Ph.D. Programs

The Department of Linguistics offers four concentrations leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Linguistics (see list below). No matter the concentration, our faculty work closely with students, guiding their research and supporting their passions.

  • Applied Linguistics
  • Computational Linguistics
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Theoretical Linguistics

Applicants to the Ph.D. program are encouraged to identify prospective research advisors, at least one of whom should be in the concentration to which they apply.

After entering the program, Ph.D. students may elect to add a minor in a second one of these concentrations [new policy effective Spring 2023].

An interdisciplinary (second) concentration in Cognitive Science is also available to Ph.D. students.

Master’s in Passing

If, in their course of the Ph.D. program, a doctoral student meets all of the requirements of a M.S. degree in Linguistics, he or she may apply to receive a “Master’s in Passing.” Please consult section IV.D.3 of the Graduate School Bulletin for full details about the “in passing” or “terminal” Master’s degree.

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PhD in Linguistics

These are the new requirements implemented beginning in August 2019; for the old requirements, please click here .

A Brief Description of the PhD Program

The PhD program in Linguistics allows a high degree of flexibility and specialization, and is designed to encourage students to advance quickly to producing original research. Students may choose any of several standard areas of specialization, or design their own specialization with the help of their faculty advisor.

The PhD program in Linguistics consists of three stages, which correspond to the three Graduate College doctoral degree stages (see chapter 6 in the Graduate College Handbook ). The entire PhD program in Linguistics is intended to take 5 or 6 years: 2 years for Stage 1, and 3 or 4 years for Stages 2 and 3.

Stage 1 , which should be completed in two years, consists of 40 hours of graduate coursework, and the Stage 1 qualifying examination ; at the completion of Stage 1, students are eligible to receive a MA in Linguistics.

Stage 2 consists of 64 hours of graduate coursework, the Stage 2 qualifying examination , and the preliminary examination .

Stage 3 consists of the final defense and dissertation deposit.

Entry Requirements for the PhD Program

Students may be admitted to the PhD program in Linguistics with or without a prior master’s degree in linguistics or a related field. Depending on the student’s prior preparation, they may be admitted either into Stage 1 of the PhD or into Stage 2 of the PhD. Students who have completed a master’s degree in linguistics or a closely related field may be considered for admission to Stage 2 of the PhD program. Students without an approved prior master’s degree will only be considered for admission to Stage 1 of the PhD program. For admission to Stage 1 of the PhD program, undergraduate preparation should include the study of at least one foreign language; a course equivalent to LING 400 (Introduction to Linguistic Structure); and a broad background in the humanities, social sciences, and/or mathematics. 

Students admitted to Stage 1 must complete 40 credit hours in the areas listed below, maintain a GPA of 3.5 or better in all core courses, maintain a GPA of 3.0 or better overall, and earn a grade of High Pass on the Stage 1 qualifying examination in order to advance to Stage 2. Students who complete Stage 1 with a GPA of 3.0 or better overall, and who earn a grade of either Pass or High Pass on the Stage 1 qualifying examination, are eligible t o receive an MA in Linguistics.

Students who are admitted directly to Stage 2, but lack any of the core courses required for Stage 1, must complete Stage 1 requirements immediately on entry into the program; the courses will not count toward the 64 hours required for Stage 2 of the PhD.

How to Apply

Follow this link to information about applying to the PhD program; click here to start your graduate application.

Academic Advising

All students should choose a faculty member to serve as their academic advisor. New students are advised by the Director of Graduate Studies until a different advisor is chosen. Consult often with your advisor about course selection, research projects, publications, conference presentations, and any other academic issue. You may change advisors at any time. Once you reach the stage of writing your dissertation, your academic advisor serves as your Director of Dissertation Research. Typically (though not necessarily), your advisor also serves as chair of your Prelim Examination and Final Examination Committees. To select or change an advisor, fill out the electronic advisor agreement form . Your advisor should be a tenure-track or tenured faculty member at the University of Illinois.

PhD Program Requirements: Stage 1

40 graduate credit hours are required for Stage 1 of the PhD in Linguistics. Credit hours which have already been applied to another degree do not count toward this total; nor do preparatory courses taken as a condition on admission. It is normally possible to complete Stage 1 in two years. Note: core courses for Stage 1 are under bullets A and B below; all other courses are non-core courses.

A. The following courses are required (12 hours):

  • LING 501: Syntax I
  • LING 502: Phonology I
  • LING 507: Formal Semantics I

B. Choose at least one course each from two of the following four areas (8 hours):

  • LING 450: Sociolinguistics I
  • LING 406: Intro to Computational Linguistics Note: LING 402 (Tools & Technology in Speech and Language Processing) needs to be taken as a pre-requisite to LING 406 for students without a computational background
  • LING 425: Introduction to Psycholinguistics
  • LING 426: Child and Adult Language Acquisition
  • LING 489: Theoretical Foundations of SLA

C. Choose at least one course  in quantitative and/or qualitative research methods (4 hours):

  • LING 403: Introduction to Field Methods
  • LING 413: Corpus Linguistics
  • LING 514: Design and Methodology in Linguistic Research
  • LING 516: Field Methods
  • A section of LING 490 on statistics or methodology for language research (subject to SEEC approval)
  • A section of LING 591 on statistics or methodology for language research (subject to SEEC approval)
  • A relevant course from another unit, such as Educational Psychology, Psychology, Anthropology, or Communications, with approval from the Student Examination and Evaluation Committee (SEEC); please click here to see a list of methods courses from other units that can satisfy the methods requirement.

D. Practicum and independent study are required (4 hours):

  • LING 504: Practicum (2 hours)
  • LING 590: Special Topics in Linguistics (2 hours)

E. Three elective courses are required (12 hours):

  • These may be any LING courses at the 400-level or above, or non-LING courses approved by the student's advisor.

F. Language Requirement:

  • For students who are native speakers of a language other than English, English satisfies this requirement.
  • For students who are native speakers of English, demonstrated 4 th -level proficiency is required, which can be achieved by (a) completion of four semesters of college study (or four years of high school study), or equivalent, within 5 years of matriculation; or (b) corresponding placement on an Illinois foreign language placement test.
  • Language courses can be taken Credit-No Credit (CR/NC) here at UIUC to satisfy the requirement. 

G. Stage 1 Qualifying Examination:

  • Students first work closely with a faculty member to prepare an original research paper. The paper must be submitted to the department during the Spring semester of the student's second year (the deadline is set by the Student Examination and Evaluation Committee, and is usually the first day of the Spring semester), and the oral exam must take place before the end of the Spring semester.
  • Qualifying papers must be supervised by a tenure-line faculty member with a non-zero appointment in Linguistics. For any questions about qualifying paper supervision, students should contact the Director of Graduate Studies.
  • The examination itself consists of an oral presentation of the research paper before a committee of faculty members, who may ask questions concerning the research, the written paper, and the presentation.
  • High Pass : the student is eligible to proceed to Stage 2 of the PhD, as well as to earn a MA in Linguistics , provided all other requirements are met.
  • Pass: the student is NOT eligible to proceed to Stage 2 of the PhD, but the student IS eligible to earn a MA in Linguistics , provided all other requirements are met. The student has to leave the program with a terminal MA.
  • Fail : the student is NOT eligible to proceed to Stage 2 of the PhD, and NOT eligible to earn a MA; the student is dismissed from the program with no degree.

H. Minimum GPA requirements

  • Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA across all courses, and a minimum 3.5 GPA across all core courses (listed under Point A and Point B above) in order to be eligible to proceed to Stage 2.
  • Students who maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA across all courses are eligible to earn a MA in Linguistics , provided all other MA requirements are satisfied.

PhD Program Requirements: Stage 2

64 graduate credit hours are required for Stage 2 of the PhD in Linguistics. For students admitted directly to Stage 2 of the PhD, credit hours which have already been applied to another degree do not count toward this total; nor do preparatory courses taken as a condition on admission. The requirements below are in effect for all students entering the program in Fall Semester 2019 or later.

A. Choose at least one upper-level course in one of the following areas (4 hours):

  • LING 541: Syntax II
  • LING 581: Topics in Syntactic Theory
  • relevant section of an advanced seminar or other course, with SEEC approval
  • LING 542: Phonology II
  • LING 520: Acoustic Phonetics
  • LING 522: Articulatory Phonetics
  • LING 582: Topics in Phonological Theory
  • LING 547: Formal Semantics II
  • LING 551: Pragmatics

B. Choose at least one upper-level course in one of the following areas (4 hours):

  • LING 550 (Sociolinguistics II)
  • LING 587 (Topics in Sociolinguistics)
  • LING 506 (Topics in Computational Linguistics)
  • LING 525 (Psycholinguistics)
  • LING 529 (Second Language Acquisition and Bilingualism)
  • relevant section of LING 588 (Seminar in Second Language Learning)
  • relevant section of LING 560 (Seminar in Bilingualism)
  • LING 584 (Theories in Second Language Acquisition)
  • relevant section of Ling 588 (Seminar in Second Language Learning)

C. Elective courses (12 hours)

  • Students must complete at least 12 hours of graduate courses (400-level or higher) in Linguistics or related fields. These courses should reflect the student’s interests and professional goals, and should be selected in consultation with the advisor.

D. Research/Project/Independent Study Hours (12 hours)

  • Students must complete at least 12 credit hours of LING 590: Special Topics in Linguistics, or of another independent research course approved by the advisor.

E. Language Requirement:

  • Students must demonstrate knowledge of the structure of a language that is not their native tongue nor the same language that satisfied the foreign language requirement for Stage 1 of the PhD, or (in the case of students admitted directly to Stage 2) of the prior approved master's degree.
  • This requirement may be satisfied through (a) 2 nd -level proficiency in the language, obtained through two semesters of college-level study, or equivalent; (b) 2 nd -level placement on an Illinois foreign language placement test; (c) completion of a course on the structure of the language; (d) completion of LING 516: Field Methods; or (e) a demonstration that the language is the focus of the student’s doctoral research.
  • One of the languages with which the student is familiar (this may be the student’s native language, or the language used to satisfy one of the language requirements) must be a non-European or a non-Indo-European language.

F. Stage 2 Qualifying Examination:

  • Students first work closely with a faculty member to prepare an original research paper. The paper may be in the same or a different area than the paper submitted for the Stage 1 qualifying examination , and it may be supervised by the same or a different faculty member. The Stage 2 paper must differ from the Stage 1 paper in terms of research topic, research questions, and/or research methods.
  • For students who proceeded to Stage 2 from Stage 1, the Stage 2 paper must be submitted to the department during the Spring semester of the student's third year (the deadline is set by the Student Examination and Evaluation Committee, and is usually the first day of the Spring semester), and the oral exam must take place before the end of the Spring semester.
  • For students who entered the program at Stage 2, the Stage 2 paper must be submitted to the department during the Spring semester of the student's second year (the deadline is set by the Student Examination and Evaluation Committee, and is usually the first day of the Spring semester), and the oral exam must take place before the end of the Spring semester.
  • Pass : the student is eligible to proceed to the thesis proposal stage.
  • Rewrite : the student is given a timeline to rewrite and resubmit the paper. Only one rewrite is permitted. The possible grades for a rewritten qualifying paper are Pass (proceed to the thesis proposal stage) or Fail (dismissal from the program).

G. Minimum GPA requirements

  • Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in all courses in order to be eligible to proceed to Stage 3.

H. Thesis Hours Required (32 hours)

Students must complete at least 32 credit hours of LING 599: Thesis Research. Enrollment in LING 599 is not normally allowed before the semester in which the student expects to complete the Preliminary Examination.

I. Preliminary Examination

All students must pass the Preliminary Examination, normally in the fourth year of the PhD program for students who entered at Stage 1, or in the third year of the PhD program for students who entered directly into Stage 2.

  • To take the Preliminary Examination, first finish all your course requirements. Work closely with your advisor to prepare a written dissertation proposal. Assemble your examination committee, bearing in mind the policies on committee membership set by the Graduate College (see https://grad.illinois.edu/exams-committees for more information). Submit your written proposal to your committee at least two weeks before the oral examination, which may be scheduled through the  Graduate Student Services Office  of the School of Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics (please fill out the exam scheduling form ).
  • The examination consists of an oral presentation of the dissertation proposal before the committee. The committee may ask questions about the proposed research, the written proposal, or the presentation.

PhD Program Requirements: Stage 3

Students complete all Stage 2 program requirements before proceedings to Stage 3.

A. Final Examination/Dissertation Defense

All students must write a dissertation and successfully defend its thesis in an oral examination. Familiarize yourself early in the process with the  Graduate College policies and procedures regarding dissertations .

  • The Final Examination committee is normally (but not necessarily) identical to the Preliminary Examination committee. If it is different, please bear in mind the policies on committee membership set by the Graduate College; see https://grad.illinois.edu/exams-committees . Work closely with your advisor and other committee members to be sure the dissertation is satisfactory before arranging for the Final Examination. The completed dissertation must be submitted to the committee at least two weeks prior to the examination, which may be scheduled through the  Graduate Student Services Office  of the School of Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics (please fill out the exam scheduling form ).
  • The Final Examination consists of an oral presentation of the dissertation and defense of its thesis before the committee. The committee may ask questions about the research, the written dissertation, or the presentation.

B. Dissertation Deposit

Following successful completion the defense, make any revisions requested to the dissertation by the committee, and secure the approval of your advisor. Make sure the dissertation conforms to the  Graduate College formatting policies . Deposit the dissertation according to  the procedure set by the Graduate College .

Applying credit from other institutions

Students who enter the program with previous graduate work in Linguistics from another institution may petition to transfer course credit to the University of Illinois. Transfer of credit is not possible if the courses have already been counted towards a degree at any other institution. Transfer must be requested through the  SLCL Graduate Student Services office .

