speech will not be particularly inspiring. Getting the levels of anxiety down at the beginning is key to getting a good start, and using an icebreaker to engage the audience helps them, and you. Just knowing you are an expert (“the” expert) is not enough to allay our fears, sadly. And reasoning (“I know my subject…they came here to listen to me,” etc) just doesn’t reduce our stress levels!

Hi, I love your perspective on ice-breaker speeches. It is great to hear ice-breaker speeches which give us more information on the speaker, his experiences, interests and events that moulded his personality to give it its present shape.

This article helped me deliver my “Public Speaking Triumph and Disaster Toastmasters Ice Breaker:” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55CPJ7rUd8U Good luck to everyone!

Your articles are very helpful. But when I see those ice-breakers examples, I feel like the ice-breaker I have prepared is quite pale in comparison. I also think it’s hard to incorporate humour in it. This is asking a lot for a first speech.

The examples are just that: examples. It doesn’t matter if your speech is different. Everyone will have a different ice breaker speech, and that’s fine.

Can I bring props? It’s only my second meeting and I jumped in this both feet to do the ice breaker. A big part of who I am is a woodturner and would like to bring a 2 or 3 small pieces to have on the table to showcase what I do and answer questions.. Would that be appropriate?

There’s no rule which says that you cannot bring props. If your Ice Breaker speech heavily focuses on your woodturning pursuits, then it may add value to bring in examples of this work. My advice for you would be to make sure that the speech is about yourself (where woodturning is one of your hobbies or passions) and avoid making the speech _about_ the woodturning pieces themselves (i.e. don’t make the speech about “how to turn Christmas tree ornaments”). You can certainly devote future speeches to focus on woodturning skills/examples, but the first speech should be about yourself. Make sense?

Similarly, there’s no rule against Q&A for an Ice Breaker speech, however I would advise you not to design your speech in this way… this time. While handling a Q&A is an important skill for a complete speaker, it can also be a very time-consuming component in a presentation. It would be easy to speak for 2 minutes and take questions for 4 minutes, but this would not allow you to meet the objectives for this first TM project. Try filling your available time with your speech this time. Near your speech conclusion, you might say something like “If anyone has questions about the wood pieces I showed, I’d love to talk about it after the meeting with you.” Again, future speech projects can be designed with an included Q&A in mind, but I think you will gain the most value from “pure” speaking for the first speech.

I have just joined toastmasters and am not very good at speeches. Your information has helped me A LOT. thanx!

I’ll be starting my Icebreaker session very soon. And I’m glad I found your blog! Thank you. All the contents here are very useful.

My icebreaker theme was ‘Challenge and Response’ – My life has been a series of challenges and responses. Please visit http://www.lagoontoastmasters.com for the complete script of my icebreaker speech which had won best speaker award

Thanks for the super helpful articles on each speech. Definitely helped me with my first speech entitled, “Becoming a Technical Evangelist” http://bit.ly/aliceTMicebreaker

very nice post. Quite helpful for a me as I’ve to deliver an ice breaking speech in a couple of days. Thanks for sharing

I’m wondering if there’s any chance I could access those video or article line which be shown as good example …really eager to see how did they perform this role…as I still hesitate to do my first ice break presentation…

I went to my first toastmasters meeting last night. I’m curious about the contents of the basic books that are used and was pleasantly surprised to find your link.

Thanks so much Andrew for these tips, very helpful.

I recorded my experience of doing my Icebreaker and my speech transcript here ( http://bit.ly/TQ8I5f ), and have linked to this post as it’s so useful.

This site will really help my icebreaker coz its my firsttime to deliver a speech for our oral and communication subject! Thank you!

Hi, these are good tips but lots of your links no longer work. If your still updating this blog it would be great if these were fixed as its a useful resource (and one of the first that comes up in a google search for icebreaker tips)

Going to school to be a alcohol and drug counselor had my first mock group today and pretty much mind went blank I need to get over this fear of public speaking and have more confidence in myself will toastmaster help me with this fear .and does it cost to go to your meetings thanks for taking time to read.

