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Course type

Qualification, university name, postgraduate economics courses at university of cambridge.

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About Postgraduate Economics

Given the current state of our global finances, Economics is a fascinating subject which offers graduates a wide range of career opportunities, Whether you are interested in macroeconomics or environmental economics you’ll be able to find the perfect course on Postgraduate Search

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MPhil in Population Health Sciences

University of cambridge.

The overall aim of the programme is to provide course participants with the necessary knowledge and skills to serve as a foundation for a Read more...

  • 10 months Full time degree: £13,554 per year (UK)
  • 22 months Part time degree: £6,777 per year (UK)

PhD in Land Economy

Land Economy offers a full-time and a part-time PhD programme. The Department currently has over 70 PhD students at different stages of the Read more...

  • 3 years Full time degree: £9,858 per year (UK)
  • 4 years Part time degree: £5,915 per year (UK)

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University of Cambridge

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Economics, BA (Hons)

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Economics at Cambridge

Economics at Cambridge gives you an understanding of core, pure and applied economics.

Study a range of different topics, including supply and demand, the role of prices and markets, employment, inflation, the operation of financial institutions and monetary policy.  

Our course provides a sound understanding of core, pure and applied economics.

You study economics in considerable depth, while also using ideas and techniques from many other disciplines including:

  • mathematics

Facilities and resources

Past and present Faculty members, such as Alfred Marshall and John Maynard Keynes, have played a major role in the subject’s development.

Several members of our Faculty have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics, including Sir John Hicks, James Meade, Sir Richard Stone, Sir James Mirrlees and Amartya Sen.

We are committed to using economics to improve public policy. Recent staff have been active on the Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England the Competition Commission.

They also advise international agencies such as the United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund and Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development.

Our Faculty of Economics facilities include:

  • access to an extensive range of statistical databases and software
  • the Marshall Library of Economics, which holds a comprehensive collection of books, journals and other papers in economics
  • the student-run Marshall Society, which organises social events and informal lectures from distinguished visiting speakers

You'll also have access to the impressive Cambridge University Library, one of the world’s oldest university libraries.

Course costs

When you go to university, you’ll need to consider two main costs – your tuition fees and your living costs (sometimes referred to as maintenance costs).

Your living costs will include costs related to your studies that are not covered by your tuition fees. There are some general study costs that will apply for all students – you can find details of these costs here .

Other additional course costs for Economics are detailed below. If you have any queries about resources/materials, please contact the Faculty.

  • University approved scientific calculator: CASIO FX570, CASIO FX115 or CASIO FX991. Estimated cost £20.

Your future career

As an Economics graduate, you will communicate well. You will have the skills to understand complex arguments and analyse practical issues and data.

These skills are valuable in many careers, particularly professional, financial and managerial occupations. They also provide a helpful foundation for many Masters’ degree courses.

Many graduates go on to professional training in:

  • chartered accountancy
  • actuarial work and similar fields

Other graduates go on to work as professional economists in:

  • financial institutions
  • government and management consultancy

Teaching is provided through lectures, practical classes and small-group supervisions.

In your first year you can usually expect 10 to 15 lectures each week.

You’ll be assessed through formal written examinations at the end of each year and the compulsory dissertation in the third year.

Typically, you have one 3-hour exam for each paper covered that year.

In your first year:

  • British Economic History paper is assessed through an exam paper and a project.

In your second year:

  • Econometrics paper is assessed through a project
  • History and Philosophy of Economics paper is assessed through essay work

You won't usually be able to resit any of your exams.

Year 1 (Part I)

You get an introduction to the subject, a common core of knowledge which can subsequently be extended.

You take 5 compulsory papers:

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Quantitative Methods in Economics, an introduction to the use of mathematical and statistical techniques in economics
  • Political and Social Aspects of Economics
  • British Economic History

These papers cover topics such as:

  • supply and demand
  • the role of prices and markets
  • the operation of financial institutions
  • monetary policy

Year 2 (Part IIA)

You take 3 compulsory papers:

  • Theory and Practice of Econometrics I

You also take one optional paper, chosen from:

  • International Trade and Development
  • Mathematics and Statistics for Economists
  • Modern Societies
  • The Modern State and its Alternatives
  • International Conflict, Order and Justice
  • History and Philosophy of Economics, also available as an optional paper in the third year
  • World Depression in the Interwar Years

Through these papers you:

  • acquire a knowledge and understanding of a range of key topics and analytical techniques in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory
  • develop knowledge of key econometric techniques
  • learn the IT skills needed to undertake a project in applied econometrics

Year 3 (Part IIB)

You take 2 compulsory papers:

  • Microeconomic Principles and Problems
  • Macroeconomic Principles and Problems

You also take two optional papers and write a compulsory dissertation of 7,500 words.

Optional papers can vary from year to year. Recent examples include:

  • Economic Theory and Analysis
  • Political Economics
  • Banking and Finance
  • Public Economics
  • The Economics of Developing Countries
  • Theory and Practice of Econometrics II
  • Global Capitalism
  • British and European Politics
  • History and Philosophy of Economics, also available as an optional paper in the second year

For further information about this course and the papers you can take see the Faculty of Economics website .

Changing course

It’s really important to think carefully about which course you want to study before you apply. 

In rare cases, it may be possible to change course once you’ve joined the University. You will usually have to get agreement from your College and the relevant departments. It’s not guaranteed that your course change will be approved.

You might also have to:

  • take part in an interview
  • complete an admissions test
  • produce some written work
  • achieve a particular grade in your current studies
  • do some catch-up work
  • start your new course from the beginning 

For more information visit the Faculty website .

You can also apply to change to:

  • Management Studies at the Judge Business School

You can't apply to this course until you're at Cambridge. You would usually apply when you have completed 1 year or more of your original Cambridge course.

You should contact your College’s Admissions Office if you’re thinking of changing your course. They will be able to give you advice and explain how changing courses works.

Minimum offer level

A level: A*A*A IB: 41-42 points, with 776 at Higher Level Other qualifications : Check which other qualifications we accept

Subject requirements

To apply to any of our Colleges for Economics, you will need A levels/IB Higher Levels (or the equivalent) in: 

  • Mathematics 

If you’re studying IB, we ask for Analysis and Approaches for this course. If this isn’t an option at your school, please contact the College you wish to apply to for advice. 

If you're studying A Levels, the following Colleges also require Further Mathematics: 

  • Christ’s College
  • Churchill College
  • St John's College
  • Magdalene College 

Colleges will usually require you to achieve an A*/7 in Mathematics and/or Further Mathematics.

If you are applying to Trinity Hall, you will also need an A level/IB Higher Level in an essay-based subject.

Further Mathematics A level 

A level Further Mathematics is very strongly encouraged. If unavailable or you’ve recognised its desirability too late, we’d advise you to do as much additional maths as possible, eg by studying advanced material or Further Mathematics AS level.

What Economics students have studied

Most Economics students (who had studied A levels and started at Cambridge in 2017-19) achieved at least A*A*A* (87% of entrants).

Most had studied:

  • Economics (93%)
  • Further Mathematics (93%)
  • or both (86%)

The majority of students who studied IB achieved at least 44 points overall.

Check our advice on choosing your high school subjects . You should also check if there are any required subjects for your course when you apply.

Admissions test

All applicants for Economics for 2025 entry are required to take the Test of Mathematics for University Admission (TMUA) at an authorised assessment centre. You must register in advance for this test.

Please see the admissions test page for more information.

If you applied to study Economics in the 2024 entry March application round , you'll be required to take a written assessment if you're invited to interview. You won't need to register in advance for this and your College will provide details in your interview invitation. See the admissions test page for more information.

Submitted work

You won't usually be asked to submit examples of written work. You may be asked to do some reading prior to your interview, but if this is required the College will provide full details in your interview invitation.

Offers above the minimum requirement

The minimum offer level and subject requirements outline the minimum you'll usually need to achieve to get an offer from Cambridge.

In some cases, you'll get a higher or more challenging offer. Colleges set higher offer requirements for a range of reasons. If you'd like to find out more about why we do this,  check the information about offers above the minimum requirement  on the entry requirements page.

Some Colleges usually make offers above the minimum offer level. Find out more on our qualifications page .

All undergraduate admissions decisions are the responsibility of the Cambridge Colleges. Please contact the relevant  College admissions office  if you have any queries.

Discover your department or faculty

  • Visit the Faculty of Economics website - The Faculty of Economics website has more information about this course, facilities, people and research.

Explore our Colleges

  • Find out how Colleges work - A College is where you’ll live, eat and socialise. It’s also where you’ll have teaching in a small group, known as supervisions.
  • How to choose a Cambridge College that's right for you - If you think you know which course you’d like to study, it’s time to choose a College.

Visit us on open day

  • Book an open day - Get a feel for the city and the University.
  • Find an event - We offer a range of events where you can find out more about Cambridge, Colleges, and your course. Many of our events have hybrid options so you can join us virtually.

Find out how to apply

  • Find out how to apply and how our admissions processes work - Our admissions process is slightly different to other universities. We’ve put together a handy guide to tell you everything you need to know about applying to study at Cambridge.
  • Improve your application - Supercurricular activities are a great way to engage with your chosen subject outside of school or college.

Discover Uni data

Contextual information.

Discover Uni allows you to compare information about individual courses at different higher education institutions.  This can be a useful method of considering your options and what course may suit you best.

However, please note that superficially similar courses often have very different structures and objectives, and that the teaching, support and learning environment that best suits you can only be determined by identifying your own interests, needs, expectations and goals, and comparing them with detailed institution- and course-specific information.

We recommend that you look thoroughly at the course and University information contained on these webpages and consider coming to visit us on an Open Day , rather than relying solely on statistical comparison.

You may find the following notes helpful when considering information presented by Discover Uni.

