uf phd cs

Computer Science PHD

Cs phd program and curriculum.

The Computer Science Ph.D. program produces professionals trained at the highest possible academic level in the theory and practice of Computer Science in order to meet current and projected market demands for Computer Science experts. CS Ph.D. students from the Department of CS at UCF graduate with proven abilities in research and instruction and have expertise suitable for positions in industry, academia and government.

Students

Students in the program receive a broad background in the areas of programming systems and languages, computer architecture and computer science theory while specializing in a research area. Research interests of the computer science faculty include affective computing, applied perception, bioinformatics, computational biology, computational geometry, computer and network security, computer architecture, computer forensics, computer graphics, computer networks, computer vision, cryptography, data compression, database management systems, data mining, design and analysis of algorithms, evolutionary computation, genetic algorithms, graph theory, hardware/software co-design, image processing, machine learning, mixed and virtual reality, mobile computing, modeling and simulation, multimedia systems, natural language processing, neural networks, parallel and distributed processing, performance evaluation, programming languages, quantum computing, semantic web, software agents, software engineering and VLSI systems.

PhD Curriculum Requirements

  • A total of at least 72 semester hours of credits at the 5–7000 level. At least one half of these must be 6–7000 level and none can be undergraduate credit.
  • CDA 5106, COT 5405, and COT 6410, all with a grade of B (3.0) or better.
  • A total of at least 36 credit hours of CS or ECE coursework (Prefixes CAP, CDA, CEN, CIS, CNT, COP, COT, EEE, EEL, and ECM) and excludes Independent Study/Doctoral Research/Dissertation credits.
  • At least 15 credit hours of Dissertation (CXX 7980).

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Application Deadlines

Plan of study (pos).

No course can be on a plan of study with a grade below 2.0. At most two courses can have a grade below 3.0. No coursework can appear on a POS that is more than 7 years old at the time of graduation.

The initial POS must be filed prior to the completion of 9 credit hours after admission to the program. This is mandatory! The College of Graduate Studies automatically places a “hold” on future registration for non compliance. The POS can, and usually will, be revised later to reflect changes in the courses actually taken, but it is crucial that a POS be on file, signed by the student and faculty advisor, and approved by the Graduate Program Coordinator. Any variation from the current POS must be approved by the advisor and Graduate Program Coordinator and then immediately reflected in an updated POS.

Explore Further

  • Plan of Study Templates

Students

Transfer of Credit

If a student has an earned MS degree in CS, or a related area, they may, with the approval of the advisor and graduate coordinator, transfer up to 30 credit hours of actual coursework hours into the POS (no Independent Study or Thesis credit). This can occur after the initial POS, but must be approved prior to entering candidacy status.

In no case can courses with a grade below a B (3.0) be transferred, nor can undergraduate credit.

  • Course Transfer Request Form
  • Other Graduate Programs

Students

PhD Milestones

After a student has been admitted into the PhD program and has a research advisor, there are several points in their academic career that require special attention. We cover these in more detail in the following.

Students

CS PhD Qualifying Review

The QR will be offered twice a year in the Fall (sometime in October) and the Spring (sometime in March) semester. The Graduate Committee will meet twice a year to evaluate the results. Each student must apply for the qualifier before completing their 37th credit hour in the PhD program, excluding credits hours taken during summer semesters, doctoral research credit hours taken under a previous advisor, and transfer credit hours. Hence, most students must apply for the qualifier before completing their fifth semester of the PhD program. To pass the qualifier, the student must demonstrate satisfactory progress in their coursework, must secure an advisor, and must show acceptable progress on a mutually agreed-upon research topic with the advisor.

Forms Required

  • Qualifying Review System

Students

Specifically, all students applying for the qualifier must submit a portfolio containing the complete record of coursework (a SASS Degree Audit highlighting the core courses) and a manuscript endorsed by the advisor summarizing the student’s research progress made since the student started in the PhD program OR a citation of an accepted or published work with the advisor, along with the advisor’s endorsement. In the case that student would fail the Qualifying Review because they lack the advisor’s endorsement, but have a published work with them, the student may appeal to the Graduate Committee, which will then render a final decision.”

