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How to Write a Good Cover Letter for a Research Position

Writing a cover letter can be intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be!

Some people believe cover letters are a science. Others seem to think they are more akin to black magic. Regardless of how you feel about cover letters, they are one of the most important parts of the job application process. Your resume or CV may get you an interview, but a good cover letter is what ensures that the hiring manager reads your resume in the first place.

Writing a cover letter for any job is important, but the art of writing a good cover letter for a research position can make or break your application. While writing a cover letter for a research position, you have to walk a fine line of proving your expertise and passion while limiting jargon and dense language.

In this post, we will explain cover letter writing basics, and then dive into how to write a research specific cover letter with examples of both good and bad practices.

hands typing on blank google doc

What Is A Cover Letter and Why Do Cover Letters Matter?

A cover letter is your opportunity to tell a story and connect the dots of your resume. Resumes and curriculum vitae (CVs) are often cold and static—they don’t show any sort of character that will give companies a hint about if you will fit in with their culture. 

Your cover letter gives you the chance to demonstrate that you are an interesting, qualified, and intelligent person. Without proving that you are worth the time to interview, a company or research organization will set your application in the rejection pile without giving it a second look. 

So, what is a cover letter, exactly? It is an explanation (written out in paragraph form) of what you can bring to the company that goes beyond the information in your resume. Cover letters give a company a glimpse into the qualities that will make you the ideal candidate for their opening. 

Note that a cover letter is not the same as a letter of intent. A cover letter is written for a specific job opening. For example, if I got an email saying that the University of Colorado was looking for a tenure track faculty member to teach GEO 1001, and I chose to apply, I would write a cover letter. 

A letter of intent, however, is written regardless of the job opening. It is intended to express an interest in working at a particular company or with a particular group. The goal of a letter of intent is to demonstrate your interest in the company (or whatever type of group you are appealing to) and illustrate that you are willing to work with them in whatever capacity they feel is best. 

For example, if I loved the clothing company, Patagonia and wanted to work there, I could write a letter of intent. They may have an opening for a sales floor associate, but after reading my application and letter of intent, decide I would be better suited to a design position. Or, they may not have any positions open at all, but choose to keep my resume on hand for the next time they do. 

Most organizations want a cover letter, not a letter of intent, so it is important to make sure your cover letter caters to the specifics of the job posting. A cover letter should also demonstrate why you want to work at the company, but it should be primarily focused on why you can do the job better than any of the other applicants.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter: The Basics 

Writing a cover letter isn’t hard. Writing a good cover letter, a cover letter that will encourage a hiring manager to look at your application and schedule an interview, is more difficult (but certainly not impossible). Below, we will go over each of the important parts of a cover letter: the salutation, introduction, body, and conclusion, as well as some other best practices.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Salutation

Don’t start with “Dear Sir/Ma’am” (or any iteration of a vague greeting, including “to whom it may concern”). Avoiding vague greetings is the oldest trick in the book, but it still holds a lot of weight. Starting a cover letter with the above phrase is pretty much stamping “I didn’t bother to research this company at all because I am sending out a million generic cover letters” across your application. It doesn’t look good. 

The best practice is to do your research and use your connections to find a name. “Dear Joe McGlinchy” means a lot more than “Dear Hiring Manager.” LinkedIn is a great tool for this—you can look up the company, then look through the employees until you find someone that seems like they hire for the relevant department. 

The most important thing about the salutation is to address a real human. By selecting someone in the company, you’ve demonstrated that you’ve done some research and are actually interested in this company specifically. Generic greetings aren’t eye-catching and don’t do well.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Introduction

Once you’ve addressed your cover letter to a real human being, you need a powerful introduction to prove that this cover letter is worth the time it will take to read. This means that you need a hook. 

Your first sentence needs to be a strong starter, something to encourage the hiring manager not only to continue reading the cover letter, but to look at your application as well. If you have a contact in the company, you should mention them in the first sentence. Something along the lines of “my friend, Amanda Rice (UX/UI manager), suggested I apply for the natural language processing expert position after we worked together on a highly successful independent project.” 

The example above uses a few techniques. The name drop is good, but that only works if you actually have a connection in the company. Beyond that, this example has two strengths. First, it states the name of the position. This is important because hiring managers can be hiring for several different positions at a time, and by immediately clarifying which position you are applying for, you make their job a little bit easier.  Next, this sentence introduces concrete skills that apply to the job. That is a good way to start because it begins leading into the body, where you will go into depth about how exactly your experience and skills make you perfect for the job. 

Another technique for a strong lead-in to a cover letter is to begin with an applicable personal experience or anecdote. This attracts more attention than stereotypical intros (like the example above), but you have to be careful to get to the point quickly. Give yourself one or two sentences to tell the story and prove your point before you dive into your skills and the main body of the cover letter.

A more standard technique for introductions is simply expressing excitement. No matter how you choose to start, you want to demonstrate that you are eager about the position, and there is no easier way to do that than just saying it. This could take the form of “When I saw the description for X job on LinkedIn, I was thrilled: it is the perfect job for my Y skills and Z experience.” This option is simple and to-the-point, which can be refreshing for time-crunched hiring managers. 

Since we’ve provided a few good examples, we will offer a bad example, so you can compare and contrast. Don’t write anything along the line of: “My name is John Doe, and I am writing to express my interest in the open position at your company.” 

There are a few issues here. First, they can probably figure out your name. You don’t need that to be in the first sentence (or any of the sentences—the closing is an obvious enough spot). Next, “the open position” and “your company” are too generic. That sounds like the same cover letter you sent to every single employer in a hundred mile radius. Give the specifics! Finally, try to start with a little more spice. Add in some personality, something to keep the hiring manager reading. If you bore them to death in the first line, they aren’t going to look over your resume and application with the attention they deserve. 

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Body

So, you’ve addressed a real human being, and you’ve snagged their attention with a killer opening line. What next? Well, you have to hold on to that attention by writing an engaging and informative cover letter body. 

The body of a cover letter is the core of the important information you want to transmit. The introduction’s job was to snag the attention of the hiring manager. The body’s job is to sell them on your skills.  There are a few formatting things to be aware of before we start talking about what content belongs in the body of the cover letter. First, keep the company culture and standards in mind when picking a format. For example, if I want to work for a tech startup that is known for its wit and company culture, I can probably get away with using a bulleted list or another informal format. However, if I am applying to a respected research institution, using a standard five paragraph format is best. 

In addition, the cover letter should not be longer than a page. Hiring managers are busy people. They may have hundreds of resumes to read, so they don’t need a three page essay per person. A full page is plenty, and many hiring managers report finding three hundred words or less to be the idea length. Just to put that into context, the text from here to the “How to Write a Good Cover Letter Body” header below is about perfect, length-wise. 

Now, on to the more important part: the content. A cover letter should work in tandem with a resume. If you have a list of job experiences on your resume, don’t list them again in the cover letter. Use the valuable space in the cover letter to give examples about how you have applied your skills and experience. 

For example, if I have worked as a barista, I wouldn’t just say “I have worked as a barista at Generic Cafe.” The hiring manager could learn that from my resume. Instead, I could say “Working as a barista at Generic Cafe taught me to operate under pressure without feeling flustered. Once…” I would go on to recount a short story that illustrated my ability to work well under pressure. It is important that the stories and details you choose to include are directly related to the specific job. Don’t ramble or add anything that isn’t obviously connected. Use the job description as a tool—if it mentions a certain skill a few times, make sure to include it!

If you can match the voice and tone of your cover letter to the voice of the company, that usually earns you extra points. If, in their communications, they use wit, feel free to include it in your letter as well. If they are dry, to the point, and serious, cracking jokes is not the best technique.

A Few Don’ts of Writing a Cover Letter Body   

There are a few simple “don’ts” in cover letter writing. Do not: 

  • Bad: I am smart, dedicated, determined, and funny.
  • Better: When I was working at Tech Company, I designed and created an entirely new workflow that cut the product delivery time in half. 
  • Bad: When I was seven, I really loved the monkeys at the zoo. This demonstrates my fun-loving nature. 
  • Better: While working for This Company, I realized I was far more productive if I was light-hearted. I became known as the person to turn to in my unit when my coworkers needed a boost, and as my team adopted my ideology, we exceeded our sales goals by 200%. 
  • Bad: I would love this job because it would propel me to the next stage of my career.
  • Better: With my decade of industry experience communicating with engineers and clients, I am the right person to manage X team. 
  • Bad: I know I’m not the most qualified candidate for this job, but…
  • Better: I can apply my years of experience as an X to this position, using my skills in Y and Z to… 
  • Bad: I am a thirty year old white woman from Denver…
  • Better: I have extensive experience managing diverse international teams, as illustrated by the time I…  

The most important part of the cover letter is the body. Sell your skills by telling stories, but walk the razor’s edge between saying too much and not enough. When in doubt, lean towards not enough—it is better for the hiring manager to call you in for an interview to learn more than to bore them.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Conclusion

 The last lines of a cover letter are extremely important. Until you can meet in-person for an interview, the conclusion of your cover letter will greatly affect the impression the hiring manager has of you. A good technique for concluding your cover letter is to summarize, in a sentence, what value you can bring to the company and why you are perfect for the position. Sum up the most important points from your cover letter in a short, concise manner. 

Write with confidence, but not arrogance. This can be a delicate balance. While some people have gotten away (and sometimes gotten a job) with remarks like, “I’ll be expecting the job offer soon,” most do not. Closing with a courteous statement that showcases your capability and skills is far more effective than arrogance. Try to avoid trite or generic statements in the closing sentence as well. This includes the template, “I am very excited to work for XYZ Company.” Give the hiring manager something to remember and close with what you can offer the company. 

The final step in any cover letter is to edit. Re-read your cover letter. Then, set it aside for a few hours (or days, time permitting) and read it again. Give it to a friend to read. Read it aloud. This may seem excessive, but there is nothing more off-putting than a spelling or grammar error in the first few lines of a cover letter. The hiring manager may power through and ignore it, but it will certainly taint their impression. 

Once the cover letter is as flawless and compelling as it can be, send it out! If you are super stuck on how to get started, working within a template may help. Microsoft Word has many free templates that are aesthetically appealing and can give you a hint to the length and content. A few good online options live here (free options are at the bottom—there is no reason to pay for a resume template).

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Research Position

Writing a cover letter for a research position is the same as writing any other cover letter. There are, however, a few considerations and additions that are worth pointing out. A job description may not directly ask for a cover letter, but it is good practice to send one unless they specifically say not to. This means that even if a cover letter isn’t mentioned, you should send one—it is best practice and gives you an opportunity to expand on your skills and research in a valuable way.

Format and Writing Style for a Research Position Cover Letter

Research and academics tend to appreciate formality more than start-ups or tech companies, so using the traditional five paragraph format is typically a good idea. The five paragraph format usually includes an introduction, three short examples of skills, and a concluding paragraph. This isn’t set in stone—if you’d rather write two paragraphs about the skills and experience you bring to the company, that is fine. 

Keep in mind that concise and to-the-point writing is extremely valuable in research. Anyone who has ever written a project proposal under 300 words knows that every term needs to add value. Proving that you are a skilled writer, starting in your cover letter, will earn you a lot of points. This means that cover letters in research and academia, though you may have more to say, should actually be shorter than others. Think of the hiring manager—they are plowing through a massive stack of verbose, technical, and complex cover letters and CVs. It is refreshing to find an easy to read, short cover letter. 

On the “easy to read” point, remember that the hiring manager may not be an expert in your field. Even if they are, you cannot assume that they have the exact same linguistic and educational background as you. For example, if you have dedicated the last five years of your life to studying a certain species of bacteria that lives on Red-Eyed Tree Frogs, all of those technical terms you have learned (and maybe even coined) have no place in your cover letter. Keep jargon to an absolute minimum. Consider using a tool like the Hemingway Editor to identify and eliminate jargon. While you want to reduce jargon, it is still important to prove that you’ve researched their research. Passion about the research topic is one of the most valuable attributes that a new hire can offer. 

Use your cover letter to prove that you have done your homework, know exactly what the institution or group is doing, and want to join them. If you have questions about the research or want to learn more, it isn’t a bad idea to get in touch with one of the researchers. You can often use LinkedIn or the group’s staff site to learn who is working on the project and reach out.

What Research Information Should be Included in a Cover Letter

A research position cover letter is not the place for your academic history, dissertation, or publications. While it may be tempting to go into detail about the amazing research you did for your thesis, that belongs in your CV. Details like this will make your cover letter too long. While these are valuable accomplishments, don’t include them unless there is something  that pertains to the group’s research, and your CV doesn’t cover it in depth. 

If you do choose to write about your research, write about concrete details and skills that aren’t in your CV. For example, if you have spent the last few years working on identifying the effects of a certain gene sequence in bird migration, include information about the lab techniques you used. Also, try to put emphasis on the aspects of your resume and CV that make you stand out from other candidates. It is likely that you will be competing with many similarly qualified candidates, so if you have a unique skill or experience, make sure it doesn’t get lost in the chaos—a cover letter is the perfect place to highlight these sorts of skills. 

Industry experience is a great differentiator. If you have relevant industry experience, make sure to include it in your cover letter because it will almost certainly set you apart. Another valuable differentiator is a deep and established research network. If you have been working on research teams for years and have deep connections with other scientists, don’t be afraid to include this information. This makes you a very valuable acquisition for the company because you come with an extensive network

Include Soft Skills in Your Cover Letter

Scientific skills aren’t the only consideration for hiring managers. Experience working with and leading teams is incredibly valuable in the research industry. Even if the job description doesn’t mention teamwork, add a story or description of a time you worked with (or, even better, lead) a successful team. Soft skills like management, customer service, writing, and clear communication are important in research positions. Highlight these abilities and experiences in your cover letter in addition to the hard skills and research-based information. 

If you are struggling to edit and polish your letter, give it to both someone within your field and someone who is completely unfamiliar with your research (or, at least, the technical side of it). Once both of those people say that the letter makes sense and is compelling, you should feel confident submitting it.