Hello Mr. Andrew Dlugan, Good Day! Two months before I joined Toastmaster in Kuwait and attended couple of meetings. This is really good platform for learning and gain knowledge how to stand and deliver and 100’s of audience. I shall be glad if you can send me regularly your good speeches so that I can ready and learn and pass ahead to others. Looking forward to hear from you Thanks Yunus

Hi Andrew, I am giving my icebreaker speech tomorrow and can only thank you for your insight and experience sharing this for me. I am using humor and a variation of the ‘imagine your audience naked’ joke to open and close my speech. Looking forward to it. Thanks Bren

I so enjoy this website. Thank you so much for publishing it. Often refer new Toastmasters to your website.

Regards, Margy Sneeden South Africa

I am a new member to the Toastmaster community and needed some guidance for preparing my talks. I found this website and am discovering it has rich, rich resources. The Comments below are one of the incredible sources of encouragement, wisdom and guidance. Thank you for this website, it’s invaluable!

I’m finding this helpful as I steer myself towards my first meeting in Sooke B.C

Good day I would like to become part of the toast masters south Africa currently living in Soweto south of Johannesburg,

Kindly send me details on how to join the close toast master group around.

Have a brilliant day,

Kind regards

Hello Martin,

Not sure if you found a club yet. Just in case, here is the link that should take you to the clubs close by you: http://www.toastmasters.org/Find-a-Club?q=Soweto%2C%20Gauteng%2C%20South%20Africa&radius=150

Marvin Wiley Jr.

I’m looking forward to learning mindful and effective public speaking.

Hello there,i need to get started with the course but don’t know how i should do it. BTW i live in Iran. Can somebody help me plz? Thnx

Dear Andrew

Today is my first speech an ice breaker at toastmaster event. One of my best friend had advised me to come forward at he event since he is already a toastmaster for quite some time.

I am not a good orator or a speaker at functions kindly advise me how to present a good speech in front of audience. What things have to be keep in mind while give a speech.

My wife and I just gave our Icebreaker Speeches last month. I thought hers was great; mine was okay. I did mine in chronological order.

I also typed it out and posted it on my blog if anyone is interested: https://hendrixjoseph.github.io/toastmasters-icebreaker-speech-the-story-of-joe/

Recent Tweets

The Ice Breaker, tips and links to numerous sample speeches to help you reach your goal. https://t.co/o0hdXY2WS4 #Toastmasters — @RadiantRhetoric Jan 15th, 2016
Toastmasters Speech 1: The Ice Breaker https://t.co/kNVDT6xr72 — @sgrealtynet Jan 16th, 2016
I hope this article would be useful for you. Enjoy it! 󾌵 https://t.co/1GTsEUxCZ3 — @SagradaFamiliaT Jan 16th, 2016
Share this ice breaker story with new members to boos their confidence. https://t.co/E7eYM2ekw7 https://t.co/KSzggy0rk2 — @D83Toastmasters Feb 24th, 2016
Toastmasters Speech 1: Ice Breaker https://t.co/CeTi7hbstK by @6minutes — @D51MTM Feb 24th, 2016
@ConanVenus @kyle_mullaney Read this nice article by Andrew https://t.co/gmvyogWO7K Also watch couple of #icebreaker videos on YouTube. — @evaluatespeech Feb 24th, 2016
Toastmasters Speech 1: The Ice Breaker https://t.co/QCDEAuhm92 — @ThinkSales101 Mar 24th, 2016
Early tomorrow morning is my Ice Breaker speech at the Innsbrook Toastmaster meeting. #toastmasters… https://t.co/HXjEyZMLoy — @LCrowco Apr 4th, 2016
Toastmasters Speech 1: Ice Breaker https://t.co/FLfgSdZOsQ by @6minutes #toastmasters — @tmohapatra May 19th, 2016
Nervously working on my #Icebreaker speech for my @OaklandHillsTM #Toastmasters meeting tomorrow. https://t.co/t79iLi535y — @keeliamurphy1 May 30th, 2016