If applying for the qualifier before completing their 19th credit hour in the PhD program (i.e., before completing their third semester of the PhD program), excluding the aforementioned types of credits hours, the student must demonstrate at minimum a passing grade (B or above) in one core course, and proof of registration in the current semester in another core course. If applying later, the student must demonstrate passing grades in all core courses.

CS PhD Candidacy

  • Academic Integrity Training
  • Dissertation and Thesis Advisory Committee Form
  • Department Admission to Candidacy Form

Students

External members of dissertation advisory committee are often not appointed until after the student has entered candidacy. By general University guidelines, a student and his or her dissertation advisory committee must formally convene for the committee to appraise the student’s progress at least once per calendar year.

uf phd cs

CS PhD Dissertation Proposal

All PhD students must write a dissertation. Please visit UCF Thesis and Dissertation . This must be preceded by an oral presentation of a written dissertation proposal, which, in turn, cannot occur until a term after admission into candidacy status. The purpose of the written proposal, given to members of the research committee at least two weeks prior to the presentation, is to show the student has sufficiently explored the literature of a significant research problem in computer science to be able to embark upon solving that problem. The written proposal should detail a proposed methodology and plan for undertaking the research work, and its completion. Rules governing the proposal announcements, scheduling and committee attendance can be found in the UCF Graduate Catalog .

The oral presentation of the proposal is open to the public and must be announced at least two weeks prior to its occurrence. The presentation should last approximately 45 minutes to an hour, and it should show the student is aware of the background, has a good idea of the problem being attacked, and has a reasonable plan for carrying out the research. The committee’s role is to assess the significance of the proposed problem, the feasibility of the proposed solution, and to offer advice. The proposal is not “cast in stone.” It is a proposal. The research may change direction as new information is uncovered. That is perfectly acceptable and expected. Of course, if the direction of the research becomes too “off target” a new proposal should be considered. This is at the discretion of your advisor, committee, and the graduate coordinator.

CS PhD Dissertation Defense

  • Thesis/Dissertation Proposal and Defense
  • CS PhD Program Assessment Form

Students

CS PhD Synopsis

  • Admission into the PhD program
  • File an initial Plan of Study (By the 9th credit hour)
  • Obtain an advisor
  • Qualifying Review (Between 19th and 37th credit hour)
  • Form a Dissertation Advisory Committee
  • Candidacy (Paper acceptance)
  • Dissertation Proposal
  • Dissertation Defense

Graduate Contact Info

Questions and Appointments Jeanine Clements Phone: (407) 882-2313 Email: [email protected]

Advising and Approval Dr. Wei Zhang Phone: (407) 823-2638 Email: [email protected]

University of Florida

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Computer Engineering

Program information.

The Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering offers the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Computer Engineering through the College of Engineering. Minimum requirements for these degrees are given in the Graduate Degrees section of this catalog.

The department offers graduate study and research in Algorithms, Computer Vision, Databases, Graphics and Modeling, Machine Learning, Networks, and Systems, with active labs in Bioinformatics; Computational Science and Intelligence; Vision, Graphics and Medical Imaging; Database Systems Research and Development; Data Science Research; Mobile and Pervasive Computing; Human-Centered Computing; and Cybersecurity.

Specific degree requirements and options may be found here: http://cise.ufl.edu/academics/grad .

Instructions for application for admission may be found here: http://cise.ufl.edu/admissions/graduate .

Degrees Offered with a Major in Computer Engineering

  • Doctor of Philosophy
  • Master of Engineering
  • without a concentration
  • concentration in Digital Arts and Sciences

Requirements for these degrees are given in the Graduate Degrees section of this catalog.

Computer and Information Science and Engineering Departmental Courses

College of engineering courses, computer engineering (phd).