Cover letters are intended to give hiring managers information beyond what your resume and CV are able to display. Write with a natural but appropriately formal voice, do your research on the position, and cater to the job description. A good cover letter can go a long way to getting you an interview, and with these tips, your cover letters will certainly stand out of the pile.

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Crafting an effective research assistant cover letter + examples.

medical research cover letter

Reviewed by:

Akhil Katakam

Third-Year Medical Student, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University

Reviewed: 1/8/24

Are you looking to land a research assistant position? Keep reading to learn how to craft a standout cover letter for a research assistant role. 

Your medical research assistant cover letter is the first impression you make on potential employers, and it can significantly influence their decision to consider you for the role. While your resume provides the facts, your cover letter adds the personal touch, helping you stand out and demonstrate your enthusiasm and suitability for the position. 

In this article, we'll break down the importance of your cover letter in your application for research assistant positions and show you how it can be a game-changer in landing that perfect job.

Get The Ultimate Guide on Writing an Unforgettable Personal Statement

image of teacher icon

Why Do You Need a Research Assistant Cover Letter

Let's dive into why a well-crafted research assistant cover letter is vital for your academic and research job applications.

First Impressions Matter

Your cover letter is your initial handshake with potential employers. It's their first impression of you and carries significant weight. A strong opening paragraph can help grab their attention and set a positive tone.

Customization is Key

Each research assistant job is unique, and your cover letter should reflect that. It's your tool to demonstrate that you're the ideal fit for the specific position you're applying for by emphasizing matching skills and experiences.

Show Genuine Enthusiasm

Beyond qualifications, your cover letter allows you to express your real interest in the research assistant role and the organization. It's your chance to convey your excitement and alignment with their mission and values.

Highlight Soft Skills

While resumes focus on hard skills, your cover letter spotlights essential soft skills like teamwork and communication, crucial in research. Provide examples of your effective use of these skills.

Explain Your Story

Your career journey may have unique aspects or gaps. Use your cover letter to provide context and help employers understand your professional journey.

Writing Abilities

Many research roles require strong writing skills. Your cover letter serves as a writing sample to showcase your ability to communicate ideas clearly. Working on your writing skills will also help down the line when you write a personal statement for medical school. 

In a competitive job market, a well-crafted cover letter sets you apart, signaling your commitment to making a strong impression.

male research assistant working in lab

How to Write an Effective Cover Letter?

Writing a strong cover letter is important when applying for jobs. In this section, we'll look at the key elements and tips for creating a cover letter that stands out and increases your chances of getting the job you want.

Address the Recipient

Begin with a courteous salutation, such as "Dear Hiring Manager" or "To the Research Team." If you have information about the hiring manager's name, use it for a more personalized touch.

Introduction

Open with enthusiasm for the medical research assistant position. Mention where you learned about the job, such as through a job board or a referral, and briefly state why you're excited about the opportunity to contribute to medical research.

Customize for the Job

Ensure your cover letter is specific to the medical research assistant role and the healthcare institution you're applying to. Mention the position title and the organization's name to demonstrate your genuine interest. 

For example, if you’re applying for a position with a pharmacist , mention the position title and the healthcare institution's name, such as "Pharmacy Research Assistant at XYZ Medical Center." This personalized approach shows that you've done your research and are genuinely enthusiastic about the role, making a strong impression on potential employers.

Highlight Your Qualifications

In the main section, emphasize qualifications and skills relevant to medical research. Provide concrete examples of your experience in data collection, lab techniques, patient interactions, or any other applicable areas.

Show Cultural Fit

Explain how your values align with those of the healthcare institution or research team. Highlight your dedication to ethical research practices and commitment to advancing medical knowledge.

Soft Skills and Achievements

Discuss soft skills crucial for medical research, such as attention to detail, teamwork, and adherence to protocols. Share accomplishments, like successful research projects or contributions to scientific publications.

Explain Career Gaps or Changes

If your career path includes gaps or transitions, use the cover letter to address these. Explain how these experiences have enriched your skills and prepared you for the role of a medical research assistant.

Express Enthusiasm and Confidence

Conclude with a confident statement of your eagerness to join the research team and contribute to medical discoveries. Reiterate your belief that your qualifications make you an ideal candidate.

Call to Action

In your closing paragraph, politely request an interview to discuss your qualifications in more detail. Express your availability for further discussions.

Formal Closing

Sign off with a formal closing, such as "Sincerely" or "Best Regards," followed by your full name.

Proofread and Edit

Thoroughly proofread your cover letter to eliminate any spelling or grammar errors. Ensure it's well-structured and concise. If possible, have a trusted colleague or mentor review it for feedback.

Format and Length

Keep your cover letter to one page, maintaining a professional and organized format. Use a standard font and formatting style for clarity.

Include Contact Information

Place your contact details, including your phone number and email, at the top of the cover letter for easy reference.

Attach or Send with Resume

When applying online, attach your cover letter and resume as separate documents. If sending via email, include both as attachments or in the email body, as per the employer's instructions.

After submitting your application, consider sending a polite follow-up email within a reasonable timeframe to inquire about the status of your application. This demonstrates your continued interest in the position.

Writing an effective cover letter doesn't have to be complicated. It's all about introducing yourself, explaining why you're a great fit for the job, and showing your enthusiasm. 

Customizing it for each job application is key, as it demonstrates your interest and effort. With these steps, you'll be on your way to creating a compelling cover letter that impresses potential employers.

Preparing an Undergraduate Research Assistant Cover Letter

Creating an effective undergraduate research assistant cover letter hinges on identifying key terms, qualifications, and responsibilities in the job description. Here's why it's crucial:

  • Customization : Tailoring your cover letter demonstrates your genuine interest. Identifying key terms allows you to align your qualifications with the job's needs.
  • Relevance : Including relevant keywords helps your cover letter navigate applicant tracking systems (ATS), which screen for a match with the job's requirements.
  • Highlighting Fit : Addressing qualifications and responsibilities shows how you're a strong fit. It makes it easier for employers to see your potential as a research assistant.
  • Attention to Detail : Paying close attention and incorporating job description elements demonstrates your attention to detail and ability to follow instructions—qualities highly valued in research roles.

Remember, it's not just about identifying key terms; you should also provide evidence of how you meet these qualifications to stand out in the application process.

medical student typing cover letter

How to Format Your Letter Properly?

Formatting your research assistant cover letter properly is crucial to creating a professional and appealing document. Here's a step-by-step guide on how to format it correctly:

  • Contact Information : Place your contact information at the top of the letter. Include your full name, phone number, email address, and LinkedIn profile (if applicable). Center-align this section for a clean look.
  • Date : Include the current date below your contact information.
  • Employer's Contact Information : Beneath the date, include the recipient's details. Mention the employer's name, title, company or institution name, and their address. If you don't have a specific name, use a general salutation like "Dear Hiring Manager."
  • Salutation : Greet the recipient with a polite salutation. If you know the recipient's name, use it (e.g., "Dear Mr. Smith"). If not, "Dear Hiring Manager" is acceptable.
  • Opening Paragraph : Begin with a strong and engaging opening that explains your intent. Mention the position you're applying for and how you learned about it.
  • Body Paragraphs : Use two or three body paragraphs to highlight your qualifications, skills, and experiences. Tailor your content to match the specific requirements of the research assistant role. Provide examples of relevant projects or research you've been involved in and how they relate to the position.
  • Closing Paragraph : Summarize your interest in the position and briefly reiterate your qualifications. Express enthusiasm for the opportunity to discuss your application further.
  • Complimentary Close : Choose a professional closing such as "Sincerely" or "Yours faithfully."
  • Signature : Leave space for your handwritten signature above your typed name.
  • Enclosures : If you're including additional documents, like your resume or academic transcripts, mention them in this section.
  • Postscript (Optional) : You can include a postscript (P.S.) beneath your signature for an extra note, but make sure it's relevant and adds value.
  • Formatting and Style :   ‍
  • Use a professional font (e.g., Arial, Times New Roman) and keep the font size between 10 and 12 points. 
  • Ensure consistent formatting, alignment, and spacing throughout the letter.Use standard margins (usually 1-inch) and left-align your text. 
  • Keep the cover letter concise, typically one page in length. 
  • Proofread your letter carefully to eliminate any typos or grammatical errors. ‍
  • File Format: Save your cover letter as a PDF file to ensure that the formatting remains intact when the employer opens it.

Remember that a well-formatted cover letter not only makes a good first impression but also demonstrates your attention to detail and professionalism. Tailor each cover letter to the specific job you're applying for to increase your chances of success.

Strategies for Getting a Research Assistant Role

Whether you’re applying in your freshman year or before medical school —securing a research assistant role can be competitive.

Keep reading for some effective strategies that will boost your chances of success. Let's get into the approaches that will help you land the research assistant position you're aiming for.

Emailing Your Cover Letter and Resume

  • Use a Professional Email : It's essential to use a professional-sounding email address for job applications. If your current email is informal or unprofessional, consider creating a new one that includes your name, like "[email protected]." ‍
  • Clear Subject Line : Create a subject line that clearly states the purpose of your email. For example, "Application for Research Assistant Position - [Your Name]." ‍
  • Introductory Email : Write a concise, engaging email to accompany your attachments. Start by introducing yourself and mentioning the specific job you're applying for. Express your genuine interest in the position and briefly explain why you're a strong candidate. Also, include where you found the job listing (e.g., on the company's website or a job board).
  • Attach PDFs: Save your resume and cover letter as PDF files. PDFs ensure that your formatting remains intact and that the documents are easily accessible across different devices. Give your files clear names, such as "YourName_Resume.pdf" and "YourName_CoverLetter.pdf." Mention in your email that you have attached these files for their reference.

Sending a Follow-up Email

  • Timing Matters : After you've submitted your application, try to be patient. Wait about one to two weeks before sending a follow-up email. This allows the hiring team sufficient time to review applications and make initial selections.
  • Polite Tone : Craft your follow-up email with a polite and professional tone. Express your continued interest in the position and inquire about the status of your application. Use courteous language, and remember that the hiring process may take time.
  • Show Gratitude : Regardless of whether you've received a response, always thank the recipient for considering your application. Express your appreciation for the opportunity to apply and your enthusiasm for the role. This courtesy demonstrates your professionalism and gratitude for their time.

By following these steps, you'll effectively navigate the process of emailing your cover letter and resume and sending a follow-up email in a professional and considerate manner.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Securing a research assistant role is an exciting opportunity, but avoiding these common cover letter mistakes is crucial for success:

  • Generic Approach : Tailor each cover letter to the specific job and organization, showcasing how your skills align with their goals.
  • Overemphasizing Education : Balance your academic qualifications with practical skills and real-world experiences to create a well-rounded pre-med resume.
  • Neglecting Research : Understand the prospective employer's values and projects. Mention what resonates with you and why you want to join their team.
  • Ignoring Requirements : Address job posting requirements explicitly with examples from your experiences.
  • Being Long-Winded : Keep your cover letter concise, focusing on relevant qualifications and experiences.
  • Forgetting to Proofread: Thoroughly proofread for typos, grammar, and formatting issues to reflect professionalism.
  • Lacking Enthusiasm: Convey genuine enthusiasm for the role and organization, explaining why you're excited about the opportunity.
  • Not Following Instructions: Adhere to submission guidelines precisely to demonstrate your ability to follow directions.

By avoiding these mistakes and crafting a well-tailored, concise cover letter, you'll enhance your chances of securing that coveted research assistant role.

job applicant handing resume and cover letter to interviewer

Research Assistant Cover Letter Examples

Take a look at these research assistant cover letter examples to get practical guidance on creating an effective cover letter that will make a positive impression on prospective employers. 

"Yaretzi Townsend

City, State, Zip Code

Home : 000-000-0000 Cell: 000-000-0000

[email protected]

Dear Professor Saro-Wiwa,

I am very interested in the medical research assistant position in the immunization department at Queensborough Medical. The focus of my career has been immunology and genetics, and I have followed your work in this field since I began operating professionally in the field six years ago. I believe my experiences and diligence in medical research would be beneficial to all your projects.

With a degree in Medical Biochemistry, I have laboratory experience in conducting cell culture assays, processing blood samples, analyzing DNA sequences, performing polymerase chain reactions, protein purification spectrophotometry, and electrophoresis. I am also quite adept at performing statistical analysis using bioinformatics and documenting experiment results and sample details. 

I have prepared pro forma reports for other specialists and pathology labs. In my work as a medical research assistant, I have a reputation for conducting highly received seminars and presentations in immunology and the latest developments and expectations in the field. In fact, you may recall attending one in 2006 at Alton Hall for the Students’ Chemistry Society in Tennessee.

As you have already noted, I am experienced and enthused about being a medical research assistant. But, my resume cannot express how excited I am about being a part of your institute. Only a person-to-person interview can do that.

Best Regards,

Yaretzi Townsend"

"Dear Dr. Johnson,

I am writing to express my enthusiastic interest in the Medical Research Assistant position at NeuroTech Solutions, as posted on your company's website. With a solid educational background in neuroscience and a strong commitment to unraveling the complexities of neurodegenerative diseases, I am eager to contribute my expertise to your esteemed research team.

My academic journey at Columbia University has equipped me with a robust knowledge base in neuroscience, including comprehensive coursework in neurobiology and cutting-edge neuroimaging techniques. Furthermore, I have had the privilege of participating in research projects like "Neuroscience and Aging," where I conducted in-depth investigations into the effects of aging on brain function, utilizing functional MRI scans. These experiences have significantly bolstered my proficiency in neuroimaging and enhanced my ability to conduct autonomous research effectively.

One standout project that exemplifies my skills is my involvement in the "NeuroAge Study" at NeuroTech Solutions. Here, I conducted intricate neuroimaging analyses, focusing on examining functional connectivity changes in the aging brain. My findings not only contributed to valuable insights but also led to the publication of a research paper in the esteemed "Journal of Neuroscience," underlining my capacity to make meaningful contributions to the field.