  • Discover Uni relies on superficially similar courses being coded in the same way. Whilst this works on one level, it may lead to some anomalies. For example, Music courses and Music Technology courses can have exactly the same code despite being very different programmes with quite distinct educational and career outcomes. Any course which combines several disciplines (as many courses at Cambridge do) tends to be compared nationally with courses in just one of those disciplines, and in such cases the Discover Uni comparison may not be an accurate or fair reflection of the reality of either. For example, you may find that when considering a degree which embraces a range of disciplines such as biology, physics, chemistry and geology (for instance, Natural Sciences at Cambridge), the comparison provided is with courses at other institutions that primarily focus on just one (or a smaller combination) of those subjects.You may therefore find that not all elements of the Cambridge degree are represented in the Discover Uni data.
  • Some contextual data linked from other surveys, such as the National Student Survey (NSS) or the Destination of Leavers in Higher Education (DLHE), may not be available or may be aggregated across several courses or several years due to small sample sizes.  When using the data to inform your course choice, it is important to ensure you understand how it has been processed prior to its presentation. Discover Uni offers some explanatory information about how the contextual data is collated, and how it may be used, which you can view here: https://discoveruni.gov.uk/about-our-data/ .
  • Discover Uni draws on national data to provide average salaries and employment/continuation data.  Whilst starting salaries can be a useful measure, they do not give any sense of career trajectory or take account of the voluntary/low paid work that many graduates undertake initially in order to gain valuable experience necessary/advantageous for later career progression. Discover Uni is currently piloting use of the Longitudinal Education Outcomes (LEO) data to demonstrate possible career progression; it is important to note that this is experimental and its use may be modified as it embeds.

The above list is not exhaustive and there may be other important factors that are relevant to the choices that you are making, but we hope that this will be a useful starting point to help you delve deeper than the face value of the Discover Uni data.

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FT Responsible Business Education Awards: 2 wins for Cambridge Judge

Purpose of Finance course wins top Teaching award and a study on paedophile hunters wins Academic Research award, while Cambridge Judge is Highly Commended for School-wide activities in the Financial Times awards for business education responsibility and impact.

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Millennials (roughly those born between the early 1980s and mid 1990s) want more from work than just a salary, and they care deeply about the social values of companies they work for.

Exploring the rise of the global B Corp movement

The B Corp movement is helping to shift the focus of capitalism from shareholders to all stakeholders: find out how Cambridge fits in.

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The iconic Lecture Theatre 1 (LT1) is due for a refurbishment, and with it comes the opportunity for alumni, friends and other supporters of Cambridge Judge Business School to claim their seat in LT1.

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The Finance PhD…

The Finance PhD pathway

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The Finance group at Cambridge Judge Business School covers a broad spectrum of issues in finance. We define finance as more than a set of financial transactions – it is the glue that holds together corporations, capital markets and the real economy. 

We pursue research on empirical and theoretical corporate finance, asset pricing, and financial accounting as well as the intersections of finance and economics. In doing so, we treat finance as both an art and a science.

Professor Raghavendra Rau talks about the Finance pathway.

Hello. My name is Raghu Rau, and I’m the Head of the Finance and Accounting group here at Cambridge Judge Business School. Finance is actually an area which deals with four different groups of people.

We are looking at investors. Investors are people who give money to corporations and to reinvest in investment project and so on. We’re looking at corporations who take money from individuals and use that to invest in different types of projects. We have financial intermediaries, who sit between the corporations and individuals trying to make sure they have the best match between projects which the companies are offering and the individuals who want to invest in these projects. And finally, you have government and regulators who make sure the whole process is fair.

Here at Cambridge Judge Business School, we focus mostly on corporate finance. So in particular, we look at empirical corporate finance. What that means is most of our research uses actual data from companies. We look at why companies use particular types of financial policy.

We look at why individuals make certain types of decisions, whether they do this rationally, whether they’re driven by behavioural biases, and so on. We look at what conflicts of interest might make financial intermediaries advocate one type of action rather than another, for example, why they might ask firms to issue equity in place of debt and other factors like that. Overall, our focus is on trying to get actual data, hard data, which tells us exactly– allows us to get at the truth, allows us to figure out what it is that individuals, managers, and financial intermediaries are really thinking when they make financial decisions.

A lot of the data we use comes from deep engagement with companies. So in fact, here at Cambridge Judge Business School, we engage a lot with individuals who are at high level positions at firms. And because we are the University of Cambridge, we have been able to get access to a lot of unique data sets, which are not available typically at most universities across the world. And we use these to answer these types of questions.

What type of student are we looking for? Basically, someone who is interested in finding out the truth. The problem with industry is that you cannot really spend much time digging into to issues and figure out what is really going on.

We don’t just have the time. You need to talk to your clients. You need to talk to your company. These are short-frame, short-term projects, which typically last more than less than about three to six months.

Three to six months is a very, very short time for an academic. If you’re interested in truly figuring out how things work, you really have to go in-depth into these matters. And that might take a year, maybe two years. At the end of the day, we’re looking for someone who is at heart interested in the truth, someone who is, well, for better words, an academic.

View video with transcript

The pathway

To start on the Finance pathway you must take one of the following 9-month masters programmes:

Master of Research (MRes) (for students with a Cambridge MPhil in Economic Research)

Essential reading

Download detailed information about the 9-month + 4-year programme structure and content.

  • Research areas What we expect from you What you can expect from us PhD supervisors
  • What we expect from you Research areas What you can expect from us PhD supervisors
  • What you can expect from us Research areas What we expect from you PhD supervisors
  • PhD supervisors Research areas What we expect from you What you can expect from us

Research areas

Our faculty research is based around empirical and theoretical corporate finance, asset pricing, and financial accounting as well as the intersections of finance and economics. You will have the opportunity to conduct cutting-edge research on the multi-faceted linkages between investors, intermediaries and corporations. While the questions are academic in nature, we strive for solutions that can inform the practice of finance, and we incorporate this spirit into our teaching and other classroom interactions. 

Application of econometric methods and theoretical tools from contract theory and financial economics

  • Provides the methodical rigour to infer causal statements about the way the world works.
  • Allows us to shed light on questions that we, and businesses in the real world, deemed to be interesting and important at this time.
  • Leads to key new understandings, eg the importance of the role of financial intermediation for growth and welfare.

Analysing the ‘black box’ that is financial institutions

  • Work on topics and papers related to the study of commercial banks, investment banks, universal banks, mutual funds, hedge funds and other providers of financial services.
  • Market failures and inefficiencies as a result of what happens within firms, not just between financial institutions and those seeking their services.
  • Analysis of how firms work – how are compensation contracts written, and why do companies pay bribes to politicians?
  • Analysis of investors that invest in firms through a set of financial intermediaries. How do these investors understand risk? Can managers and intermediaries consistently fool them into paying too much for securities or assets?

We pay close attention to human decision-making and behavioural anomalies, both of which also apply to the broader context of capital markets and financial accounting.  

What we expect from you

You will need to have earned a first class undergraduate degree or equivalent. In some cases you will need to have a graduate degree from a highly regarded university in financial, mathematical or business economics, and to have performed within the top 5% in your class.

You will also be able to demonstrate a high level of commitment to an academic career in a business school, to this end your academic preparation is key. Finance research is quantitative in nature and your background will reflect quantitative and methodological rigour. 

For more details, please see the academic requirements for the:

What you can expect from us

  • You will be considered a junior colleague rather than a student from the outset of the programme. 
  • Work with faculty on joint research projects for publication in leading academic journals.  
  • Learn from a series of courses focused on research methodology and the foundations of the discipline. 
  • Attend seminars given by the top researchers in the field. 
  • Benefit from close interactions both within the Finance subject group and beyond including external researchers, meetings with speakers and research visits to some of the finest finance departments outside Cambridge. 
  • You will be fully funded during your years on the programme. 
  • Access researchers across the University of Cambridge, studying a huge variety of topics at a world-class level. 
  • Take advantage of the specialised interdisciplinary centres established by the Finance group, and access unique data found nowhere else in the world. 

PhD supervisors

Your principal supervisor will be a senior academic, often Professor or Associate Professor, from within the Finance group. You will benefit from their guidance and counsel throughout the programme, and beyond: in helping you to succeed in the job market and in gaining a faculty position at a leading business school. Your principal supervisor will take an active role in your research programme and will assemble a group of faculty (your advisory committee) who will co-author papers with you. 

Take a look at the faculty who may serve as your principal supervisor and view their research interests:

Chambers david 137x137 2

David Chambers

Invesco professor of finance, read more about david.

Research interests

David Chambers researches investment management; financial history; endowment asset management; IPOs; law and finance.

View David's profile

Elroy Dimson.

Elroy Dimson

Professor of finance, not available to take incoming phd students in october 2024., read more about elroy.

Elroy Dimson researches investment management; financial market history; endowment asset management; sustainable and responsible investing.

View Elroy's profile

Oğuzhan Karakaş.

Oğuzhan Karakaş

Associate professor in finance, read more about oğuzhan.

Oguzhan Karakas researches corporate governance; ownership and control; corporate social responsibility; private equity; dynamic investment strategies.

View Oğuzhan's profile

Andrei Kirilenko.

Andrei Kirilenko

Read more about andrei.

Andrei Kirilenko researches the intersection of finance, technology and regulation; fintech; asset pricing, data, and digital technologies; the design of automated financial markets and instruments.

View Andrei's profile

Lambrecht bart 137x137 1

Bart Lambrecht

Read more about bart.

Bart Lambrecht researches various aspects of corporate finance such as real options and investment under uncertainty; mergers and acquisitions; payout policy; managerial agency and the role of asymmetric information; bankruptcy; and the financing of firms; housing and household finance; bank lending and bank capital structure.

View Bart's profile

Bang Dang Nguyen.

Bang Dang Nguyen

Read more about bang.

Bang Dang Nguyen researches corporate finance; empirical finance; corporate governance.

View Bang's profile

Rau raghavendra 137x137 2

Raghavendra Rau

Sir evelyn de rothschild professor of finance, read more about raghavendra.