SLO 1     Knowledge         Students identify, formulate, and solve computer science and engineering problems

SLO 2     Knowledge         Students can critically read computer science and engineering literature

SLO 3     Skills      Students use the techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer science and engineering practice at an advanced level

SLO 4     Professional Behavior    An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

SLO 5     Professional Behavior    Students can communicate effectively

Computer Engineering (ME & MS)           

SLO 4     Professional Behavior    Professional experience: an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

SLO 5     Professional Behavior    Professional experience: Students can communicate effectively

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[UG/MS/PhD] USC Makers Spring 2024 Showcase

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The following announcement is from USC Makers. Please contact them directly if you have any questions.

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Published on April 23rd, 2024

Last updated on April 23rd, 2024

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What to Know About the Turmoil at Colleges Over the Israel-Hamas War

On campus, the debate over free speech and antisemitism has only become more charged.

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A group carrying Palestinian flags and signs calling for boycotting Israel gathers on a university campus.

By Anemona Hartocollis ,  Colbi Edmonds and Anna Betts

As the Israel-Hamas war has escalated, many universities have been caught in an often vitriolic debate over how to handle pro-Palestinian student protests.

Many Jewish students and alumni have been alarmed, saying that the demonstrations can veer into antisemitism. Supporters of academic freedom and students and faculty critical of Israel’s policy toward Palestinians have responded that the real goal is to suppress their political views.

The Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights has opened dozens of investigations into allegations of antisemitism at colleges and K-12 schools, a dramatic increase from previous years.

The Republican-led House Committee on Education and the Workforce has also started investigations into a half-dozen schools and has held hearings. One in December helped lead to the resignations of the presidents of Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania.

Another, in April, featured Columbia’s officials, and the testimony from the university president caused uproar after she vowed to crack down on unauthorized protests and disclosed the disciplinary details of some faculty members.

Here’s what to know about how these issues are playing out on campuses.

How the conflict began.

On the weekend of the Oct. 7 Hamas attack in Israel, a student coalition at Harvard, calling itself the Harvard Palestine Solidarity Groups, issued a public letter holding “the Israeli regime entirely responsible for all the unfolding violence.”

Despite an outcry over the letter from alumni and donors, Harvard’s new president, Claudine Gay, did not initially forcefully condemn the Hamas attack, leading to complaints that the university was letting the students’ letter fill the vacuum and appear to represent the university’s view.

At Penn, the debate over campus antisemitism started before the Hamas attacks, as some high-profile donors and alumni asked the administration to cancel or strongly condemn a Palestinian writers conference, which was being held on campus.

Penn’s president at the time, M. Elizabeth Magill, refused, citing free speech, while acknowledging that some of the speakers had a history of making remarks viewed as antisemitic.

After the Hamas attack, the anger from some Penn alumni grew. Critics faulted the university for not reaching out early to its Jewish students or alumni with an official statement condemning the attack. And the institutional responses fortified the sense of some alumni that the university was not sensitive to what they saw as a rising tide of antisemitism. Many declared they would withhold their donations. Some called for new leadership.

But for others watching the conflict, the campaign was unsettling. Critics, especially among the faculty, accused the alumni of censoring views and inappropriately intervening in academic affairs, where, they said, they had no business.

The war in Gaza divides campuses.

As the Israel-Hamas conflict escalated, so did the campus conflicts.

A t Columbia University , hundreds participated in competing pro-Israel and pro-Palestinian demonstrations in October that led school administrators to close the campus to the public. Its faculty traded open letters, which were often barbed.

At Harvard, students associated with the anti-Israel letter following the Hamas attack were doxxed .

At Northwestern University, students at a rally accused the university president, Michael H. Schill, of being complicit in the killing of Palestinians in Gaza. At George Washington University , students projected slogans like “Glory to our martyrs” on a building wall.

And at Brown University, 20 students were arrested in November after holding a sit-in where they pushed for a cease-fire and a divestment from weapons manufacturers. Students were also arrested at a pro-Palestinian protest at the University of Michigan.