Linguistics

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You will experience a unique range and depth of Harvard’s offerings in related fields, especially ancient and modern languages and the growing Mind Brain Behavior Initiative.

You will have the flexibility to customize your program to prepare you for post-graduate success in an academic or non-academic role. You can access a wide range of Harvard resources including the Widener Library, which contains a matchless linguistic and philological collection supplemented by a special non-circulating collection accessible only to linguistics students and faculty.

Examples of theses and dissertations by graduates include “An Experimental Pragmatic Investigation of Depictive Co-Speech Gestures,” “Interpreting Questions with Non-Exhaustive Answers,” “Nominal Arguments and Language Variation,” and “Phrasing is Key: The Syntax and Prosody of Focus in Georgian.”

Graduates of the program have secured academic positions at Rutgers University; University of California, Berkeley; University of Vienna; and the University of Hawaii. Others hold jobs with companies such as Amazon, Google, and Grammarly.

Additional information on the graduate program is available from the Department of Linguistics and requirements for the degree are detailed in Policies .

Areas of Study

Historical Linguistics | Linguistic Theory | Unspecified

Admissions Requirements

Please review admissions requirements and other information before applying. You can find degree program-specific admissions requirements below and access additional guidance on applying from the Department of Linguistics .

Academic Background

Applicants typically have a previous background in linguistics, a mature interest in the field, and a strong language background.

Writing Sample

A writing sample is required as part of the application and should be no more than 100 pages.

Standardized Tests

GRE General: Optional

Theses & Dissertations

Theses & Dissertations for Linguistics

See list of Linguistics faculty

APPLICATION DEADLINE

Questions about the program.

Graduate Programs

phd programs linguistics

Our graduate programs provide a unique environment where linguistic theory, multiple methodologies, and computational research not only coexist, but interact in a highly synergistic fashion.  

Our focus is on the Ph.D. degree.  The department occasionally admits students already enrolled at Stanford for the M.A. degree. Ph.D. students in other departments at Stanford may also apply for the Ph.D. Minor. 

Green Library

Doctoral Program

Our Ph.D. program emphasizes rigorous theoretical work that has at its base a firm empirical foundation in language data.

Stack of Books

Ph.D. Minor

Our Ph.D. Minor allows Ph.D. students in other Stanford departments to develop a solid grounding in linguistics that can complement and enhance their studies and research in their home department.

Letters

M.A. for Stanford Graduate Students

We offer an MA degree for Stanford graduate students which develops students' knowledge of linguistics, preparing them for a professional career or doctoral study in linguistics or related disciplines.

phd programs linguistics

Coterminal M.A. Program

Our Coterminal M.A. Program develops students' knowledge of linguistics, preparing them for a professional career or doctoral study in linguistics or related disciplines.

phd programs linguistics

Graduate Program

The curriculum is designed to assure that Ph.D. students receive an adequate grounding in all of the fundamental areas of linguistics, while leaving them the freedom they need to become independent researchers. The first year is devoted to coursework, which gives students a strong foundation and enables them to quickly begin contributing to the research life of the department. Beyond the core, students are relatively free to design their own program of study both within the discipline and across disciplines, within a framework of requirements set by the field and the Graduate School.

This program is organized in consultation with a Special Committee of the student’s own choosing. Committee members represent the student's major and minor subjects. Minors may be chosen from disciplines other than linguistics, so that it is possible, for example, for a Ph.D. student to major in General Linguistics and minor in such areas as Computer Science, Latin American Studies or Cognitive Science. The Special Committee system makes the Ph.D. program maximally flexible and allows students to avail themselves of the entire university's resources. 

Note on M.A. Program:

We do not offer a Master's program. The exception is through the Employee Degree Program (a benefit for Cornell employees). Contact the Graduate Field Assistant for more information ( [email protected]  or 607-255-1105)

ADMISSIONS REVIEW CONSIDERING COVID-19 DISRUPTIONS

APPLICATION DEADLINE: December 15 (of each year - fall admission only)

Application Requirements

Applicants must have a B.A., B.S. or M.A. degree.

Submitted online:

  • Online application found at www.gradschool.cornell.edu/admissions
  • Academic statement of purpose
  • Personal statement
  • One research paper as a writing sample
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Application fee: $105
  • TOEFL or ILETS scores also required.  For exact details of how to satisfy the English Language Proficiency, please see   https://gradschool.cornell.edu/admissions/prepare/english-language-proficiency-requirement/ .

*The GRE is not required for admission to the Field of Linguistics.

All materials must be uploaded to CollegeNet (see application link above). No hard copy application materials are accepted.

Requests for further information should be addressed to: E-mail :  [email protected] Phone : (607) 255-1105 Notification of Application Status: If any material is missing from your application, you will be notified by email.  Check the status of your application and select "review your activity".

Application and Admission Timeline

December 15 – All application materials are due.

Early February - Applicants are informed of admissions decisions and financial awards by this time. 

April 15 – Admitted students are required to accept or decline their offers by this date.

FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions 

- What are the strengths of your program? At Cornell, linguistic theory is applied to a broad range of linguistic evidence and tools, augmenting traditional linguistic intuitions. These include experimental/instrumental approaches, corpora, computational methods, and language documentation.

- What are the research interests and theoretical orientation of your faculty? Take a look at our  faculty webpages ! Our faculty cover a wide range of interests within the field of linguistics.

- How long does it take to complete the Ph.D. in Linguistics? Most students take five years. Finishing in this amount of time is contingent on timely completion of the required coursework and the A-exam.

- Can I do a Master's in Linguistics at Cornell University? No. Our program is designed to train students for the Ph.D.

- Can I start the program in the Winter or Spring semester? No. Our program's coursework is designed to start in the fall semester.

- What kinds of jobs do students who receive the Ph.D. in Linguistics have? Our students are successful in obtaining various academic and non-academic positions . See our " MA/PhD Alumni " page for information on the placement of our Ph.D graduates.

- What if I cannot afford the application fee? Please refer to this information from the Cornell University Graduate School: Application fee waivers: Check fee waiver eligibility requirements online before applying . If you are eligible, you can find a link to our fee waiver request form on the payment page of the online application form. You must submit your application and the fee waiver request at the same time. We review fee waiver requests every business day.

- What are the tuition costs? The tuition cost set for the 2023-24 academic year is $24,800. More detailed information on tuition & stipend rates and other fees (student activity fee and health insurance).

- What financial aid is available? Are international students eligible for financial aid? Two types of financial support are available through Cornell: merit-based (fellowships, assistantships, and tuition awards) and need-based (loans). Please visit our " Financial Support " section below for more information. Unless you choose otherwise, students are considered for merit-based aid, regardless of citizenship, as part of the admissions process—no special application is required. Applicants are notified of merit-based awards at the same time admissions offers are made. You must notify the Graduate School by April 15 if you plan to accept the offer.

- What does the admissions committee look for when reviewing applications? Simply stated, we are looking for talented students who are a good match for our program.

- How many students are accepted to the program per admission cycle? Our target class size is six. 

- What do my GRE scores and GPA have to be? We do not set specific minimums for GRE scores and GPA. GREs and GPA are only one consideration in evaluating applications for admission. Note that for the 2022-23 admissions cycle, the GRE test has been waived due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

- Who should my letters of recommendation come from? Generally, academic references are from professors you have worked with during your undergraduate or master’s program. If you are not coming straight out of an academic program, these may also include references from your employers. Simply put, we are looking for letters from people who know both the applicant and our program and can tell us that the applicant will do well in our program.

- What should I include in my statement of purpose? A statement of purpose should be a well-written statement (of about 2 pages in length) that tells us why you have chosen to pursue linguistics as a field of study and why you have chosen to apply to Cornell. It should include your reasons for undertaking graduate work and an explanation of your academic interests, including their relation to your undergraduate study and professional goals. If possible, include the names of the Cornell faculty members whose research seems to match your own interests, and briefly discuss the connections you see. Also describe your relevant research experience, and note any publications you have authored or co-authored

Ph.D. Requirements

Progress towards the degree is attained by

  • Completing the core course requirements
  • Passing the Qualifying Exam (Q-exam), results reported to Field
  • Passing the Admission to Candidacy Exam (A-exam), results reported to Grad School (form A4)
  • Defending the prospectus (P-exam), results reported to Field
  • Completing and defending dissertation (B-exam), results reported to Grad School (form A4)

Brief Ph.D Progress Checklist (For details on the requirements, see below. Italicized items are new Graduate School policies that apply to students beginning with those admitted for Fall 2014.)

1st year: 

  • Apply for an NSF or other national fellowship in the fall semester, if eligible (usually only US citizens and resident aliens are eligible). 
  • Make significant inroads on completing the core courses 
  • Have two meetings (one per semester) with your Advisory Committee
  • File academic plan with Graduate School describing anticipated summer activities and outcomes (due May 1, required for summer funding)

Select a Special Committee for your Q-paper by September 1st

  • Submit a Q-paper proposal to your Special Committee by December 1st

Continue taking core courses, seminars

Complete any ancillary skills courses your committee requires (if any)

  • Take Research Workshop (LING 6603) in spring

Take Q-Exam, committee reports results to GFA

The Q-Exam should be attempted before the end of the 4th semester. Summer funding for the second summer will be contingent on having attempted the Q-Exam by this deadline. To qualify for summer funding at the end of the fourth semester, it is essential that you schedule your Q-Exam no later than May 1st, and that the date of the exam be no later than May 14th.

  • File academic plan with Graduate School describing anticipated summer activities and outcomes (due May 1, required for summer funding)​
  • Select a Special Committee for your A-paper by September 1st
  • Submit an A-paper proposal to your Special Committee by December 1st

Take Research Workshop (LING 6604) in fall semester

Take seminars to further research goals

Schedule A-Exam (form A3)

Take A-exam (report results with form A4, eligibility for 3rd summer funding is contingent on passing A-exam or filing a scheduling form indicating an intention to take the exam for the start of the 7th semester)

N.B. The dissertation-year fellowship will be available only to students who attempted their A-exam prior to the seventh semester of enrollment (a requirement of the Code of Legislation) and have passed the A-exam. In addition, students seeking the dissertation-year fellowship must have written and submitted an external fellowship or grant proposal within their first four years of enrollment, to encourage all students to pursue external funding. (In exceptional cases for which there may be no logical external funding organization to which it would be appropriate to write a proposal, the student may write a proposal for an internal Cornell award such as a Graduate School or Einaudi travel grant or may petition for permission to complete an alternative professionalization activity.)

  • A-exam should be done by the beginning of the 7th semester!
  • Select Special Committee for your dissertation by September 1st
  • Write your dissertation proposal
  • Take P-Exam (defense of prospectus) by end of fall semester, committee reports results to GFA
  • Work on dissertation
  • Apply for dissertation year fellowships (usually done in fall) and other post-A-exam funding
  • 4th year summer funding is available by application only; students who have not passed their A-exam are not eligible. Applications for summer funding are due May 1 at the Graduate School.

 5th year:

  • Apply for jobs, postdocs, etc.
  • Finish dissertation
  • Schedule B-Exam (form A3)
  • Take B-exam (defense of dissertation, report results with form A4)
  • File Thesis, using Graduation Manager

Course Requirements

A. core courses.

To assure that Ph.D. students receive an adequate grounding in all of the fundamental areas of linguistics, the field has defined a set of core requirements in the areas of Syntax, Phonology, Semantics and Historical Linguistics. The general expectation is that all students will take all core courses. If a student requests an exemption on the basis of comparable graduate-level coursework at another institution, this exemption can only be granted after consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies and the instructor of the relevant course. Beyond the core courses, Ph.D. students are expected to attend advanced linguistics courses (topics courses and seminars) not only in the areas in which they write their research papers and thesis but in areas that will provide sufficient breadth as advised by the Special Committee.  

Students are required to complete courses equivalent to the following: 

  • Historical Linguistics (LING 6314)
  • Phonology I and II (LING 6401/6402)
  • Syntax I and II  (LING 6403/6404)
  • Semantics I (LING 6421)
  • Research Workshops (LING 6603/6604): This course provides students with an opportunity to develop an original research paper through a number of revisions, some of which are presented to an audience of fellow students. The final version is presented at a semester-end conference.  Offered both fall and spring.
  • At least one course from the following subfields:  computational linguistics, historical linguistics (beyond Ling 6314), morphology, phonetics, semantics and pragmatics.
  • Advanced courses: all students are required to take at least four (4) seminars or topics courses for credit. These are courses at the 6600-level or higher. 

B. Ancillary skill sets

In the course of research a student may need to master one or more ancillary skill sets. These might be familiarity with languages of scholarship or training in statistics, logic, field methods or programming. The student, in consultation with his/her committee, is expected to determine which skills need to be acquired and how and when this should be done.

Q- and A-Exams (admission to candidacy):

Admission to candidacy in the field of Linguistics consists of writing two research papers which are evaluated in two exams, the Q-exam and the A-exam.  The Q-exam is taken by the end of the second year, and the A-exam is taken by the end of the third year.  Graduate School regulations require that all doctoral students must take the Examination for Admission to Candidacy before beginning their seventh semester of registration unless special permission is obtained from the Dean.  The format of the Q- and A-exams varies from case to case, depending on the expectations of the Special Committee.  The Field requires that the candidate submit to the committee in advance of the exam a research paper of high quality (see the deadlines above).  The papers for the two exams must be in two distinct subfields, with a distinct Special Committee devoted to each paper.  The Special Committee for each exam will normally ask the candidate to prepare written answers for one to two questions.    