Raghu Rau researches empirical corporate finance; empirical behavioural finance.

View Raghavendra's profile

Pedro Saffi.

Pedro Saffi

Professor of financial economics, read more about pedro.

Pedro Saffi researches security lending markets; short selling; liquidity risk; and how differences of beliefs affect trading volume.

View Pedro's profile

Sarno lucio 137x137 1

Lucio Sarno

Read more about lucio.

Lucio Sarno researches empirical asset pricing; international finance, and especially foreign exchange markets; macro-finance; microstructure of financial markets.

View Lucio's profile

Finance faculty

Learn more about the faculty that teach on this pathway.

Learn more about the Finance subject group

Learn more about the application process and deadlines

Explore fees and funding options

Contact the admissions team

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  • PhD Program

The Ph.D. Program in the Department of Economics at Harvard is addressed to students of high promise who wish to prepare themselves in teaching and research in academia or for responsible positions in government, research organizations, or business enterprises. Students are expected to devote themselves full-time to their programs of study.

The program prepares students for productive and stimulating careers as economists. Courses and seminars offered by the department foster an intellectually active and stimulating environment. Each week, the department sponsors more than 15 different seminars on such topics as environmental economics, economic growth and development, monetary and fiscal policy, international economics, industrial organization, law and economics, behavioral economics, labor economics, and economic history. Top scholars from both domestic and international communities are often invited speakers at the seminars.  The Harvard community outside of the department functions as a strong and diverse resource. Students in the department are free to pursue research interests with scholars throughout the University. Faculty of the Harvard Law School, Kennedy School of Government, and Harvard Business School, for example, are available to students for consultation, instruction, and research guidance. As a member of the Harvard community, students in the department can register for courses in the various schools and have access to the enormous library resources available through the University. There are over 90 separate library units at Harvard, with the total collections of books and pamphlets numbering over 13 million.  Both the department and the wider University draw some of the brightest students from around the world, which makes for a student body that is culturally diverse and likely unequaled in the range of intellectual interests of its members. These factors combine to add an important dimension to the educational process. Students are able to learn from one another, collaborate on research projects and publications, and form bonds that are not broken by distance once the degree is completed and professional responsibilities lead them in different directions.

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MRes/PhD Economics

  • Graduate research
  • Department of Economics
  • Application code L1U4
  • Starting 2024
  • Home full-time: Closed
  • Overseas full-time: Closed
  • Location: Houghton Street, London

This programme offers you the chance to undertake a substantial piece of work that is worthy of publication and which makes an original contribution to the field of economics. You will begin on the MRes degree, and will need to meet certain requirements to progress to the PhD.

The Department of Economics pioneered the development of systematic research training in economics in Britain and our MRes/PhD Economics aims for the highest international standard of achievement and professional competence. The programme offers structured research training and supervision by faculty prominent in their fields. It begins with two years of rigorous coursework, equipping you with the theoretical knowledge and analytical techniques necessary to proceed to the research component of the programme. 

Many research students are associated with the work of one of LSE's research centres. You could work with the Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines on areas ranging from development economics to public policy; or on research technology, growth and globalisation as part of the Centre for Economic Performance . You could contribute to major research programmes addressing the key issues of unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, macroeconomic development and growth, financial markets, and changes in the world economy at the  Centre for Macroeconomics ; or specialise in risk management, asset pricing, financial institutions and corporate finance as part of the Financial Markets Group .

Programme details

For more information about tuition fees and entry requirements, see the fees and funding and assessing your application sections.

Entry requirements

Minimum entry requirements for mres/phd economics.

An upper second class honours (2:1) degree (or equivalent) in any field. Some preparation in economics, a strong mathematics background and evidence of research potential are essential. The goal of the MRes/PhD Economics is to train first class researchers. We will use all available information to assess research potential.

Competition for places at the School is high. This means that even if you meet our minimum entry requirement, this does not guarantee you an offer of admission. 

If you have studied or are studying outside of the UK then have a look at our  Information for International Students  to find out the entry requirements that apply to you.

GRE/GMAT requirement

GRE is required for all applicants. This must be no more than five years old on 1 October 2024 and must show full and percentile scores for all three sections. Most successful MRes/PhD Economics applicants score 166 or above in the quantitative section.

Find out more about GRE/GMAT

Assessing your application

We welcome applications for research programmes that complement the academic interests of members of staff at the School, and we recommend that you investigate  staff research interests  before applying.

We carefully consider each application on an individual basis, taking into account all the information presented on your application form, including your:

- academic achievement (including existing and pending qualifications) - statement of academic purpose - references - CV - research statement - GRE/GMAT

See further information on supporting documents

You may also have to provide evidence of your English proficiency. You do not need to provide this at the time of your application to LSE, but we recommend that you do.  See our English language requirements  for further information.

When to apply

The application deadline for this programme is 14 December 2023 . However, to be considered for any LSE funding opportunity, you must also have submitted your application and all supporting documents by this deadline. See the fees and funding section for more details.

Research statement

An application for entry to the MRes/PhD Economics should include a Research Statement, along with other required information  (Note: A separate sample of written work is not required as part of the MRes/PhD Economics application).

What should my Research Statement contain?

Your Research Statement should be submitted in place of the Outline Research Proposal, along with your application form and other required supporting documents, via the LSE online application system.

Please answer the following questions clearly and concisely. Max 200 words per question.

  • Why do you want to do research in economics?
  • Can you explain how your studies and experience make you suitable to do research in economics?
  • Which aspect of the PhD do you think you will like the most? Which will you dislike the most? Why?
  • Tell us about your favourite paper in economics. What do you like about it? How would you improve it?
  • Write a comment for a general audience on ONE of the following topics  (i) Is inequality good for growth?   (ii) Do immigrants take the jobs of native workers?   (iii) Is CEO compensation excessive?  (iv) Is universal minimum income a good idea?  (v) Overall, has central banks' move to inflation targeting has been a success?  (vi) Is culture an important determinant of differences in income per capita across countries?  (vii) Markets function well as information is aggregated efficiently through prices.  (viii) Elections are effective at disciplining politicians who do not have the public interest as their main goal.

How can I demonstrate research potential?

If you have served as research assistant for an economist please ask that person to write a letter focussing on your research skills and describe your experience – reference point 2 (above) of the research statement.

If not, please list any evidence you think would be valuable. Examples include but are not restricted to: experience working autonomously under stress without any guidance, demonstration of creativity in any form, experience of writing original research.

Fees and funding

Every research student is charged a fee in line with the fee structure for their programme. The fee covers registration and examination fees payable to the School, lectures, classes and individual supervision, lectures given at other colleges under intercollegiate arrangements and, under current arrangements, membership of the Students' Union. It does not cover  living costs  or travel or fieldwork.

Tuition fees 2024/25 for MRes/PhD Economics

Home students: £4,829 for the first year (provisional) Overseas students: £22,632 for the first year

The fee is likely to rise over subsequent years of the programme. The School charges home research students in line with the level of fee that the Research Councils recommend. The fees for overseas students are likely to rise in line with the assumed percentage increase in pay costs (ie, 4 per cent per annum).

The Table of Fees shows the latest tuition amounts for all programmes offered by the School.

The amount of tuition fees you will need to pay, and any financial support you are eligible for, will depend on whether you are classified as a home or overseas student, otherwise known as your fee status. LSE assesses your fee status based on guidelines provided by the Department of Education.

Further information about fee status classification.

Scholarships, studentships and other funding

The School recognises that the  cost of living in London  may be higher than in your home town or country, and we provide generous scholarships each year to home and overseas students.

This programme is eligible for  LSE PhD Studentships , and  Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funding . Selection for the PhD Studentships and ESRC funding is based on receipt of an application for a place – including all ancillary documents, before the funding deadline. 

For the MRes/PhD Economics, the funding deadline is the same as the application deadline for the programme: 14 December 2023

The Economics Department also has a number of scholarship packages for direct entry MRes/PhD students. After the first year of the MRes/PhD Economics, there are teaching and research assistantships available in the Department. Read more about funding opportunities through the  Economics Department .

In addition to our needs-based awards, LSE also makes available scholarships for students from specific regions of the world and awards for students studying specific subject areas.  Find out more about financial support.

External funding

There may be other funding opportunities available through other organisations or governments and we recommend you investigate these options as well.

Further information

Fees and funding opportunities

Information for international students

LSE is an international community, with over 140 nationalities represented amongst its student body. We celebrate this diversity through everything we do.  

If you are applying to LSE from outside of the UK then take a look at our Information for International students . 

1) Take a note of the UK qualifications we require for your programme of interest (found in the ‘Entry requirements’ section of this page). 

2) Go to the International Students section of our website. 

3) Select your country. 

4) Select ‘Graduate entry requirements’ and scroll until you arrive at the information about your local/national qualification. Compare the stated UK entry requirements listed on this page with the local/national entry requirement listed on your country specific page.

Programme structure and courses

Introductory course (mres).

In early September, before the academic year commences, you will begin your degree programme by taking the Introductory Mathematics and Statistics course.

First year (MRes)

In the first year of the programme you will take advanced core courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics, to equip you with the theoretical knowledge and analytical techniques necessary for research. Permission must be obtained to sit Econometric Analysis as it is intended for students with a strong econometric background and an interest in pursuing a PhD with econometrics as the primary field.

Microeconomics for MRes students Introduces the basic analytical tools that are necessary to conduct research in any field in economics.

Macroeconomics for MRes students Covers topics in advanced macroeconomics with emphasis on fundamentals and applications to recent theoretical advances. Either Econometrics for MRes students Covers inference, classical and generalised linear regression, generalised regression methods, time-series, panel-data, and microeconometric methods, and specialised econometric methods. Or Econometric Analysis Gives an advanced treatment of the theory of estimation and inference for econometric models.