Hillel, a Jewish campus group, and the Council on American-Islamic Relations, an Arab and Muslim civil rights group, both recorded a rising number of bias incidents on campus.

Congressional hearings lead to outrage.

Nothing heightened the debate more than the congressional hearings on Dec. 5 with the presidents of Harvard, M.I.T. and Penn, and on April 17 with leaders of Columbia, including its president, Nemat Shafik.

In December, the presidents were asked whether students would be punished if they called for genocide against Jews; they said it would depend on the context. Their legalistic and dispassionate responses led to an uproar and widespread condemnation, and Dr. Gay and Ms. Magill resigned under pressure.

When Dr. Shafik and other Columbia leaders testified in front of the same committee this month, they answered more affirmatively that a call for genocide would violate Columbia’s code of conduct.

Dr. Shafik said that the university was taking serious action to combat antisemitism, telling lawmakers that she agreed that some protests had used antisemitic language, and that certain contested phrases — like “from the river to the sea” — might warrant discipline.

Dr. Shafik also vowed that there would be “consequences” for employees who “make remarks that cross the line in terms of antisemitism.” She went into surprising detail about disciplinary procedures against some university professors, noting at one point that one visiting professor would “never work at Columbia again.”

This deeply worried and drew a sharp rebuke from some supporters of academic freedom.

How are schools addressing the protests?

Some colleges have started cracking down on pro-Palestinian protests and events despite possible free-speech concerns.

At Columbia, Dr. Shafik appeared to fulfill her vow to Congress that she was prepared to punish students who held unauthorized protests. A day after her testimony, pro-Palestinian demonstrators set up a “Gaza Solidarity Encampment,” and Dr. Shafik called on the police to clear the tents out, a decision that swiftly escalated tensions on campus. The police arrested more than 100 students, and the university said that it would suspend all of them .

But the students appeared undeterred , and they set up new tents the next day. The clash prompted students from other universities, including Yale, Boston University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, to hold rallies and form their own encampments in solidarity with the Columbia students.

Students for Justice in Palestine, the most prominent pro-Palestinian campus group, has been suspended from at least four universities, including Columbia, Brandeis, George Washington and Rutgers.

Vanderbilt recently expelled three students for the takeover of an administration building.

The University of Southern California said on Monday that it had canceled plans for a graduation speech by this year’s valedictorian, Asna Tabassum, who is Muslim. The school cited security concerns, but Muslim civil rights groups have denounced the decision as censorship. Later in the week, the university announced that its main commencement program would eliminate all outside speakers and honorees, including the director of the movie “Crazy Rich Asians,” Jon M. Chu, and the tennis star Billie Jean King.

And after a student protest at the University of Michigan interrupted a school ceremony for high-achieving students, university officials put forward a proposal that would ban activities that disrupt “celebrations, activities and operations of the university.” Michigan’s president, Santa J. Ono, said the demonstration was “unacceptable.” But the Michigan chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union criticized that policy as too vague and broad.

Jeremy W. Peters contributed reporting.

An earlier version of this article misstated when the Harvard Palestine Solidarity Groups issued a public letter holding “the Israeli regime entirely responsible for all the unfolding violence.” The letter was issued on the weekend of the Oct. 7 Hamas attack on Israel, not on the weekend after the attack.

An earlier version of this article incorrectly linked and misidentified a statement by the American Civil Liberties Union’s Michigan chapter. The statement that said the University of Michigan had taken actions that “censored, suppressed, and punished student speech and advocacy” was issued on Dec. 19; it was not in reference to a more recent proposal from the university.