P-Exam (defense of prospectus):

Following successful completion of the A-exam, a Special Committee for the dissertation is selected and the P-exam is undertaken by the fall of the fourth year.    

B-Exam (thesis defense):

The B-Exam is taken after completion of the Ph.D. dissertation.  The B-Exam includes a presentation of the highlights of the dissertation followed by questions from the committee and others in attendance. 

Financial Support

We typically offer guaranteed five-year full financial support to students we admit into the graduate program, regardless of the student's citizenship. Two of those years (SAGE Fellowship: the first-year and the "dissertation year" in which students are not expected to work as a Teaching Assistant or Research Assistant) are through fellowships, and the other three years are through other sources of support, typically teaching assistantships or research assistantships. The five year funding package covers: tuition and fees, student health insurance and a nine-month stipend for living expenses. Funding is contingent on satisfactory academic performance, and beginning with the 2014-15 academic year, the Graduate School has instituted progress requirements for continued funding.

Teaching/Research Assistantships

The studies of all graduate students are funded in part by Teaching Assistantships (TA). In the Department of Linguistics, most Teaching Assistantships involve helping a professor in an undergraduate course; responsibilities may include leading discussion sections, meeting with students, helping grade papers and exams. Every effort is made to match teaching assignments with graduate student interests and to make sure that each Teaching Assistant receives a variety of teaching experiences while at Cornell. Teaching assistants work on average 15 hours per week and do not usually exceed 20 hours in any given week.

A student holding a TA-ship may work total of 20 hours per week as a combination of the TA responsibilities and employment elsewhere, either on- or off-campus.  Students holding a University fellowship, external fellowship, or GRA may also be employed on- or off-campus for no more than 8 hours per week, as long as this does not conflict with the terms of the external funding agreement.

A research assistantship (RA) entails work on a faculty research project not necessarily related to the student's dissertation. RAs work 15 to 20 hours per week. If the research project directly relates to the student's dissertation, then the appointment is a graduate research assistantship, in which case the time spent on research connected with the project is expected to be significant.

The  John S. Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines  allots the Linguistics department TA-ships for our graduate students to teach a First-Year Writing Seminar. This program emphasizes the humanities and social sciences and provides graduate students in all fields the opportunity to lead small undergraduate writing seminars and even to develop their own unique course syllabi. All graduate student instructors of First-Year Writing Seminars are required to take Writing 7100: Teaching Writing, a summer or fall semester one-credit course that provides a thorough pedagogical and experiential grounding in teaching. The department of Linguistics has approved courses that are offered as a writing seminar. If you would like to propose a new writing seminar, you will need to fill out the pre-EPC form.

Students may serve as language instructors for their TA-ship.  These also involve 15-20 hours a week.  Students with appropriate language background who are given such assignments are required to fulfill the respective department's training requirements.

Fellowships

The Graduate Field now requires all graduate students to apply for external funding at some point in their first four years. Students in the field of Linguistics are encouraged to apply for a variety of fellowships such as the National Science Foundation and the Social Science Research Council Fellowships. Also, the area programs at Cornell (East Asian, Southeast Asia, South Asia and European Studies) offer federally supported Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to students whose research focuses on any of these areas.

Many of these non-Cornell sourced external fellowships are intended for students who are U.S. citizens or nationals or permanent residents of the United States. Applicants from foreign countries should seek aid from their own governments, universities, corporations or from a U.S. agency operating abroad, such as the Institute for International Education or the Fulbright-Hays Program.

Under certain conditions, external funds can be used to extend the package of guaranteed support from the Field or used in place of the teaching assistantship or research apprenticeship to allow the recipient to focus on research. The Graduate School and Field policies on modifying the initial package are available from the Director of Graduate Studies. Currently, students who are awarded these fellowships receive the two "free" years of SAGE funding (i.e., the first year and the dissertation year), but not the University-funded RA or TA stipends in the years that are covered by the external fellowship. 

The East Asian Program offers the following fellowships that have no citizenship restrictions. These three typically provide tuition and stipend for one semester. 

Einaudi Center Funding-East Asia Program Fellowships

  • Robert J. Smith Fellowships in Japanese Studies
  • Starr Fellowships
  • Lee Teng-hui Fellowships in World Affairs

Einaudi Center grants: http://einaudi.cornell.edu/student-funding Cornell's Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS), Fulbright-Hayes Awards, Fulbright Program, International Research Travel Grants: The Mario Einaudi Center and its associated Programs offer a wide range of support and assistance to graduate students in search of funding for their international research, study and scholarship. See web site for deadlines, usually late January.

Graduate School Fellowship Database: http://gradschool.cornell.edu/fellowships/ A searchable database of fellowships of all kinds - well worth a look!

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSFGRFP):   http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=6201 The National Science Foundation funds research and education in most fields of science and engineering. For U.S. citizens and permanent residents, these are very competitive, but they provide a multi-year package of fellowship funding. College seniors, first- and second-year students with no more than 12 months of graduate study (i.e. no MA/MS degree) are eligible. It is most advisable to apply in your first year, if you are eligible. Even if you feel you do not have much linguistics research experience, the experience of writing the proposal is worthwhile. You will also get feedback from the NSF Fellowship Panel, which you can incorporate into an improved application the following year, if you do not succeed the first time. If you wait until your final year of eligibility to apply, you cannot take a second chance.

Social Science Research Council fellowships:  https://www.ssrc.org/fellowships-and-opportunities/ Most support from the Council goes to predissertation, dissertation and postdoctoral fellowships, offered through annual, peer-reviewed competitions.

NSF dissertation improvement grants (DDRIG):  http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505033&org=SBE&sel_org=SBE&from=fund These are for post-A-exam dissertation writers. There is no U.S. citizenship requirement. The grants supply up to $12,000 for research-related expenses. Deadlines are July 15th and January 15th of each year. The Principal Investigator should be the student's dissertation advisor, and the student should be the Co-Principal Investigator. It is expected that the student (Co-PI) will author the proposal, which will then be submitted through the university by the dissertation advisor (PI).

Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships: http://www.acls.org/programs/dcf

Recently Offered Seminars

The department of linguistics offers a wide variety of graduate-level seminars. Seminar topics vary each semester based on the research interests of the graduate students and faculty.

  • Finite State Methods
  • Optimality Theory
  • Neuro-linguistics
  • Old Iranian
  • Sanskrit Historical Grammar
  • Phonetics in the Lexicon
  • Timing and Weight in Phonology and Phonetics
  • Information Structure
  • Modality, Negative Polarity
  • Polarity, Alternatives, Modality, Pragmatics
  • Aspect of Interface between Syntax and Morpho-Phonology
  • Relation Based Syntax
  • Peripheries

Research Facilities

The Computational Linguistics Lab focuses on the statistical parsing of large data samples, including grammar development, parameter estimation, and acquisition of lexical information from corpora.

The Language Documentation Lab provides resources and laboratory space for research involving language documentation, description, and analysis, with an emphasis on understudied languages.

The Phonetics Lab offers state-of-the-art facilities for research in articulatory movement tracking, ultrasound, electroglottography, and speech aerodynamics. The phonetics lab is part of the Cornell Speech Imaging Group (SIG), a cross-disciplinary team of researchers using real-time magnetic resonance imaging to study the dynamics of speech articulation. 

Faculty and students in the Computational Psycholinguistic Discussions research group (C.Psyd) are interested in the intersection of computational linguistics and psycholinguistics. By building computational models to predict human language processing behavior (e.g., reading times), we can study the linguistic features that impact human processing decisions. Relatedly, C.Psyd members use psycholinguistic techniques to study the strategies used by neural networks to produce high accuracy in different language contexts, which gives us insights as to when different strategies might be employed by humans.

At the Linguistic Meaning (LiMe) Lab we investigate the complex process by which humans assign meaning to utterances. To do so, we combine insights from linguistic theory and cognitive science more broadly with experimental and computational methods. Contact: [email protected]

Cornell Linguistics Circle

The Cornell Linguistics Circle (CLC) is the graduate student group of the Cornell Department of Linguistics.  Students from linguistics and related fields are welcome to attend CLC meetings and participate in planned activities. The CLC serves to promote exchange of ideas among graduate students in the field and to advocate for the graduate student body within the department. Throughout the course of the academic year the CLC invites a series of outside speakers from linguistics departments around the country and the world.  Speakers deliver talks attended by faculty and graduate students (followed by a CLC-sponsored reception, of course!) and are often available for one-on-one meetings with interested students. The CLC also publishes The Proceedings of SALT, which contains articles developed from work presented at the annual Semantics and Linguistic Theory conference. All volumes of the Proceedings of SALT are available online through the LSA.

CLC Officers 2023-24

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Department of Linguistics

Ph.d. program.

The main components of the Linguistics Ph.D. program are as follows:

  • Course Requirements
  • Language Requirement
  • Generals Papers
  • Dissertation
  • Extra Funding Availability

All requirements, including two generals papers, should ideally be completed by the end of the third year, but in no case later than the end of the fourth. The dissertation prospectus is due on October 15 of the fall term of the fourth year. Failure to meet program requirements in a timely fashion may result in termination of candidacy. 

First-year students are advised by the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) until they select a major field from the regular departmental faculty. Thereafter, progress toward completion of the Ph.D. requirements continues to be monitored by the DGS, but primary responsibility for overseeing study shifts to the major advisor. Students are free to change their major advisor at any time. By the end of the second year they should also select a co-advisor, who serves as a secondary advisor and faculty mentor.

Harvard Linguistics Graduate Student Handbook

Progress to the Degree (updated 7/1/2015)

A B+ average must be maintained in each year of graduate study. Grades below B- cannot be counted toward departmental requirements; two grades below B- in required courses will result in termination of candidacy. Ordinarily, a grade of Incomplete can only be converted into a letter grade if the work is made up before the end of the following term. No grade of Incomplete can be used to satisfy a departmental requirement.   No two programs of study are alike, but students should typically plan to complete the requirements for the degree according to the timetable below. Departures from this schedule must be approved by the main advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies.   Years G1 and G2: Course requirements are satisfied. By the end of the G2 year, the first generals paper should be well underway.   Year G3: Teaching duties begin. The first generals paper should be defended before the end of the fall term, and the second generals paper by the end of the spring term.   Year G4: Teaching duties continue. A thesis prospectus, naming a dissertation committee, is due on October 15 of the fall term; the committee must be chaired or co-chaired by a member of the Department of Linguistics and must include at least two members of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dissertation Completion Fellowship applications are due at midyear.   Year G5: The thesis is completed and defended in the spring.

A.M. Degree  (updated 7/1/2015)

Graduate students who have completed two years of residence, who have fulfilled all the course requirements and language requirements for the Ph.D., and who have successfully defended one Generals paper, are eligible to petition for a Master’s (A.M.) degree.  

Note that there is no master’s program in Linguistics.                     

  • Courses 2023-24 (Subject to change)
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Course Descriptions

Full course descriptions, fall 2023 courses, fall 2023 course schedule, spring 2024 courses, spring 2024 course schedule, american sign language (asl) at harvard.

phd programs linguistics

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PhD in Linguistics

  • MA in Linguistics
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Aims of the PhD

Human language is a multifaceted phenomenon. It is simultaneously a property of individual minds and of whole speech communities, and thus both internal and external to us. It both shapes and is shaped by our societies over time. It is a combination of sound (or sign), which has physical properties that can be measured, and meaning, which does not. Accordingly, becoming a linguistic researcher involves mastering a variety of methods, both quantitative and qualitative. The PhD in Linguistics at BU aims to produce scholars who are versatile enough to be experts in both of these aspects of linguistic inquiry, yet skilled enough to do cutting-edge research in a particular subfield of the discipline. We offer a solid grounding in a range of research methods, including field methods, quantitative methods, and computational methods.

Learning Outcomes

Students graduating with a PhD in Linguistics will demonstrate:

  • broad knowledge of the discipline
  • deeper knowledge in a specialized area or subfield
  • ability to carry out a significant piece of independent research (which implies knowledge of and ability to use research methodologies in order to complete the research)

Prerequisites

The GRE (Graduate Record Examination) is not required to apply.

Entering students are expected to have completed introductory classes in: 

  • phonetics/phonology (e.g., GRS LX 601)
  • syntax (e.g., GRS LX 621)
  • semantics/pragmatics (e.g., GRS LX 631)

Students who do not have sufficient background in linguistics must complete additional coursework to fulfill the above prerequisites prior to entry or during the first year. Note: if completed at BU, GRS LX 601, 621, and 631 will not count toward the PhD course requirements.

Admissions & Funding

The deadline for application to enter the program in Fall 2023 is January 6, 2023.  Information about the graduate admissions process ( including the application process and requirements ) is available at the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences (GRS) website:

We anticipate being able to admit about five students per year. All admitted students will receive full coverage of tuition costs plus a fellowship for five years. For further information about funding, consult the GRS website above.

Requirements

Course requirements.

The PhD requires successful completion of 64 credits at the graduate level, including three core courses: 

  • GRS LX 703 Phonological Analysis
  • GRS LX 722 Intermediate Syntax
  • GRS LX 732 Intermediate Semantics

Six additional courses from the four areas below, with two courses each in two of the areas, and one course each in the remaining two areas:

  • advanced phonetics, phonology, or morphology (e.g., GRS LX 706)
  • advanced syntax, semantics, or pragmatics (e.g., GRS LX 723, 736)
  • linguistic research methodology
  • language acquisition or socio-historical linguistics

A 4-credit graduate proseminar sequence (GRS LX 801 & 802) is typically taken in the second year.

Finally, six additional courses (including up to 8 credits of directed study) are taken in Linguistics or related fields that comprise a specialization , which will generally be in the area of the dissertation. These courses will be decided upon by the student in conjunction with their advisor, whose approval is required.