29 Blog Links

Toastmasters Speech Series: Your Guide to the First 10 Speeches | "Public Speaking in Singapore" — Sep 3rd, 2008

Conejo Valley News : Join a Toastmasters Club to Improve Your Communication Skills — Nov 3rd, 2008

St.Lawrence Toastmasters Club » What’s an “Ice-breaker” speech? — Feb 3rd, 2009

Updated Toastmasters Speech Series: Your Guide to the First 10 Speeches | "Public Speaking in Singapore" — Aug 30th, 2009

Toastmasters – Ice Breaker: Waking Up In a Nation of Immigrants < ~C4Chaos — Oct 21st, 2009

Gundy Gabbers Toastmasters Blog — Nov 16th, 2009

Toast to the Master of Pot Holes « Sprout — Apr 4th, 2010

If You Can Meet With Public Speaking Triumph and Disaster, and Treat Those Two Imposters Just the Same | Kevin's Notes — Sep 21st, 2010

Competent Communicator Objectives « Calgary Toastmasters — Oct 26th, 2010

The Road to Rhyme - Farnham Speakers — Nov 1st, 2010

Effective Tools For Toastmasters | ptpltmc — Nov 9th, 2010

How A Sitcom Saved My Life | We Can Rebuild Her — Nov 24th, 2010

My family and other animals - Farnham Speakers — Feb 24th, 2011

Your first 10 speeches | Speakmasters — May 4th, 2011

Secundum Artem - Farnham Speakers — May 26th, 2011

The Ice Breaker Speech « First Oakville Toastmasters #2245 Blog — Aug 29th, 2011

Public Speaking Downtown Montreal Parler en public | St.Lawrence Toastmasters Montreal » Bienvenue à nos nouveaux membres Mathieu, Ann! — Sep 19th, 2011

Impossible Dreams? Then Double the Persistence and Double The Results | 8 Women Dream — Oct 2nd, 2011

My First Toastmasters Speech « carlos-m.net — Nov 9th, 2011

How I gave my “ice breaker” at Toastmasters | Dre@mer — Apr 22nd, 2012

Question 796 « BETWIXT AND BETWEEN — May 10th, 2012

Toastmasters Icebreaker Speech HelpShawnee Huie — Sep 6th, 2012

This Week in Toastmasters | July 22 – August 3 | Chase Polaris Toastmasters — Sep 14th, 2012

Guildford Speakers | Becky Ladley — Sep 15th, 2012

Three Examples of Ice-Breaker Speeches « Moving People to Action — Oct 20th, 2012

That One Time When I Nearly Died : Alan Perlman — Dec 7th, 2012

That One Time I Nearly Died : Alan Perlman — Dec 7th, 2012

Guildford Speakers | Social Quirk Events — Feb 5th, 2013

Ice breaker marathon on April 18th, 2013 | Toast of CIBC Toastmasters Blog — Apr 8th, 2013

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ICE BREAKER SPEECH SAMPLE (TOASTMASTERS)

The icebreaker speech sample will help anyone worried about doing their first speech.

The first time you get a chance to do a speech in front of a crowd is a huge challenge. Especially if your audience is new to you. The amount of pressure you feel will be multiplied. Usually, when you are doing the first speech to a crowd, it is called an “Icebreaker”.

In this article, I will briefly talk about the icebreaker speech. I will share an icebreaker sample speech for you to get started.

What is an Icebreaker speech?

Icebreaker speeches are designed to help both the speaker and the audience to get to know each other. This can help you to break the ice between you and your audience.

When you join the Toastmasters Club you have to do an icebreaker speech. Usually, after you join the club, you will be assigned to a senior member (mentor) and also you have to select a pathway program.

I chose the “Presentation Mastery” pathway program. Usually, that is the recommended program if you are a new member. So in this program, they have guided steps for you to get ready for your icebreaker.

What are the objectives of an Icebreaker speech?

The main objective of doing an icebreaker speech is to introduce yourself to the other members. At the same time by completing the icebreaker speech, you will learn how to prepare and structure a public speech properly.