How we handle corrections

Anemona Hartocollis is a national reporter for The Times, covering higher education. More about Anemona Hartocollis

Colbi Edmonds writes about the environment, education and infrastructure. More about Colbi Edmonds

Anna Betts reports on national events, including politics, education, and natural or man-made disasters, among other things. More about Anna Betts

UMD Ph.D. Student Snehesh Shrestha's Software Uses AI to Teach You How to Play the Violin

Descriptive image for UMD Ph.D. Student Snehesh Shrestha's Software Uses AI to Teach You How to Play the Violin

On the ground floor of one of the new computer buildings at the University of Maryland, Anna Kelleher played her centuries-old violin while a program running on a laptop in front of her told her to do things such as raise her chin or widen her stance.

These were common mistakes that Kelleher knows not to do. After all, she’s a graduate student studying violin performance. But she also teaches violin to others, and the program she was demonstrating might someday help those she teaches to play even better.

Believers in artificial intelligence say the program will radically transform our lives in so many ways.

It’s designed by Snehesh Shrestha , a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Computer Science, and is the perfect example of how the University of Maryland is building bridges between AI and every other academic program on campus.

A simple webcam found on your laptop, or even your phone, captures enough movement and audio from your performance that the AI program can tell what you’re doing wrong. Whether your stance is too wide or narrow, to whether or not your chin is in the right spot, it can see and also hear everything you’re doing right and wrong.

The program was designed to try “to understand the whole space, not just blindly building a technology, but understanding how can we fill the gaps that are currently there in the entire music learning process,” Shrestha said. “And by identifying gaps where we can empower the teacher and the students, we could really build something a lot more powerful than just building a single technology. And that really was like the starting point of exploring into what the technology can provide towards the future direction of music education.”

On the monitor, the teacher can see the student in 3D — every angle imaginable — to see how they stand and how they move. Technology, including a piece that looks sort of like a smartwatch, can also send cues to the student through vibrations in the wrist.

Click  HERE  to read the full article

The Department welcomes comments, suggestions and corrections.  Send email to editor [-at-] cs [dot] umd [dot] edu .

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College of Engineering

Computer Science PhD Student First to Receive Competitive Award

Ruxin Wang

BATON ROUGE, LA – LSU Computer Science Ph.D. student Ruxin Wang is the recipient of the highly competitive 2024 Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) Rising Stars Award, making her the first-ever LSU student to receive the honor. She is also the first female LSU student to publish a first-author security paper at one of the Big 4 Security conferences.

Wang will next attend the 2024 CPS Rising Stars Workshop in May at the University of Virginia. There, she will receive the award, which aims to identify and mentor outstanding Ph.D. and post-doctoral students who are interested in pursuing academic careers in CPS core research areas.

“This award recognizes my research in CPS security and using CPS to improve traffic safety and public health,” Wang said. “In addition to my research, this award also recognizes my efforts in engaging women scholars in STEM research. I greatly appreciate the help and guidance of my Ph.D. advisor, Dr. Chen Wang, who consistently encouraged me to apply for this national award and be brave enough to compete with other top-ranking university peers. I am now more determined to pursue a faculty position after graduation, and I am now more confident that I can make significant contributions to CPS research and education.”

Last May, Wang became the first female LSU student to publish a first-author security paper at a Big 4 Security conference when her paper on developing a low-effort authentication method for VR headset users was published at the 44th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. Existing VR authentications require users to enter a PIN number or draw graphical passwords, which can be observed by others in proximity to the user and create security issues. Wang’s proposed method would be based on the unique skull-reverberated sounds, which can be acquired when the user wears the VR device.

“It is very challenging to publish a first-author paper at a Big 4 Security conference, such as IEEE S&P, which has a low acceptance rate (e.g., 13%),” Wang said. “The review process is double-blind, and reviewers don’t know who you are…[they only have] your submitted paper to make decisions. I worked with my advisor, Dr. Wang, and my colleague, Mr. Long Huang, for over two years on the VR authentication topic, and our submission has been rejected many times. We kept researching on this area, solving challenges, and improving our paper to finally make it to the level of the Big 4 Security conferences.

“To me, it is a high recognition of my research achievements in ‘Cyber-Physical Systems for Security, Safety, and Healthcare’ at LSU and a milestone in my academic career. ‘First’ means there will be a second and a third. I am now working towards publishing the second Big 4 paper.

