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IRS Letter 6419: What you need before reporting your Child Tax Credit payments

As you gather your tax documents this year, you’ll want to keep an eye out for IRS Letter 6419. The IRS plans to send this important notice in late January to those who received advance Child Tax Credit payments in 2021. 

Why is the letter so important? The details in the document will not only help you report your advance payments correctly—it will also help you claim the other half of your Child Tax Credit. Additionally, relying on the amounts in the letter can help you avoid delays in processing your return and sending your refund.

In the post, we’ll outline what the letter is, what you need to know, and an alternative you can use if you don’t have your IRS Letter 6419.

What is a letter 6419?

You can think of the letter like a tax form. The letter 6419 is the official documentation that has the details you need to report your advance Child Tax Credit (CTC) payments.*

Specifically, it will show you:

  • The total amount of advance CTC payments you received for 2021. This information will go on Schedule 8812, line 14f or 15e as applicable.
  • Number of qualifying children counted in determining the advance CTC

In addition to the details above, the letter 6419 outlines how the IRS calculated your amount and the conditions for repayment. You can also find those details in our 2021 Child Tax Credit article. 

*Note that for some filers whose December payments were returned to the IRS, Letter 6419 may be incorrect. Those filers should use their online account (see below) vs. Letter 6419. 

Do I really need the 6419 letter to file? Can I just use my bank statement?

We strongly encourage you to reference IRS letter 6419 before you file your taxes. Using incorrect amounts on your return could trigger a manual review of your return, which could delay your return—and refund for weeks.

Referencing your bank statements may not be the best route. In some cases, amounts may have been adjusted due do a variety of reasons, including if the processing of a 2020 return after an initial advance CTC payment was made.  Or, the amounts may have changed from one payment to the next as you made changes in the IRS Child Tax Credit portal. 

Ready to file but don’t have your letter? Read on to learn about using the IRS Online Account as an alternative.

Who receives a letter 6419?

Anyone who received at least one advance Child Tax Credit payments from July to December 2021 will receive Letter 6419. So, even if you stopped payments at some point, you should still expect to receive a letter.

Married filers should take note: You’ll both receive your own IRS Letter 6419. You’ll need to have both documents to file an accurate return and claim the second half of your credit.

What if I can’t find my Letter 6419?

If you’re ready to file, but don’t have your letter, there is an alternative. You can use your  IRS Online Account to verify the details from the letter.

If you don’t have an existing IRS Online Account here’s how to create a new one:

  •  Visit https://www.irs.gov/payments/your-online-account
  • Click the “Sign in to Your Online Account” button
  • Click “ID.me  Create New Account” on the next page
  • Follow the on-screen instructions to provide information to set up the secure ID.me account. Note that users may be asked to create a live video of themselves (using phone or webcam) and/or upload photo identification. For help, visit the  ID.me help page .

Once you’ve created an ID.me account, you can access your IRS Online Account at the link directly above. After you log in, navigate to the Tax Records tab to view your CTC payments.

Get help reporting advance Child Tax Credit payments

Whether you choose to file taxes online or file with an H&R Block tax pro , or Block Advisors tax pro , we can help you report the advance payments you received in 2021 and claim the second half of your Child Tax Credit payment on your return.

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Published: July 26, 2021   |   Last Updated: August 9, 2023

Advance child tax credit payment (advctc) letters.

Letter 6416 and 6416-A Letter 6417 Letter 6419, Advance Child Tax Credit Reconciliation

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Letter Overview

Letters 6416 and 6416-A (both named Advance Child Tax Credit Outreach letter) were mailed by the IRS in June 2021. These letters estimate Child Tax Credit (CTC) amounts for tax year 2021 and tell you that you may be eligible to receive AdvCTC payments.  The letters also provide information about opting out of automatic payments.