What captivates me about NeuroTech Solutions is the organization's unwavering dedication to advancing research in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly evident in your groundbreaking "NeuroScienceCare" project. I am particularly drawn to this initiative and am excited about the prospect of lending my neuroimaging and data analysis skills to further its success.

Throughout my academic journey and my prior role as a research intern at NeuroTech Solutions, I have honed my expertise in experimental design, data collection, and meticulous analysis, all of which I believe are indispensable for the seamless execution of research endeavors.

The prospect of joining NeuroTech Solutions and collaborating with esteemed researchers to advance our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases fills me with excitement. I have enclosed my resume for your reference, providing a more comprehensive overview of my academic background and research experiences. I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to discuss how my qualifications align with your specific requirements in further detail.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eagerly looking forward to the chance to contribute my passion for neuroscience research and my unwavering dedication to the exploration of neurodegenerative diseases to your dynamic team. Please feel free to contact me at (416) 546-6542 or via email at [email protected] to arrange an interview.

Karan Singh"

“Dear Dr. Wahi,

I am writing to express my strong interest in the Research Assistant position at Stanford University, as advertised on your university's careers page. With a solid foundation in molecular biology and a passion for genomics research, I am eager to contribute my expertise to your esteemed research team.

During my academic journey at Harvard University, I had the privilege of working on several research projects that equipped me with hands-on experience in genome sequencing and analysis. One project that showcases my skills is the "Genome Mapping Initiative." In this initiative, I sequenced and analyzed genomic data from various species, including a challenging project involving the genome of an endangered bird species. My contributions significantly improved data accuracy and contributed to the publication of two research papers.

What excites me about the Research Assistant role at Stanford University is the opportunity to collaborate with renowned researchers in genomics, including your ongoing "Genome Diversity Project." One specific aspect of this project that resonates with me is your exploration of genetic variations in underrepresented populations. My previous experience in genome sequencing, particularly with non-model organisms, aligns perfectly with this initiative, and I am eager to contribute my expertise.

In addition to my technical abilities, I am highly organized and detail-oriented. As a laboratory assistant at Harvard University, I managed laboratory resources efficiently and ensured accurate record-keeping. These skills are essential for managing the complexities of genomics research effectively.

I am excited about the prospect of joining Stanford University and contributing to its cutting-edge genomics research efforts. Enclosed, please find my resume, which provides further details about my academic background and research experience. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss how my qualifications align with your needs in more detail.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to bring my passion for genomics research and my dedication to advancing the field to your team. Please feel free to contact me at (647) 203-4577 or [email protected] to schedule an interview.

Lisa Nguyen

These examples feature strong cover letters. The applicants express their genuine interest in the job, highlight their qualifications, and show their familiarity with the research field or company. The letters are well-structured, providing clear details about their past experiences and contributions, making a compelling case for their abilities. 

Throughout the letters, their enthusiasm for the job shines, and they conclude by expressing eagerness for an interview, leaving a straightforward impression that they're a good match for the positions they seek.

Cover Letter Template

Below, you'll find a cover letter template for a research assistant role tailored to help you craft a compelling cover letter.

[Your Name]

[Email Address]

[Phone Number]

Dear Hiring Manager,

It’s my pleasure to be applying to the position of Research Assistant with Seaside University, which I saw advertised on Resume.com. I'm particularly interested in sustainability and environmentalism and I know that this is one of your main focus areas. I'm confident that my education, previous work experience, and personal interests would make me a great asset to your research team.

For the past 2 years, I've been working as a Research Assistant for East Coast University. My responsibilities include coordinating the schedules of research participants, compiling data, and presenting it in reports.

As I performed my job duties, I realized that our data collection system wasn't very streamlined. I suggested some modifications to my team, and my ideas were well received. After implementation, my suggested changes enabled us to improve both the accuracy and the efficiency of the data collection process by 50% over our previous method.

Over the 2 years I've been in my current role, I've discovered that my favorite part of the job is developing data collection and reporting processes. I find data manipulation to be fascinating as well. At this point in my career, I'm looking for a role that enables me to be part of a project that I am deeply passionate about. This is why I'm so drawn to your organization. I would love to play a part in researching sustainability to make our planet healthier for the generations to come.

I really appreciate you taking the time to review my application, and I hope to speak with you soon regarding an interview. I have no doubt that my attention to detail, analytical thinking skills, and commitment to environmentalism and sustainability will make me a valuable and dedicated member of your team!

Keep reading for quick answers to common questions about crafting your research assistant cover letter effectively.

1. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Research Assistant With No Experience?

If you're new to research assistant roles, focus on your relevant coursework, academic achievements, and transferable skills in your cover letter. Highlight your passion for research and eagerness to learn.

2. Why Is a Cover Letter Essential for a Research Assistant Application?

A cover letter introduces you to potential employers, showcases your qualifications, and demonstrates your enthusiasm for the role and organization. It's your chance to make a strong first impression.

3. What Should I Do if I Lack Prior Research Assistant Experience?

If you don't have research assistant experience, emphasize your academic background, coursework, and any relevant projects or lab work. Highlight transferable skills like attention to detail and analytical thinking.

4. Is It Important to Customize My Cover Letter for Each Research Assistant Position?

Yes, customizing your cover letter for each job is crucial. It shows your genuine interest and how well you match the specific job's requirements and the organization's culture.

5. How Can I Address the Hiring Manager in My Research Assistant Cover Letter?

Whenever possible, address the hiring manager by name. If the name isn't provided in the job posting, try to find it through research or use a generic salutation like "Dear Hiring Manager."

6. What Information Should I Include in My Cover Letter?

Your cover letter should include an introductory paragraph, a section highlighting your qualifications, a section explaining your interest in the position and organization, and a closing paragraph expressing your eagerness and willingness to discuss further in an interview.

Final Thoughts

To sum it up, your cover letter for a research assistant is indispensable. It acts as your initial introduction and provides an avenue to showcase your abilities, passion, and alignment with the role and institution.

A carefully composed cover letter can unlock doors to exciting opportunities in the field of medical research during your undergraduate years, setting you on a path for career growth. So, prepare to make a lasting impression and secure that coveted research assistant position.

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Clinical Researcher Cover Letter Example

Writing a cover letter for a job as a Clinical Researcher can be a challenging task. There are several key elements to consider in order to create a strong, compelling letter that will help you stand out from other applicants. This guide provides advice and tips for writing an effective cover letter for a Clinical Researcher position, along with an example of a successful cover letter to help you get started. With the right preparation and writing approach, you can make the most of your cover letter and increase your chances of landing a job.

If you didn’t find what you were looking for, be sure to check out our complete library of cover letter examples .

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Clinical Researcher Cover Letter Sample

Dear [Hiring Manager],

My name is [Name], and I am writing to apply for the role of Clinical Researcher at [Company Name]. I am a highly experienced clinician and research scientist with a proven track record of delivering successful clinical studies and trials.

My extensive research experience includes working on clinical studies and trials for the [organization], where I was responsible for leading a team of researchers and coordinating the collection and analysis of data. I have extensive experience in both large- scale studies and smaller, targeted trials, and have a strong background in using advanced research methods, such as quantitative and qualitative analysis.

In addition to my diverse research experience, I have a master’s degree in [Field] and have completed several courses in clinical research and data analysis. I have a strong understanding of regulatory guidelines and ethical principles, and I am well- versed in the requirements and standards set by the FDA.

I am confident that I can bring a wealth of knowledge and experience in clinical research to the role of Clinical Researcher at [Company Name], and I am excited about the prospect of contributing to the growth of your research program. I am available for a phone or video interview at your convenience, and I look forward to discussing this opportunity with you further.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

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What should a Clinical Researcher cover letter include?

A Clinical Researcher cover letter should include a professional introduction that immediately captures the attention of the hiring manager. It should also include some information about yourself and your qualifications. Your cover letter should emphasize your experience and qualifications related to the position you are applying for. Additionally, you should clearly communicate why you are the right candidate for the job.

When crafting your Clinical Researcher cover letter, it is also important to give specific examples of skills, accomplishments, or experience that make you the ideal candidate. For example, you may want to mention your ability to effectively collaborate with other researchers, analyze patient data, and produce high- quality research reports. It is also beneficial to provide examples of how your research has had an impact on the medical field.

Finally, your Clinical Researcher cover letter should include a brief summary that reiterates why you are the best candidate for the job. Your conclusion should be concise and to the point, leaving the reader with a strong impression of your skills and qualifications.

Clinical Researcher Cover Letter Writing Tips

Are you interested in becoming a clinical researcher? If you are, then you’ll want to make sure your cover letter is as impressive as possible. Applying for a job as a clinical researcher requires a professional and well- written cover letter to capture the attention of the hiring manager. Here are some tips to help you write an outstanding clinical researcher cover letter:

  • Present yourself professionally: Make sure your cover letter reflects your professional background and qualifications. Use formal language and avoid any errors in grammar, punctuation, or spelling.
  • Clearly explain your experience: Provide a clear and concise description of your experience. Make sure you include any relevant information regarding your past work experience, education, or any additional qualifications.
  • Show your enthusiasm: Demonstrate your enthusiasm for the position by discussing why you’re interested in the job, what skills and qualities you possess that are beneficial for the role, and why you believe you’d be a great fit for the position.
  • Provide details: Make sure to include specifics about your qualifications and experience, such as clinical research projects you’ve completed or any awards or certifications you’ve earned.
  • Demonstrate your knowledge: Show the hiring manager that you understand the requirements of the job, by providing an overview of the research processes and protocols you’re familiar with.
  • Proofread your letter: Before sending your letter, proofread it several times to ensure there are no errors. Have someone else look it over to make sure it’s free of any typos or mistakes.

By following these tips, you’ll be able to create an impressive and professional cover letter that will help you to stand out from the competition. Good luck with your job search!

Common mistakes to avoid when writing Clinical Researcher Cover letter

Writing a cover letter for a clinical researcher role requires attention to detail and careful consideration to ensure it is professional and highlights your relevant skills. To ensure your cover letter stands out from the competition, here are some common mistakes to avoid while writing your clinical researcher cover letter:

  • Not Tailoring to the Role: It’s important to tailor your letter to the specific role you are applying for; it should reflect the qualifications and skills listed in the job description. Generic cover letters that don’t mention the role or use generic language will not grab the attention of the recruiter.
  • Not Being Concise: It is important to be concise when writing your cover letter, keeping it to no more than one page. You need to be able to explain your experience and qualifications quickly and clearly, without waffling on.
  • Not Demonstrating Your Knowledge: Show the recruiter that you know about the company and the role you’re applying for. Demonstrate that you have done your research and that you’re knowledgeable about the subject area.
  • Not Proofreading: Before sending your cover letter, it’s essential to proofread it thoroughly to ensure there are no spelling or grammar errors. It’s also important to make sure you’ve used the correct terminology and that the information is accurate.
  • Not Including a Call to Action: Include a call to action at the end of your letter, such as asking to set up an interview. This will show the recruiter you are keen to secure the role and will help move the process forward.

Following these tips should help you create a successful cover letter for a clinical researcher role. Ensure your cover letter is tailored to the role, concise, and contains a call to action for the best chance of success.

Key takeaways

Writing a cover letter for a clinical researcher position is an important part of the job application process. It is your chance to introduce yourself to the hiring manager and demonstrate your passion, qualifications, and experience for the job.

Here are some key takeaways when writing a clinical researcher cover letter:

  • Highlight your research experience and achievements: Showcase the research projects you have worked on and the results you have achieved.
  • Showcase your technical skills: Clinical researchers must have strong technical skills. Explain the technical skills you have and how you have used them in the past to complete research projects.
  • Describe your knowledge of the field: Demonstrate your knowledge of the field by discussing the latest developments, publications, and research in the field.
  • Explain the value you can bring to the position: Explain how you can contribute to the research objectives of the organization and how you can help them achieve their goals.
  • Use the right language: Use the right language when writing your cover letter. Use clear, concise language and avoid jargon or technical terms.
  • Follow the standard format: Keep your cover letter professional and concise. Follow the standard format of a cover letter, including the introduction, body, and conclusion.

Following these key takeaways when writing a cover letter for a clinical researcher position will give you the best chance of successfully landing the job. Make sure you highlight your research experience, technical skills, knowledge of the field, and value you can bring to the position. Use the right language and follow the standard format for the best results.

Frequently Asked Questions

1.how do i write a cover letter for an clinical researcher job with no experience.

Writing a cover letter for an Clinical Researcher job with no experience can be a daunting task. However, if you take the time to prepare, you can stand out from the competition and make a strong impression on potential employers.

Start by researching the position and the hiring manager’s expectations, so that you can tailor your cover letter to their needs. Include a strong opening paragraph that summarizes your relevant qualifications and highlights the value you can bring to the company. Showcase your research, critical thinking and problem- solving skills, and be sure to emphasize any relevant coursework or internships. Explain how your unique combination of experience, education and personal qualities will help you excel in the role.

Finally, express your enthusiasm for the position and thank the hiring manager for taking the time to review your application.

2.How do I write a cover letter for an Clinical Researcher job experience?

When applying for an Clinical Researcher job with experience, an effective cover letter can make all the difference. Start by referencing your relevant professional experience and the skills you developed during your career. Then, highlight any research or clinical experience you have, as well as any specialized training or certifications.

Be sure to emphasize the accomplishments you have achieved in previous roles and explain how they relate to the position you are applying for. Showcase your critical thinking and problem- solving skills, and be sure to demonstrate your enthusiasm for the role. Finally, thank the hiring manager for taking the time to review your application and express your interest in the position.

3.How can I highlight my accomplishments in Clinical Researcher cover letter?

When highlighting your accomplishments in a Clinical Researcher cover letter, it’s important to focus on the skills and experience that make you a strong candidate for the position. Showcase any research or clinical experience you have, as well as any specialized training or certifications. Explain how your knowledge, skills and abilities were used to resolve issues and develop solutions.

Provide specific examples of how your work has made an impact on the organization, such as improving patient outcomes or developing new processes. Finally, be sure to emphasize any awards or recognitions you have received in the past.

4.What is a good cover letter for an Clinical Researcher job?