Like us on Facebook (@lsuengineering) or follow us on X (formerly Twitter) and Instagram (@lsuengineering).​

Contact: Joshua Duplechain Director of Communications 225-578-5706 [email protected]

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COMMENTS

  1. Ph.D. Program

    To earn a Ph.D. degree, a student must satisfy a minimum of 90 graduate-level credits beyond the bachelor's degree. Up to 30 credits from a prior master's degree in Computer Science or Computer Engineering taken either at the University of Florida or from another accredited institution may be transferred and counted towards the Ph.D. degree.

  2. Computer Science (Engineering) < University of Florida

    Computer Science (phd) SLO1 Knowledge Students identify, formulate, and solve computer science and engineering problems. SLO2 Knowledge Students can critically read computer science and engineering literature. SLO3 Skills Students use the techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer science and engineering practice at an advanced level.

  3. Graduate

    GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS PH.D. PROGRAM COMPUTER ENGINEERING (CEN) Computer Engineering (CEN) is a discipline that embodies the science and technology of design, construction, implementation, and maintenance of software and hardware components of computer systems and computer-controlled equipment. Learn more … COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSE)

  4. Computer and Information Science and ...

    The Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) offers. The CISE Department has six broad areas of specialization: Computer systems. Database and information systems. High-performance computing/applied algorithms. Computer graphics, modeling, and art. Intelligent systems and computer vision.

  5. Graduate Catalog < University of Florida

    The University of Florida Graduate School offers research opportunities in a variety of fields. In collaboration with UF's Office of Research , our many colleges and departments offer numerous majors alongside the various Centers, Institutes, and Other Research Facilities and interdisciplinary offerings available to the graduate students here ...

  6. UF Human-Centered Computing PhD program now recruiting for 2022-2023!

    The University of Florida Department of Computer & Information Science & Engineering (CISE) is recruiting applicants for its Human-Centered Computing (HCC) Ph.D. program for 2022-2023 admission! Applications are due December 5th. The UF HCC Ph.D. program is a growing, vibrant degree with over 30 current students, and our graduates have gone ...

  7. Human Centered Computing

    UF Researchers to Augment Human Cognition to Aid in Extreme Work Environments March 15, 2022. Using a new $2.8 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), researchers in the University of Florida Department of Computer & Information Science & Engineering (CISE) will work to augment human cognition by providing task ...

  8. Computer and Information Science & Engineering

    First course of a two-semester introductory sequence for those planning further study in computer science, digital arts and sciences or computer engineering. Concepts of computer science and the process of computer programming, including object-oriented programming, procedural and data abstraction and program modularity. Corequisite: MAC 2311.

  9. Computer and Information Science and Engineering

    This project focuses on understanding and modeling that dialogue. Project Title #1: Remote Sensing of Coral Reefs. Department: Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering. Faculty Mentor: Paul Gader, [email protected]. Ph.D. Student Mentor (s): Ron Fick, [email protected]. Terms Available: Fall, Spring.

  10. Faculty

    University of Florida. Computer & Information Science & Engineering. Home; About. Accreditation; ... Arnold and Lisa Goldberg Rising Star Associate Professor in Computer Science 352-392-0054 MH 6115 [email protected]. Abdelsalam (Sumi) Helal, Ph.D. ... Graduate Program Director 352-294-6678 MH 5400E [email protected]. Ye Xia, Ph.D. Associate Professor ...

  11. Ph.D. Admissions

    If so, these application deadlines vary, and you should check with department websites or contact dept graduate staff Ph.D. Application Fee Waiver. The Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering at the University of Florida provides Ph.D. application fee waivers to some students. U.S. Citizen or Permanent Residents. 3.00+ cumulative undergraduate GPA

  12. Computer Science Education

    The Computer Science Education programs at the University of Florida are a collaboration between the College of Education and Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering. We offer a fully online graduate certificate, MAE program , and Ed.D. program designed for educators seeking to teach evidence-based, equitable, and accessible computer science ...