Language Requirement

The PhD requires demonstration of graduate-level reading proficiency in two foreign languages (one of which may be English, for non-native speakers) by the end of the third year of enrollment.

These proficiencies can be demonstrated through any of:

  • a language examination
  • successful completion of a non-credit graduate-level foreign language reading course offered at BU
  • the equivalent of two years of undergraduate study of the language at BU (or successful completion of any higher-level language course taught in the language)

Graduate-level foreign language reading courses offered at BU include:

  • GRS LF 621 Reading French for Graduate Students
  • GRS LG 621 Reading German for Graduate Students
  • GRS LI 621 Reading Italian for Graduate Students
  • GRS LS 621 Reading Spanish for Graduate Students

Qualifying Examinations

To advance to candidacy, students must satisfactorily complete and defend two substantial research papers in different areas of the field (the first by the end of the fourth semester, the second by the end of the sixth semester of enrollment).

Each Qualifying Paper (QP) will be planned and carried out under the supervision of a Linguistics faculty member with expertise appropriate to the relevant project and, upon completion, will be defended orally and approved by an examining committee, composed of the first and second reader as well as a third faculty member determined by the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) in consultation with the student.

A brief proposal for each QP must be submitted, with signed approval of a first and second reader (who have been approved by the DGS and who have agreed to advise the student on the proposed project), by October 15 of the academic year in which the project is to be completed. For the second QP, a topic approval form, in which the student explains how the second QP differs from their first QP, must also be submitted, in advance of the proposal approval form.

Dissertation and Final Oral Examination

PhD candidates will demonstrate their abilities for independent study in a dissertation representing original research or creative scholarship.

A prospectus for the dissertation must be completed and approved by the readers, the DGS, and the Department Chair.

Candidates must undergo a final oral examination in which they defend their dissertation as a valuable contribution to knowledge in their field and demonstrate a mastery of their field of specialization in relation to their dissertation.

All portions of the dissertation and final oral examination must be completed as outlined in the GRS general requirements for the PhD degree:

Director of Graduate Studies

Co-Directors of Graduate Admissions

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The UCLA Linguistics Department’s normal business hours are M-F 8am-12pm, 1-4pm. Office schedule and availability may change based on UCLA protocol ( www.covid-19.ucla.edu). Masks are optional but strongly recommended indoors. All UCLA affiliates and visitors must self-screen for symptoms before coming to campus.

UCLA

The Department of Linguistics

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Graduate Student Support

Courses and degree requirements.

  • Getting in touch with us

UCLA’s Linguistics Department began as an interdepartmental graduate M.A. program in 1960; a Ph.D. program was introduced in 1962, and a B.A. program in 1965. The department was established in 1966, and has flourished ever since.

At the undergraduate level , the department currently administers twelve majors: Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Linguistics and Anthropology, Linguistics and Asian Languages and Cultures, Linguistics and Computer Science, Linguistics and English, Linguistics and French, Linguistics and Italian, Linguistics and Philosophy, Linguistics and Psychology, Linguistics and Scandinavian Languages, and Linguistics and Spanish. The department also offers a linguistics minor and a Specialization in Computing.

At the graduate level , the department offers M.A. and Ph.D. degree programs in Linguistics, and its faculty participate in interdepartmental Ph.D. programs in  Biomedical Engineering , American Indian Studies , Asia Insititute and African Studies . Our faculty and graduate program are internationally acclaimed, and we attract some of the best and brightest graduate students from this country and abroad, with a current graduate student population of between 40 students from ten countries.

The goal of the UCLA Linguistics Department’s program is to provide a basic education in the nature of human language and linguistic theory for undergraduates, and to train graduate students as university teachers and as researchers in the major areas of linguistics.

Theoretical Orientation

The department has a strong theoretical orientation committed to research in formal linguistic theory, addressing questions in the fields of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, and at the interfaces of these fields with the fields of psycholinguistics, computational linguistics, mathematical linguistics, historical linguistics, and the linguistic study of particular language areas (especially African languages and American Indian languages). A number of factors distinguish the UCLA linguistics department from other departments with similar emphases.

Linguistics as an empirical science uses cross-linguistic evidence to develop and test theories of human language. In keeping with this goal, the UCLA program is committed to training its graduate students to analyze primary data in the Field Methods sequence, in which the students work with a native speaker consultant of a little-studied language. Substantial opportunities to develop fieldwork skills and to test theoretical ideas against novel data are provided, along with department funding for native speaker consultants. Several of the faculty have long experience in fieldwork and provide practical guidance to students embarking on their own field study. Los Angeles is probably the most linguistically diverse city in the United States, thus providing a living laboratory for field work research.

Graduate Student Career Development

The UCLA Linguistics Department emphasizes the development of professional skills among its graduate students, particularly in presenting their own research at conferences and for publication. The present department budget offers travel funding for students to present papers whose work has been accepted for presentation at regional, national, and international conferences. The department also offers some funding to its graduate students to pay for native speaker consultants, experimental subjects, and other research expenses.

The Linguistics Department undertakes to provide support packages for all the students that it admits, with a support commitment five years, subject to maintenance of satisfactory academic standing. All support packages include the cost of tuition, fees, and a salary or living stipend; consult the department for current stipend levels. Almost all support packages involve a mixture of fellowship, Research Apprenticeship (RA), and Teaching Apprenticeship (TA) positions, spread out over the five year period.

We admit only as many students as can be supported. Prospective applicants should apply for an extramural fellowship (such as a Mellon Fellowship , Jacob K. Javits Fellowship , or National Science Foundation Fellowships (NSF) ; or an equivalent type of fellowship from another country, such as the Canadian SSHRC  fellowship) where possible. Prospective applicants who have been granted such fellowships generally have an excellent chance of admission.

Available financial awards vary from year to year. The following outlines the principal sources:

Fellowships

UCLA Fellowships – Pauley Fellowships, Cota-Robles Fellowships, and Departmental Fellowships are combined with a mixture of TA and RA appointments to make up the full support package. All students who have been advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. are also eligible to apply for Dissertation-year Fellowships for their fifth year; these are awarded on a competitive (university-wide) basis. In recent years UCLA Linguistics graduate students have had considerable success in winning these fellowships.

National Resource Fellowships (Title VI) –for language and area studies: e.g. Africa, the Near East, Latin America, East Asia. Applications are selected by the relevant area studies centers and the department. (For information see the admissions packet.) Title VI fellowships require students to enroll for one 4-unit course per quarter in the relevant language area and include a stipend which is supplemented by additional departmental support (RAship, TAship, etc.) to bring them up to the general annual support level.

Teaching Apprenticeships

These are awarded to students on the basis of admissions fellowship commitments, timely progress in graduate work, student specialization, and need. They are normally available only to students in the second year of graduate study and beyond.

Upper Division Undergraduate Courses , some of which may be taken by students to make up deficiencies, include courses in phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, syntactic typology and universals, language change, child language acquisition, psycholinguistics, and language disorders.

Graduate Courses   cover every major area of linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, morphology, psycholinguistics, computational linguistics, field methods, historical linguistics, and language areas and language structures.

Proseminars  are advanced graduate special-topics courses in the areas mentioned above. Most faculty offer proseminar courses in their area approximately once per year, often on the topic of their current research.

Area Seminars are informal talk series, meeting once per week, in which faculty and students present their current research to colleagues for comment and discussion. Currently, there are active area seminars in phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, psycholinguistics, and Native American languages.

Additional courses in various topics, including thesis preparation, college teaching practicum and practical phonetics, are also regularly offered.

Degree Requirements

Although the department offers both the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, each with its own set of requirements, completion of the M.A. degree is normally just a milestone towards the completion of the Ph.D. requirements. We normally admit students to the graduate program only if they have the Ph.D. as their ultimate degree objective, and new graduate students are normally admitted directly into the Ph.D. program, regardless of whether they have already completed an M.A. elsewhere.

Furthermore, all students, including those who already have an M.A. degree, are normally expected to complete all of the M.A. degree requirements at UCLA, as part of the normal progress toward the Ph.D. The M.A. requirements include six obligatory core courses, three additional courses selected by the student from a list of survey courses covering various areas of the field, and completion of an M.A. thesis or M.A. paper (an original work of research of approximately 50 double-spaced pages). Students who choose to withdraw from the program and who wish to receive a terminal M.A. degree may elect to undergo a comprehensive oral exam instead of completing an M.A. paper.

The Ph.D. requirements involve taking a few additional courses, including our two-quarter sequence in Field Methods and various seminar and proseminar courses selected by the student. Other requirements include delivering a department colloquium , and completion of the Ph.D. dissertation.

Typical Progress

Most of our students take about five years to complete the full graduate program. Of course, students’ backgrounds and work patterns are diverse; some take less time and others take more.

Since the normal course load for graduate students is three courses per quarter, it is usually possible for students to complete all or most of the M.A. course requirements within the first year of the program. Students who enter the program with deficiencies in certain areas may need to take longer to satisfy the M.A. course requirements, since they may have to enroll in certain upper-division undergraduate courses during their first year.

All students must have completed the M.A. paper and all other M.A. requirements by the end of the spring quarter of the second year. Third-year students are encouraged to explore the field, take advanced seminars, prepare original research for publication or presentation at conferences, etc.

By the end of the third year, students should have a good idea of the area they plan to concentrate on for their dissertation, and they should have a Ph.D. committee assembled before the end of the spring quarter. Fourth years students should be advanced to candidacy before the end of the fall quarter; this entails the completion of all Ph.D. requirements other than the dissertation, including defense of a prospectus of their dissertation in an oral exam conducted by their committee.

The last two quarters of the fourth year, as well as the entire fifth year, is devoted to the completion of the dissertation and job-market activities.

More details about the graduate sequence can be found here .

Click on the links below for descriptions of department research facilities.

  • Language Acquisition Lab
  • Language Processing Laboratory
  • Phonetics Laboratory
  • Psycholinguistics Lab

We have a conference room on the second floor (2122) and a lounge on the third floor (3103C). Each floor has its own seminar room (the Syntax/Semantics Seminar Room in 3103D, the Phonetics Lab in 2101K).

Other resources

The strong research culture of the UCLA Linguistics Department is supported in many tangible ways by the department and by the university:

  • Free statistics consulting on campus
  • Free poster printer
  • Experimental subject pool
  • Phonetics Lab staff engineer
  • Weekly research group seminar meetings
  • Access to undergraduate RAs
  • Access to laboratory facilities
  • Staff assistance with IRB applications

and specifically for grad students:

  • Funding for subjects/consultants
  • Ladefoged Scholarship (research support for grad students)
  • Funding for conference travel
  • Experimental methods courses offered in both phonetics and psycholinguistics
  • A Professional Development course (Ling. 444)

In addition, the Linguistics Department maintains a  department library , and provides office space to its graduate students.

The library system at UCLA, with over nine million volumes and extensive online offerings, is ranked in the top ten university libraries in the United States, and has strong collections in linguistics and language description.

Getting In Touch With Us

For information about applying to our graduate program, please visit our Graduate Admissions Information page.

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Linguistics, PhD

The Ph.D. program in Linguistics at Penn embraces a wide range of theoretical specializations and methodologies. What unites them is a commitment to careful and explicit formal analysis of the human capacity for learning and using language.

The core of our program is the formal generative tradition, but we encourage the cross-fertilization that results from the confrontation of empirical and theoretical perspectives on language structure. By our close collaboration with other programs (such as computer science and psychology) we promote an awareness of the broad view of language that interdisciplinary study induces. In addition to broad training, students are offered and expected to master the methods and results of their chosen areas of concentration in linguistics as a prerequisite to fruitful engagement in dialogue with others, both within and outside the program.

For more information: https://www.ling.upenn.edu/graduate/

View the University’s Academic Rules for PhD Programs .

Required Courses

The total course units required for graduation is 20. A minimum of 12 course units must be taken at the University of Pennsylvania.

The degree and major requirements displayed are intended as a guide for students entering in the Fall of 2023 and later. Students should consult with their academic program regarding final certifications and requirements for graduation.

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phd programs linguistics

Yale Linguistics

Graduate Studies

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Graduate studies.

Our PhD program takes a distinctively integrative and interdisciplinary approach in investigating the systems of knowledge that comprise our linguistic competence. Students are exposed to different methodological approaches, while receiving firm grounding in the traditional domains of linguistics.

Our faculty supports our graduate students in their pursuit of academic and non-academic positions. We regularly offer workshops on professional skills and the job market application process. Most of our PhD students graduate in 5 to 8 years, with an average of 6.5 years. As of March 2019, a bout two thirds of our graduates from the last 10 years have jobs in academia (66% of those have long-term appointments, and the remaining 33% have postdocs and temporary positions). Of the remaining one third who do not have a teaching or research academic position, half of the rest have industry jobs related to linguistics (at companies such as Google); others have a variety of jobs, including academic administration and educational outreach.

PhD students work closely with a faculty adviser to develop their dissertation project, but all faculty in the department provide mentorship to some degree. The Yale GSAS Guide to Advising Processes for Faculty and Students provides good guidelines for mentoring relationships from the student and faculty point of view. 

PhD students in the program are provided financial support for up to 6 years of study, consisting of full tuition, stipend support, and comprehensive health care coverage. The department and university also provide financial support for travel to conferences and workshops. Generous funding for fieldwork and other overseas research is available through Yale’s MacMillan Center .

Interested students can find more information on applying to the program on our website.