A good cover letter for an Clinical Researcher job should demonstrate your enthusiasm for the position and highlight the skills and experience that make you a strong candidate. Start by referencing your relevant professional experience and the skills you developed during your career.

Be sure to explain how your unique combination of experience, education and personal qualities will help you excel in the role. Showcase any research or clinical experience you have, as well as any specialized training or certifications.

In addition to this, be sure to check out our cover letter templates , cover letter formats ,  cover letter examples ,  job description , and  career advice  pages for more helpful tips and advice.

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medical research cover letter

medical research cover letter

Medical Researcher Cover Letter Example

medical research cover letter

Written by Mark DeGrasso

May 19, 2023.

When applying for a job in the medical research field, your cover letter can either make or break your chances of landing the position. A well-crafted cover letter can set you apart from the other applicants and demonstrate your passion for medical research. In this article, we will discuss the essential components of a medical researcher cover letter, common mistakes to avoid, tips for writing a strong cover letter, and provide an example to guide you in crafting a perfect cover letter for your next job application.

Understanding the Importance of a Medical Researcher Cover Letter

Before delving into the essential components of a medical researcher cover letter , it’s crucial to understand its importance in the job application process. The cover letter serves as an introduction to you as a candidate and why you are the ideal fit for the position. It provides an opportunity to showcase your personality, passion, and relevant skills and experience beyond what is listed in your resume.

The role of a cover letter in the job application process

A cover letter is the first document that a hiring manager will see before reviewing your resume and supporting materials. It presents a snapshot of who you are as a candidate and can help answer the following questions:

  • What are your qualifications?
  • Why do you want this job?
  • What makes you stand out from other candidates?

However, a cover letter is not just a summary of your resume. It is an opportunity to showcase your writing skills and demonstrate your knowledge of the company and the specific role you are applying for. By doing so, you can demonstrate that you have done your research and are genuinely interested in the position.

How a well-crafted cover letter can set you apart

A well-crafted cover letter can set you apart from other applicants by demonstrating your passion for the field and showcasing your unique skills and experience. A generic cover letter can make you look like a less passionate and qualified candidate. A personalized cover letter, on the other hand, can make you stand out from the crowd and increase your chances of landing an interview.

One way to make your cover letter stand out is to highlight your relevant experience. For example, if you have experience conducting medical research in a specific area, such as oncology or cardiology, be sure to mention it in your cover letter. This will show the hiring manager that you have the skills and experience necessary to excel in the role.

Another way to make your cover letter stand out is to demonstrate your knowledge of the company and its mission. Research the company’s history, values, and current projects, and mention them in your cover letter. This will show the hiring manager that you are genuinely interested in the company and its mission, and that you have taken the time to do your research.

Finally, be sure to showcase your personality in your cover letter. While it is important to be professional, you also want to show the hiring manager that you are a personable and engaging candidate. Use your cover letter to convey your enthusiasm for the field, your passion for the work, and your desire to make a difference in the lives of patients.

In conclusion, a well-crafted cover letter is an essential component of any medical researcher job application. By demonstrating your passion, skills, and experience, and showcasing your knowledge of the company and the role, you can set yourself apart from other candidates and increase your chances of landing an interview.

Essential Components of a Medical Researcher Cover Letter

As a medical researcher, your cover letter is an essential tool to showcase your skills and experience to potential employers. A well-crafted cover letter can make all the difference in securing an interview and ultimately landing your dream job.

Now that you understand the importance of a cover letter, let’s delve into the essential components of a medical researcher cover letter.

Personalizing your cover letter

One of the most critical components of a successful cover letter is personalization. Your cover letter should be personalized to the specific job posting and employer. Avoid using a generic template to write your cover letter. Instead, research the organization and the position to demonstrate your knowledge and passion for the job.

Address the hiring manager by name, and introduce yourself and explain why you’re interested in the position. Show them that you have taken the time to research the job requirements, and you have what it takes to fulfill them.

For example, if you’re applying for a medical research position at a hospital, you could mention how their commitment to patient care aligns with your own values.

Highlighting your relevant skills and experience

Your cover letter should showcase your relevant skills and experience that make you a good fit for the position. Emphasize your experience and skill set based on the job description and the skills required for the role.

Use bullet points to list your skills and experiences that match those listed in the job description. This will make it easier for the hiring manager to see how your experience aligns with the position.

For example, if the job posting requires experience in conducting clinical trials, you could highlight your experience in designing and executing clinical trials.

Demonstrating your passion for medical research

Medical research is a field that requires passion and dedication. Your cover letter should demonstrate your passion for medical research. Explain why you are interested in the position and what about the industry inspires you.

Talk about how you have participated in previous research projects and your desire to make a difference in the world. Showcase your passion for the field by sharing your long-term goals and career aspirations.

For example, you could mention how your desire to find a cure for a specific disease has inspired you to pursue a career in medical research.

Showcasing your knowledge of the organization and position

In addition to showing your passion for medical research, your cover letter should also showcase that you understand the organization’s mission, values, and goals.

Highlight how your skills and experience align with those specific values. Discuss how the business operates and why you believe that you would be the best fit for the role.

For example, if the organization is known for its commitment to innovation, you could mention how your experience in developing new research methodologies would be an asset to the team.

By following these essential components, you can create a compelling cover letter that showcases your skills, experience, and passion for medical research. Remember to personalize your cover letter, highlight your relevant skills and experience, demonstrate your passion for medical research, and showcase your knowledge of the organization and position.

Common Mistakes to Avoid in Your Cover Letter

To increase your chances of getting noticed and landing an interview, you must avoid the following common mistakes:

Using generic or overly formal language

Avoid using generic or overly formal language in your cover letter. While it’s important to maintain a professional tone, using language that is too stiff or formal can make you come across as unapproachable. Instead, use active, engaging language that showcases your passion for the field and your enthusiasm for the position you’re applying for. Make your cover letter personal and engaging by using first-person language when addressing the hiring manager.

For example, instead of saying “I am writing to apply for the position of Marketing Manager,” try saying “I am thrilled to be applying for the Marketing Manager position at XYZ Company.”

Focusing too much on yourself and not enough on the organization

Your cover letter should focus more on how you can help the organization rather than just what the organization can do for you. While it’s important to highlight your skills and qualifications, it’s equally important to show how those skills and qualifications will benefit the organization and its goals.

Research the company and its mission statement, and use that information to tailor your cover letter to the specific needs of the organization. Highlight how your skills and experience will contribute to the company’s success, and show that you understand the company’s values and goals.

Repeating your resume verbatim

Avoid simply repeating your resume verbatim in your cover letter. While it’s important to provide an overview of your qualifications, your cover letter should provide additional context and personalization that can’t be found on your resume.

Highlight the aspects of your resume that are most relevant to the position, and provide more details about how your experiences qualify you for the role. Use examples from your past work experiences to show how you have the skills and qualities the employer is looking for.

Neglecting to proofread and edit your cover letter

One of the most common mistakes in a medical researcher cover letter is to submit one that is full of errors. Since you are applying for a job in the field of medical research that values attention to detail, your cover letter should be error-free.

Make sure that you proofread your cover letter carefully, checking for spelling and grammar errors, as well as typos and formatting issues. It’s also a good idea to get feedback from at least one other person, such as a friend, family member, or mentor, to ensure that your cover letter is clear, concise, and effective.

By avoiding these common mistakes and crafting a well-written, personalized cover letter, you can increase your chances of getting noticed by potential employers and landing your dream job in the field of medical research.

Tips for Writing a Strong Medical Researcher Cover Letter

Are you looking to land your dream job as a medical researcher? A well-crafted cover letter can make all the difference in getting noticed by potential employers. Here are some tips for writing a strong medical researcher cover letter that will help you stand out:

Researching the organization and position thoroughly

Before writing your cover letter, it is essential to research the organization and the position thoroughly. This will help you understand their mission, values, and goals, and enable you to tailor your cover letter to their specific needs. Take the time to browse their website, read about their recent research projects, and learn more about their team. This knowledge will be useful when crafting a personalized cover letter that speaks directly to their needs and requirements.

Tailoring your cover letter to the specific job posting

Customizing your cover letter to the specific job posting you are applying for is crucial. It shows that you have taken the time to read and understand the job description and that you are genuinely interested in the position. Use specific language from the job description to demonstrate your knowledge and show that you meet the specific qualifications listed. This will help you stand out from other applicants and increase your chances of getting an interview.

Using strong action verbs and concise language

Your cover letter should be written in a clear and concise manner, using strong action verbs that showcase your skills, experience, and passion for the position. Avoid vague language and use specific examples to provide more context. Use bullet points to list your achievements and highlight your skills. This will make it easier for the hiring manager to scan your cover letter and identify your strengths.

Seeking feedback from mentors or colleagues

Before you submit your cover letter, it is essential to seek feedback from someone you trust to provide an honest critique on your writing and content. This could be a mentor, colleague, or friend who has experience in the field. They can provide you with insights on what you need to improve on before submitting your application. Take their feedback seriously and make the necessary changes to ensure that your cover letter is the best it can be.

By following these tips, you can craft a strong medical researcher cover letter that showcases your skills, experience, and passion for the position. Remember to personalize your cover letter, tailor it to the job posting, use strong action verbs and concise language, and seek feedback from trusted sources. Good luck with your job search!

Example Medical Researcher Cover Letter

Below is an example of a medical researcher cover letter:

Analyzing a successful cover letter

Dear Hiring Manager,

As a highly motivated individual with a passion for medical research, I am thrilled to apply for the medical researcher position that you recently advertised on your company’s website. I am impressed with the unique approach your organization takes towards medical research, and I would love to contribute my skills in promoting and implementing innovative health care solutions. I believe my skills and experience would be a valuable addition to your team.

My interest in medical research began during my undergraduate studies in Biology and Chemistry. I was fascinated by the intricacies of the human body and the potential for scientific discovery to improve people’s lives. After graduation, I began working in the field of medical research and have been fortunate to work on a variety of projects that have allowed me to develop strong skills in experimental design, implementation, and data analysis.

One of my most notable accomplishments was working on the development of a novel drug delivery system. This project required me to create experimental designs, develop protocols, and analyze data. Through this experience, I gained valuable insights into the research process and the importance of collaboration and communication in achieving successful outcomes.

In addition to my technical skills, I am proficient in several laboratory techniques and experienced in using statistical software packages such as SPSS and Minitab. I am also committed to staying up-to-date with the latest research and industry trends, and I regularly attend conferences and workshops to expand my knowledge and skills.

I am eager to bring my expertise and experience to your organization and contribute to the development of innovative medical solutions. Thank you for considering my application.

Adapting the example to your own application

If you are interested in applying for a medical researcher position, I encourage you to use this example as a guide to help you personalize your own cover letter. Use the language and phrasing to get started, and adapt it to fit your experiences. Customize the language to fit your application and the job requirements. Remember to highlight your unique skills and experiences and demonstrate how they align with the organization’s mission and values.

Good luck with your application!

Medical research is an exciting field that offers numerous opportunities for growth and development. As a medical researcher, you will be responsible for conducting research studies, analyzing data, and presenting findings to the scientific community. To succeed in this field, you need to have excellent communication skills, a strong work ethic, and a passion for discovering new things.When crafting your cover letter for a medical research position, it’s essential to start with a strong introduction that captures the reader’s attention. You can do this by using an attention-grabbing headline, sharing a personal story, or highlighting your relevant experience.In the body of your cover letter, you should focus on providing concrete examples of your skills and experiences that make you an ideal candidate for the position. Use bullet points or numbered lists to make it easy for the reader to scan and understand your qualifications.It’s also important to tailor your cover letter to the specific job you’re applying for. Research the organization and the job requirements to ensure that you’re highlighting the skills and experiences that are most relevant to the position.Finally, don’t forget to proofread and edit your cover letter carefully. Typos and grammatical errors can make a negative impression on the reader and hurt your chances of getting hired. Seek feedback from others, such as friends, family members, or professional editors, to ensure that your cover letter is polished and professional.In conclusion, crafting the perfect medical researcher cover letter requires time, effort, and attention to detail. By following these tips, you can create a compelling cover letter that showcases your skills and experiences and increases your chances of landing your dream job in the field of medical research. Good luck!

Table of Contents

13 Professional Researcher Cover Letter Examples for 2024

Your researcher cover letter must showcase your academic excellence and research skills. Highlight your publications or any relevant projects that demonstrate expertise in your field. Connect your past experiences with the potential role, indicating how they make you an ideal candidate. It's crucial to convey your passion for the subject and how you can contribute valuable insights to the team.

All cover letter examples in this guide

medical research cover letter

UX Researcher

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Product Researcher

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Design Researcher

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Market Researcher

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Quantitative Researcher

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Lab Researcher

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User Researcher

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Undergraduate Researcher

medical research cover letter

Psychology Researcher

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Student Researcher

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Machine Learning Researcher

medical research cover letter

Qualitative Researcher

Cover letter guide.

Researcher Cover Letter Sample

Cover Letter Format

Cover Letter Salutation

Cover Letter Introduction

Cover Letter Body

Cover Letter Closing

No Experience Researcher Cover Letter

Key Takeaways

Researcher cover letter

Embarking on the job hunt, you’ve likely discovered the need to complement your resume with a researcher cover letter—a daunting task for many. Surpassing the routine checklist of your resume, your cover letter should weave a compelling narrative around your proudest professional milestone. It must strike the delicate balance between formal tone and original expression, avoiding overused phrases that dull your accomplishments. Keep it concise; this powerful one-pager is your chance to captivate and convince.

  • Personalize the greeting to address the recruiter and your introduction that fits the role;
  • Follow good examples for individual roles and industries from job-winning cover letters;
  • Decide on your most noteworthy achievement to stand out;
  • Format, download, and submit your researcher cover letter, following the best HR practices.

Use the power of Enhancv's AI: drag and drop your researcher resume, which will swiftly be converted into your job-winning cover letter.