Letter 6417 highlights key changes to the 2021 CTC that affect families with dependents under the age of 18 and provides an estimate of your monthly AdvCTC payments.  This letter is on White House letterhead and is signed by President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

Letter 6419 is sent to help you reconcile and report your 2021 CTC when you file your 2021 federal tax return; the IRS sent Letter 6419 between late December 2021 and January 2022.  You should keep this, and any other IRS letters about AdvCTC payments, with your tax records.

This notice or letter may include additional topics that have not yet been covered here. Please check back frequently for updates.

What does this letter mean to me?

Letter 6419 shows the total amount of advance Child Tax Credit payments that you received during 2021. You will need this letter when you file your 2021 federal tax return.  If you received AdvCTC payments, you can also check amounts using Online Account on IRS.gov.

How did I get here?

The IRS disbursed AdvCTC payments to you in 2021. Letter 6419 is sent to help you file an accurate 2021 federal tax return.

What are my next steps?

If you received AdvCTC payments, you should file a 2021 federal tax return and reconcile the total amount received in 2021 with the amount you are eligible to claim on your tax return. “Reconciling” the AdvCTC payments means:

  • Compare the total amount of the AdvCTC payments that you received during 2021 (even if that amount is $0) with
  • The amount of the CTC you can properly claim on your 2021 federal tax return.

To reconcile these amounts, you will need to do the following:

  • Get the advance payments total and number of qualifying children on your Online Account, or your Letter 6419.  If the amount in your Online Account differs from your letter, you should rely on the amount reflected in your Online Account.
  • Enter the information on  Schedule 8812 of the Form 1040.

View Notice Online:

View your federal tax records and manage your communication preferences online

Sign in to your  Online Account  to:

  • Make payments
  • Go paperless for certain notices
  • Get email notifications for new notices

I need more information

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Advanced Child Tax Credit Payments

Frequently Asked Questions

2021 Child Tax Credit and Advance Child Tax Credit Payments

2021 Child Tax Credit and Advance Child Tax Credit Payments — Topic H: Reconciling Your Advance Child Tax Credit Payments on Your 2021 Tax Return

Child Tax Credit & Advance Payment Option

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Advance Child Tax Credit: What You Should Know: Part I

Read the Blog

Advance Child Tax Credit: What You Should Know: Part II

Advance Child Tax Credit: What You Should Know: Part III

Where can I get additional help?

Understanding your notice or letter

For more specifics on your notice, visit Understanding your IRS Notice or Letter on IRS.gov

  • Understanding Your Letter 6416 or Letter 6416-A
  • Understanding Your Letter 6417 (Note: on White House letterhead)
  • Understanding Your Letter 6419

Get Help topics

Browse common tax issues and situations at TAS Get Help

If you still need help

The Taxpayer Advocate Service is an independent organization within the IRS that helps taxpayers and protects taxpayers’ rights. We can offer you help if your tax problem is causing a financial difficulty, you’ve tried and been unable to resolve your issue with the IRS, or you believe an IRS system, process, or procedure just isn’t working as it should. If you qualify for our assistance, which is always free, we will do everything possible to help you.

copy of letter 6419 irs

Low Income Taxpayer Clinics (LITCs) are independent from the IRS and TAS. LITCs represent individuals whose income is below a certain level and who need to resolve tax problems with the IRS. LITCs can represent taxpayers in audits, appeals, and tax collection disputes before the IRS and in court. In addition, LITCs can provide information about taxpayer rights and responsibilities in different languages for individuals who speak English as a second language. Services are offered for free or a small fee. For more information or to find an LITC near you, see the LITC page on the TAS website or Publication 4134 , Low Income Taxpayer Clinic List.