You have the chance to establish yourself as a member of the club. By sharing your personal stories and your goals you can form a good relationship with your club members. Remember you need your member’s help to be a great toastmaster. They are one of the important parts of your success.

Icebreaker Speech Sample

This is the first speech I delivered as a Toastmaster . I was nervous and I made a lot of mistakes. But I will share the whole speech as it is without any changes.

Fortunately, I won the best-prepared speech award for my speech. But after I got the evaluation I realized I included too much information here. Because of that, I had to speak dast to finish within the allocated time. So If you are going to read this speech make sure to structure your speech to finish within 4 to 6 minutes.

Enjoy my icebreaker speech sample.

Purpose: The purpose of this project is to introduce yourself to the club and learn the basic structure of a public speech. 

Overview: Write and deliver a speech about any topic to introduce yourself to the club. Your speech may be humorous, informational, or in any other style that appeals to you. 

Time 4- to 6-minute

Title: Saying It’s ok

Dear Toastmaster of the day and my fellow Toastmasters let me start this icebreaker by giving you a challenge. 

I hope you have a good memory.  So, I challenge you to remember my name by the end of this speech. And I’m going to say it only twice. 

The other day when I went to the clinic to get vaccinated, I had to wait in front of the nurse at the reception for a few minutes. She was beautiful in her pink uniform. First, she looked at me, and then she looked at the application I wrote. And I knew she was struggling to say my name. 

Then she started calling my name. 

” ke……..heru…….wa……raga..” 

She looked like a foreigner who tried to read Japanese for the first time. 

So I smiled and said.”It’s ok. Don’t worry. Its Kehelwala Gamaralalage Kalinga Nirosh”

As a Sri Lankan, I have a pretty fantastic, long name. When I`m introducing myself to foreigners, especially to beautiful Japanese ladies, I repeat my name several times. I consider it a fortune.  It gives me a chance to interact with people more

I was born and raised in Sri Lanka. Although I like eating spicy foods, when I moved to Japan I fell in love with Somen. My first introduction to Japan was Kyokushin karate. As a small kid, I watched my brother practising karate.  For a while, I thought Japanese people always greet each other with “oss”. 

The first time someone punched me in the face I didn’t tell It’s ok/Daijoubu desu. I Said some nasty things. and I went home and said to my father I’m not going back. My father is a tough man. He was working as a military officer.  He holds my shoulders. And said “It’s okay to get punched in the face. Because that’s how life works. But it’s never ok to quit.” 

The next day I punched the bully without any fear. Unfortunately, my mom got mad at me for getting into a fight and my father got scolded for giving bad advice.

Anyway I started to say “It’s ok” to challenges and

At the age of thirty, I got a chance to study abroad. I chose Japan. leaving my family and home was one of the hardest decisions I made. But I said to myself “It’s ok”.

living in a foreign land without your family and friends is difficult and it’s a challenge. 

But I like challenges. I usually watch TED talks and inspirational speeches. When I watched Toastmaster Dhananjaya Hettiarachchis’s speech it motivated me to challenge myself. 

So I decided to join a Toastmasters club and sent emails to several clubs. I got two replies. One was short and the other one was long. I read the long email and decided to join that club. During the first meeting, I tried to find someone looks like me. But I was the only foreigner. At the end of the meeting, they held a chat time and asked me so many questions.

So I asked myself “Am I ready to join this club? I am the only foreigner here. I can’t speak fluently”

But I said to myself “It’s ok。”

My fellow Toastmasters, here I am, doing my first Icebreaker in front of prestigious members of this club and I feel happy. This was possible because I decided to say “It’s okay” to the challenges I faced.

This life is full of challenges. But by saying it’s ok to your worries, to your negative feelings you can turn those challenges into opportunities. No matter which age we are or which background we are from let’s make our life more colorful by saying it’s ok.

As for the challenge, I know some of you couldn’t remember my name. For that, I say It’s ok. Because we have enough time to get to know each other. And I thank you all for making me feel welcome in this club. 