If the researcher isn't exactly the one you're looking for we have a plethora of cover letter examples for jobs like this one:

  • Researcher resume guide and example
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  • Undergraduate Research Assistant cover letter example
  • Lab Technician cover letter example
  • Entry Level Chemist cover letter example
  • Biology cover letter example
  • Research Assistant cover letter example
  • Scientist cover letter example
  • Research Manager cover letter example

Researcher cover letter example

Samuel Moore

Columbus, Ohio

+1-(234)-555-1234

[email protected]

  • Demonstration of past experience relevant to the role, such as leading a comprehensive evaluation of digital resources, indicates the candidate's ability to perform similar tasks at Ithaka S+R.
  • Quantifiable achievements in previous roles, like improving project efficiency by 25%, show the candidate's potential to add measurable value to Ithaka S+R's projects.
  • Alignment with the organization's mission, seen in the candidate's expression of shared goals regarding academic growth and equity, suggests a good fit with the team and its objectives.
  • Mention of specific skills, such as advanced qualitative methodologies and strategic project management, matches the skill set required for a successful researcher at Ithaka S+R.

The must-have sections and format of your researcher cover letter

When writing your researcher cover letter, keep in mind that it'll only be read by the recruiters and not the Applicant Tracker System (or software used to assess your profile). That's why you should structure your content with a/an:

  • Header (apart from your contact information, include your name, the role you're applying for, and the date);
  • Personalized salutation;
  • Opening paragraph to win the recruiters over;
  • Middle paragraph with key details;
  • Closing that starts from clichés;
  • Sign off (that's not mandatory).

Industry standards dictate your paragraphs to be single-spaced and to wrap your content in a one-inch margin. Designing your researcher cover letter, refer to one of our templates , which automatically takes care of the spacing and margins.

Choose the same font for your researcher cover letter as you did for your resume : the likes of Lato and Bitter would help you to stand out in a sea of cover letters in Arial or Times New Roman.

Export your whole researcher cover letter from our builder in PDF to keep the same formatting and image quality.

The top sections on a researcher cover letter

  • Header: Include your contact information, the date, and the employer's contact information, ensuring you can be easily reached for follow-up and portraying a professional format specific to researchers who value detail orientation.
  • Greeting: Address the hiring manager or committee directly, if known, to show you've done your research, which is a critical skill for any research position.
  • Introduction: Clearly state the research position you're applying for, mention how you found the job listing, and include a hook that summarizes your enthusiasm and fit for the role, demonstrating your genuine interest and initiative in the field.
  • Body: Detail your previous research experience, publications, and how your skills align with the job requirements, showing that you can contribute significantly to the ongoing projects or academic pursuits of the organization.
  • Closing: Express your eagerness to discuss further how you can contribute to the team, thank the reader for considering your application, and indicate that you have attached your CV or any relevant publications, establishing a call-to-action and preparation for the next steps.

Key qualities recruiters search for in a candidate’s cover letter

Proven track record in conducting independent research and publishing in peer-reviewed journals: It demonstrates the ability to contribute to the scientific community with original findings.

Expertise in specialized techniques or methodologies unique to the field: This shows the candidate possesses the technical skills necessary to perform and contribute to cutting-edge research.

Successful grant writing experience: Securing funding is critical for research; this skill indicates the candidate can attract the necessary resources to support their work.

Prior involvement in collaborative projects with multidisciplinary teams: Research increasingly requires collaboration across various disciplines, so the ability to work with diverse teams is highly valued.

Evidence of critical thinking and problem-solving abilities: Researchers must be able to tackle complex problems, analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions that propel the field forward.

Strong communication skills, both written and oral: The ability to effectively communicate research findings to a wide range of audiences, including non-specialists, is essential for disseminating knowledge and advancing one's career in academia or industry.

How to start your researcher cover letter: with a greeting, of course

Have you ever considered just how powerful a personalized salutation can be?

We sure have news for you! Your researcher cover letter should start with the right salutation to recruiters, nurturing a sense of respect and individuality.

Greet recruiters by using their first name (e.g. "Dear Tom" or "Dear Patricia") if you've previously established contact with them.

Otherwise, opt out for the less familiar, "Dear Ms. Peaches" or "Dear Ms Kelsey", if you've found the recruiter's name on LinkedIn or a corporate website.

"To whom it may concern" is never a good option, as it creates a sense that you've been sending out your researcher cover letter to anyone. Instead, use "Dear HR team" or "Dear (company name) recruiter" for a feeling of exclusivity.

List of salutations you can use

  • Dear Dr. [Last Name],
  • Dear Professor [Last Name],
  • Dear Hiring Committee,
  • Dear Search Committee,
  • Dear [Full Name],
  • Dear Mr./Ms. [Last Name],

Using your researcher cover letter intro to show your dedication

We know just how difficult it is to start writing your researcher cover letter introduction .

There are so many great qualities you have as a professional, which one should you choose?

How about writing up to two sentences about your passion and commitment to the work you do or are set to do?

Try to describe exactly what you enjoy about the potential role.

A positive attitude from the get-go will help you stand out as a motivated researcher professional.

Choosing your best achievement for the middle or body of your researcher cover letter

Now that you have the recruiters' attention, it's time to write the chunkiest bit of your researcher cover letter .

The body consists of three to six paragraphs that focus on one of your achievements.

Use your past success to tell a story of how you obtained your most job-crucial skills and know-how (make sure to back these up with tangible metrics).

Another excellent idea for your researcher cover letter's middle paragraphs is to shine a light on your unique professional value.

Write consistently and make sure to present information that is relevant to the role.

Finishing off your researcher cover letter with what matters most

So far, you've done a fantastic job in tailoring your researcher cover letter for the role and recruiter.

Your final opportunity to make a good impression is your closing paragraph.

And, no, a "Sincerely yours" just won't do, as it sounds too vague and impersonal.

End your researcher cover letter with the future in mind.

So, if you get this opportunity, what do you plan to achieve? Be as specific, as possible, of what value you'd bring to the organization.

You could also thank recruiters for their interest in your profile and prompt for follow-up actions (and organizing your first interview).

Researcher cover letter advice for candidates with no experience

If you're worried about writing your Researcher cover letter and have no professional experience , we sure have some advice for you.

Turn recruiters' attention to your transferable or relevant skills gained thanks to your life and work experience.

Instead of writing about past jobs, focus on one achievement (whether from your volunteering experience, education, etc.) and the skills it has helped you build.

Alternatively, you could focus your Researcher cover letter on your career objectives and goals. Always remember to make those relevant to the job you're applying for by detailing how you see yourself growing as part of the company.

Recruiters would be way more impressed with candidates who fit the job profile and can bring about plenty of skills and vision to the table.

Key takeaways

Summarizing the most important aspects in writing your researcher cover letter, remember to:

  • Create a personalized researcher cover letter for each role you apply for, that includes the recruiter's name in the salutation;
  • Format your researcher cover letter with single-spacing, one-inch margins, and a modern, yet ATS-friendly font;
  • Always start off your researcher cover letter with two sentences that reflect what is most important about your application;
  • Your researcher cover letter body should feature your biggest accomplishments and the job-relevant skills it has taught you;
  • Instead of opting for the "Sincerely yours" ending, close your researcher cover letter with a nod to the future with what you aim to achieve in this potential role.

Researcher cover letter examples

Explore additional researcher cover letter samples and guides and see what works for your level of experience or role.

UX Researcher Resume Example

Cover letter examples by industry

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  • Premed Research

Research Assistant Cover Letter: The Ultimate Guide

Research Assistant Cover Letter

You should never underestimate the power of a good research assistant cover letter. Whether you are seeking to gain some research experience to bolster your applications for medical school and MD-PhD programs or seeking to get a coveted research assistant position, your cover letter is one of the key components of your application.

Research assistant cover letters can be tricky to write, but I'm going to guide you through this process. In this blog, you will learn why a cover letter is important, how to write your research assistant cover letter, learn tips to make your cover letter stand out, and get to read cover letter samples, including one with no research experience! Whether you're a premed or not, this ultimate guide will help you get your desired research position.

>> Want us to help you get accepted? Schedule a free strategy call here . <<

Listen to the blog!

Article Contents 17 min read

Why get involved in research.

Research is certainly one of the ways to build up your medical school application and impress the admissions committees with your extracurriculars for medical school . However, it is also your chance to build up professional skills and knowledge in the field of your interest. Admission committees appreciate applicants with a research background because these students demonstrate interest in actively shaping medical and scientific progress.

Since the research process is challenging and enriching, these students develop critical thinking skills and confidence to challenge the status quo. Research fosters patience and stamina. It provides freedom to experiment and a space for constructive criticism. If you are looking to gain research experience, do not limit your search to strictly medical positions. Pursue disciplines that interest you. Research skills can often be transferred to a variety of fields.

Unique research experiences will also make you stand out in your medical school applications. As you might already know, one of the most common medical school interview questions  you’ll be asked is how you can contribute to the diversity of the incoming class – research is your chance to add another unique experience to your application.

Research experience is highly valued by some of the top medical schools in the world. For example, over 90% of Ivy League medical schools’ matriculants have research experience. According to the latest data, 99% of  Stanford Medical School  matriculants have research and lab experience. Research is especially valuable if you are looking at MD-PhD programs.

Firstly, you should always send a cover letter in addition to your CV as part of your job or volunteer application, unless otherwise expressed by the recruiter. Even if you have had the chance to explain your motivation for applying in the application form or email, you should still include a separate cover letter. This letter is an additional opportunity to present yourself as the perfect candidate for the research position.

The primary goal of a research assistant cover letter is to intrigue your potential employer enough to invite you to an interview. Whether you’re an experienced researcher or an undergraduate student looking for research experience, your cover letter is the “face” of your application. Most likely, your cover letter will be the first document your potential colleagues read about you. A perfect research assistant cover letter should include the following:

Your cover letter must compel the reader to read your CV and other application components, if applicable. "}]" code="timeline3">

Simply put, your cover letter should explain why you are the most suitable candidate for the position. Your letter must demonstrate how you meet the criteria for the research position and what makes you a unique candidate. Additionally, this letter is your chance to show off your communication and language skills. Remember, research reports require the ability to articulate clearly and succinctly. Your strong technical research abilities must be accompanied by excellent verbal and written communication skills.

How to Write Your Cover Letter

Let’s examine what steps you need to take to create an outstanding research assistant cover letter.

Research the Position

First and foremost, when you write a cover letter for a research assistant position, you must know exactly what the position entails, what expectations your potential colleagues have of the new hire, and how this research position might develop in the future.

If you found a position as a job posting, it would certainly be wise to study the job description closely. It usually gives you some important, albeit surface, information. You can start by carefully studying the position summary, duties and responsibilities, qualifications, requirements, etc. However, this is usually not enough. Whether you found this position as a job posting or not, it is important to do your research.

Your cover letter needs to show that you are the best possible match for this research position. The job description you have found can only give you so much. You need to find out how your research interests match with this institution’s research program, what the recruiters are really looking for, and how it can help you in your future career as a medical professional or a researcher.

Start by researching the institution or department you’re applying to online. Research their programs, their research profile, and the research interests of their staff. Often you can find important information about the institution’s latest research ranking and their research projects on their website. It could also be interesting to read reviews written by people who have worked in the institution to which you’re applying. Do take these with a grain of salt, but some of these reviews can give you insights into the program’s expectations.

Another way to find out more information about the position is to contact the institution or the department. There is usually someone who can answer your questions, such as an administrative assistant, recruiter, or someone directly involved in the research project. They will be happy to answer any questions you might have about the job, the department, or the institution.

Avoid asking specific questions that will be covered in an interview such as “how much does the job pay” as this will send the impression that you're only interested in the position for the pay, and not because it's what you really want to do. Calling to inquire about the job may also make your name stand out among dozens of applicants for this position. The recruiters may make a note that you personally called and showed enthusiasm about the job.

Before you call, make sure you prepare a list of questions. Beware that your phone call may turn into an unofficial interview, especially if you talk to someone involved in the research process. Be ready to speak about yourself in relation to the position and prepare to answer some of the most common interview questions like “ Tell me about yourself ?”, “why do you want to work with us?” and so on. These are common introductory questions that allow the interviewer to get some insights about you as a potential colleague.

If you are a current undergraduate student, you can also try speaking to your classmates and any TAs you know who may have worked in the research lab you are applying to. You can ask them what they enjoyed and what they found challenging about the work, allowing you to learn from a first-person perspective what it is like to work in that lab.

It might seem like a lot of work, but researching the position, the institution, faculty, and staff will give you a competitive edge. Whoever reads your research assistant cover letter and CV will be able to tell the depth of your research. Your dedication and curiosity will really show in your application and distinguish you as a serious applicant from the rest of the hopefuls. It is also great preparation for the interview stage.

A research position cover letter should be no longer than a page. Your language must be succinct and clear. You must be able to demonstrate that you can express your ideas fluently and clearly – do not use informal language or include any fluff. Your cover letter is not the place to give a detailed account of every research position you have held.

Remember, your letter may go through several readers and not all of them may be researchers, so do not use overly technical language. Your letter must capture the interest of any reader, while further details of your research experiences and education can be included in your CV. If you want to accompany your cover letter with a stellar CV, check out our blog on how to write a CV for graduate school .

For your cover letter, use a classic font such as Times New Roman or Calibri sized 11 or 12 and break your letter into paragraphs. This order of paragraphs is not set in stone, but it may give you some ideas about how to structure your letter:

Remind the reader why you are a good fit for this job and restate your interest in the position. "}]">

Are you planning to apply to medical school? Check out how research can help you:

How to Stand Out in Your Research Position Cover Letter

When you prepare your cover letter, you need to reflect on what makes you a unique candidate for the research position to which you’re applying. To do this, think about what may differentiate you from the competition and try to anticipate what other candidates may offer.

First of all, try to analyze and have a clear understanding of your depth of expertise in this field. Do you have a high research profile? Have you had much research experience in this field? If your answer is yes, then it might be a good point to include in your cover letter. Perhaps you have demonstrated passion for this research field, and you want to commit your future to this area of research? Or maybe you want to stay and work in this particular institution? Perhaps you completed your undergraduate degree there and know the ins-and-outs of their labs? Try to think of yourself in relation to the position, your potential colleagues, and the department. You might find more connections upon a deeper inspection.