Director of Graduate Studies

Any questions about the graduate program can be directed to the DGS, Jim Wood, at jim.wood@yale.edu

Jim Wood's picture

Photo of student waving Cal flag

Linguistics PhD

The program emphasizes intellectual breadth and connections integrating many areas of Linguistics, as well as connections with neighboring disciplines.

Faculty expertise in the department spans an unusually diverse range of endeavors. The graduate program accordingly includes a broad range of advanced coursework focusing on analyzing linguistic structure, variation and change, and cognition, using methods including archival research, field methods, experimental and corpus-based analyses, and computational modeling.

The Linguistics department has strong commitments to language documentation and reclamation, theoretical training and research, and the interdisciplinary study of language and cognition. Graduate students in the Linguistics department are eligible to apply to two Graduate Designated Emphases : the Designated Emphasis in Indigenous Language Revitalization , and the Designated Emphasis in Cognitive Science .

The department has an excellent record of placing graduates in professional careers in academia, in private industry (e.g. research and development, technology), and non-profit organizations.

Contact Info

[email protected]

1203 Dwinelle Hall

Berkeley, CA 94720

At a Glance

Department(s)

Linguistics

Admit Term(s)

Application Deadline

December 1, 2023

Degree Type(s)

Doctoral / PhD

Degree Awarded

GRE Requirements

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Berkeley Berkeley Academic Guide: Academic Guide 2023-24

Linguistics.

University of California, Berkeley

About the Program

The program emphasizes intellectual breadth and connections integrating many areas of Linguistics, as well as connections with neighboring disciplines.  

Faculty expertise in the department spans an unusually diverse range of endeavors. The graduate program accordingly includes a broad range of advanced coursework focusing on analyzing linguistic structure, variation and change, and cognition, using methods including archival research, field methods, experimental and corpus-based analyses, and computational modeling.

The Linguistics department has strong commitments to language documentation and reclamation, theoretical training and research, and the interdisciplinary study of language and cognition. Graduate students in the Linguistics department are eligible to apply to two Graduate Designated Emphases : the Designated Emphasis in Indigenous Language Revitalization , and the  Designated Emphasis in Cognitive Science .

The department has an excellent record of placing graduates in professional careers in academia, in private industry (e.g. research and development, technology), and non-profit organizations.

Visit Department Website

Admission to the University

Applying for graduate admission.

Thank you for considering UC Berkeley for graduate study! UC Berkeley offers more than 120 graduate programs representing the breadth and depth of interdisciplinary scholarship. A complete list of graduate academic departments, degrees offered, and application deadlines can be found on the Graduate Division website .

Prospective students must submit an online application to be considered for admission, in addition to any supplemental materials specific to the program for which they are applying. The online application can be found on the Graduate Division website .

Admission Requirements

The minimum graduate admission requirements are:

A bachelor’s degree or recognized equivalent from an accredited institution;

A satisfactory scholastic average, usually a minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) on a 4.0 scale; and

Enough undergraduate training to do graduate work in your chosen field.

For a list of requirements to complete your graduate application, please see the Graduate Division’s Admissions Requirements page . It is also important to check with the program or department of interest, as they may have additional requirements specific to their program of study and degree. Department contact information can be found here .

Where to apply?

Visit the Berkeley Graduate Division application page .

Departmental Requirements

In additional to the general materials required by the University we ask that you include:

Writing Sample : A writing sample is required of all applicants. Ideally, this sample would be a research paper on a linguistic topic, but it should in any event demonstrate the applicant's competence in writing analytic expository prose. The writing sample is to be submitted/uploaded with your online application.

For detailed information as to what we are looking for please go to our website at Linguistics .

Doctoral Degree Requirements

All students in the Department of Linguistics graduate program, including those holding a  Master’s degree from another institution, must earn a Berkeley MA in Linguistics en route to the  PhD.

Research training is part of the MA/PhD program from the start. As part of the MA phase of the program, students write an MA Capstone Paper. The MA Capstone Paper represents a piece of original research, undertaken with guidance from two faculty members. After the MA and before advancing to PhD candidacy, students write a PhD Qualifying Paper, with guidance from two additional faculty members. Throughout the program, students participate in professional activities, including research, writing, and presenting their work at conferences.

The usual timeline of program milestones, including both the MA and PhD portions is as follows:

Year 1: Research training and coursework.  This includes  LINGUIS 200 (Graduate Proseminar). Towards the end of the year, a required MA Capstone Planning Meeting with (at least) two faculty members launches students into working on their MA Capstone Paper.

Year 2: Continued training and coursework. Completion of MA Capstone Paper.

Year 3: LINGUIS 201 (Advanced Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics), PhD Qualifying Paper and Qualifying Exam . Advancement to PhD candidacy.

Year 4: Annotated Bibliography and Dissertation Prospectus + Prospectus Review, begin dissertation writing.

Year 5 (and 6):  Continue Dissertation Writing + Dissertation Committee Meetings

The MA Course Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of 24 semester units of graduate coursework in Linguistics, which include the Proseminar LINGUIS 200 , two Methods courses (any two of LINGUIS 240A , LINGUIS 240B , LINGUIS 260 Statistical Methods, or LINGUIS 252 Computational Modeling), and at least one course each from four of the five bins shown below.  

To find more specific information and details about our PhD, please review our Department website and the Grad Program Webpage .

LINGUIS 200 Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 Required of graduate students during first year in program. An introduction to linguistics as a profession, its history, subfields, and methodologies. Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics: Read More [+]

Hours & Format

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of seminar per week

Additional Format: Two hours of Seminar per week for 15 weeks.

Additional Details

Subject/Course Level: Linguistics/Graduate

Grading: Offered for satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade only.

Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 201 Advanced Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 The course is designed to help students become professional linguists by showing them how to write abstracts of papers, how to prepare papers for presentation at conferences, and how to prepare written versions of papers for submission as qualifying papers (and for journal publication), as well as to give students practical experience in the public presentation of their work. Advanced Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics: Read More [+]

Rules & Requirements

Prerequisites: M.A. requirements should be completed or instructor approval

Advanced Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 201A Second-Year Proseminar in Linguistics 1 Unit

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014 The goal of the course is to help second-year graduate students navigate the graduate program and develop professional skills. Second-Year Proseminar in Linguistics: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Second-year standing (or equivalent) in the Linguistics graduate program

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1 hour of seminar per week

Additional Format: One hour of Seminar per week for 15 weeks.

Second-Year Proseminar in Linguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 201B Advanced Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2015, Fall 2014 The course is designed to help students become professional linguists by showing them how to write abstracts of papers, how to prepare papers for presentation at conferences, and how to prepare written versions of papers for submission as qualifying papers (and for journal publication), as well as to give students practical experience in the public presentation of their work. Advanced Graduate Proseminar in Linguistics: Read More [+]

Credit Restrictions: Course must be taken at the beginning of graduate student's third year.

Formerly known as: Linguistics 201

LINGUIS 205 Advanced Cognitive Linguistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Spring 2018 This will be an advanced course in cognitive linguistics. Among the topics covered will be cognitive bases for aspects of grammatical structure, cognitive constraints on language change and grammaticalization, and motivations for linguistic universals (i.e., constraints on variability). Advanced Cognitive Linguistics: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 105. Graduate standing or consent of instructor

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week

Additional Format: Three hours of Lecture per week for 15 weeks.

Grading: Letter grade.

Advanced Cognitive Linguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 208 Advanced Psycholinguistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Fall 2019, Spring 2019 This is a graduate-level introduction to psycholinguistics. This course provides an overview of key questions and research findings in psycholinguistics. Psycholinguistics focuses on the mechanisms underlying human language production and comprehension. Central to psycholinguistics is the formulation of conceptual and computational models of those mechanisms. Advanced Psycholinguistics: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Linguistics or consent of the instructor

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of seminar per week

Additional Format: Three hours of seminar per week.

Instructors: Gahl, Johnson

Advanced Psycholinguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 210 Advanced Phonetics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Fall 2021, Spring 2020 A reading course focusing on theories of speech production, perception, and acoustics as they relate to phonetic and phonological patterns found in the languages of the world. Students write 5-8 "responses" to target articles, and the class as a whole reads background articles and books that place the target articles into their context. Advanced Phonetics: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Linguistics 110. Graduate standing or consent of instructor

Additional Format: Three hours of Seminar per week for 15 weeks.

Advanced Phonetics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 211A Advanced Phonology I 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2023, Spring 2022 Introduction to phonological theory at the graduate level with an emphasis on cross-linguistic phonological patterns. Advanced Phonology I: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Linguistics 111. Graduate standing or consent of instructor

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture per week.

Advanced Phonology I: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 211B Advanced Phonology II 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2021, Fall 2020 Continuation of 211A focusing on topics of current interest in phonological theory. Advanced Phonology II: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Linguistics 211A

Advanced Phonology II: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 213 Advanced Experimental Phonetics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2019, Spring 2016 The goal of this course is to provide graduate students with advanced practical training in experimental methods within phonetics. This is a rotating topics course. The specific techniques taught will depend on the instructor. Advanced Experimental Phonetics: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Graduate student status or consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Instructors: Lin, Johnson

Advanced Experimental Phonetics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 215 Advanced Morphology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2018, Fall 2015 Examination of complex morphological systems. Issues in the theory of word morphology. Advanced Morphology: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 211A. Graduate standing or consent of instructor

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Advanced Morphology: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 220A Advanced Syntax I 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 This course aims at developing a solid conceptual, analytical, and empirical foundation for doing research in syntax and semantics. The emphasis is on gaining familiarity with the central empirical phenomena, as well as core theoretical notions, methodology, and argumentation. Advanced Syntax I: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor

Advanced Syntax I: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 220B Advanced Syntax II 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2022, Spring 2021 This course continues 220A with an in-depth examination of selected syntactic and semantic phenomena and the methods of their analysis. The phonomena investigated varies with each offering of the course. Advanced Syntax II: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Linguistics 220A

Advanced Syntax II: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 221 Advanced Formal Semantics I 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2021, Fall 2018 This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the core principles and empirical issues addressed by formal semantics and to familiarize them with the analytical tools involved in conducting research in this domain. The focus of this class is truth-conditional aspects of meaning and the compositional interpretation of phrases and sentences. Students will develop skills in semantic analysis and argumentation by focusing on semantic questions that arise in the analysis of a range of different phenomena, including quantification, the semantics of definite/indefinite descriptions, and relative clauses. Advanced Formal Semantics I: Read More [+]

Instructor: Deal

Advanced Formal Semantics I: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 221B Advanced Formal Semantics II 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023 Students will continue to be introduced to various foundational issues and results in formal semantics. This course will provide a thorough introduction to intensionality as a phenomenon of natural language, as well as the core techniques and results of intensional (possible-world) semantics and the semantics of tense. In particular, we will examine in depth the semantics of sentential complements, the de re / de dicto distinction, modal auxiliaries, and tense and aspect morphemes. We will pay special attention to the ways that languages may vary with respect to these phenomena. Students will gain exposure to primary literature in the field of semantics through: key course readings, in-class presentations and final research project Advanced Formal Semantics II: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Linguistics 221 or permission of the instructor

Advanced Formal Semantics II: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 222 Advanced Linguistic Typology 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Spring 2021, Spring 2019 This course is a graduate level introduction to linguistic typology that covers quantitative, formal, and functional approaches to the typology of morphosyntactic and phonological phenomena. Students will be introduced to: 1) influential frameworks and tools for typological research including implicational hierarchies, semantic maps, and combinatorial typologies; 2) the status of universals in typology and formal, functional, and diachronic explanations for universals; 3) key topics in typology, including word order correlations and sampling methodology, grammatical relations typology, areal typology, and phonological typology. Advanced Linguistic Typology: Read More [+]

Instructors: Jenks, Michael

Advanced Linguistic Typology: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 225 Construction Grammar: The Relationship Between Thought and Language 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2015 Construction grammar arose in cognitive linguistics from phenomena showing how thought structures language and how language also structures thought, and from grammatical phenomena that could not be accounted for by transformational grammars. Over the past three decades two major theoretical approaches have evolved: One based on embodied cognition results, conceptual metaphor, and the neural modeling of brain mechanisms necessary to account for thought and language; and another theoretical approach that is disembodied, purely formal, and uses feature structures and head-driven grammars. The course will discuss these and other approaches. Construction Grammar: The Relationship Between Thought and Language: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Either Linguistics C105, C106, or 205. Or permission of instructor

Instructor: Lakoff

Construction Grammar: The Relationship Between Thought and Language: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 230 Advanced Comparative and Historical Linguistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Fall 2020 The scholarly tradition of historical and comparative linguistics. Methods of reconstruction. Advanced Comparative and Historical Linguistics: Read More [+]

Advanced Comparative and Historical Linguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 234 Indo-European Linguistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2016, Fall 2013, Spring 2012 A survey of Indo-European (IE) linguistics, intended for general linguists interested in learning about the most fully developed sub-area of historical linguistics and for language-area specialists interested in how specific language areas relate to IE as a whole. All areas of the field will be surveyed (phonology, morphology, syntax, lexical semantics, cultural reconstruction, and subgrouping and diversification), with special emphasis on issues of broad current research interest. Indo-European Linguistics: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: An introductory historical linguistics course or a good knowledge of an older Indo-European language

Additional Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week.

Indo-European Linguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 240A Advanced Field Methods 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Fall 2021, Fall 2020 Training in elicitation and analysis of linguistic data in a simulated field setting. The same language is used throughout the year. Linguistics 240B is the continuation of 240A. Advanced Field Methods: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Linguistics 211A and Linguistics 220A. Graduate standing or consent of instructor

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 4 hours of session per week

Additional Format: Four hours of session per week.