Second year (MRes)

In the second year, you will typically take two PhD field courses and write a research paper in your major field. Currently, there are economics PhD field courses covering: econometrics, international, labour, public, development, industrial, microeconomics, macroeconomics, political economy. In addition, there are PhD field courses offered in Corporate Finance and Asset Pricing. From the second year onwards, you will also participate in a departmental research seminar and a work in progress seminar allied to your major research field.

Research Paper in Economics A research paper, between 5,000 and 10,000 words, related to the student's designated major field, to be submitted mid-way through the Spring Term.

Two courses from a range of options

Upon successfully completing the MRes and progressing to the PhD, you will work on your research and write your PhD thesis. You will also take one further PhD field course. You will also attend Work in Progress seminars, where you present your research, as well as the weekly departmental seminar series closest to your major field.

One course from a range of options.

Second and subsequent years of the PhD programme

You will continue to work on your research and write a PhD thesis. You will also continue to attend Work in Progress seminars, where you present your research, as well as the weekly departmental seminar series closest to your major field.

For the most up-to-date list of optional courses please visit the relevant School Calendar page .

You must note, however, that while care has been taken to ensure that this information is up to date and correct, a change of circumstances since publication may cause the School to change, suspend or withdraw a course or programme of study, or change the fees that apply to it. The School will always notify the affected parties as early as practicably possible and propose any viable and relevant alternative options. Note that the School will neither be liable for information that after publication becomes inaccurate or irrelevant, nor for changing, suspending or withdrawing a course or programme of study due to events outside of its control, which includes but is not limited to a lack of demand for a course or programme of study, industrial action, fire, flood or other environmental or physical damage to premises.  

You must also note that places are limited on some courses and/or subject to specific entry requirements. The School cannot therefore guarantee you a place. Please note that changes to programmes and courses can sometimes occur after you have accepted your offer of a place. These changes are normally made in light of developments in the discipline or path-breaking research, or on the basis of student feedback. Changes can take the form of altered course content, teaching formats or assessment modes. Any such changes are intended to enhance the student learning experience. You should visit the School’s  Calendar , or contact the relevant academic department, for information on the availability and/or content of courses and programmes of study. Certain substantive changes will be listed on the  updated graduate course and programme information  page.

Supervision, progression and assessment

Supervision.

You will be assigned a lead supervisor (and a second supervisor/adviser) who is a specialist in your chosen research field, though not necessarily in your topic. Lead supervisors guide you through your studies.

Progression and assessment

In order to progress to each subsequent year of the programme, and to progress to PhD registration, you will need to meet specific progression requirements, such as achieving certain grades in your coursework.

Your final award will be determined by the completion of an original research thesis and a viva oral examination.

More about progression requirements

Student support and resources

We’re here to help and support you throughout your time at LSE, whether you need help with your academic studies, support with your welfare and wellbeing or simply to develop on a personal and professional level.

Whatever your query, big or small, there are a range of people you can speak to who will be happy to help.  

Department librarians   – they will be able to help you navigate the library and maximise its resources during your studies. 

Accommodation service  – they can offer advice on living in halls and offer guidance on private accommodation related queries.

Class teachers and seminar leaders  – they will be able to assist with queries relating to specific courses. 

Disability and Wellbeing Service  – they are experts in long-term health conditions, sensory impairments, mental health and specific learning difficulties. They offer confidential and free services such as  student counselling,  a  peer support scheme  and arranging  exam adjustments.  They run groups and workshops.  

IT help  – support is available 24 hours a day to assist with all your technology queries.   

LSE Faith Centre  – this is home to LSE's diverse religious activities and transformational interfaith leadership programmes, as well as a space for worship, prayer and quiet reflection. It includes Islamic prayer rooms and a main space for worship. It is also a space for wellbeing classes on campus and is open to all students and staff from all faiths and none.   

Language Centre  – the Centre specialises in offering language courses targeted to the needs of students and practitioners in the social sciences. We offer pre-course English for Academic Purposes programmes; English language support during your studies; modern language courses in nine languages; proofreading, translation and document authentication; and language learning community activities.

LSE Careers  ­ – with the help of LSE Careers, you can make the most of the opportunities that London has to offer. Whatever your career plans, LSE Careers will work with you, connecting you to opportunities and experiences from internships and volunteering to networking events and employer and alumni insights. 

LSE Library   –   founded in 1896, the British Library of Political and Economic Science is the major international library of the social sciences. It stays open late, has lots of excellent resources and is a great place to study. As an LSE student, you’ll have access to a number of other academic libraries in Greater London and nationwide. 

LSE LIFE  – this is where you should go to develop skills you’ll use as a student and beyond. The centre runs talks and workshops on skills you’ll find useful in the classroom; offers one-to-one sessions with study advisers who can help you with reading, making notes, writing, research and exam revision; and provides drop-in sessions for academic and personal support. (See ‘Teaching and assessment’). 

LSE Students’ Union (LSESU)  – they offer academic, personal and financial advice and funding.  

PhD Academy   – this is available for PhD students, wherever they are, to take part in interdisciplinary events and other professional development activities and access all the services related to their registration. 

Sardinia House Dental Practice   – this   offers discounted private dental services to LSE students.  

St Philips Medical Centre  – based in Pethwick-Lawrence House, the Centre provides NHS Primary Care services to registered patients.

Student Services Centre  – our staff here can answer general queries and can point you in the direction of other LSE services.  

Student advisers   – we have a  Deputy Head of Student Services (Advice and Policy)  and an  Adviser to Women Students  who can help with academic and pastoral matters.

Student life

As a student at LSE you’ll be based at our central London campus. Find out what our campus and London have to offer you on academic, social and career perspective. 

Student societies and activities

Your time at LSE is not just about studying, there are plenty of ways to get involved in  extracurricular activities . From joining one of over 200 societies, or starting your own society, to volunteering for a local charity, or attending a public lecture by a world-leading figure, there is a lot to choose from. 

The campus 

LSE is based on one  campus  in the centre of London. Despite the busy feel of the surrounding area, many of the streets around campus are pedestrianised, meaning the campus feels like a real community. 

Life in London 

London is an exciting, vibrant and colourful city. It's also an academic city, with more than 400,000 university students. Whatever your interests or appetite you will find something to suit your palate and pocket in this truly international capital. Make the most of career opportunities and social activities, theatre, museums, music and more. 

Want to find out more? Read why we think  London is a fantastic student city , find out about  key sights, places and experiences for new Londoners . Don't fear, London doesn't have to be super expensive: hear about  London on a budget . 

Student stories

Hanwei Huang MRes/PhD Economics, 2018 China

Hanwei Huang

I am a PhD student studying economics in the LSE. I am also affiliated with the Centre of Economic Performance (CEP), one of the largest research centres in the LSE. My main research interest is international trade.

One thing that I have learned from the faculties is that economics is not just about mathematics, it should answer interesting economics questions. Over the past few years in the LSE, I have been conducting a few research related to China. This is not surprising given my Chinese origin. Given the anti-globalization current that we have been witnessing, it is also quite relevant to the academic and policy circle to understand how China has become a global manufacturing power house and the champion of global trade.

My work features a close link between theory and empirics, another lesson I have learned in the LSE. My first piece of work done in the LSE focuses on the evolving structure of Chinese production and export. My second paper, which is a joint work with my supervisor Professor Ottaviano, studies how Chinese exporter producing multiple products respond to competition due to comparative advantage. My current research project studies how the domestic infrastructure construction boom that has been taking place in China has enabled China to make better use of globalization.

The most exciting part of LSE is that we are seated near the centre of the UK policy-making. I am fortunate enough to be able to be on a team from the CEP which has been studying various issues related to Brexit. It is only by doing this bit of work that I have seen how LSE research has shaped the debate in the media and the UK parliament.

As a one of the largest economics departments in the world, with numerous seminars and visitors every week, you bump into various people all the time. You might run into a workshop introducing machine learning. You might also hear people talking about big data in the Bean Counter, where we have our coffee. And I am very glad to be one of them here.

Stephan Maurer MRes/PhD Economics, 2017 Germany

Stephan Maurer

I came to the LSE in 2011 after having completed my MSc in Economics at the Barcelona Graduate School of Economics. Already during my undergraduate studies in St. Gallen, I had gotten hooked to economics and to the idea of doing a PhD, and my time in Barcelona further confirmed this.

My research is in applied economics broadly, at the intersection of labour economics, political economy, and economic history. Economic history is for me both a tool and an end itself - I am interested in better understanding historical events, but I also frequently use exogenous variation provided by history to study questions in labour economics and political economy.

What I really like about research and the academic profession is that it offers a lot of freedom and allows me to work independently on a variety of issues. For example, I have studied determinants of city growth in Iron Age Europe, but also local economic effects of resource booms in the early 20 th century US South. I also enjoy teaching - during my time here, I have taught various courses and have found it very enriching. Being asked to explain concepts such that students can understand them often has deepened my own understanding. In this respect, I particularly enjoyed teaching in the MPA and MSc Programmes.

Research can also be frustrating. It involves a great deal of failed projects, ideas that do not materialize, and work that does not reap rewards. It is also very discontinuous - you can make great progress in few days, or feel like you’re banging your head against a wall for months. I was lucky to have two very dedicated supervisors to guide me through my PhD, helping me triage my ideas, strengthening my results by constantly questioning them, but also cheering me up when needed. My colleagues and friends at the LSE have also been a great help, not only but especially those from my cohort. Studying for the first year exams and going through the first research steps together has created a lot of cohesion and friendships that I am sure will continue to last for a long time.

After finishing my PhD, I will be joining the Department of Economics at the University of Konstanz as an Assistant Professor. I am very much looking forward to this new endeavour, but I will make sure to be back in London and at the LSE from time to time!

Preliminary reading

Readings are included in the respective course guides in the Calendar .