Related Letters and Forms

  • Schedule 8812 (Form 1040), Credits for Qualifying Children and Other Dependents

Additional Resources

If you want someone to contact the IRS about the letter on your behalf, you will need to complete Form 2848 , Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative.  You can download this form at www.irs.gov or request a copy by calling 1-800-TAX-FORM (1-800-829-3676). You may be eligible for representation from an attorney, certified public accountant, or enrolled agent associated with a  Low Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC). LITCs are independent from the IRS and the Taxpayer Advocate Service. LITCs represent individuals whose income is below a certain level and who need to resolve tax problems with the IRS.  LITCs can represent taxpayers in audits, appeals, and tax collection disputes before the IRS and in court. In addition, LITCs can provide information about taxpayer rights and responsibilities in different languages for individuals who speak English as a second language. Services are offered for free or a small fee. For more information or to find an LITC near you, see the LITC page at www.taxpayeradvocate.irs.gov/litcmap or IRS Publication 4134, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic List. This Publication is also available online at www.irs.gov or by calling the IRS at 1-800-829-3676.

Taxpayer Rights

The right to be informed, the right to quality service, the right to pay no more than the correct amount of tax, the right to challenge the irs’s position and be heard, the right to appeal an irs decision in an independent forum, the right to finality, the right privacy, the right to confidentiality, the right to retain representation, the right to a fair and just tax system, advanced child tax credit payment (advctc) letters.

Child Tax Credit: How to Get Your Money if You Lost the IRS Letter

If you're eligible for the child tax credit, you still have at least half of it coming. But what if you lost the IRS letter you need to claim it?

katie-conner

The remaining half of the 2021 child tax credit is coming with tax refunds.

IRS Form 8812 for Additional Child Tax Credit

Last year's American Rescue Plan  expanded the child tax credit significantly, raising the amount of money that eligible parents can receive from a previous level of $2,000 per child up to $3,600 for each kid under 6 or $3,000 for children 6 to 17.

The change to the child tax credit also instituted monthly advance payments up to $300 for each child from July to December 2021, giving parents an early $1,800 per child. Now it's time for families to claim the remaining money on their 2021 tax returns.

To get that money, however, parents need IRS Letter 6419, 2021 advance CTC . These  IRS letters  were mailed in December and January to families who received advance monthly payments. Parents need to report the official amount of payments they received in 2021 to get the rest of the credit with their tax refund.

If you never received IRS Letter 6419 or you lost it, don't panic. Read on to learn what the letter includes, how to report it and what to do if you don't have it.

For more information, here's everything to know about possible  child tax credit payments in 2022 . Also, learn if you might have to pay back child tax credit money and what to do if you're having issues with a missing payment .

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What info does IRS Letter 6419 include?

The IRS letter -- called Letter 6419 -- has important information that can help you when you prepare your taxes. The notice will show how much child tax credit money you received in 2021 and the number of qualifying dependents used to calculate your total amount. 

You'll need to cross-check the information to make sure it's still correct. For example, if you had a baby since you last filed your taxes, the IRS wouldn't have counted that dependent when determining how much money you're eligible for. Therefore, you'll need to make sure your information is updated when you file your tax return.

How do I report the information from Letter 6419 on my tax return?

If you're using tax software to file your 2021 tax return, the program will simply ask you for the total amount of advance child tax credit money you received last year and perform the necessary calculations for you. If you're doing your own taxes by hand, you'll enter the total amount from Letter 6419 on line 14f of IRS Schedule 8812 .

Important : If you're married filing jointly and you received advance child tax credit payments, you and your spouse should have both received separate letters from the IRS. You'll need to provide the total amount of both letters for your 2021 tax return. 

What if you lost, threw away or never received the IRS letter?

If you accidentally disposed of Letter 6419, lost it or never got it, you can still claim the rest of your money. Your child tax credit information is available via the IRS website , but you'll need to create an online IRS account to access it.

Registering for an account on the IRS site takes a bit of time and patience, but once you're in, you will have all the necessary information for the child tax credit, along with other useful IRS information for preparing your taxes.

Again, if you're married filing jointly, you'll need to combine the amount of payments made to you and your spouse. You and your partner should both log in to your separate IRS accounts and include the total of your advance monthly payments on your 2021 tax return.

The amount of child tax credit money you get depends on a number of things.

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What if the info in the letter isn't correct?