Advanced Field Methods: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 240B Advanced Field Methods 4 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Spring 2021 Training in elicitation and analysis of linguistic data in a simulated field setting. The same language is used throughout the year. Linguistics 240B is the continuation of 240A. Advanced Field Methods: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Linguistics 240A

LINGUIS 243 Language, Computation, and Cognition 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Spring 2021 This course provides a graduate-level introduction to the relation of language and cognition, through the lens of computation. We will explore universal aspects of cognition that underlie language, and the effect of one's native language on cognition. We will do this by: (1) reading a mixture of classic and recent papers on these issues,(2) replicating or extending computational analyses in those papers,(3) identifying interesting questions that are left open by the material covered, and (4) designing and conducting research to answer those open questions. Language, Computation, and Cognition: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Graduate students in linguistics or one of the other cognitive sciences or consent of instructor

Instructor: Regier

Formerly known as: Linguistics 290R

Language, Computation, and Cognition: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 245 Anthropological Linguistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2016, Spring 2010 Graduate level survey of anthropological linguistics which seeks to understand the role of culture in linguistic meaning, language use, and the development of linguistic form and, conversely, the role of linguistic form and structure in social action and in cultural practices. Anthropological Linguistics: Read More [+]

Instructor: Michael

Anthropological Linguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 250A Sociolinguistic Analysis: Variation 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2008 This series of courses is designed to give graduate students in linguistics and related fields advanced training in current theories and methods in sociolinguistics. The five courses (Variation; Language Contact; Language and Gender; Conversation/Discourse Analysis; Endangered Languages) represent five major foci of current sociolinguistic interest. Students will be exposed to historical overviews, readings, discussions, and demonstrations of methods and will be expected to do original field research, the results of which are to be presented orally and in a 15- to 25-page research paper. Sociolinguistic Analysis: Variation: Read More [+]

Instructor: Bleaman

Sociolinguistic Analysis: Variation: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 250B Sociolinguistic Analysis: Language Contact 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2008 This series of courses is designed to give graduate students in linguistics and related fields advanced training in current theories and methods in sociolinguistics. The five courses (Variation; Language Contact; Language and Gender; Conversation/Discourse Analysis; Endangered Languages) represent five major foci of current sociolinguistic interest. Students will be exposed to historical overviews, readings, discussions, and demonstrations of methods and will be expected to do original field research, the results of which are to be presented orally and in a 15- to 25-page research paper. Sociolinguistic Analysis: Language Contact: Read More [+]

Instructors: R. Lakoff, Michael

Sociolinguistic Analysis: Language Contact: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 250C Sociolinguistic Analysis: Language and Gender 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2009, Spring 2005 This series of courses is designed to give graduate students in linguistics and related fields advanced training in current theories and methods in sociolinguistics. The five courses (Variation; Language Contact; Language and Gender; Conversation/Discourse Analysis; Endangered Languages) represent five major foci of current sociolinguistic interest. Students will be exposed to historical overviews, readings, discussions, and demonstrations of methods and will be expected to do original field research, the results of which are to be presented orally and in a 15- to 25-page research paper. Sociolinguistic Analysis: Language and Gender: Read More [+]

Sociolinguistic Analysis: Language and Gender: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 250D Sociolinguistic Analysis: Conversation/Discourse Analysis 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Fall 2009, Fall 2007 This series of courses is designed to give graduate students in linguistics and related fields advanced training in current theories and methods in sociolinguistics. The five courses (Variation; Language Contact; Language and Gender; Conversation/Discourse Analysis; Endangered Languages) represent five major foci of current sociolinguistic interest. Students will be exposed to historical overviews, readings, discussions, and demonstrations of methods and will be expected to do original field research, the results of which are to be presented orally and in a 15- to 25-page research paper. Sociolinguistic Analysis: Conversation/Discourse Analysis: Read More [+]

Sociolinguistic Analysis: Conversation/Discourse Analysis: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 250E Sociolinguistic Analysis: Endangered Languages 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2008 This series of courses is designed to give graduate students in linguistics and related fields advanced training in current theories and methods in sociolinguistics. The five courses (Variation; Language Contact; Language and Gender; Conversation/Discourse Analysis; Endangered Languages) represent five major foci of current sociolinguistic interest. Students will be exposed to historical overviews, readings, discussions, and demonstrations of methods and will be expected to do original field research, the results of which are to be presented orally and in a 15- to 25-page research paper. Sociolinguistic Analysis: Endangered Languages: Read More [+]

Sociolinguistic Analysis: Endangered Languages: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 251 Indigenous Language Revitalization: Contexts, Methods, Outcomes 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2019 This course provides consistent engagement with indigenous languages, speakers, and texts. It gives an overview of historical and social contexts that produce language endangerment and loss; definitions and debates over terms and methods associated with language revitalization; ethical and methodological issues in language revitalization work; practical skills in language documentation and linguistic analysis; and case studies and outcomes in language revitalization. Indigenous Language Revitalization: Contexts, Methods, Outcomes: Read More [+]

Indigenous Language Revitalization: Contexts, Methods, Outcomes: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS C251A Indigenous Language Revitalization: Contexts, Methods, Outcomes 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2022 This is the core course for graduate students who intend to complete the interdisciplinary Designate Emphasis in Indigenous Language Revitalization, and is open to non-DE graduate students as well. The course will provide consistent engagement with indigenous languages, speakers, and texts. The course will provide an overview of historical and social contexts that produce language endangerment and loss; definitions and debates over terms and methods associated with language revitalization; ethical and methodological issues in language revitalization work; practical skills in language documentation and linguistic analysis; and case studies and outcomes in language revitalization. Indigenous Language Revitalization: Contexts, Methods, Outcomes: Read More [+]

Instructor: Baquedano-Lopez

Also listed as: EDUC C251A

LINGUIS 252 COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2021 This course provides a graduate-level introduction to computational linguistics. We will explore computational principles and methods that cross-cut different branches of linguistics, and will apply those principles to replicate and extend computational analyses in a selection of published papers. COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS: Read More [+]

Objectives & Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes: Familiarity with computational principles and methods in linguistics, and experience in conducting computational analyses.

Prerequisites: The course is open to graduate students in linguistics or related disciplines. Access for other students is by permission of instructor. Some basic prior experience with programming is necessary, but no prior experience with computational linguistics is required. Starter code for homework assignments will be provided, giving students a basis on which to build further. Programming will be in Python

Instructor: REGIER

COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 253 Language Contact 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007 This course is an introduction to the study of the linguistic and social phenomena that arise when speakers of different languages come in contact with one another, or when a community of speakers makes use of multiple languages. We will attend closely both to the grammatical dimensions of language contact processes and outcomes, and to the socio-historical and cultural conditions under which these processes take place. A major focus of the course will be to critically examine the notion that language contact gives rise to a set of clearly distinguishable language types (pidgins, creoles, and mixed languages), as well as the notion that each of these types arise under determinate socio-historical conditions. Language Contact: Read More [+]

Credit Restrictions: Students will receive no credit for LINGUIS 253 after completing LINGUIS 253 . A deficient grade in LINGUIS 253 may be removed by taking LINGUIS 253 .

Language Contact: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 255 Advanced Sociolinguistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Spring 2023, Spring 2022 This course is a graduate-level introduction to the major theories and methodologies of sociolinguistics, which addresses the relationship between linguistic structure and the social and cultural contexts in which language is embedded. The course focuses on the variationist tradition but includes readings from allied areas (linguistic anthropology, the sociology of language, etc.). Advanced Sociolinguistics: Read More [+]

Advanced Sociolinguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 256 Advanced Sociolinguistics: Variation 3 Units

Terms offered: Prior to 2007 This course addresses the theoretical status and grammatical locus of sociolinguistic variation and develops practical research skills in the quantitative analysis of sociolinguistic variables. Advanced Sociolinguistics: Variation: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: LINGUIS 255 or permission of instructor (graduate standing)

Advanced Sociolinguistics: Variation: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 270 Structure of a Particular Language 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2018, Spring 2015 An analysis of the language structure of a particular language. The language investigated changes from year to year. Structure of a Particular Language: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 211A and 220A

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 3 hours of session per week

Additional Format: Three hours of Session per week for 15 weeks.

Structure of a Particular Language: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 290A Topics in Linguistic Theory: Syntax 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2016, Spring 2016 Seminars or special lecture courses. Topics in Linguistic Theory: Syntax: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Topics in Linguistic Theory: Syntax: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 290B Topics in Linguistic Theory: Semantics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2015 Seminars or special lecture courses. Topics in Linguistic Theory: Semantics: Read More [+]

Topics in Linguistic Theory: Semantics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 290D Topics in Linguistic Theory: Pragmatics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2020, Fall 2019 Seminars or special lecture courses. Topics in Linguistic Theory: Pragmatics: Read More [+]

Topics in Linguistic Theory: Pragmatics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 290E Topics in Linguistic Theory: Phonology 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2019, Spring 2017 Seminars or special lecture courses. Topics in Linguistic Theory: Phonology: Read More [+]

Topics in Linguistic Theory: Phonology: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 290F Topics in Linguistic Theory: Diachronic Linguistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Fall 2012, Fall 2010 Seminars or special lecture courses. Topics in Linguistic Theory: Diachronic Linguistics: Read More [+]

Topics in Linguistic Theory: Diachronic Linguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 290H Topics in Linguistic Theory: Linguistic Reconstruction 3 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 1999, Fall 1998 Seminars or special lecture courses. Topics in Linguistic Theory: Linguistic Reconstruction: Read More [+]

Topics in Linguistic Theory: Linguistic Reconstruction: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 290L Additional Seminar on Special Topics to Be Announced 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2021, Fall 2020 Seminar or special lecture courses on linguistic topics. Additional Seminar on Special Topics to Be Announced: Read More [+]

Additional Format: Hours to be arranged.

Additional Seminar on Special Topics to Be Announced: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 290M Topics in Linguistic Theory: Psycholinguistics 3 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2021, Spring 2018 Seminars or special lecture courses. Topics in Linguistic Theory: Psycholinguistics: Read More [+]

Topics in Linguistic Theory: Psycholinguistics: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 297 Research Mentorship 1 - 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019 Mentor undergraduates in research on projects in the subfields of linguistics, sponsored by a faculty member; written report required. Research Mentorship: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 1-2 hours of fieldwork per week

Additional Format: One to two hours of fieldwork per week.

Research Mentorship: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 298 Special Group Study 2 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2024, Fall 2023, Spring 2023 Special Group Study: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: One full year of graduate study at Berkeley or consent of graduate adviser

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-8 hours of seminar per week

Additional Format: Two to eight hours of seminar per week.

Special Group Study: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 299 Special Individual Study 2 - 12 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Spring 2014, Spring 2013 Special Individual Study: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-8 hours of independent study per week

Additional Format: Two to eight hours of independent study per week.

Special Individual Study: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 301 Teaching Practice and Instruction 2 or 4 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 Course may be repeated for credit, but credit for the instructional training portion is to be given only once for each individual course taught by a T.A. For graduate students currently serving as T.A.s in the Department's undergraduate courses. Two units of credit are given for the teaching experience each time a student serving as T.A. enrolls in this course; two more units are given for teaching instruction, this taking the form of weekly consultations between instructors and their T.A.s. Teaching Practice and Instruction: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2-4 hours of independent study per week

Subject/Course Level: Linguistics/Professional course for teachers or prospective teachers

Teaching Practice and Instruction: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 375 Training for Linguistics Teaching Assistants 2 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 A teaching-methods "clinic" for first-time Linguistics GSI's. Sessions will deal with the presentation of linguistic concepts in each of the foundation courses, the creation of homework assignments and examination, policies and practices regarding correction of students' work, grading, and feedback. Training for Linguistics Teaching Assistants: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: 110, 120 and 130 or consent of instructor

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 2 hours of independent study per week

Additional Format: Two 90-minute sections per week.

Formerly known as: Linguistics 302

Training for Linguistics Teaching Assistants: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 601 Individual Study for Master's Students 1 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Fall 2012 Individual study for the comprehensive or language requirements in consultation with the field adviser. Individual Study for Master's Students: Read More [+]

Credit Restrictions: Course does not satisfy unit or residence requirements for master's degree.

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 0 hours of independent study per week

Subject/Course Level: Linguistics/Graduate examination preparation

Individual Study for Master's Students: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 602 Individual Study for Doctoral Students 1 - 8 Units

Terms offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013, Fall 2012 Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read More [+]

Prerequisites: One full year of graduate work at Berkeley or consent of graduate adviser

Credit Restrictions: Course does not satisfy unit or residence requirements for doctoral degree.

Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read Less [-]

LINGUIS 700 Colloquium 0.0 Units

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Fall 2020, Fall 2019 Colloquium lecture presentations by Berkeley faculty and students, and invited visitors, on topics in language and linguistics. Department students and faculty offer feedback, suggestions, and critiques on work in progress. Colloquium: Read More [+]

Fall and/or spring: 15 weeks - 0 hours of colloquium per week

Additional Format: Zero hour of colloquium per week.

Grading: The grading option will be decided by the instructor when the class is offered.

Formerly known as: Linguistics 999

Colloquium: Read Less [-]

Contact Information

Department of linguistics.

1203 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-642-2757

[email protected]

Department Chair

Terry Regier, PhD

1221 Dwinelle Hall

[email protected]

Graduate Student Affairs Officer

Johnny Morales Arellano

1207 Dwinelle Hall

Phone: 510-643-7224

[email protected].

Head Graduate Advisor

Susanne Gahl

1220 Dwinelle Hall

[email protected]

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Educational linguistics, doctor of philosophy (ph.d.), you are here, a pioneering doctoral program with an enduring legacy of research in applied linguistics, language learning, and teaching..