Quick Careers Facts for the Department of Economics

Top 5 sectors our students work in:

  • Financial and Professional Services              
  • Education, Teaching and Research            
  • Government, Public Sector and Policy   
  • Consultancy      
  • Advertising, Marketing, PR Media, Entertainment, Publishing and Journalism

The data was collected as part of the Graduate Outcomes survey, which is administered by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). Graduates from 2020-21 were the fourth group to be asked to respond to Graduate Outcomes.

Students who successfully complete the programme often embark on an academic career. See information on the placements of previous students on this programme . 

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme

Starting from the second year of the MRes, students are encouraged to undertake some class teaching in the Department, as this represents useful professional training. Additional information about teaching in the Department .

Support for your career

Many leading organisations give careers presentations at the School during the year, and LSE Careers has a wide range of resources available to assist students in their job search. Find out more about the  support available to students through LSE Careers .

Find out more about LSE

Discover more about being an LSE student - meet us in a city near you, visit our campus or experience LSE from home. 

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Cambridge graduation ceremonies forced elsewhere by pro-Palestine camp

S tudents at the University of Cambridge have been forced to graduate in a less traditional venue because of pro-Palestine disruption.

Activists pitched tents outside Senate House , the grand venue where Cambridge graduations have been held since the 18th century, earlier this week in an attempt to force bosses to meet their demands on the Israel-Gaza war.

It led to Friday and Saturday’s ceremonies being moved by university chiefs to Downing College – which was announced to all students due to graduate but not publicly – with security patrols stepped up.

By Friday morning the protesters had ended their occupation of the lawn at Senate House, claiming that bosses had now agreed to start negotiations with them next week, but the graduations were not moved back in time.

In a statement, the camp organisers Cambridge for Palestine said: “The university has agreed to negotiate and met a number of our preconditions.

“Our goal from the Senate House yard occupation has been accomplished, in a step towards distancing our university from genocide.

“This small victory paves the way for our demands to be met in future negotiations.”

Camp remains standing

The Telegraph understands the university has agreed that students taking part in talks will not be disciplined and that faculty members will be used as observers and mediators rather than third parties.

Cambridge’s main pro-Palestine camp, outside King’s College, remains standing along with others at dozens of universities across Britain, as activists try to copy the occupations that swept US universities last month .

The demands of the main Cambridge camp, which still numbers at least 30 tents on King’s Parade, are similar to those on campuses nationwide.

They are for bosses to disclose financial investments, divest from companies with links to the war in Gaza, reinvest in Palestinian academia and become a “university of sanctuary” for “all forced migrants”.

The university did not answer questions about whether it would cave into the demands, but denied it was a negotiation.

Prof Bhaskar Vira, pro-vice-chancellor for education, said: “We were glad to meet our students as we have been willing to do from the first day of the protest. While we understand some will see it as a negotiation, we see it as a constructive dialogue with our students.”

On Friday, pictures showed lines of students in gowns processing from their individual colleges to the new venue. They were allowed to take photographs of each other in their robes outside Senate House afterwards with security officers patrolling the gates.

‘Alternative arrangements’

In an earlier statement on Tuesday, the university said: “We regret that due to the ongoing presence of protesters on Senate House lawn, we have taken the very difficult decision to make alternative arrangements for the degree congregations this weekend.

“All students who want to graduate this weekend will still be able to attend their degree congregation at an alternative location that is fitting of the occasion.

“We are confident that ceremonies will be a memorable and enjoyable experience for students and their guests.”

Former home secretary Suella Braverman paid a visit to the Cambridge King’s College camp on Thursday, where she was met with a wall of silence when she asked the protesters questions about Israel and the hostages seized by Hamas.

“I’m very concerned about this anti-Semitism on campus. We have a lot of Jewish students feeling very intimidated and harassed on campus,” the MP told the student newspaper Varsity.

Meanwhile, at the University of Oxford, where another pro-Palestinian camp has been erected , a letter from staff and students this week claimed that when when some had raised concerns about anti-Semitism to their heads of programmes, they were “simply advised to leave Oxford”.

Oxford said it was “unequivocal in its position that there is no place for anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, or unlawful discrimination of any kind”.

Demonstrators at the London School of Economics became the latest to occupy part of a campus this week, joining peers in Manchester, Newcastle, Sheffield, Leeds, Warwick and Bristol.

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Negotiations are set to begin with the Cambridge pro-Palestine protesters next week - Getty/Martin Pope

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Our PhD Program in Microeconomics is widely recognized for our faculty, whose insights have changed the course of modern-day economic research.

The Chicago School of Economics. It all started here at the University of Chicago.

Fields of specialization in the Microeconomics Stevens Doctoral Program include price theory, market design, industrial organization, labor economics, public economics, health economics, and financial economics. While the research community at Chicago Booth is multidisciplinary and collaborative, the majority of Stevens Doctoral Program students produce scholarship in microeconomics. Doctoral students can take advantage of a wide range of course offerings in the Kenneth C. Griffin Department of Economics at the University of Chicago and at Chicago Booth.

Our Distinguished Economics Faculty

Chicago Booth faculty have been responsible for many of the pioneering economic concepts that inform today’s global businesses and policymaking. And they’ll be your teachers, mentors, and research collaborators. For our macroeconomics faculty, visit the Booth faculty directory  and select “Macro/International Business” under “Academic Area.”

Milena Almagro

Milena Almagro

Assistant Professor of Economics, Liew Family Junior Faculty Fellow, George G. Rinder Faculty Fellow

Marianne Bertrand

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Richard Hornbeck

Richard Hornbeck

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Emir Kamenica

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Jacob Leshno

Jacob Leshno

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Andrew McClellan

Andrew McClellan

Jack Mountjoy

Jack Mountjoy

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Sendhil Mullainathan

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Roman Family University Professor of Computation and Behavioral Science

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Matthew Notowidigdo

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Chad Syverson

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Thomas Wollmann

Associate Professor of Economics and William Ladany Faculty Scholar

Alumni Success

Alumni have written dissertations in industrial organization, labor economics, microeconomics, and other related areas. Upon graduation, they go onto Career Outcomes in academics, government, and industry.

Nick Tsivanidis, PhD '18

Assistant Professor in the Real Estate Group Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley Nick researches topics related to urbanization in developing countries. His current interests center on policy issues around transport and housing, with projects in India, Nigeria, Colombia and Brazil. His dissertation area is in economics.

A Network of Support

Doctoral students at Booth have access to the resources of several high-powered research centers that offer funding for student work, host workshops and conferences, and foster a strong research community.

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Bringing together researchers from the entire Chicago economics community, the Becker Friedman Institute fosters novel insights on the world’s most difficult economic problems.

George J. Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State Dedicated to examining issues at the intersection of politics and the economy, the Stigler Center supports research by Doctoral students and others who are interested in the political, economic, and cultural obstacles to better working markets.

Rustandy Center for Social Sector Innovation Committed to making the world more equitable and sustainable, the Rustandy Center works to solve complex social and environmental problems. The center’s student support includes fellowships, research funding, and networking opportunities.

Fama-Miller Center for Research in Finance Tasked with pushing the boundaries of research in finance, the Fama-Miller Center provides institutional structure and support for researchers in the field.

Center for Research in Security Prices CRSP maintains one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive stock market databases. Since 1963, it has been a valued resource for businesses, government, and scholars.

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The Journal of Labor Economics presents international research on the relationship between labor and the economy.

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Spotlight on Research

Our faculty and PhD students continually produce high-level research. The Chicago Booth Review frequently highlights their contributions in economics.

To Keep Students Focused, Try Paying Their Parents

A study of subsidized training programs and incentives. Research from Hamna Ahmed (Lahore School of Economics), Zunia Tirmazee (Lahore), Rebecca Wu (UChicago PhD), and Emma Zhang (Chicago Booth PhD), suggest that including parents in decision-making may be most effective.

How Demolishing Public Housing Increased Inequity

A study by Chicago Booth's Milena Almagro, Eric Chyn (University of Texas), and Bryan A. Stuart (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia) investigate what happened to Chicago's public housing system and find that demolishing public housing increased inequality.

Why Medical Tourism Could Be Good Policy

Rather than investing in putting more medical facilities in remote areas, it could be more effective to pay for patients to visit healthcare facilities, according to research by Chicago Booth's Johnathan Dingel, Joshua D. Gottlieb (UChicago Harris School), Maya Lozinski (Harris PhD) and Booth PhD, Pauline Mourot.

NBER Dissertation Fellowship in Consumer Financial Management

The National Bureau of Economics (NBER) awarded PhD Student, Benedict Guttman-Kenney, a dissertation fellowship to support his research in the economics of credit information.

Inside the Booth PhD Experience

Nick Tsivanidis, PhD ’18, talks about the culture of interdisciplinary study he found at Booth.

Nick

Video Transcript

Nick Tsivanidis, ’18: 00:03 My PhD thesis was about how commute costs shape economic organization in cities. Billions of people over the next 50, 100 years, they're going to be moving into mostly developing cities. Governments are going to spend huge amounts of money on providing new infrastructure to try and accommodate them. My project had both macro and applied micro elements. One of the benefits of Booth is that you have access to people from a wide range of areas who are very happy to encourage you to work on interdisciplinary topics.

Nick Tsivanidis, ’18: 00:38 I've always been interested in development and in particular how cities and countries can use evidence-based policy to try and improve welfare of their citizens. I've decided that pursuing a PhD would allow me to research and help translate that research into policy. What attracted me to the PhD program here at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business was this culture of interdisciplinary study. People at Chicago certainly aren't scared or will shy away from trying to think at the intersection of different areas. This is where a lot of very fruitful and productive new research actually takes place, which is at the border of frontiers. That really attracted me to come here.

Current Economics Students

From the effects of government regulation on economies to the impact of urban transit infrastructures, our PhD students examine a wide range of economic issues. When they graduate, they go on to positions at some of the top universities and companies in the world.