Over to you Toastmaster of the Day.

Icebreaker speech is the chance to introduce yourself to your audience. It helps anyone to break the ice between them and their audience. In Toastmasters, you can follow the icebreaker assignment. It will help to structure your icebreaker speech properly.

Icebreaker is the best opportunity to make a great impression. So grab the attention of your audience, share your life story, and tell them your goals.

Here I shared my first speech. This Icebreaker speech sample will help you to get an idea. If you need any other information leave a comment below and subscribe to our newsletter.

Good luck with your icebreaker speech. You can do this. Be brave. Speak without fear .

Check out these 3 Icebreaker Speech Examples for you to get more comfortable with the idea of doing your own.

6 thoughts on “ICE BREAKER SPEECH SAMPLE (TOASTMASTERS)”

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I’m looking forward to learning more….

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Thanks Barbara. Good luck on your public speaking journey.

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Thanks Rithu.

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This help me a lot!

Thanks. Keep working towards your public speaking goal. Good luck. 

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  1. PDF 8012 Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet

    SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET. Ice Breaker. Use this outline to help you organize the information you want to include in your speech. Speech Title. About Yourself/Main Points List two to four things about yourself that you would like fellow club members to know. 1. 2. 3. 4.

  2. PDF LEVEL 1 PROJECT

    SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET Ice Breaker SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET ICEBREAKER. B. Capture audience interest Begin with something about yourself that will capture the interest and attention of the audience. C..Introduce yourself Following your opening, provide a brief introduction. You might want to include why you joined Toastmasters.

  3. PDF ICE BREAKER

    share some of those goals in your "Ice Breaker" speech. You may also use the Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet on page 17 to help you collect and develop your thoughts. A clear, thorough outline will assist you in crafting your speech and sharing your communication and leadership goals with the audience within the allotted time.

  4. Icebreaker speech Toastmasters

    Sayings/quotations I live by - For example, "This too will pass" - 3 examples of times when "This too will pass" was the reminder needed. 4. Topical ideas for your icebreaker speech. This is a series of snapshots (topics) illustrating different and significant aspects of your life.

  5. Ice Breaker

    Part 2: Your Ice Breaker Speech. You and Your Goals. Prepare and Present. Part 3: After Your Speech. Understanding the Toastmasters Evaluation. Review and Apply. Complete Your Assignment. Evaluation and Resources. Part 4: Complete Your Project.

  6. DOCX 8012 Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet Accessible

    This is the Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet resource document. This document is designed as a form so you can input text in fillable fields. The form contains protected and unprotected sections. Instructional text and headings reside in unprotected sections to help you understand and navigate the document.

  7. PDF PROJECT DESCRIPTION

    SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET Ice Breaker. PEEC TIE REET Ice Breaer Page 2 of 4 Opening A. Greeting You may thank the Toastmaster or person who introduced you and acknowledge fellow Toastmasters and guests. B. Capture audience interest Begin with something about yourself that will capture the interest and attention of the audience.

  8. Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet Accessible

    This document provides an outline for an ice breaker speech with fillable text fields. The outline includes sections for the speech title, background on the speaker, their reasons for joining Toastmasters, goals, and an opening, body, and conclusion. The body section includes space for three main points about the speaker. Instructions explain that protected fields are fillable and unprotected ...

  9. 8012 Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet

    8012 Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Toastmaster ice breaker speech

  10. Toastmasters Speech 1: Ice Breaker

    Toastmasters Speech 1: The Ice Breaker. Ice breaker (or Icebreaker) is a term which describes an activity which reduces tension and anxiety in a group. Thus, it is fitting that the first Toastmaster speech project is titled The Ice Breaker. This article of the Toastmasters Speech Series examines the primary goals of this project, provides tips ...

  11. PDF 8101 Ice Breaker

    The Ice Breaker speech is 4 to 6 minutes in length and the first one that all Toastmasters present to their clubs. It is also the speech Toastmasters deliver when they embark on a new path. ... You may also use the Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet on page 19 to help you collect and develop your thoughts. A clear, thorough outline will ...