Another great selling point is your ability to access research and funding networks and organizations. If you have had success in applying to and receiving research grants or organizing fundraisers for your research projects, be sure to include this in your cover letter. A colleague who can increase funding for a research project is an invaluable addition to any team.

If you do not have a strong research background in this field, do not worry. Try to think of your personal research experience – do you have a diverse background? Does your particular blend of experiences give you a unique perspective? If you have had research experience in a variety of disciplines, it might be your competitive edge!

What if you have not had the chance to gain research experience? Maybe you have had a limited amount of opportunities for research? You can talk about this in your cover letter by expressing enthusiasm to be exposed to research. In this case, try to focus on your biggest successes and most relevant qualities. You might possess a qualification that would be highly relevant to this research position even if you’ve never had a serious research experience. Have your abilities to multitask been praised by previous employers? Have you received awards for teaching excellence? Are you particularly skilled with technology and computer software? All these qualities and accomplishments may help you impress the reader. Try to market yourself, your skills, and qualifications in relation to the position – you might have something other applicants don’t.

How to Look for Research Positions if You Have Little to No Experience

If you have little to no research experience, but want this experience for your medical school application or to be eligible to apply for a research position you really want – here are some tips:

1. If you’re out of school, finding out about research positions and opportunities is quite difficult. Oftentimes, research positions are not posted externally. Even within the institution, professors and PIs tend to select students they have taught to help them in their research projects.

With this said, there are things you can do to search for these opportunities. One of the most common ways to find a research position is to email professors in the departments you would like to join as a researcher. Whether you are still a student or a graduate, explain in your email that you want to volunteer in the lab. Do not mention money – state clearly that you want to gain research experience. Without experience, a paying research position is almost impossible to get. Start as a volunteer and see where it takes you.

  • Your cover letter should include your most recent successes. Talk about your most recent or current jobs.
  • You should present evidence that would support your relevancy for the position in the first half of the letter. Support your pertinent qualifications with examples of achievements from your previous or current roles (i.e. awards, distinctions, publications, etc.).
  • Illustrate your successes with brief but solid examples, explaining why you would be a good fit for this position.
  • Concentrate on achievements and qualities that make you unique, rather than simply listing the job description’s criteria.
  • Your cover letter should indicate that you spent much time researching the position, the faculty, and the institution. Demonstrate how well you know the role and the research context when explaining your career motivations.
  • Ensure your letter is error-free and clearly written. A grammatically correct and succinct letter is professional and shows the reader you are capable of communicating effectively in writing.

Things to Avoid in Your Research Assistant Cover Letter

  • Do not summarize your CV or give too much detail. Remember, the reviewer already has your CV so it's not appropriate to list items that are available elsewhere in your application. You must be selective about the qualifications and responsibilities you emphasize.
  • Do not leave out examples when you make statements about the relevancy of your skills and experiences.
  • Never send the same cover letter to more than one employer. Do not cut and paste from one letter to another. Your reader will be able to tell your lack of research and career focus.
  • Do not use jargon and overly technical vocabulary. You might want to come off as a knowledgeable candidate for this position but try to stick to a professional tone and language as much as possible.
  • Do not concentrate your cover letter on what the employer can do for you. Instead, focus on what you can do for the employer and the research project.
  • Do not make statements that are too general. For example, do not say “I’ve always wanted to work in this research field” – rather, show that you have worked in this research area and that you are passionate about this field. Do not write that you want to work for this institution or with this PI because they are famous all over the world. You must include other reasons for wanting to work with them. Searching for validation might make the wrong impression and eliminate you from the competition.

Some Important Don'ts for Research Assistant Cover Letters:

Do not make statements that are too general "}]" code="timeline2">

Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample #1

Dear Dr. Smith,

With this letter and enclosed CV, I would like to express my strong interest in the Research Assistant position you have available in the X department. I am a recent master’s graduate with experience in facilitating successful clinical trials. My graduate research involved working with clinicians and patient populations. Before my master’s, I graduated from a premed program at X university with the highest honors.

This research assistant position is a perfect combination of my educational background and my clinical experience. During my master’s degree, not only was I able to read, analyze, and interpret information from professional journals, technical procedures, and government regulations, but I also participated in clinical procedures directed by my PI, Dr. John Johnson. I completed and maintained case report forms as per FDA guidelines and reviewed them against the patient’s medical record for completeness and accuracy. I was heavily involved in assisting my superiors with the clinical process. I collected, processed, and shipped blood and urine specimens at scheduled patients’ visits. I was in charge of ensuring that all laboratory results were given to appropriate doctors for review of clinical significance, then filed the results in the patient study binder. My dedication to research and my team earned me the Research Assistant Excellence Award. Today, I am still in touch with my PI and my colleagues, with whom I have maintained professional and friendly ties. After recently graduating from my master’s degree, I am looking to apply my skills and knowledge to your research project.

Aside from learning a set of clinical and laboratory skills, working in research has trained my other competencies. My research position involved working in a team of researchers from different disciplines and nationalities. This experience significantly improved my ability to communicate as I often found myself explaining complex concepts to people outside of the medical field. Working with such an international team taught me to problem-solve and find quick solutions. For example, one aspect of the project involved collaborating with team members in Japan. We had a hard time communicating due to the time difference. I suggested to my colleagues and PI that we create a message board online where we could quickly ask questions and send documents back and forth; this board was available both on mobiles and computers, allowing for easier communication between our two teams at any time. This initiative improved our productivity and speed, as well as allowed us to quickly communicate practical solutions to any problems that came up during research. This successful collaboration resulted in the university funding our research project for one more year.

My interests and responsibilities outside of research would also make great contributions to your team. I am particularly impressed with your Institution’s commitment to improving patient experience in deprived communities. As an active volunteer at my local Street Heath Community Clinic, your dedication to providing healthcare to all in need is very inspiring. I am also drawn to your department's interdisciplinary approach. As a master's graduate, I learned the value of combining academic and clinical research. I know from experience that thinking beyond your discipline will only improve your research approach and results.

I am confident that my clinical research experience, my in-depth educational background, and interests make me an ideal match for this position. I would appreciate any opportunity to discuss my expertise in more detail at the interview and I look forward to hearing from you shortly.

Author’s signature

What makes this cover letter strong:

1. Uses a personal address.

2. States right away that his/her educational and research background are relevant.

3. Gives solid descriptions of his/her duties, experiences, and successes in the most recent research project.

4. Uses specific examples to show his/her soft skills, including superb communication skills.

5. Mentions that he/she was able to secure extra funding for a research project.

6. Includes interests outside of research that make him/her relevant to this institution.

7. Restates his/her interest and shows confidence in closing remarks.

Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample #2 (No Research Experience)

Dear Dr. Roe,

I am writing to you regarding the Research Assistant position available at the Biological Sciences department at X University. As a second-year pre-medical student at X University, I strive to gain in-depth, comprehensive research experience, and the position of an assistant in your research project may become my stepping stone into the world of scientific discovery and progress. I am certain that my academic and professional experiences make me the perfect candidate for this research position.  

Research demands high attention to detail and accuracy. As a sophomore student majoring in biochemistry, I understand the great responsibility of scientific research. I have been exposed to the intricate nature of scientific discovery and trained to think like a future researcher. Not only have I achieved grades in the 80th percentile in all my premed courses, but my lab experiences have taught me how to build a hypothesis and develop a method of inquiry. During lab work, experiments did not always work the first time. I sought feedback from my supervisor about how to refine my technique, always striving for better results. My attention to detail allowed me to reach great heights in my premed coursework and I am ready to apply the skills I have learned to a serious research project.

My interests and competencies reach beyond academia and can help me become a valuable member of your research team. As a member of the student council at X University over the last two years, I am in charge of developing successful state and federal grant applications. Last year, I was successful in obtaining a municipal grant that was used to renovate computer labs in the Y building on our campus. Additionally, my organizational skills are further demonstrated by the fundraising events I have helped organize with the student body. While research demands high levels of scientific expertise and knowledge, research also requires paperwork and financial support from the state – my background can help advance our research in this regard. 

While I have not had the chance to participate in professional research, I have substantial professional experience in keeping records and updating databases while working as an assistant to my mother in our family's grocery store. In addition to working with numbers at the till, I was in charge of keeping records of deliveries. This responsibility taught me to keep neat and accurate records while working with a lot of information – a skill that’s greatly valuable while documenting the research process and findings. 

Working at the grocery has also trained my ability to interact and get along with a variety of people. Through cooperating with people of different languages and cultures, I developed outstanding comprehension and communication skills, which help me not only in my academic work but also in my personal life. Research is not a lonely endeavor – rather, it is a cooperative effort where communication and patience are key. My professional background will certainly make me a suitable member of any research team, and I would be honored if you gave me a chance to showcase my talents.   

I look forward to discussing my candidacy with you further. If you would like any additional information that will help me gain this position, please let me know. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Author’s Signature

Check out our video for a quick recap:

In truth, the recruiter may decide to go with a candidate with more research experience than you. However, your cover letter is exactly the place where you can address any lack of experiences found in your resume or CV. This letter is an opportunity to reinforce yourself as a candidate, rather than highlight your flaws.

If you do not have specific research experience appropriate for the position, perhaps you can augment your candidacy by demonstrating other qualities that your recruiter is seeking for in their potential colleague. For example, you can demonstrate that you are a fast learner with experience in reading and analyzing complex information, or that you have experience in organizing and executing fundraising activities.

A cover letter is your chance to be more than a list of experiences and accomplishments. You can make them come alive and describe how they are relevant to the specific position to which you’re applying. CVs can be a few pages long, it's a lot of information for reviewers to sift through. Instead, they prefer an easy to read, one-page document that summarizes an applicant’s main accomplishments, experiences, and overall suitability for the role. Keep in mind that hiring departments may not even review your CV if they are not first impressed by your cover letter.

Your cover letter is an addition to your CV, and you need to show you can concisely focus on the strongest experiences you have had. A well-written cover letter demonstrates your ability to write and prioritize information clearly, which is something you must do as a researcher. Even though most job criteria have more than 3 qualities or skills they look for, it is important to stay succinct in your cover letter.

Remember, you cannot just list the skills but must show that you have them by using concrete examples of encounters and interactions you have had. Including examples will limit the number of skills you can include in your cover letter to a maximum of 3, as it is usually not possible to talk about more than 3 in any detail at all. So, reflect on your experiences and pick a maximum of 3 that you have solid examples for.

Your cover letter must be easy to follow and easy to read. Consider ordering your experiences in chronological order so the reader can follow the timeline of events easily. Include your most recent experiences.

Brainstorming experiences, creating an outline, writing, revising, and finalizing your cover letter may take a while, so think about giving yourself at least 1 week. Pay attention to the deadline to submit your job application and give yourself enough time.

Once you have created an outline and thought up experiences, you want to write your body paragraphs first, using a few sentences to describe each experience and what you gained from it that will contribute to this research position. You can then write succinct concluding and opening paragraphs. You want to ensure you read through your cover letter at least twice and correct any instances of unclear phrasing. Your first revision should be designed to change any wording or examples that are not as effective. Your second revision should finalize all the elements of your cover letter and include a check of grammar and fix any typos.

No, they don’t! You could have picked up relevant skills for a research position through academic experiences, but also through extracurriculars, volunteering, other work, or even personal experiences. For example, playing on a sports team teaches you a lot about perseverance, reliability, and teamwork. You can definitely include these types of experiences if you feel they are relevant.

To get an idea of what kind of experiences you should include, start by looking at the job posting. The job description should indicate the main criteria the recruiters are looking for in their candidates. Make a list of all the examples you can think of that relate to those criteria, and then choose a few that best highlight a variety of skills. Make sure to include the most recent examples in your cover letter.

If you’re an undergraduate student, start looking for research positions in your school. They may be posted in science department classrooms, on the departments' website pages, or around the lab spaces. It's also important to pay attention to your professors, perhaps they have mentioned that they are involved in a research project right now and are looking for a student assistant. If you're unsure, don't be afraid to ask them if they are looking for any help.

If you’re no longer a student, you can always reach out to your past professors and ask if they need any help with research. Make inquiries in local medical centers, hospitals, and other institutions. You will need to explain your situation and ask if they are looking for any help. Be aware that many entry-level positions are not paid well. Sometimes you may be required to help for free, but this will all depend on the position. If you have volunteered or shadowed a physician, you should reach out to them and ask if they are involved in research and could use your help.

If you are a serious researcher, you can look for research positions on job websites. These positions usually require an in-depth research background. If you are simply looking to gain some experience to build up your medical school applications, this option may not be for you. Some research projects last years and med schools can be skeptical of applicants who spend too much time on research and not enough time gaining clinical experience. They might wonder how well you will transition to patient interaction and clinical work.

You should avoid using any funky fonts, colors, or formatting in your cover letter. It is a professional document not suitable for experiments. So, stick to the standard font types and size, professional tone, and appearance.

You can certainly include these great achievements as long as they add to the overall narrative of your cover letter. Be sure to show what kind of skills and qualities your accomplishments helped you develop. Make your achievements come alive on the page.

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medical research cover letter

Cover letters

A good cover letter will help "sell" your manuscript to the journal editor. it is not enough to send a manuscript to a journal editor like this:.

Dear Editor-in-Chief,

I am sending you our manuscript entitled "Large Scale Analysis of Cell Cycle Regulators in bladder cancer" by Researcher et al. We would like to have the manuscript considered for publication in Pathobiology.

Please let me know of your decision at your earliest convenience.

With my best regards,

Sincerely yours,

A Researcher, PhD

Instead, check to see whether the journal's Instructions for Authors have any cover letter requirements (e.g., disclosures, statements, potential reviewers).

Then, write a letter that explains why the Editor would want to publish your manuscript:

Common phrases:

  • Please find enclosed our manuscript, "[manuscript title]" by [first author's name] et al., which we would like to submit for publication as a [publication type] in [name of the journal].
  • To our knowledge, this is the first report showing...
  • We believe our findings would appeal to the readership of [journal name].
  • Please address all correspondence to:
  • We look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience.