  13. Grad How to Apply Grad

    Applicants with a previous graduate or professional degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution may be exempt from the Graduate Record Exam or Graduate Management Admission Test at the program's discretion. Verifying Receipt of Scores. Requested scores generally arrive to UF within 2-4 weeks.

  14. The Graduate School

    The Graduate School at the University of Florida is more than an institution — it's an incubator where intellect, ingenuity, and imagination shape minds and forge futures for the better. University of Florida Graduate School. 106 Grinter Hall · 1523 Union Road · Gainesville FL 32611 · 352 392 6622 · [email protected]

  15. Computer Science (CLAS) < University of Florida

    Computer Science - Liberal Arts (MS) SLO 1 Knowledge Students identify, formulate, and solve computer science problems. SLO 2 Knowledge Students can critically read computer science literature. SLO 3 Skills Students use the techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer science practice at an advanced level.

  16. Computer Science PHD

    The Computer Science Ph.D. program prepares students in the highest level of theory and practice of Computer Science, aiding with the development of research and instruction skills for positions in academia, industry and government sectors. The Computer Science Ph.D. program produces professionals trained at the highest possible academic level ...

  17. 10 University of Florida business graduate programs ranked among the

    Three other University of Florida business graduate programs ranked in the nation's top 15 including the Master of Science in Information Systems and Operations Management at No. 12, the Fisher School of Accounting's Master of Accounting at No. 14 and the UF MBA Full-Time program at No. 14.

  18. Computer Engineering < University of Florida

    1-12. ESI 6900. Principles of Engineering Practice. 1-4. Computer engineering (phd) SLO 1 Knowledge Students identify, formulate, and solve computer science and engineering problems. SLO 2 Knowledge Students can critically read computer science and engineering literature. SLO 3 Skills Students use the techniques, skills, and tools necessary for ...

  19. Triple Gator graduate Matthew Diller pursues his calling in biomedical

    The current UF doctoral graduate was rife with scientific curiosity as an undergrad, but he often struggled to channel his academic interests - from philosophy to neuroscience - into one field. That was, until he discovered the endlessly fascinating world of biomedical informatics. Less than a decade ago, this was a new concept at UF.

  20. Research Areas

    The University of Florida Department of Computer & Information Science & Engineering offers a wide range of research areas. Below, you will find a majority of the areas studied in the department and the respective faculty who are working in these areas. Click each of the below research areas to view associated faculty.

  21. [UG/MS/PhD] USC Makers Spring 2024 Showcase

    Department of Computer Science About. Chair's Welcome. Awards and Honors. CS@SC Institutes. News. Media Coverage. Newsletters and Fact Sheets. CS Industry Affiliate Program. Bekey Lecture. Contact Us. ... Graduate Certificate. Distance Education. K-12 Outreach. Student Resources. ← Back; Academic Advisement. D-Clearance. Directed Research.

  22. How the Israel-Hamas War Became a Source of Turmoil on College Campuses

    Another, in April, featured Columbia's officials, and the testimony from the university president caused uproar after she vowed to crack down on unauthorized protests and disclosed the ...

  23. UMD Ph.D. student Snehesh Shrestha's software uses AI to ...

    On the ground floor of one of the new computer buildings at the University of Maryland, Anna Kelleher played her centuries-old violin while a program running on a laptop in front of her told her to do things such as raise her chin or widen her stance.These were common mistakes that Kelleher knows not to do. After all, she's a graduate student studying violin performance.

  24. Computer Science PhD Student First to Receive Competitive Award

    April 25, 2024 BATON ROUGE, LA - LSU Computer Science Ph.D. student Ruxin Wang is the recipient of the highly competitive 2024 Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) Rising Stars Award, making her the first-ever LSU student to receive the honor. She is also the first female LSU student to publish a first-author security paper at one of the Big 4 Security conferences.