Unfortunately, the IRS has warned that  some of the information in the letters might be wrong , which could throw a wrench into the process of completing your tax return. 

The IRS says that the number of affected families is low and limited to taxpayers who moved or changed bank accounts in December . If you believe the information in your IRS letter isn't accurate, first check your banking account for deposits from the IRS. Search for the description  IRS TREAS 310 CHILDCTC to locate specific monthly child tax credit payments .

If your banking account lists different monthly payment information to what is listed on IRS Letter 6419, the IRS recommends logging into an  online IRS account . The agency stressed that the IRS website has accurate information on child tax credit payments. If the website lists money that you didn't receive, you may need to contact the IRS to request a payment trace .

How much child tax credit money will come with your tax refund?

The amount of child tax credit money you receive with your tax refund depends on a number of things. For instance, if you opted out of receiving the monthly payments last year, the amount of money you get will be larger than someone who received every check. The monthly checks were for up to $300 for children 5 and younger and up to $250 for kids 6 and older.

So if you were eligible for the full amount and opted out of the payments, you could get up to $3,600 per child with your tax refund. However, if you received all six payments in 2021, you could get up to $1,800 per child, depending on the ages of your children.

If you're still waiting on a payment to arrive due to an IRS error, that should also arrive with your tax refund.

For more information, here's how to contact the IRS with child tax credit questions . Also, you could be eligible for up to $16,000 if you paid for child care last year.

Don't throw away this document. Why IRS Letter 6419 is critical to filing your 2021 taxes.

copy of letter 6419 irs

Parents are flooded with paperwork every single day of the year. But this year , they absolutely want to keep track of one key letter — Letter 6419 , to be sent to you by none other than the Internal Revenue Service. 

Do not throw this letter away. Keep it with all of your other important tax paperwork, including your W-2s.

Repeat, keep this letter to do your taxes. 

The IRS said in early January that it started issuing these letters in December to those who received advance child tax credit money last year. But many parents had yet to spot this letter in the mail as of Jan. 19. It's important to keep an eye out for this information. 

The IRS will kick off the tax season on Jan. 24 when it will first begin accepting and processing tax returns.

(If you have any tax questions, feel free to  fill out this form , which also is below. USA TODAY will be answering the top reader questions as we go through the 2022 tax season.)

►2022 tax advice: How to get child tax credit cash, charitable deductions and free help

►When can you file?  If the IRS is accepting tax returns Jan. 24, does that mean you'll get your refund early?

Some families may want to hold off a bit when it comes to filing a return until they spot the letter, which can help file them an accurate return and avoid delays. Others who don't want to wait may need to review their own records and check their specific information at the IRS "Child Tax Credit Update Portal Site." 

Someone who normally does not make enough money to be required to file a tax return will still need to keep this letter to claim extra money that could be owed for the child tax credit when they file a 2021 federal income tax return. 

"Even if you had $0 in income," the IRS notes, "you could have received advance Child Tax Credit payments if you were eligible." 

►Save smarter, spend smarter: The Daily Money offers financial tips and advice. Sign up here.

►Tax season 2022: IRS now accepting tax returns. What to know before filing taxes about your refund.

When did the advanced child tax credit arrive?

Families who received the advance child tax credit in 2021— the money went out from July through December — must reconcile what they received last year with what their financial situation is this year, and file a Schedule 8812.

The monthly advance payments, part of a temporary expanded program, were designed so that half the total credit amount would be paid in advance monthly payments over those six months of 2021. 

The tax filer will claim the other half when filing a 2021 income tax return. The IRS issued the first advance payment on July 15, 2021.

►Free filing: Want to file your tax return for free? TurboTax opts out of major program

►Budget shocks: Student loans, child tax credit unknowns could shock budgets in 2022

What does Letter 6419 look like?

While many have not yet seen the letter, I reviewed a sample copy  that is posted online at IRS.gov. It was found on the IRS page called "Understanding Your Letter 6419." 