The Educational Linguistics Ph.D. program focuses on language learning and teaching as well as the role of language in education. Our questions and concerns are situated squarely in educational policy and practice, informing and informed by interdisciplinary theory and research in linguistics, anthropology, psychology, sociology, history, and other fields.

What Sets Us Apart

About the program.

Our program promotes the view that language must be examined within the cultural contexts and social situations in which it occurs.

3–4 courses per semester (fall/spring semesters only)

Transfer courses 8 (electives only)

Duration of program 5–7 years

Culminating experience Candidacy examination, and dissertation

Our faculty and students are involved in generating research on language and learning in areas such as:

  • Linguistic, cognitive, and sociocultural aspects of (additional) language development
  • Local and global perspectives on world language teaching policy and practice in K-12 and higher education
  • The intersections of disability, language, school–parent partnerships, and education policy
  • The historical and contemporary manifestation of raciolinguistic ideologies that frame the language practices of racialized communities
  • How multilingual speakers use milimodal communication practices – such as gestures, laughter, actions, and learning materials – to resolve miscommunication
  • How language, social interaction, institutions, and the Internet influence what students learn in schools
  • The role of lanugage in all forms of learning

Our curriculum is designed to provide a solid foundation in linguistics and research methodology. Students customize their education by working with their advisor to choose electives from a wide range of course offerings from across the Penn campus. Introductory courses in language pedagogy and sociolinguistics are strongly encouraged for students with no background in these areas. 

For course descriptions and requirements, visit the  Educational Linguistics Ph.D. program in the University Catalog .

For a full list of courses offered at GSE, visit  Penn’s University Course Catalog .

Sample courses

  • Linguistics in Education                                                                              
  • Sociolinguistics in Education                                                                      
  • Language Diversity and Education                                                             
  • Second Language Development    
  • Genealogies of Race and Language in Educational Research 
  • Issues in Second Language Acquisition                                        
  • Phonology I
  • Citizen Sociolinguistics
  • Classroom Discourse and Interaction
  • Approaches to Teaching English and Other Modern Languages
  • Anthropology & Education
  • Theories of Reading
  • Language in Culture & Society

Our Faculty

Penn GSE Faculty Asif Agha

"I got to work with inspiring scholars doing cutting-edge work. I saw firsthand the process of writing, submitting, and publishing a journal article. I had so many experiences that shaped me as a scholar and that I continue to draw on in my research and academic writing."

Our Graduates

The Educational Linguistics Ph.D. program prepares candidates for teaching and research careers in colleges and universities worldwide, as well as careers in government, community, and private organizations.

Alumni Careers

  • Associate Professor, Columbia Teachers College
  • Assistant Professor, Indiana University
  • Associate Professor, Malmö University
  • Associate Professor, University of Iowa
  • Associate Professor and Chair, Adelphi University
  • Director of Educational Programming and Research, Center for Cultural, Art, Training and Education (CCATE)
  • Senior International Baccalaureate World Schools Manager
  • Assistant Professor of TESOL and Applied Linguistics in the English Department, Illinois State University
  • Research and Evaluation Supervisor, William Penn School District
  • Lecturer in Language Studies, Brown University
  • Founder/CEO, Brilliant Bilingual
  • Associate Professor of Language Education and Urban Social Justice Learning & Teaching, Rutgers University
  • Associate Professor of Teaching and Learning, The Ohio State University
  • Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne
  • Assistant Professor of International Students, College of Charleston
  • Assistant Professor of Linguistics, University of Louisville
  • Assistant Professor, Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Education, University of Colorado, Denver
  • Marie Skłodowska-Curie Postdoctoral Fellow

Admissions & Financial Aid

Please visit our Admissions and Financial Aid pages for specific information on the application requirements , as well as information on tuition, fees, financial aid, scholarships, and fellowships.

Contact us if you have any questions about the program.

Graduate School of Education University of Pennsylvania 3700 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104 (215) 898-6415 [email protected] [email protected]

Erica Poinsett Program Assistant [email protected]

Please view information from our Admissions and Financial Aid Office for specific information on the cost of this program.

All Ph.D. students are guaranteed a full scholarship for their first four years of study, as well as a stipend and student health insurance. Penn GSE is committed to making your graduate education affordable, and we offer generous scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships.

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Dean Strunk weighs in on teacher turnover

Sigal Ben-Porath poses warmly in a professional portrait, with a friendly smile, curly brown hair, and dressed in a blue top with white accents.

Sigal Ben-Porath shares insights for navigating free speech on campus

Ericka S. Weathers, with a warm smile, stands confidently, her braided hair elegantly styled into an updo, complemented by large hoop earrings, a vibrant beaded necklace, and a chic beige blazer, reflected against a glass surface.

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Felix Rosado, the program coordinator for Healing Futures with the Youth Art & Self-empowerment Project (YASP) and an adjunct professor at Chestnut Hill College, delivers a keynote to an audience of high school students in front of a projector screen with his headshot and name on it in a lecture hall.

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phd programs linguistics

Working Papers in Educational Linguistics

Working Papers in Educational Linguistics  is a student-managed journal focused on the many areas of research within educational linguistics.

You May Be Interested In

Related programs.

  • Educational Linguistics Ed.D.
  • Intercultural Communication M.S.Ed.
  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) M.S.Ed.

Related Topics

Graduate Program

The graduate program in Linguistics at Berkeley combines mentoring from faculty members in the department, coursework, research training, and professional development opportunities.

Faculty expertise in the department spans an unusually diverse range of endeavors. The graduate program accordingly includes a broad range of advanced seminars, along with coursework focusing on analyzing linguistic structure (e.g. syntax, semantics, phonology, phonetics), language ecologies (language variation and change, language and cognition), and methods (including field methods, archival research, experimental and corpus-based analyses, and computational modeling).

Graduate students have published their research in numerous journals, including Bilingualism: Language and Cognition , Glossa , Natural Language & Linguistic Theory, The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America , Language Documentation & Conservation , Linguistic Inquiry , and Phonology ; and regularly present their work at conferences, including the Annual Meeting on Phonology , the Manchester Phonology Meeting , New Ways of Analyzing Variation , the Cognitive Science Society Conference , the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing , LabPhon , the Acoustical Society of America Meeting , the Linguistics Society of America ,  NELS , Sinn und Bedeutung , the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas , among others.

Graduate students actively participate in working groups, reading groups, and other activities, including Fieldwork Forum, Phorum, Syntax & Semantics Circle, and TABLE .  These groups contribute to the strength of the program as hubs of intellectual exchange, professional networking, and community building.

Graduate students in the Linguistics department are eligible to apply to two Graduate Designated Emphases : the Designated Emphasis in Indigenous Language Revitalization , and the  Designated Emphasis in Cognitive Science .

Our graduates build exciting careers in research labs, for-profit businesses, non-profits, government agencies, and higher education, among others.

Detailed description

The particulars of this program, describing the exact course requirements, details about the exams and required research papers are available in the  Linguistics Graduate Program description  (updated 2023). This document changes from time to time. Get previous versions of the program description for 2022 ,  2020 ,  2019 ,  2018 , and 2017 .

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Ph.D. in Linguistics

Ph.d. in linguistics (general linguistics track) .

Note that the required courses and language requirement differ between the curriculum instituted Sept. 2018 and the prior curriculum. All other requirements are the same.

1A. Required courses (30 credits): Curriculum instituted Sept. 2018 

One graduate-level course in each of the following sub-disciplines:

  • Syntax: LING 507 “Syntactic Theory I”
  • Sociolinguistics: LING 532 “Sociolinguistics I”
  • Language Processing and Development: LING 541 or 542 (“Language Processing and development I or II”)
  • Phonology LING 552 (“Phonology II”)
  • Phonetics LING 550 (“Introduction to Linguistic Phonetics”)
  • Semantics LING 479 or 579 ("Semantic Theory I or II")

1B. Required courses (35 credits): Prior to Sept. 2018 

  • LING 507 ("Syntax I")
  • LING 508 ("Syntax II")
  • LING 532 ("Sociolinguistics I")
  • LING 551 ("Phonology I")
  • LING 552 ("Phonology II")
  • LING 550 or 553 ("Phonetics I or II")
  • LING 578 or 579 ("Semantics I or II")

If a student has taken an equivalent course elsewhere, the requirement to take this course can be waived. The waiver needs to approved by the faculty in the relevant area and the GPC. Such waivers do not change the total number of credits required by the Graduate School for graduation.

2. Credits of study:

Additional courses for a minimum of 90 credits (27 of which are LING 800) to be determined by specialization and consultation with the advisory committee.

3A. Language knowledge requirement: Curriculum instituted Sept. 2018

General Linguistics Track students must satisfy one natural language requirement for the PhD. The choice of the language needs to be approved by the student’s advisory committee. The language requirement may be satisfied in one of the following three ways:

  • One year of study at the university or community college level. Students who are language instructors in other UW departments can use their language teaching experience to satisfy one language requirement.
  • A major research project that involves significant primary data collection that includes substantial structural analysis and results in a major paper such as a generals paper.

3B. Language knowledge requirement: Prior to   Sept. 2018

General Linguistics Track students must satisfy two natural language requirements for the PhD. Those may be satisfied in the following ways:

  • Translation exam to demonstrate the ability to read linguistic literature in a foreign language; only one of the two language requirements for the PhD can be satisfied through the translation exam.

4. Colloquium conference talks:

Two papers delivered at a colloquium or conference.

5. Constitution of PhD committee:

By the end of the second year of study.

6. Generals Papers:

Two generals papers in different areas (normally 10cr LING 600). What counts as a different area is determined and needs to be approved by the student's committee.

7. General Examination:

An oral examination, in which the candidate is questioned on the two papers. The oral examination may not be scheduled until the committee has read the two papers and approved them as passing.

8. Dissertation Prospectus:

Within 6 months of the oral examination, the student will present a formal dissertation proposal to the subset of PhD committee members who constitute the reading committee, along with a proposed calendar for completion of the dissertation.

9. Final Exam:

A Final Exam on the dissertation attended by the candidate’s Supervisory Committee and open to others interested.

10. Dissertation:

A dissertation suitable for publication.

11. ABD (all but dissertation) requirement:

All degree requirements except for the dissertation and the two colloquia must be completed before the General Exam.

Ph.D. in Linguistics (Computational Linguistics Track)

The requirements for students on the computational linguistics track will meet all the same requirements as students in other specializations except :

1. Required courses:

  • 2 syntax courses from among: LING 566, 507, 508
  • 2 phonetics/phonology courses from among: LING 550, 551, 552, 553
  • 1 semantics course from among: 578, 579
  • 1 sociolinguistics course from among: LING 532, 533
  • 3 Computational Linguistics courses from among: 567, 570, 571, 572, 573

3. Language knowledge requirement:

Students in Computational Linguistics must fulfill only one language requirement, but may not use a translation exam to do so. The language must be typologically substantially distinct from the student's native language; for example, a native English-speaking student would need to select a non-Indo-European language. Please refer to Language Requirements for details.

6. Generals papers:

Same as for the General Linguistics program except a Master’s thesis completed as part of the CLMS program may count as one of the two generals papers.

How to make the CLMS to PhD transition

M.A. in Linguistics

The M.A. is not required as a prerequisite to Ph.D. study.  Students enrolled in the PhD program may get an MA degree when they pass the general exam and file a request for an MA degree with the graduate school.  Students who have taken all the required courses for the PhD CompLing track may analogously file a request for an MS degree with the Graduate School, under either model A or B below. Students who would like to get an MS degree have to get their advisor's approval before filing an official request with the Graduate School.

A. Non-thesis model:

The Generals papers and Exam constitute the capstone project necessary for a master’s degree (or the student may complete the thesis model below).

B. Thesis model: 

  • Required courses: Same as the required courses in PhD General Linguistics Track. 
  • Language requirement: Same as the language requirement in PhD General Linguistics Track. 
  • Thesis:  A thesis, written under the supervision of a Linguistics faculty member, and accepted by a second faculty reader. Normally the work is completed in 10 credits of LING 700.

Remarks on Graduate School Requirements

Students are advised to become familiar with Graduate School requirements, as well as those described on this website. If there are any questions, the student should contact the Graduate School, the Graduate Program Coordinator or the chair of the Supervisory Committee. Once admitted to the program, students should make it a regular practice to see the Graduate Program Coordinator about their progress at least once a year. All graduate students must be either registered or officially on leave. Failure to register or go on leave is interpreted as resignation from the Graduate School. Information on the Graduate School is available at http://www.grad.washington.edu . If you have any further questions or comments please contact us at [email protected]

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PHD, Linguistics

The discipline of Linguistics is the scientific analysis of the complex systems of language. It embraces phonology and phonetics, morphology, syntax, and semantics in the synchronic and diachronic study of contemporary as well as ancient languages.

Degree Type: Doctoral

Degree Program Code: PHD_LING

Degree Program Summary:

Linguistics at the University of Georgia is interdisciplinary by nature, having 30 faculty members sourced from 11 different departments across campus. Our graduate program provides both a strong grounding in core areas of linguistics as well as the opportunity for specialization within the broad areas of formal linguistic theory, second language acquisition, language variation and change, and historical Indo-European linguistics. The program boasts a diverse research-oriented community, a faculty with a wide range of research interests, exceptional library resources, and a dynamic learning environment.

Formal linguistic theory

This area deals with language structure and meaning, with the goal of constructing theoretical models to explain how humans acquire, produce, and comprehend language. Research focuses on the study of the sounds of human language (phonetics and phonology), the structure of words (morphology), the structure of sentences (syntax), and meaning (semantics), using natural language data, speaker intuitions, and experimental methods. Students may choose a specific area within formal linguistics theory to focus on.