  12. PDF Toastmasters Pathways:

    Topic and Purpose Worksheet The Speech Outline Worksheet A 5- to 7-minute speech Below are tasks you will need to complete for this project. Please remember, your project is unique to you. You may alter the following list to incorporate any other tasks necessary for your project. PROJECT DESCRIPTION Ice Breaker

  13. PDF SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET

    ICE BREAKER Page 19 SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET - Ice Breaker Body A. Main point 1 Use some of the About Yourself/Main Points from page 1. Transition This is a sentence or two that connects main point 1 with main point 2.

  14. IceBreaker

    Ice Breaker : The Icebreaker : ... Icebreaker Speech Outline Worksheet: Project Evaluation Form: The Snowflake Method for Writing any Speech: Simple Steps to Writing a Fantastic Speech: ... Now you have an 'outline' for a speech - next rehearse and refine the speech. The following example shows how to approach an Icebreaker.

  15. 8012 Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet PDF

    8012 Ice Breaker Speech Outline Worksheet (2).pdf - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site.

  16. ICE BREAKER SPEECH SAMPLE (TOASTMASTERS)

    ICE BREAKER SPEECH SAMPLE (TOASTMASTERS) May 24, 2022. The icebreaker speech sample will help anyone worried about doing their first speech. The first time you get a chance to do a speech in front of a crowd is a huge challenge. Especially if your audience is new to you. The amount of pressure you feel will be multiplied.

  17. PDF SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET

    SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET Ice Breaker. PEEC TIE REET Ice Breaer Page 2 of 4 Opening A. Greeting You may thank the Toastmaster or person who introduced you and acknowledge fellow Toastmasters and guests. B. Capture audience interest Begin with something about yourself that will capture the interest and attention of the audience.

  18. PDF Speech Outline Worksheet

    SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET - Ice Breaker Page 2 of 4 Opening A. Greeting You may thank the Toastmaster or person who introduced you and acknowledge fellow Toastmasters and guests. B. Capture audience interest Begin with something about yourself that will capture the interest and attention of the audience. C. Introduce yourself

  19. PDF SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET

    SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET Ice Breaker. PEEC TIE REET Ice Breaer Page 2 of 4 Opening A. Greeting You may thank the Toastmaster or person who introduced you and acknowledge fellow Toastmasters and guests. B. Capture audience interest Begin with something about yourself that will capture the interest and attention of the audience.

  20. PDF PRESENTATION MASTERY

    The Speech Outline Worksheet ... MASTERING FUNDAMENTALS. 2. 1. 2. 3. A DISTRICT 121 INITIATIVE. www.d121toastmasters.org. ICE BREAKER. Deliver a. 4-6 minute speech to introduce yourself to the. club. Deliver a 5-7 minute speech on. any topic. Incorporate feedback from your. first speech into a second 5-7.

  21. PDF V3 Speechcraft Support Guide for Speeches

    THE ICE BREAKER Your first prepared speech is The Ice Breaker. OBJECTIVES OF THE ICE BREAKER To begin speaking before an audience. To help you understand what areas require emphasis in your public speaking. To introduce yourself to your fellow Speechcrafters. PREPARING YOUR SPEECH The general subject of your talk is YOU.

  22. 8012 ice breaker speech outline worksheet ff

    SPEECH OUTLINE WORKSHEET Ice Breaker Use this outline to help you organize the information you want to include in your speech. Speech Title About Yourself/Main Points List two to four things about yourself that you would like fellow club members to know. 1. 2. 3. 4.

  23. PDF DYNAMIC LEADERSHIP

    The Speech Outline Worksheet ... MASTERING FUNDAMENTALS. 2. 1. 2. 3. A DISTRICT 121 INITIATIVE. www.d121toastmasters.org. ICE BREAKER. Deliver a. 4-6 minute speech to introduce yourself to the. club. Deliver a 5-7 minute speech on. any topic. Incorporate feedback from your. first speech into a second 5-7.