Letter 6419 is a black-and-white one-page letter with an IRS logo on the top left corner. It is issued by the Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service.

The letter has a big box at the top stating: "2021 Total Advance Child Tax Credit (AdvCTC) Payments."

The letter states in bold: "Keep this important tax information. You need it to prepare your 2021 income tax return." 

The very top of the correspondence does not state "Letter 6419" in bold letters across the top. But it is marked as "Letter 6419" on the very bottom right-hand corner.

The term "Letter 6419" is also listed in Box 1 at the top of the letter in the sentence that refers to married couples filing a joint return for the tax year 2021. 

Will I get one or two of these IRS letters?

Great question. You might expect one letter. After all, a married couple that files a joint return sends in one tax return, so it would be logical that one couple would receive one letter. But that's not the case at all. 

The IRS will be sending two letters — and you're going to need to keep both of them — to married couples filing a joint return, according to April Walker, lead manager for tax practice and ethics with the American Institute of CPAs. 

According to instructions on the example posted at IRS.gov: "If you file a joint return for tax year 2021, you must add the amounts in Box 1 from both Letters 6419 and enter the total amount on Schedule 8812."

Keep both letters. Do not assume you got a duplicate letter out of the blue and throw one away. 

What key information is on IRS Letter 6419? 

The letter itself spells out two key components that were used to calculate your advance child tax credit payments in 2021.

Box 1, which is at the very top of this letter, will tell you the total dollar amount of money you received for the advance child tax credit payments over six months in 2021. You need to enter that amount on Schedule 8812 called "Credits for Qualifying Children and Other Dependents" on line 14f or line 15e, whichever applies.

Box 2, which is right under Box 1, lists the number of qualifying children that were taken into account when the advance payments were determined for 2021. (Note: If you are dressing and feeding two little ones in the morning — including a baby born in 2021 — the box will likely list one child. Parents who had a baby born in 2021 did not receive advance payments last year but now can claim that child on their 2021 income tax returns to receive money.)

The IRS notes that "families who received advance payments need to file a 2021 tax return and compare the advance payments they received in 2021 with the amount of the child tax credit they can properly claim on their 2021 tax return."

Why does any of this matter?

If you lose the letter — and do not come up with a number that exactly matches the IRS files — you're likely to face lengthy delays in processing your income tax return.

And yes, you'll wait a long time to get your federal income tax refund.

Schedule 8812 notes specifically on Line 14f: "Caution: If the amount on this line doesn’t match the aggregate amounts reported to you (and your spouse if filing jointly) on your Letter(s) 6419, the processing of your return will be delayed."

Mark Steber, Jackson Hewitt’s chief tax information officer, cautioned tax filers that they need to make sure their total dollar amount for what was received for the advance payments is accurate when they file their tax returns.

"If this information isn’t correct on the 2021 tax return, taxpayers risk a delay in receiving their refund," Steber warned. 

Antonio Brown, a CPA in Flint, Michigan, said on Jan. 20 that he had not heard of any of his clients getting the letter yet.

It is possible, he said, to file the tax return without the letter but you need to know exactly how much advance child tax credit you have received and how many dependents the money covered in 2021.

In general, Brown said, it is important to refer to Letter 6419 before you file a return because in some cases, a taxpayer could have received a different amount for one child under age 5 and another amount for the dependent ages 6 through 17. Some families could be confused about how much was received. 

As part of the monthly payments, families received up to $300 for each child through age 5 or up to $250 each for children ages 6 through 17. 

"The letter breaks down how much was received and how many dependents it was for," Brown said. 

What is the IRS child tax credit update portal?

If taxpayers have not received the letter, taxpayers can look up the amounts on the IRS website at the "Child Tax Credit Update Portal."   But you're going to need to create a user account with the IRS. 

Brown noted that his early filer clients did not have the letter to prepare the return but they were able to go to the IRS website to obtain this information, or they reviewed their bank statements to find it.