Current Students

Olivia Bordeu

Franco Calle

William Cockriel

Emily Crawford Arshia Hashemi

Paulo Henrique de Alcantara Ramos

Camille Hillion

Benedict Guttman-Kenney

Tyler Jacobson

Nidhaanjit Jain

Pauline Mourot

Lucy Msall Jeffrey Ohl

Fern Ramoutar

Pengyu Ren Gabriele Romano

Lillian Rusk

Christoph Schlom

Karthik Srinivasan

Jorge Tello Garza

Emily (Emma) Zhang

Program Expectations and Requirements

The Stevens Doctoral Program at Chicago Booth is a full-time program. Students generally complete the majority of coursework and examination requirements within the first two years of studies and begin work on their dissertation during the third year. For details, see General Examination Requirements by Area in the Stevens Program Guidebook below.

Download the 2023-2024 Guidebook!

phd in economics cambridge

Congratulations to the 2024 recipient of the Robert M. Solow Prize

Viola Corradini

MIT Economics alumni and faculty established the Robert M. Solow Prize for Graduate Student Excellence in Teaching and Research to celebrate graduate students who reflect one of the department's core values, as embodied by Robert Solow: the interdependence of innovative research and excellence in teaching.

Congratulations to recent PhD graduate  Viola Corradini  who has been awarded the 2024 Solow Prize for their remarkable contributions to the educational and research missions of MIT Economics.

College of Arts and Sciences

Congratulations to our award-winning College faculty and staff

By Kim Spurr

Beautiful red flowers surround the side of the Old Well with a view across Cameron Avenue of South Building.

The College of Arts and Sciences celebrates the dozens of talented faculty and staff who received awards and honors during the spring semester. The recognitions include election into one of the national scientific academies, two Sloan Research Fellow awards, a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, a lifetime achievement award from a research society, a Mellon fellowship, numerous teaching excellence awards, several recognitions for advising excellence and two Massey distinguished service awards for staff, among many other honors and achievements.

HONORS AND AWARDS TO COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES FACULTY AND STAFF, SPRING 2024

African, African American and Diaspora Studies

  • Petal Samuel , assistant professor, was awarded a Postdoctoral Research Leave Fellowship by the American Association of University Women.

Art and Art History

  • Martín Wannam , assistant professor, received the 2024 Schwab Academic Excellence Award from the Institute for the Arts and Humanities.

Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

  • Luoyi Cai , teaching associate professor, received the 2024 Tanner Award from the University.
  • Pamela Lothspeich , professor, was awarded the 2024 article prize by the Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies for her article “Pandit Radheshyam’s Ramayan: A Sourcebook for Ramlila Scripts in the Orbit of Bareilly,” published in the Journal of Hindu Studies.
  • Morgan Pitelka , department chair and Bernard L. Herman Distinguished Professor, received an Honorable Mention from the Association of Asian Studies for the 2024 John Whitney Hall Book Prize in Japanese Studies for his book Reading Medieval Ruins: Urban Life and Destruction in Sixteenth-Century Japan (Cambridge, 2022).
  • Claudia Yaghoobi  was appointed Roshan Distinguished Professor.
  • Gregory Copenhaver , Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Convergent Science, was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors.
  • Jeff Dangl , John N. Couch Professor, received the Philip N. Benfey Arabidopsis Community Lifetime Achievement Award.
  • Mara Evans , teaching associate professor, received a 2024 Undergraduate Student Teaching Award and the Innovation in Biomedical Graduate Teaching Award.
  • Alaina Garland , teaching assistant professor, received a 2024 Undergraduate Student Teaching Award.
  • Eric Hastie , teaching assistant professor, received a 2024 Undergraduate Student Teaching Award.
  • Corey Johnson , teaching professor, received the 23/24 Tri-Beta Biology Faculty Excellence Teaching Award.
  • Summer Montgomery , undergraduate student services manager, received a C. Knox Massey Distinguished Service Award from the University.
  • Lillian Zwemer , teaching assistant professor, received the 2024 Out in STEM Inclusive Teaching Award.

Biomedical Engineering

  • Rekha Balasubramanyam  received the 2024 EHRA College of Engineering Award for Excellence.
  • Naji Husseini , teaching assistant professor, received a 2024 Johnston Teaching Excellence Award from the University.
  • Derek Kamper , associate professor, was elected to the 2024 Class of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering College of Fellows.
  • Roger Narayan , professor, was elected a 2024 Fellow to the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society.

Carolina Center for Jewish Studies

  • Gabrielle Berlinger,  associate professor in American studies and Babette S. and Bernard J. Tanenbaum Scholar in Jewish studies, received a Schwab Academic Excellence Award from the Institute for the Arts and Humanities.
  • Adi Nester,  assistant professor in Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and Levine-Sklut Fellow in Jewish studies, received a Schwab Academic Excellence Award from the Institute for the Arts and Humanities.

Carolina Public Humanities

  • James Brian Entzminger  has been recognized with the Warren Nord Distinguished Service Award.
  • Joshua Beaver,  teaching associate professor, received a Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching from the University.
  • Elizabeth Brunk,  assistant professor, was honored by Morehead-Cain Seniors for Excellence in Teaching and Mentorship.
  • Abigail Knight , assistant professor, received a Sloan Research Fellow award from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.
  • Gary Pielak , Kenan Distinguished Professor, was named a 2024 fellow of the Biophysical Society and honored by Morehead-Cain Seniors for Excellence in Teaching and Mentorship.
  • Sidney Wilkerson-Hill , assistant professor, received the Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award from the Camile and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, the FMC New Investigator Award from the FMC Corp., and a Sloan Research Fellow award from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

City and Regional Planning

  • Yan Song , professor and chair, became editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Planning Association beginning Jan. 1.
  • Meenu Tewari , professor, was elected as a member of the Arts and Sciences Advisory Committee for a three-year term.
  • Timothy Shea , assistant professor and John Wesley and Hodgin Hanes Fellow, was awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to conduct research at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

Communication

  • Sarah Dempsey , assistant professor, received a 2024 Distinguished Teaching Award for Post-Baccalaureate Instruction from the University.
  • Julia Haslett , associate professor, is the recipient of the 2024-2025 Senior Faculty Research and Scholarly Leave Award.
  • Joseph Megel , teaching professor, received the Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching from the University.
  • Michael Palm , associate professor, received a 2024 J. Carlyle Sitterson Award for Teaching First-Year Students.
  • Kumi Silva , associate professor, was named the Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Distinguished Professor for Graduate Education.
  • Michael Waltman , associate professor, received the 2024 William C. Friday/Class of 1986 Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Computer Science

  • Roni Sengupta , assistant professor, received the Trailblazer R21 Award from the NIH National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.
  • Luca Flabbi , professor, was recognized for having the Top Cited Article 2022-2023, International Economics Review, for “Labor Market Search, Informality, and Schooling Investment.”
  • Donna Gilleskie , professor and chair, was appointed a Distinguished Fellow of the Southern Economic Association.

English and Comparative Literature

  • Stephanie DeGooyer , assistant professor and Frank Borden and Barbara Lasater Hanes Fellow, received a Lando grant from the DeGroot Foundation and an IAH Fellowship for Spring 2025.
  • Florence Dore , professor, received the 2024 Board of Governors’ Award for Excellence in Teaching.
  • Rebecka Rutledge Fisher , professor, was awarded the Spring 2024 Camargo Prize and Residency from the Camargo Foundation.
  • Bradley Hammer , teaching professor, received a J. Carlyle Sitterson Award for Teaching First-Year students.
  • Courtney Rivard , assistant professor, received a Faculty Award for Global Excellence from the University’s Vice Provost for Global Affairs.

Exercise and Sport Science

  • Shelby Baez , assistant professor, received the Distinguished Young Professional Award from the Mid-Atlantic Athletic Trainers’ Association and the Freddie Fu New Investigator Award from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association.
  • Troy Blackburn , professor and chair, received the Medal for Distinguished Athletic Training Research from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association.
  • Johna Register-Mihalik , associate professor, received the Established Career Free Communications Award from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association.
  • Erianne Weight , professor, received the Distinguished Teaching Award for Post-Baccalaureate Instruction from the University
  • Zachary Yukio Kerr , associate professor, received the Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award.

Geography and Environment

  • Clark Gray , professor, received the 2023 IPUMs Research Award for his work on “Heat and drought reduce subnational population growth in the global tropics.”
  • Danielle Purifoy , assistant professor, was named a fellow of the American Association of Geographers, was named to the Father Royden B Davis, S.J. Chair for spring 2025 at Georgetown University, and was awarded a 2024-2025 Mellon Fellowship in Democracy and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks.
  • Elizabeth (Betsy) Olson , professor, received the 2024 Diversity and Inclusion Award from the American Association of Geographers.
  • Chérie Rivers , associate professor, received a fellowship from the Warren Center at Harvard University.

Curriculum in Global Studies

  • Erica Johnson , teaching professor, was selected for the 2024-25 IAH Academic Leadership Program.
  • Michael Osterweil , teaching professor, received a 2024 Chapman Family Teaching Award.
  • Jonathan Weiler , teaching professor, was selected for a Provost’s Senior Research Leave.
  • Henry Gruber , assistant professor, was awarded the Harvard University Committee on Medieval Studies Ph.D. Thesis Prize for his dissertation, “Wars and Rumors of War: Archaeology, Violence, and the End of Roman Spain.”
  • Antwain Hunter , assistant professor, received the Engaged Research Award from the UNC Office of the Provost.
  • Klaus Larres , Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professor, received a fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.
  • Michelle King , associate professor, received the 2024 Kleio Award, which recognizes the work of mid-career faculty.
  • Ana Maria Silva Campo , assistant professor, was awarded a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies.
  • Katherine Turk , associate professor, was elected to the membership of the Society of American Historians and received a William C. Friday Arts and Humanities Research Award from the Institute for the Arts and Humanities; her book The Women of NOW: How Feminists Built an Organization that Transformed America, was named one of The New Yorker’s Best Books of 2023.