All cover letters should contain these sentences:

  • We confirm that this manuscript has not been published elsewhere and is not under consideration by another journal.
  • All authors have approved the manuscript and agree with its submission to [insert the name of the target journal].

Submission checklist Before submitting your manuscript, thoroughly check its quality one more time. Evaluate it critically-could anything be done better?

Be sure that:

  • The manuscript follows the submission guidelines
  • All files are in the correct file format and of the appropriate resolution or size
  • The spelling and grammar are correct
  • You have contact information for all authors
  • You have completed online registration for the submission process for your target journal
  • You have written a persuasive cover letter

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  • v.19(3); 2021 Jul

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Scientific Publishing in Biomedicine: How to Write a Cover Letter?

Zahra bahadoran.

1 Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Parvin Mirmiran

Khosrow kashfi.

2 Department of Molecular, Cellular and Biomedical Sciences, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, School of Medicine, City University of New York, New York, USA

Asghar Ghasemi

3 Endocrine Physiology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

A cover (covering) letter is a brief business letter introducing the scientific work alongside the submission process of a manuscript and is required by most scientific peer-review journals. A typical cover letter includes the name of the editor and the journal, date of submission, the characteristics of the manuscript, the importance of the work and its relevance to prospective audiences, declarations such as author agreements, conflicts of interest statement, funding source (s), and ethical statements. The letter also includes the contact information of the corresponding author (s) and may also include suggestions of potential reviewers. Spending enough time to draft an informative, comprehensive, and concise cover letter is quite worthwhile; a poorly drafted one would not persuade the editor that the submitted work is fit for publication and may lead to immediate rejection. Here, we provide a practical guide to draft a well-written, concise, and professional cover letter for a scientific medical paper.

The Cambridge dictionary defines a cover letter as “a letter that contains information about the thing it is sent with”. The cover letter is commonly known as a motivation letter submitted along with the curriculum vitae (CV) or a job application for employment ( 1 ) or academic position ( 2 ), and it is not clear why and how it was introduced into the scientific field ( 3 ). In scientific writing and publishing, a cover/covering letter is a letter to the editor’s target journal ( 4 ).

Providing a cover letter alongside the submission process is now required by most scientific journals. In fact, some high-quality and prestigious journals pay specific attention to the cover letter ( 3 ). Amongst the different steps of the publication process, the cover letter is the last step and is often overlooked ( 5 ). One of the most common complaints voiced by editors regarding submitted manuscripts is that the authors neglect to write a well-written cover letter, including a statement justifying the importance of their work ( 6 ). Missing this opportunity may have unintentional consequences, rejection without further consideration instead of being sent for external peer-review ( 5 , 6 ). Contrary to this view, some believe that the cover letter’s content overlaps with the manuscript’s abstract and gives mostly redundant information already found within the online submission system ( 3 ). The cover letter may also be a “misleading commercial advertisement” where it would not represent the content of the manuscript ( 3 ).

Although many editors may not read or seriously consider the cover letters of the submitted manuscripts ( 3 , 4 ), neglecting the importance of the cover letter may be a risk for the authors. Therefore, spending an adequate amount of time to write a coherent and persuasive cover letter is worth it. Following our previous publication on choosing a journal in a new series entitled Scientific Publishing in Biomedicine ( 7 ), here, we provided a practical guide to draft a well-written, professional, and concise cover letter needed to be accompanied by an original scientific paper, either with the initial submission or subsequently at revision/resubmitting stage. Since there are subtle differences in writing a cover letter for an original research paper versus a review article or an opinion, some points for drafting a cover letter for such papers are also discussed.

2. The Function of the Cover Letter

A cover letter is “a brief business letter”, which introduces the submitted manuscript to a prospective editor (s) ( 8 ). There are essentially two types of letters; the first is the one that is initially submitted with the manuscript (cover letter), and the second is when a revision is being submitted (revised letter). The first letter introduces the work at the initial manuscript submission ( 9 ), while the second one is needed following an invitation to revise and resubmit the manuscript. Here, the authors respond to the suggestions/criticisms of the reviewers ( 10 ). In this paper, “cover letter” and “second letter” refer to the first/submit letter and the revised letter, respectively.

A well-written cover letter is an effective tool for authors to sell their work to the journal editor and make a “good first impression”. A cover letter is a summary that highlights the main points, emphasizes the novelty, and communicates the potential implications of the submitted work ( 3 ). A cover letter allows the authors to persuade the editors regarding the novelty/originality and significance of the research in a less formal manner than in the manuscript itself ( 6 ). A well-written and informative cover letter helps the journal’s editor to be informed about the work and its significance. Regardless of the novelty and significance of the submitted manuscript, editors may miss those points without providing insights in a cover letter ( 5 ).

3. The Content of a Cover Letter

3.1. first cover letter (submit letter).

One point of view is that the cover letter’s content should be covered in the manuscript’s abstract ( 3 ). A typical cover letter includes the name of editor (s) and the journal, date of submission, the characteristics of the manuscript (i.e., title, type of the manuscript, e.g., review, original, case report), the importance of the work and its relevance to the readership of the journal, verification of the originality of the work, the authors’ confirmation that the manuscript is currently submitted only to this journal, declarations and ethical statements, suggested potential reviewers, and contact information of the corresponding author of the submitted work ( 5 , 6 ). Other manuscript characteristics, including the length and number of tables and figures, can also be indicated. If the manuscript belongs to a special issue or is being submitted upon an official invitation from the journal’s editorial office, it should also be addressed. The main contents of the first cover letter are described in Table 1 .

The most critical element of a cover letter is a “statement of novelty/significance/implication.” The authors are advised to carefully write a brief and concise description of their work’s impact toward communicating its significance ( 6 ). The authors are strongly advised not to copy the abstract into the cover letter and instead explain in their own words the significance of the work and the reason for submitting it to the journal ( 11 ). If this information is lacking, the editors may rely on the reviewers who may not appreciate the significance of the work and just focus on the technical issues rather than the scientific value of the work ( 5 ). Providing a clear and robust statement of novelty and significance would be more critical for editors and potential reviewers with diverse and interdisciplinary backgrounds ( 6 ).

The statements are expected to answer the following questions: (1) why is the work important? (e.g., emphasizing a new measurement, a new diagnostic method or criterion, a newly discovered biological process); and (2) how does the work advance current knowledge in the field? The best approach to answer this question is by describing the current state of knowledge in the field and clarifying how the work provides an added value by answering a previously unanswered question, finding the solution to a problem, or improving existing methods ( 5 ). Checking the recently published papers on similar topics in the journal provides new insights for the authors to clarify in the cover letter as to how the manuscript follows the publication trends of the journal and will add something new that would be relevant to the trend ( 12 ).

The cover letter is also expected to emphasize why the manuscript will attract the journal’s readers ( 5 ). The authors also need to consider the journal’s Aims and Scope to underscore how the manuscript would fit within the journal’s scope and attract potential readers ( 13 ). Instead of stating simply that the manuscript is “of interest to the field” or “novel,” the authors should address specific aspects of the journal’s Aims and Scope statement, e.g., “We believe that this manuscript is appropriate for publication by [journal name] since it… [reference to the journal’s aims and scope] ( 11 ).

For a review, opinion, or a trends paper, emphasizing the timeline and novelty is needed, as stated by Sacristán, the editor of trends in molecular medicine: “The synthesis and conceptual advance should be particularly stated in terms of what is new and has been trending in the field for the last one to five years”. She also recommends that the authors need to provide a future perspective beyond the main take-home message of the manuscript for a trends paper and take a strong and novel stance on a hypothesis or idea for a cover letter of an opinion manuscript ( 14 ).

The cover letter must contain some predefined statements, including the “author agreement” statement ( 13 ). An “author agreement” is a statement to confirm that “all authors have read and approved the final version of the manuscript being submitted” ( 8 ). Furthermore, “the authors warrant that the manuscript is their original work, has not received prior publication and is not under consideration for publication elsewhere” ( 8 ). Some journals may request the corresponding author to confirm that he/she will take responsibility for informing co-authors of editorial decisions, reviews received, and any changes or revisions made; additionally, the editor (s) should be informed about any closely related manuscript (s) simultaneously submitted for consideration to the same or another journal ( 15 ). The authors also should declare if any part of the submitted work has been previously published elsewhere, even as an abstract ( 16 ); e.g., “there is some overlap in the content of the introduction section, which we have noted in the text”.

Depending on the journal’s policy, other statements, including “conflict of interest statement”, “funding source declarations”, and “permission note”, may also be required to be included in the cover letter ( 8 , 11 ). As indicated by Elsevier, a conflict of interest statement, known as a disclosure statement, is a declaration from the author that “there is no financial/personal interest or belief that could affect their objectivity”. The publisher emphasizes that the authors should declare and state the potential conflict’s source and nature in cases where a conflict of interest exists. A funding source declaration is defined by the publisher as “a declaration of any funding or research grants (and their sources) received in the course of study, research or assembly of the manuscript”. Elsevier also defines the permission note as a statement that declares that “permission has been received to use any material in the manuscript such as a figure, which is not original content” ( 8 , 17 ). Other statements like “Statement of English native editing” may also be added.

Furthermore, informing the editor (s) regarding any information that will support the submission (e.g., original or confirmatory data, supplementary materials, relevance, topicality) can be helpful ( 8 ). Other operational information, typically provided within checkboxes of the journal’s submission system, is not required to be included in the cover letter ( 5 ).

3.2. Second Cover Letter

The second cover letter, which accompanies the revised version of the manuscript, must be a model of clarity and must address every issue posed by the editor and reviewers ( 10 ). If the revised manuscript is sent for the second round of peer-review, the reviewer (s) will see the letter. The content of the header and footer sections of the revised letter is similar to that of the submitted cover letter. The letter should be directed to the editor as addressed in the first letter unless the authors are informed that a new editor will process the revised version ( 10 ). The first paragraph should start with an “expression of polite gratitude”, e.g., “we would like to thank you for the opportunity to revise and resubmit our manuscript.” The “manuscript ID” or “identification number,” usually assigned by the journal in the first submission, should be addressed in the first paragraph ( 10 ).

The second paragraph usually “signals attention to the reviewers’ comments” by providing an explicit reference to the comments made by the reviewers and the editor. Furthermore, it may contain a positive statement regarding the results, methodology, conclusions, etc., in which case the authors need to acknowledge reviews’ insights ( 10 , 18 ). For example, “We sincerely appreciate all the valuable comments and suggestions made, which helped us improve the revised version of our manuscript” or “we found the reviewers’ comments helpful in guiding us to revise the manuscript.” Such statements will help the authors in creating a polite, formal tone throughout the letter. The paragraph should be followed by providing the editor with a roadmap or a summary of the revisions, addressing “the response to comments attachment.” A point-by-point response to the specific comments of the reviewers must be provided. If the authors disagree with a point raised by a reviewer, a rebuttal or counterstatement may be in order. A scientific and polite approach should spell out why the authors disagree, never losing sight of the reviewer’s opinion ( 19 ).

The footer section (closing salutation) of the letter returns to polite formalities, using statements like “we hope that the revised version of our manuscript is now acceptable to the reviewers, and suitable for publication in the [name of journal], we look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience” ( 10 ).

4. Organization

Although it is not a rule, the cover letter’s content can be organized within a cover letter header (opening salutation), three main paragraphs (the body of cover letter), and a cover letter footer (closing salutation), as described in Table 1 .

The cover letter should be initiated by addressing the editor (s) and the target journal; however, the author’s affiliation and contact information may also be included at the top of page ( 4 ). The name of the editor (s) can be easily found on the journal’s information page. If it is known, the authors must address the editor who will receive the manuscript and handle the peer-review process ( 13 ). If there are several co-editors, the person the author feels has the most appropriate background, and specialty of the topic should be addressed. In cases where such information is lacking, authors can mention all editors by name or address the letter to “dear editors” ( 12 ); however, it has been recommended to avoid writing “dear editor” ( 16 ). Also, the submission date and the journal’s name where the manuscript will be submitted are required ( 13 ).

In the first paragraph of the cover letter body, to introduce the submitted work, the title and the type of manuscript, authors’ name, journal name, and manuscript length are presented ( 4 ). In addition, it is mentioned that whether the manuscript is submitted upon an invitation or belongs to a special issue. The importance of the study, including novelty, potential implications, and its take-home message, are addressed in the second paragraph of the cover letter body. In addition, it is explained why the work would be attractive for journal readers. The third paragraph of the cover letter body includes some statements including authorship agreement, conflicts of interest, funding source, and ethical considerations. If required, potential reviewers are also suggested here.

Within the closing salutation, the authors can appreciate the editor for taking the time to read the cover letter and considering the submitted work for potential publication.

5. Some Practical Tips: The Length, and Dos and Don’ts

The authors need to spend plenty of time crafting their cover letters. They are advised to avoid too many details and keep it within one page (less than 200 words), like an introduction or a brief overview ( 4 , 11 ). The authors should check the guide for authors and cover letter suggestions provided by the journal, including all the requirements, e.g., specific disclosures, statements, and potential reviewers. Some publishers (e.g., Springer, https://www.springer.com/gp/authors-editors/journal-author/cover-letters/1398, Taylor & Francis, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/publishing-your-research/making-your submission/writing-a-journal-article-cover-letter/) provide sample cover letters that the authors can use. Figure 1 provides a sample for a cover letter.

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Object name is ijem-19-3-115242-i001.jpg

If the authors address previously published papers in the cover letter, then appropriate citation should be considered. The authors should carefully check the letter for any spelling and grammatical errors ( 11 , 20 ). They should make sure that they correctly spell the name of the journal’s editor (s) ( 4 ). Being careless regarding the editor’s name or the change of a journal’s name in a cover letter of a resubmitted manuscript, can be embarrassing and make a bad impression ( 4 ). It is suggested that the cover letter be written on the authors’ institutional letterhead to display professionalism and reliability ( 20 , 21 ).