George Smith, a CPA with Andrews Hooper Pavlik in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, said he has one earlier filer client who fortunately did receive the letter already and they were able to easily file the return. 

Can I get more money from the child tax credit? 

Quite possibly. You want to file Schedule 8812 to claim any of your remaining money for the child tax credit. 

"If you are eligible for the child tax credit, but did not receive advance child tax credit payments, you can claim the full credit amount when you file your 2021 tax return during the 2022 tax filing season," according to the IRS.

And again, you want to keep Letter 6419 to help you accurately report the total dollar amount you've already received upfront in 2021. 

The total child tax credit for 2021 itself amounts to up to $3,600 per child ages 5 and younger and up to $3,000 for each qualifying child age 6 through 17. 

If you have one child aged 3, you likely could have received $300 a month from July through December for a total of up to $1,800. Now, when you'd file your 2021 federal income tax return you could be owed another bit of money, up to $1,800. 

The tax rules, though, are complicated and the actual amount you'd receive now for your child tax credit is based on your 2021 income. If your income went up substantially in 2021, you might not qualify for more credit cash. 

Those monthly payouts in 2021 — via direct deposit into bank accounts or by paper check in the mail — were based on information from an income tax return you already filed or information you entered in the IRS non-filer sign-up tool in 2020 or 2021.

A lot might have changed in 2021, of course. Maybe you made more money last year and qualify for a smaller amount for the child tax credit than initially calculated. 

The IRS suggests that you review each monthly payment, including any changes, at IRS.gov/ctcportal and then click “Manage Advance Payments.”

If you did not receive one or more payments for the advance child tax credit, you should contact the IRS at 800-908-4184 before filing your return. 

Meet Claudell, one of our tax experts. She has 25 years of experience.

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  • Tax Planning

IRS Letters 6419 and 6475 for the Advance Child Tax Credit and Third Stimulus: What You Need to Know

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  • Written by Katharina Reekmans, EA
  • Published Jan 20, 2022 - [Updated Mar 18, 2022]

The IRS is sending two new forms this year. One to people who received the monthly advance Child Tax Credit Payments and one to people who received a stimulus payment in 2021. If you got either of those, you will need these forms to file – don’t throw them out!  

Letter 6419, 2021 Advance Child Tax Credit (CTC) : If you received monthly CTC payments this past year, you should receive this letter from the IRS in January. If you filed as married filing jointly on your prior year tax return, then both you and your spouse will receive a Letter 6419.

You need both letters when filing your return as you will enter both amounts to be added to your tax return. This letter will have the total amount of advance Child Tax Credit payments you received from July 2021 to December 2021, and you will need that number when you file your taxes. Why? The IRS will use this number to help reconcile your advance Child Tax Credit payments – basically to make sure you got the right amount. If you should have gotten higher CTC monthly payments, you will get that additional money as part of  your refund. If you received too much in CTC payments, you may owe that money back at tax time.

Letter 6419

copy of letter 6419 irs

Letter 6475, Your Third Economic Impact Payment : This letter will have the total amount of your stimulus payment in 2021 (just the third one, you received in 2021). If you didn’t get the full stimulus amount you were eligible for, then you may be able to claim those dollars through the Recovery Rebate Credit on your tax return. This letter has all the info you need to report the correct amount of the third stimulus you received and understand if you are eligible for additional stimulus dollars and how much. I f you and your spouse are filing a married filing joint return you will need to add the amounts from both your letters when completing your tax return. 

Don’t worry about knowing about these new letters and rules. TurboTax has specific guidance related to these new provisions and will help you easily report your advance Child Tax Credit payments and your third stimulus payment you received, so you can claim the additional credits you are eligible for.

Letter 6475

copy of letter 6419 irs

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) 

Q: My spouse and I both got a Letter 6475, how much do I input when filing my taxes? 