Mathematics

  • David Rose , professor, and a former student received the 2024 G. De B. Robinson Award from the Canadian Mathematical Society.
  • Mariska Leunissen , professor, received a UNC Chapman Family Teaching Award.

Physics and Astronomy

  • Carl Rodriguez , assistant professor, received 2024 Helen B. Warner Prize from the American Astronomical Society.

Political Science

  • Evelyne Huber , Morehead Alumni Distinguished Professor, received the Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Student and Academic Program Support
  • Isaac Unah , associate professor, received a UNC Chapman Family Teaching Award.

Psychology and Neuroscience

  • Kenneth Bollen , Henry Rudolph Immerwahr Distinguished Professor in Psychology and Neuroscience and Sociology, received the 2024 Academic Ace Award from Woxsen University in Hyderbad, India, which has established the Kenneth A. Bollen Chair of Structural Equation Models.
  • Kristen Lindquist , professor, was appointed president of the Society for Affective Science.
  • Julian Rucker , assistant professor, was named a Rising Star by the Association for Psychological Science.
  • Viji Sathy , professor of the practice in psychology and associate dean for evaluation and assessment, received the American Psychological Association’s Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award.

Public Policy

  • Anna Krome-Lukens , teaching associate professor, received a UNC Chapman Family Teaching Award.

Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense

  • Erinn Whitaker , professor of the practice, received a Faculty Award for Global Excellence from the Vice Provost for Global Affairs.

Romance Studies

  • Lorna Aviles , teaching assistant professor, received a UNC Johnston Teaching Excellence Award.
  • Oswaldo Estrada , professor, received a Fulbright U.S. Scholar award to travel to Spain in fall 2024.
  • Barbara Entwisle , Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology, was appointed chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Tania Jenkins , assistant professor, was awarded the 2024 Southern Sociological Society’s Junior Scholar Award.
  • Arne Kalleberg , Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology, was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.
  • Alexandrea Ravenelle , assistant professor, received the Graduate Center of the City University of New York 2024 Alumni Award.

Office of Undergraduate Education

  • Nicholas Siedentop , director of undergraduate curricula, received a 2024 C. Knox Massey Distinguished Service Award from the University

Academic Advising

  • Madison Cabral , Thrive Advisor, received a Mickel-Shaw Excellence in Advising Award.
  • Emma Dove , Thrive Advisor, received a Mickel-Shaw Excellence in Advising Award.
  • Lucas Fayard , Center for Student Success, received a Class of 1996 Award for Advising Excellence.
  • Kristin Hondros , teaching associate professor, department of communication, and advisor, received a Class of 1996 Award for Advising Excellence.
  • Hanna Humphrey , Thrive Advisor, received a Mickel-Shaw Excellence in Advising Award.
  • Elizabeth Moran , Thrive Advisor, received a Mickel-Shaw Excellence in Advising Award.
  • Katheryne Zambrana , academic support program for student athletes, received a Class of 1996 Award for Advising Excellence.

Suggestions or feedback?

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MIT’s Master of Applied Science in Data, Economics, and Design of Policy program adds a public policy track

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Six students wearing winter jackets consult printed materials and talk with each other in front of the Stata Center, a building of brick and steel with unusual angles

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MIT’s Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) and Department of Economics have announced an expansion of their jointly administered Master of Applied Science in Data, Economics, and Design of Policy (DEDP) program . This expansion adds a new public policy track to complement the existing international development track, opening up new avenues for student learning and research. 

Designed to tackle poverty alleviation and other pressing policy challenges in the United States and other high-income countries, the curriculum of the new track spans a diverse set of issues, from domestic concerns like minimum wage and consumer welfare to global matters including trade, climate change, and immigration. Applications for the public policy track will open this fall, with the inaugural cohort set to arrive on MIT’s campus in spring 2026.

The DEDP program, led by MIT professors and Nobel laureates Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo, along with professors Sara Fisher Ellison and Benjamin Olken, was established with the mission of equipping diverse cohorts of talented professionals with the knowledge and skills to tackle poverty using evidence-based approaches. The new master’s degree track will support this mission while also underscoring the program’s commitment to addressing a broad array of critical challenges in the fight against poverty worldwide.

"The DEDP program has proven successful on many dimensions, and we are enthusiastic about leveraging its successes to address a broader set of social challenges,” says Ellison, a faculty lead for the program. “The public policy track will enable us to apply evidence-based methodology to poverty alleviation and other related issues in the context of high-income countries, as well. Given increasing levels of wealth and income inequality in these countries, we feel that the timing is opportune and the need is great."

The DEDP program distinguishes itself with an innovative admissions model that prioritizes demonstrated ability and motivation over traditional credentials, such as standardized tests and recommendation letters. To be eligible to apply to the master’s program, candidates must have earned a DEDP MicroMasters credential by passing five of the DEDP online courses. The courses are completely free to audit. Those who wish to earn a course certificate can pay a fee, which varies by the learner’s ability to pay, to take the proctored exam. While applications are reviewed holistically, performance in these classes is the primary factor in admissions decisions.

This approach democratizes access to higher education, enabling students from typically underrepresented backgrounds to demonstrate their potential for success. Notably, the program has welcomed many students from nontraditional backgrounds, such as a student who enrolled directly from high school (and who is now a second-year PhD student in economics at MIT), reflecting the ambition of its faculty directors to make higher education more accessible.

Sofia Martinez, a graduate of the class of 2023 and now co-founder of Learning Alliance , says, "Without the MicroMasters paving the way, applying to MIT or any similar institution would have been unthinkable for us. Initially, my aim in taking the online courses wasn't to pursue the residential program; it was only after witnessing my own progress that I realized the possibility wasn't so distant after all. This sentiment resonates with many in our cohort, which is truly humbling.”

Since its launch in 2020, the DEDP master’s program has conferred degrees to 87 students from 44 countries, showcasing its global reach and the success of its admissions model. Upon arriving on campus, students embark on an accelerated master's program. They complete a full course load in the spring, followed by a capstone project in the summer, applying the theoretical knowledge and practical skills gained through the program at research and policy organizations.

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Online | Book Launch: The Cambridge Handbook of Private Law and Artificial Intelligence

12 June 2024, 1:00 pm–2:00 pm

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A book launch organised by the Centre of Ethics and Law.

Event Information

Professor Ernest Lim, Vice Dean and Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore (NUS)

Dr Philip Morgan, Reader in Law at the University of York

Nick Pelosi, Associate Director of Engagement, Federated Hermes Ltd

Dr Raphael Reims, Manager Compliance Investigations, BMW Group

Chair:  Professor Iris H-Y Chiu , Professor of Corporate Law and Financial Regulation, UCL

About the online webinar

Artificial Intelligence (AI) appears to disrupt key private law doctrines and threatens to undermine some of the principal rights protected by private law. The social changes prompted by AI may also generate significant new challenges for private law. This webinar is a book launch of The Cambridge Handbook of Private Law and AI , edited by Ernest Lim and Phillip Morgan. Written by leading experts from common and civil law jurisdictions, this Handbook comprises 29 chapters spanning the law of obligations, and corporate and commercial law.

For more information, and to order, visit the book webpage and enter the code TCHPLAI24 at the checkout for a 20% discount.

Ernest Lim is Vice Dean and Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore (NUS). A prize-winning researcher, he has published on the implications of AI for corporate law , corporate governance , AI fairness framework , and commercial liability . He is currently researching on the topic of AI adjudication and the relationship between AI and authoritarianism. He obtained his DPhil and BCL from Oxford and LLB from NUS. He was a Robert S Campbell Visiting Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford. He practised corporate and securities law in the New York and Hong Kong offices of Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP.

Phillip Morgan is a Reader in Law at the University of York. He has published widely on the liability implications of AI, as well as on tort law, particularly vicarious liability. He regularly works within interdisciplinary teams on AI issues, and is the law lead for SAINTS, York’s new interdisciplinary AI safety Centre for Doctoral Training. He obtained his PhD from UCL Laws, his BCL from Oxford, and his MA from Cambridge. He has previously held visiting appointments at Oxford, Cambridge, The University of Hong Kong, Trinity College Dublin, and Georgetown Law.  He is a Barrister of the Middle Temple, and currently sits as a fee-paid judge in both the Employment Tribunal and in the First-tier Tribunal.  He is also the Book Review Editor of the Journal of Professional Negligence, and an Editor of the Professional Negligence and Liability Reports. 

Nick Pelosi is an Associate Director of Engagement in North America, where he leads engagement with the tech sector on digital rights. He authored the EOS Digital Rights Principles, which sets out investor expectations on responsible AI, as well as articles and case studies on the broader topic of digital rights. He is on the board of the Global Network Initiative, a multi stakeholder organization dedicated to protecting online privacy and freedom of expression.

Prior to joining EOS, he worked for First Peoples Worldwide, an NGO that uses corporate engagement to protect the rights of indigenous people and promote indigenous-led community development. He worked for the University of Colorado as a co-author of research on how social risks impact the market value of firms and advised Rio Tinto on social performance at its aluminium smelting operations. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science from Hunter College and a Master of Public Administration from Columbia University.

Raphael Reims is a lawyer and compliance expert at the BMW Group. He previously worked at the German law firm Noerr and the international law firm Willkie Farr & Gallagher. He studied at the London School of Economics and German universities and holds a Ph.D. in law.

UCL's Centre for Ethics and Law promotes and enhances collaboration between corporates, practitioners, civil servants, academics and others around the broad themes of professional ethics and the ethics of risk

With its wide range of activities and events the centre creates a leading platform for the exchange of ideas and opportunities to analyse ethical dilemmas from a multi-disciplinary and practice oriented perspective.