5.2. Don’ts

When authors suggest a number of potential reviewers, they should avoid suggesting their friends and colleagues, as this would be viewed as a conflict of interest. Collaborators whom the authors have published with in the past five years should not be suggested either; an editor may easily be informed of such associations by a quick search of PubMed or other databases ( 22 ). The authors should avoid using complex sentence structures, jargon, and acronyms and keep the text straightforward and easy to read ( 11 , 20 ). The authors should also avoid including unrelated personal information or glorifying their past research papers or any of their academic accolades ( 20 ). They must not be rude towards the editors or complement the editor’s accomplishments ( 4 ). The novelty statement should not exaggerate or overstate the findings of the work; furthermore, any conclusion stated should be completely supported by the data provided in the manuscript ( 23 ). Finally, authors are recommended not to write a generic cover letter that could be used for any manuscript and could be sent to any journal ( 21 ).

6. Conclusion

In summary, a cover letter should highlight the novelty, importance, take-home message, and goodness-of-fit of the manuscript to the journal. These are critical information that can persuade an editor that the submitted work merits publication consideration in the journal. The cover letter should not be general but should be custom-written for the target journal. Although the submitted manuscript may usually pass through the peer-review process and get published regardless of the cover letter, a well-written, informative, and concise cover letter increases the chance of gaining acceptance.

Authors' Contribution: Study concept and design, Zahra Bahadoran and Asghar Ghasemi; Drafting of the manuscript, Zahra Bahadoran, Parvin Mirmiran, and Asghar Ghasemi; Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content, Khosrow Kashfi and Parvin Mirmiran.

Conflict of Interests: The authors have no conflict of interest.

Funding/Support: This study was supported by the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (grant number 28127).

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Preparing your CV, Cover Letter, and Personal Statement for Research or Scholarly Activity Opportunities

Your CV, cover letter, and personal statement are often very important components of your application to research programs and in your converstations with prospective mentors.  This page will provide to you some helpful information and tips on how to prepare these documents.  Please reach out to [email protected] with any questions.

Curriculum Vitae (CV)

Your curriculum vitae (CV) is the document that replaces the resume in a medical student’s career.  The CV is appropriate for academic or medical careers and is much more comprehensive than a resume.  A CV elaborates on education and includes a comprehensive listing of professional history.

As a medical student, your CV should include information no older than graduate and/or undergraduate education.  As you progress to residency and fellowship, your CV should then include information no older than medical school. The medical school information will then remain on your CV for the rest of your career.

Cover Letters

You may be asked to write a cover letter for application to research programs.  May research programs will have guidelines in which you should follow and information in which you should include.  It is very important that you read and follow the guidelines provided.  If no guidelines are provided, a general outline of a cover letter is as follows:

  • Polite Greeting
  • Self-Introduction
  • Establish Credentials
  • Explain how you learned of this opportunity/why you are applying
  • Establish purpose (audience, interview, award, grant, presentation, etc.)
  • Show what you can bring to the organization (specific experience, etc.)

Personal Statement

Purpose of a personal statement.

  • Share your interests and show enthusiasm for the opportunity for which you are applying
  • Demonstrate what you can contribute
  • State your professional goals and what or how you hope to contribute to the program/project

Tips for Writing Your Personal Statement

Think of your personal statement as a short written description that serves as your introduction to your reader.  Here are some tips:

  • Read the personal statement question carefully.
  • Start working on your personal statement early.  Get feedback from faculty members, colleagues, or preceptors, if possible.
  • Include your research interests as they relate to the position for which you are applying.
  • Mention any special connections you have to the project or program.
  • Include what motivates you toward this type of research experience.
  • State what you hope to gain from the opportunity and how this position fits into your academic, career, and research goals.
  • Proofread for grammar, spelling, paragraph breaks, and correct punctuation.

Examples and Tips

Guide to Preparing CV, Cover Letter, and Personal Statement

AOA CV & Personal Statement

AAMC Careers in Medicine Website

AAMC Preparing Your Curriculum Vitae

AAMC Curriculum Vitae - Tips and Strategies

The DO: Personal Statements

StandOut CV

Medical Writer cover letter examples

Andrew Fennell photo

You can write thousands of words on complicated medical topics, so why does writing a cover letter feel like such a big challenge?

The truth is, it’s hard to find the words to sell yourself when a job is on the line. So let us help.

Check out our step-by-step guide below, complete with medical writer cover letter examples to help you get past that writer’s block.

CV templates 

Medical Writer cover letter example 1

Medical Writer cover letter 1

Medical Writer cover letter example 2

Medical Writer cover letter 2

Medical Writer cover letter example 3

Medical Writer cover letter 3

These Medical Writer cover letter examples provide you with some guidance and inspiration for writing a cover letter that gets noticed and ensures your CV will get opened.

But if you really want to master the art of writing a winning cover letter , then follow our step-by-step cove letter writing guide below.

How to write a Medical Writer cover letter

Here’s a simple process to write your own interview-winning cover letter.

How to write a cover letter

Write your cover letter in the body of an email/message

When writing your Medical Writer cover letter, it’s best to type the content into the body of your email (or the job site messaging system) and not to attach the cover letter as a separate document.

This ensures that your cover letter gets seen as soon as a recruiter or employer opens your message.

If you attach the cover letter as a document, you’re making the reader go through an unnecessary step of opening the document before reading it.

If it’s in the body of the message itself, it will be seen instantly, which hugely increases the chances of it being read.

Write cover letter in body of email

Start with a friendly greeting

Cover letter address

To kick your cover letter off, start with a friendly greeting to build rapport with the recruiter instantly.

Your greeting should be personable but professional. Not too casual, but not too formal either

Go with something like…

  • Hi [insert recruiter name]
  • Hi [insert department/team name]

Avoid old-fashioned greetings like “Dear sir/madam ” unless applying to very formal companies.

How to find the contact’s name?

Addressing the recruitment contact by name is an excellent way to start building a strong relationship. If it is not listed in the job advert, try these methods to find it.

  • Check out the company website and look at their  About page. If you see a hiring manager, HR person or internal recruiter, use their name. You could also try to figure out who would be your manager in the role and use their name.
  • Head to LinkedIn , search for the company and scan through the list of employees. Most professionals are on LinkedIn these days, so this is a good bet.

Identify the role you are applying for

After you have greeted the recruiter, it’s important to state the job you are applying to.

Recruiters are often managing multiple vacancies, so they need to know exactly which job you are referring to.

Be as specific as possible and use a reference number if you can find one.

Here are some examples you can use;

  • I am interested in applying for the role of admin assistant with your organisation.
  • I would like to apply for the role of Sales assistant (Ref: 4057393)
  • I would like to express my interest in the customer service vacancy within your retail department
  • I saw your advertisement for a trainee project manager on Reed and would like to apply for the role.

See also: CV examples – how to write a CV – CV profiles

Highlight your suitability

The sole objective of your cover letter is to motivate recruiters into to opening your CV. And you achieve this by quickly explaining your suitability to the roles you are applying for.

Take a look at the job descriptions you are applying to, and make note of the most important skills and qualifications being asked for.

Then, when crafting your cover letter, make your suitability the central focus.

Explain why you are the best qualified candidate, and why you are so well suited to carry out the job.

This will give recruiters all the encouragement they need to open your CV and consider you for the job.

Cover letter tips

Keep it short and sharp

A good cover letter is short and sharp, getting to the point quickly with just enough information to grab the attention of recruiters.

Ideally your cover letter should be around 4-8 sentences long – anything longer will risk losing the attention of time-strapped recruiters and hiring managers .

Essentially you need to include just enough information to persuade the reader to open up your CV, where the in-depth details will sit.

Sign off professionally

To finish off your cover note, add a professional signature to the bottom, stating your important contact details and information.

This not only provides recruiters with multiple means of contacting you, but it also adds a nice professional appearance to the cover letter, which shows that you know how to conduct yourself in the workplace.

Include the following points;

  • A friendly sign off – e.g. “Warm regards”
  • Your full name
  • Phone number (one you can answer quickly)
  • Email address
  • Profession title
  • Professional social network – e.g. LinkedIn

Here is an example signature;

Warm regards,

Aaron Smith Customer service professional 075557437373 [email protected] LinkedIn

Quick tip : To save yourself from having to write your signature every time you send a job application, you can save it within your email drafts, or on a separate document that you could copy in.

Email signatures

What to include in your Medical Writer cover letter

So, what type of information should you write about in your Medical Writer cover letter?

The specifics will obviously depend on your profession and the jobs you are applying to, but these are the key areas you should be covering.

  • Your industry experience – Tell recruiters the types of companies you have been working for and the roles you have held in the past.
  • Your qualifications – Highlight your most important relevant qualifications to show employers you are qualified to do the roles you are applying for.
  • The impact you have made – Demonstrate the positive impact you have made for employers in previous jobs. Have you saved money? Improved processes? Made customers happy?
  • Your reasons for moving – Employers will want to know why you are leaving your current/previous role, so provide them with a brief explanation here.
  • Your availability – When will you be able to start a new job ? Check your current contract to find out your notice period if you are in a position already.

Medical Writer cover letter templates

Copy and paste these Medical Writer cover letter templates to get a head start on your own.

I am writing in response to the available Junior Medical Writer role at Med Comms. With a BSc in Biology from Durham University and passion for translating complex medical concepts into clear content, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute my competencies as a valuable member of your team.

During my academic journey and 6-month internship at CPL, I gained scientific writing skills in synthesising complex medical information into accessible language to ensure healthcare professionals and patients can comprehend and benefit from the content. I am familiar with handling patient inquiries and possess an eagerness to adapt quickly to new processes. My compassionate nature and ability to effectively communicate with colleagues allow me to create a welcoming environment.

My hands-on experience enabled me to bridge the gap between technical jargon and lay audiences, where I helped produce 15 high-quality educational materials, research summaries, and regulatory submissions that increased audience comprehension and patient satisfaction scores by 30% and 15% respectively.

Feel free to contact me, as I am immediately available for an interview. Thank you for your consideration.

Kind regards

I am writing to express my interest in the Medical Writer position at Bedrock Group, as advertised on LinkedIn. With 7 years of experience in interpreting complicated medical concepts into compelling narratives, a strong portfolio of impactful medical content, and a passion for driving strategic healthcare communications, I am excited about the opportunity to bring my expertise to your dynamic agency.

Throughout my career, I have crafted promotional pieces, scientific manuscripts, and education content that effectively engages both physicians, nurses, admin personnel, and patients. My ability to collaborate with cross-functional teams, manage client relationships, and adhere to project timelines has contributed to successful campaigns and enhanced stakeholder engagement, through reducing document review cycles by 10%, as well as increasing online content interaction and social media shares by 50% due to integrated multimedia elements into medical communications.

Enclosed is my CV, which provides more details about my relevant skills, qualifications, and additional achievements. You may contact me via email or by phone, as I am available for an interview ASAP.

Gareth Hill

Good day Mandy

I am writing to express my strong interest in the Senior Medical Writer position at CMed. With extensive experience in translating complex medical and scientific information into impactful and regulatory-compliant content, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute my expertise to your company.

Throughout my career working as a Medical Writer for United Research UK, I have demonstrated my ability to deliver first-rate medical writing for various therapeutic areas, including oncology, immunology, haematology, and neurology.

Through covering a wide range of clinical study reports, investigator brochures, and regulatory submissions, I played a significant role in generating £4B+ due to executing comprehensive medical communication and aiding the successful launch of 25 pharmaceutical products. Moreover, I expanded the organisation’s reach after collaborating with doctors and nurses to publish 10 articles in peer-reviewed journals and helped disseminate ground-breaking research which achieved citations.

Thank you for your thoughtful consideration, and I look forwards to an interview at your earliest convenience to further discuss my competencies, qualifications, and other accomplishments.

Paula Keane

Writing a strong attention-grabbing cover letter is a vital step in landing a good Medical Writer job.

Use the tips, strategies and examples above to get more responses from you job applications and start lining job interview up.

Good luck with your job search!

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Medical Internship Cover Letter Example

Get invited for more job interviews & pick up more ideas for your cover letter with our free, editable Medical Internship cover letter example. Copy-paste this cover letter example as it is or edit it directly using our HR-approved cover letter maker.

Milan Šaržík — Certified Professional Résumé Writer

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Medical Internship Cover Letter Example (Full Text Version)

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am writing to express my interest in the Medical Internship position at Brando Hospital in High River, Canada. I believe that my combination of experience, education, and skills make me a strong candidate for this role.

I am currently a third-year Medicine student at Swansea University, where I rank in the top 2% of students academically. In addition to my studies, I am actively involved in extracurricular activities such as the Medical Society, Psychology Society, and Riding Club. These experiences have helped me develop strong teamwork and interpersonal skills. I also have hands-on experience as a Medical & Health Volunteer in Ethiopia for three months.

Furthermore, I have over four months of experience as a Medical Intern at High River General Hospital, where I was responsible for various administrative and patient care tasks. I was recognized as Intern of the Month for my dedication and attention to detail.

I am a native Portuguese speaker with proficiency in English and basic knowledge of Chinese. With strong attention to detail, physical stamina, and the ability to work well under pressure, I am confident in my ability to excel in this role.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss my qualifications in more detail.

Milan Šaržík — Certified Professional Résumé Writer

Milan Šaržík, CPRW

Milan’s work-life has been centered around job search for the past three years. He is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer (CPRW™) as well as an active member of the Professional Association of Résumé Writers & Careers Coaches (PARWCC™). Milan holds a record for creating the most career document samples for our help center – until today, he has written more than 500 resumes and cover letters for positions across various industries. On top of that, Milan has completed studies at multiple well-known institutions, including Harvard University, University of Glasgow, and Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.

Edit this sample using our resume builder.

Don’t struggle with your cover letter. artificial intelligence can write it for you..

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Formal Sciences Student Nurse Physical Therapist Professions And Applied Sciences Student Mental Health Therapist Social Sciences Student Natural Sciences Student Medical Doctor Humanities Student Dentist Medical Assistant Student Internship

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