Second language acquisition

This area offers a curriculum that treats the theoretical linguistic bases for learning languages. Students may concentrate on the acquisition of specific languages, such as French, Spanish, or German. For students who are interested primarily in teaching English as a second language or in high-school foreign language education, the Department of Language and Literacy Education in the College of Education offers M.E.d and Ph.D. degrees in these areas.

Language variation and change

This area represents two interconnected areas. Languages inevitably change over time and these changes are a source of synchronic variation. The existence of linguistic variants often leads to social valuation of specific features, and these valuations or other social factors (such as language contact) can themselves drive linguistic change. The study of language variation focuses on contemporary and historical patterns of language change, including changes in progress, social factors related to variation, and empirical research methods for the investigation of language in use.

Historical Indo-European linguistics

This area investigates change over a greater depth of time; it involves both the methodology for comparison and reconstruction of historical languages and an intense, hermeneutic approach to studying ancient languages individually. Students can acquire a close familiarity with the sounds, grammar, and vocabulary of languages like ancient Greek, Latin, Sanskrit, Classical Armenian, Gothic, Old English, Old Church Slavic, and others.

Locations Offered:

Athens (Main Campus)

College / School:

Franklin College of Arts & Sciences

346 Brooks Hall Athens, GA 30602

706-542-8776

Department:

Linguistics

Graduate Coordinator(s):

Phone Number:

706-542-5099

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William & Mary

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phd programs linguistics

  • Majors & Minors

Linguistics

About the program.

Linguistics students explore language as both a faculty of mind and as a social institution. You will learn about how language is structured, including models for representing linguistic knowledge and how language varies within and between communities. Linguistics students who double major often choose to study modern languages, computer science, psychology, anthropology or philosophy.

Paths of Study

  • Major in Linguistics
  • Minor in Linguistics

Applied Learning

Take courses ranging from Phonetics and Phonology (LING 307) to First Language Acquisition (LING 358) to Sociolinguistic Field Methods (LING 441).*

Attend weekly research meetings held by professors about their cutting-edge work in order to engage in all parts of the research process.

Labs and Field Methods

Gain hands-on experience in the Child Language Lab, LabPhon Lab, lab for the Documentation, Analysis and Translation of Language in Society (DATLas) and Discourse Analysis Lab.

Career Readiness

Enroll in a career-focused Blackboard site that gives practical information and advice from former students for moving into various fields.

Commencement

Many linguistics graduates go on to work in education, publishing, government or the law. Furthermore, many companies in the technology industry (Google, Amazon and Microsoft) will hire linguists, especially those with computational skills, to develop software and technologies related to human-computer interactions. Although W&M does not offer a pre-speech pathology program, many alumni successfully go on to graduate work in hearing and speech sciences and report that the W&M Linguistics Department's curriculum had given them a solid foundation.

Want to learn more? Our current students and faculty want to connect with you.

Linguistics Program

Tucker Hall Room 112

  • Get an inside look: Contact a current linguistics major
  • Ask the faculty: Contact the Linguistics Program

Linguistics News

phd programs linguistics

Budding linguist explores roots of family dialect, finds clearer self at W&M

Soon come: on-site experience with caribbean languages and identities, choctaw dictionary gets much-needed update after more than 100 years, linguistics program issues official statement on black lives matter, courses disclaimer.

*Courses listed are examples. Course availability changes each semester.

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30 Best universities for Mechanical Engineering in Moscow, Russia

Updated: February 29, 2024

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Below is a list of best universities in Moscow ranked based on their research performance in Mechanical Engineering. A graph of 269K citations received by 45.8K academic papers made by 30 universities in Moscow was used to calculate publications' ratings, which then were adjusted for release dates and added to final scores.

We don't distinguish between undergraduate and graduate programs nor do we adjust for current majors offered. You can find information about granted degrees on a university page but always double-check with the university website.

1. Moscow State University

For Mechanical Engineering

Moscow State University logo

2. Bauman Moscow State Technical University

Bauman Moscow State Technical University logo

3. National Research University Higher School of Economics

National Research University Higher School of Economics logo

4. Moscow Aviation Institute

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5. N.R.U. Moscow Power Engineering Institute

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6. National Research Nuclear University MEPI

National Research Nuclear University MEPI logo

7. National University of Science and Technology "MISIS"

National University of Science and Technology "MISIS" logo

8. Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

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9. Moscow State Technological University "Stankin"

Moscow State Technological University "Stankin" logo

10. RUDN University

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11. Moscow Polytech

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12. Moscow State University of Railway Engineering

Moscow State University of Railway Engineering logo

13. Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation

Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation logo

14. Moscow Medical Academy

Moscow Medical Academy logo

15. Russian State University of Oil and Gas

16. mendeleev university of chemical technology of russia.

Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia logo

17. Russian National Research Medical University

Russian National Research Medical University logo

18. Plekhanov Russian University of Economics

Plekhanov Russian University of Economics logo

19. National Research University of Electronic Technology

National Research University of Electronic Technology logo

20. Moscow State Pedagogical University

Moscow State Pedagogical University logo

21. Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration

Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration logo

22. State University of Management

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23. Moscow State Institute of International Relations

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24. Russian State Geological Prospecting University

25. russian state agricultural university.

Russian State Agricultural University logo

26. New Economic School

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27. Moscow State Technical University of Civil Aviation

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28. Russian State University for the Humanities

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29. Russian State Social University

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30. Moscow State Linguistic University

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Universities for Mechanical Engineering near Moscow

Engineering subfields in moscow.

19th Edition of Global Conference on Catalysis, Chemical Engineering & Technology

  • Victor Mukhin

Victor Mukhin, Speaker at Chemical Engineering Conferences

Victor M. Mukhin was born in 1946 in the town of Orsk, Russia. In 1970 he graduated the Technological Institute in Leningrad. Victor M. Mukhin was directed to work to the scientific-industrial organization "Neorganika" (Elektrostal, Moscow region) where he is working during 47 years, at present as the head of the laboratory of carbon sorbents.     Victor M. Mukhin defended a Ph. D. thesis and a doctoral thesis at the Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia (in 1979 and 1997 accordingly). Professor of Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. Scientific interests: production, investigation and application of active carbons, technological and ecological carbon-adsorptive processes, environmental protection, production of ecologically clean food.   

Title : Active carbons as nanoporous materials for solving of environmental problems

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  2. Extended deadline for submission of applications to the MA and PhD

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  3. Phd Applied Linguistics Usa

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  4. Ph.D. In Applied Linguistics and Technology • Applied Linguistics

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  5. Writing a Linguistics PhD Research Proposal Like a Pro

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  6. Linguistics Phd Research Proposal

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COMMENTS

  1. Ph.D. Programs

    The Department of Linguistics offers four concentrations leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Linguistics (see list below). No matter the concentration, our faculty work closely with students, guiding their research and supporting their passions. Applicants to the Ph.D. program are encouraged to identify prospective research advisors, at least one of whom should […]

  2. Doctoral Program

    The program awards up to 100 high-achieving students every year with full funding to pursue a graduate education at Stanford, including the Ph.D. degree in Linguistics. Additional information is available about the student budget , Stanford graduate fellowships , and other support programs .

  3. PhD in Linguistics

    The entire PhD program in Linguistics is intended to take 5 or 6 years: 2 years for Stage 1, and 3 or 4 years for Stages 2 and 3. Stage 1, which should be completed in two years, consists of 40 hours of graduate coursework, and the Stage 1 qualifying examination; at the completion of Stage 1, students are eligible to receive a MA in Linguistics.

  4. Linguistics

    This is one of the oldest and most distinguished linguistics programs in the United States, and one of the last remaining linguistics departments that continues to focus on both the theoretical and historical components of linguistics. ... Additional information on the graduate program is available from the Department of Linguistics and ...

  5. Graduate Programs

    Graduate Programs. Our graduate programs provide a unique environment where linguistic theory, multiple methodologies, and computational research not only coexist, but interact in a highly synergistic fashion. Our focus is on the Ph.D. degree. The department occasionally admits students already enrolled at Stanford for the M.A. degree.

  6. Graduate Program

    Admission to candidacy in the field of Linguistics consists of writing two research papers which are evaluated in two exams, the Q-exam and the A-exam. The Q-exam is taken by the end of the second year, and the A-exam is taken by the end of the third year. Graduate School regulations require that all doctoral students must take the Examination ...

  7. Ph.D. Program

    Ph.D. Program. The main components of the Linguistics Ph.D. program are as follows: All requirements, including two generals papers, should ideally be completed by the end of the third year, but in no case later than the end of the fourth. The dissertation prospectus is due on October 15 of the fall term of the fourth year.

  8. PhD in Linguistics

    The PhD in Linguistics at BU aims to produce scholars who are versatile enough to be experts in both of these aspects of linguistic inquiry, yet skilled enough to do cutting-edge research in a particular subfield of the discipline. We offer a solid grounding in a range of research methods, including field methods, quantitative methods, and ...

  9. The Graduate Program

    UCLA's Linguistics Department began as an interdepartmental graduate M.A. program in 1960; a Ph.D. program was introduced in 1962, and a B.A. program in 1965. The department was established in 1966, and has flourished ever since. At the undergraduate level, the department currently administers twelve majors: Linguistics, Applied Linguistics ...

  10. Linguistics, PhD < University of Pennsylvania

    Linguistics, PhD. The Ph.D. program in Linguistics at Penn embraces a wide range of theoretical specializations and methodologies. What unites them is a commitment to careful and explicit formal analysis of the human capacity for learning and using language. The core of our program is the formal generative tradition, but we encourage the cross ...

  11. Graduate Studies

    Our PhD program takes a distinctively integrative and interdisciplinary approach in investigating the systems of knowledge that comprise our linguistic competence. Students are exposed to different methodological approaches, while receiving firm grounding in the traditional domains of linguistics. Our faculty supports our graduate students in their pursuit of academic and non-academic positions.

  12. Linguistics PhD

    The Linguistics department has strong commitments to language documentation and reclamation, theoretical training and research, and the interdisciplinary study of language and cognition. Graduate students in the Linguistics department are eligible to apply to two Graduate Designated Emphases: the Designated Emphasis in Indigenous Language ...

  13. Linguistics < University of California, Berkeley

    Linguistics Doctoral Program, Graduate. Terms offered: Fall 2023, Fall 2022, Fall 2021 The course is designed to help students become professional linguists by showing them how to write abstracts of papers, how to prepare papers for presentation at conferences, and how to prepare written versions of papers for submission as qualifying papers (and for journal publication), as well as to give ...

  14. Ph.D. in Educational Linguistics

    A pioneering doctoral program with an enduring legacy of research in applied linguistics, language learning, and teaching. The Educational Linguistics Ph.D. program focuses on language learning and teaching as well as the role of language in education. Our questions and concerns are situated squarely in educational policy and practice ...

  15. Graduate Program

    The graduate program in Linguistics at Berkeley combines mentoring from faculty members in the department, coursework, research training, and professional development opportunities. Faculty expertise in the department spans an unusually diverse range of endeavors. The graduate program accordingly includes a broad range of advanced seminars ...

  16. Ph.D. in Linguistics

    M.A. in Linguistics. The M.A. is not required as a prerequisite to Ph.D. study. Students enrolled in the PhD program may get an MA degree when they pass the general exam and file a request for an MA degree with the graduate school. Students who have taken all the required courses for the PhD CompLing track may analogously file a request for an MS degree with the Graduate School, under either ...

  17. Best 63 Linguistics PhD Programmes in United States 2024

    This page shows a selection of the available PhDs in United States. If you're interested in studying a Linguistics degree in United States you can view all 63 PhDs. You can also read more about Linguistics degrees in general, or about studying in United States. Many universities and colleges in United States offer English-taught PhD's degrees.

  18. LSA Directory of Linguistics Programs and Departments

    Arizona State University. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics. Ball State University. MA in Linguistics, MA in TESOL, MA in Linguistics & TESOL, PhD in English with a Concentration in Applied Linguistics. Barnard College. Department of German. Binghamton University. Linguistics Program. Biola University.

  19. PHD, Linguistics

    PHD, Linguistics. The discipline of Linguistics is the scientific analysis of the complex systems of language. It embraces phonology and phonetics, morphology, syntax, and semantics in the synchronic and diachronic study of contemporary as well as ancient languages. Degree Type: Doctoral. Degree Program Code: PHD_LING.

  20. Linguistics

    Many linguistics graduates go on to work in education, publishing, government or the law. Furthermore, many companies in the technology industry (Google, Amazon and Microsoft) will hire linguists, especially those with computational skills, to develop software and technologies related to human-computer interactions.

  21. Education programs

    Education programs of MIPT undergraduate, graduate and online schools, including price and financial aid information. International department ... The program provides one of the most romantic career track - you can become a real astronaut! Most of us dream it, eh? MIPT has realised relevant dreams in reality - Dolgoprudnui is called 'City of 4 ...

  22. Moscow, Russia's best Mechanical Engineering universities [Rankings]

    Moscow 29. Saint Petersburg 16. Tomsk 6. Below is the list of 29 best universities for Mechanical Engineering in Moscow, Russia ranked based on their research performance: a graph of 2.66M citations received by 371K academic papers made by these universities was used to calculate ratings and create the top.

  23. Active carbons as nanoporous materials for solving of environmental

    Biography: Victor M. Mukhin was born in 1946 in the town of Orsk, Russia. In 1970 he graduated the Technological Institute in Leningrad. Victor M. Mukhin was directed to work to the scientific-industrial organization "Neorganika" (Elektrostal, Moscow region) where he is working during 47 years, at present as the head of the laboratory of carbon sorbents.

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