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AI for Science to empower the fifth paradigm of scientific discovery

Christopher Bishop, Technical Fellow, and Director, AI4Science

“Over the coming decade, deep learning looks set to have a transformational impact on the natural sciences. The consequences are potentially far-reaching and could dramatically improve our ability to model and predict natural phenomena over widely varying scales of space and time. Our AI4Science team encompasses world experts in machine learning, quantum physics, computational chemistry, molecular biology, fluid dynamics, software engineering, and other disciplines, who are working together to tackle some of the most pressing challenges in this field.“ 未来十年,深度学习注定将会给自然科学带来变革性的影响。其结果具有潜在的深远意义,可能会极大地提高我们在差异巨大的空间和时间尺度上对自然现象进行建模和预测的能力。为此,微软研究院科学智能中心(AI4Science)集结了机器学习、计算物理、计算化学、分子生物学、软件工程和其他学科领域的世界级专家,共同致力于解决该领域中最紧迫的挑战。 Professor Chris Bishop , Technical Fellow, and Director, AI for Science

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Course closed:

Economic Research is no longer accepting new applications.

The MPhil in Economic Research provides runs from early September to the end of July and provides a solid foundation for those who wish to apply for the PhD. It involves a thorough study of the core areas of economics and the requirement to explore one area in detail to begin the process of choosing a research topic, for those who wish to pursue further study. However, please note that it is not necessary to have a detailed proposal for PhD research at the time of applying.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the MPhil degree students should have:

  • acquired advanced technical training in microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics;
  • acquired, through optional papers, some knowledge of work at the frontiers of the subject in particular areas;
  • begun to acquire independent research skills and experience of putting them into practice;
  • acquired experience and guidance in formulating a realistic research topic and prepared written work to a strict timetable; and
  • acquired sufficient knowledge and understanding of advanced economics to proceed to a research degree.

All PhD applications are judged on their own merits and against standard admissions criteria, which include achieving 70% or above in the MPhil Economic Research. Please note that successful completion of the MPhil does not necessarily guarantee acceptance onto the PhD programme.

The Postgraduate Virtual Open Day usually takes place at the end of October. It’s a great opportunity to ask questions to admissions staff and academics, explore the Colleges virtually, and to find out more about courses, the application process and funding opportunities. Visit the  Postgraduate Open Day  page for more details.

See further the  Postgraduate Admissions Events  pages for other events relating to Postgraduate study, including study fairs, visits and international events.

Key Information

10 months full-time, study mode : taught, master of philosophy, faculty of economics, course - related enquiries, application - related enquiries, course on department website, dates and deadlines:, michaelmas 2024 (closed).

Some courses can close early. See the Deadlines page for guidance on when to apply.

Funding Deadlines

These deadlines apply to applications for courses starting in Michaelmas 2024, Lent 2025 and Easter 2025.

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  6. Strategy for selection at IIT in PhD Economics Programs #EconomicIITPhD #ugcneteconomics #economics

COMMENTS

  1. PhD in Economics

    This is the most advanced programme of graduate studies in Economics at Cambridge. Upon its completion, candidates are awarded a PhD degree for producing a thesis of high-quality, original, and publishable research over a period of four years (full-time) and seven years (part-time).

  2. PhD in Economics

    PhD in Economics. Economics is no longer accepting new applications. This is the most advanced programme of graduate studies in Economics at Cambridge which offers the opportunity for detailed research on a specific topic within the broad field of Economics under the supervision of leading experts. Upon its completion, candidates are awarded a ...

  3. Postgraduate Studies

    Economics at Cambridge is ranked at number 1 in UK by the Complete University Guide, ranked 3rd by the Guardian and the University Times and ranked at number 6 in the world according to the Times Higher Education. We offer one undergraduate and six postgraduate programmes of studies. For detailed descriptions of the programmes, entry requirements and general information, click the ...

  4. Faculty of Economics

    Economics - PhD - Closed. This is the most advanced programme of postgraduate studies in Economics at Cambridge which offers the opportunity for detailed research on a specific topic within the broad field of Economics under the supervision of leading experts. The Faculty also appoint research advisers who will typically complement the ...

  5. Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge

    The Faculty of Economics is one of the constituent departments of the University of Cambridge.It is composed of five research groups, in macroeconomics, microeconomic theory, economic history, econometrics, and empirical microeconomics.It is located in the Sidgwick Site in Cambridge, has been host to many distinguished economists, and is regarded as the birthplace of macroeconomics. 19 ...

  6. PhD in Economics at University of Cambridge

    Find more information about PhD in Economics at University of Cambridge . We value your privacy. We use cookies to allow this site to work for you, improve your user experience, and to serve you advertising tailored to your interests. Let us know if you agree to all cookies.

  7. PhD Program

    PhD Program. Year after year, our top-ranked PhD program sets the standard for graduate economics training across the country. Graduate students work closely with our world-class faculty to develop their own research and prepare to make impactful contributions to the field. Our doctoral program enrolls 20-24 full-time students each year and ...

  8. Economics, BA (Hons)

    Economics at Cambridge. Economics at Cambridge gives you an understanding of core, pure and applied economics. Study a range of different topics, including supply and demand, the role of prices and markets, employment, inflation, the operation of financial institutions and monetary policy. Number 1 in the UK for Economics (The Complete ...

  9. The Finance PhD pathway

    The Finance group at Cambridge Judge Business School covers a broad spectrum of issues in finance. We define finance as more than a set of financial transactions - it is the glue that holds together corporations, capital markets and the real economy. We pursue research on empirical and theoretical corporate finance, asset pricing, and ...

  10. PhD Students

    Darija Halatova. Title: Essays in Experimental Economics. Funded by: Andrew Hannon. Title: Essays on the Economics of Debt Management and Default. Research Interests. Macroeconomics, Household Finance, Sovereign Debt, Financial Stability and the Housing Market. Funded by: Lea Havemeister.

  11. PhD Program

    The Ph.D. Program in the Department of Economics at Harvard is addressed to students of high promise who wish to prepare themselves in teaching and research in academia or for responsible positions in government, research organizations, or business enterprises. Students are expected to devote themselves full-time to their programs of study.

  12. PhD in Land Economy

    Overview. Study. Requirements. Finance. How To Apply. Land Economy offers a full-time and a part-time PhD programme. The Department currently has over 70 PhD students at different stages of the programme, working in a range of areas. Our department leads the field in the UK's latest Research Excellence Framework rating of Land Economy's joint ...

  13. MRes/PhD Economics

    For the MRes/PhD Economics, the funding deadline is the same as the application deadline for the programme: 14 December 2023. The Economics Department also has a number of scholarship packages for direct entry MRes/PhD students. After the first year of the MRes/PhD Economics, there are teaching and research assistantships available in the ...

  14. Economics MRes + MPhil/PhD

    Economics. [email protected]. UCL is regulated by the Office for Students. UCL Economics is a world-class academic department with a commitment to research excellence. The Economics MRes and MPhil/PhD programmes attract, educate and develop students of the highest academic calibre. Our graduates are employed by the world's foremost academic ...

  15. Cambridge graduation ceremonies forced elsewhere by pro-Palestine ...

    Students at the University of Cambridge have been forced to graduate in a less traditional venue because of pro-Palestine disruption. Activists pitched tents outside Senate House, the grand venue ...

  16. Micro-Economics PhD

    The Chicago School of Economics. It all started here at the University of Chicago. Fields of specialization in the Micro-Economics Stevens Doctoral Program include price theory, market design, industrial organization, labor economics, public economics, health economics, and financial economics.

  17. Congratulations to the 2024 recipient of the Robert M. Solow Prize

    MIT Economics alumni and faculty established the Robert M. Solow Prize for Graduate Student Excellence in Teaching and Research to celebrate graduate students who reflect one of the department's core values, as embodied by Robert Solow: the interdependence of innovative research and excellence in teaching. ... Cambridge, MA 02142 Twitter ...

  18. Congratulations to our award-winning College faculty and staff

    Economics. Luca Flabbi, professor, was recognized for having the Top Cited Article 2022-2023, International Economics Review, for "Labor Market Search, Informality, and Schooling Investment." Donna Gilleskie, professor and chair, was appointed a Distinguished Fellow of the Southern Economic Association. English and Comparative Literature

  19. MIT's Master of Applied Science in Data, Economics, and Design of

    MIT's Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) and Department of Economics have announced an expansion of their jointly administered Master of Applied Science in Data, Economics, and Design of Policy (DEDP) program.This expansion adds a new public policy track to complement the existing international development track, opening up new avenues for student learning and research.

  20. Online

    The social changes prompted by AI may also generate significant new challenges for private law. This webinar is a book launch of The Cambridge Handbook of Private Law and AI, edited by Ernest Lim and Phillip Morgan. Written by leading experts from common and civil law jurisdictions, this Handbook comprises 29 chapters spanning the law of ...

  21. MPhil in Economic Research

    MPhil in Economic Research. This degree is for students with an undergraduate degree in economics who wish to obtain a PhD. It provides a solid foundation for the PhD programme and involves a thorough study of the core areas of economics and the exploration of one area in detail in order to begin the process of choosing a PhD research topic ...

  22. Microsoft Research AI for Science

    "Over the coming decade, deep learning looks set to have a transformational impact on the natural sciences. The consequences are potentially far-reaching and could dramatically improve our ability to model and predict natural phenomena over widely varying scales of space and time. Our AI4Science team encompasses world experts in machine learning, quantum physics, computational chemistry ...

  23. MPhil in Economic Research

    Economic Research is no longer accepting new applications. The MPhil in Economic Research provides runs from early September to the end of July and provides a solid foundation for those who wish to apply for the PhD. It involves a thorough study of the core areas of economics and the requirement to explore one area in detail to begin the ...

  24. Faculty of Economics

    Cambridge Economics alumni webinar series: Stock market comovement and FDI - Chryssi Giannitsarou. See the Cambridge Economics Alumni Webinar Series Videos. The Faculty of Economics at the University of Cambridge is one of the longest standing as well as being one of the leading economics faculties in Europe.