A: The Letter 6475 confirms the total amount of the third stimulus check (Economic Impact Payment) and any plus-up payments you received for tax year 2021. If you received joint payments with your spouse, the letters show the total amount of payment. If you file married filing a joint return you will need both letters when filing your tax return as both amounts will need to be added together on your tax return. If you file separate 2021 tax returns, each of you must enter your half of the payment amount.

Q: I did not receive my Letter 6475, is there any other way to get this information? 

A : If you did not receive your Letter 6475, you can check Your IRS Online Account to securely access your individual IRS account information. The amount of your third Economic Impact Payment is shown on the Tax Records tab/page under the section “Economic Impact Payment Information”. If you and your spouse received joint payments, each of you will need to sign into your own account to retrieve your separate amounts.

Q: My spouse and I both got a Letter 6419, how much do I input when filing my taxes? 

A: Married filers, you both will receive your own IRS Letter 6419. If you are married filing a joint tax return, you will need both letters when filing your tax return as both amounts will need to be added together on your tax return.

Q: I did not receive my Letter 6419, is there any other way to get this information? 

A: If you did not receive your Letter 6419, you can check Your IRS Online Accoun t to securely access your individual IRS account information. In your IRS Online Account you will be able to get your advance Child Tax Credit payment total and number of qualifying children.

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Katharina Reekmans

Written by Katharina Reekmans

Katharina Reekmans is an Enrolled Agent and a contributor to the TurboTax Blog team. Katharina has years of experience in tax preparation and representation before the IRS. Her passions surround financial literary and tax law interpretation. She has a strong commitment to using all resources and knowledge to best serve the interest of clients. Katharina has worked as a senior tax accountant, operations manager, and controller. Katharina prides herself on unraveling tax laws so that the average person can understand them. More from Katharina Reekmans

19 responses to “IRS Letters 6419 and 6475 for the Advance Child Tax Credit and Third Stimulus: What You Need to Know”

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I file jointly with my wife. We each received letter 6419, but I don’t see where to enter that information into TurboTax. TurboTax is asking me for information from letter 6475 – which neither of us received.

What should I do?

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Hi Doug, Enter your Advance Child Tax Credit information from IRS Letter 6419 here: 1. Open your return. 2. Click on Federal tab under Tax Home. 3. Click on the Edit/Add button next to Advance payments, Child and Other Dependent Tax Credits (under Your tax breaks). 4. Answer the interview questions.

For the questions about the 6475, TurboTax may be asking you questions to determine if you are eligible for a Recovery Rebate Credit for the third stimulus payment.

Hope this helps! Best, Katharina Reekmans

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We received “monthly payments” and from my understanding that means we should have gotten a form 6419, but my husband and I both received forms 6475 and it adds up to double (plus some) of what we actually received. How do I go about inputting this information?

To clarify, letter 6475 has information regarding your third stimulus payment. But if you haven’t received your letter 6419 and received monthly advance payments of the child tax credit you can check your IRS Online Account to get the total of advance monthly payments you received and the number of qualifying children. Likewise, if you need information regarding your third Economic Impact Payment (also known as third stimulus check) you can find this information on your IRS Online Account. Both you and your spouse will need to sign into your own IRS Online Account to retrieve your separate amounts to be added together when filing your taxes if married filing a joint return.

Hope this helps! Sincerely, Katharina Reekmans

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Hi I see oops wrong letter my number 6475, sorry, I be my real letter 6465 my account. This fix change new my letter 6465 real my account . Thank u

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Neither myself or my husband received form 6419 and we are married filing jointly. The IRS website has the same information on each accounts. Do I add the two amounts together? Or do I use one amount for the two children?

Hi Jeannette, If you and your husband are married filing a joint tax return you will need to add the amounts from the two accounts together. Hope this helps! Sincerely, Katharina Reekmans

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My wife received letter 6475 but I did not. Should I have also received the letter since we filed jointly last year? Is there any circumstance where my wife would receive it, but I would not?

You should have also received a Letter 6475 if you received a third stimulus payment in 2021. If you did not receive your Letter 6475, you can check Your IRS Online Account to securely access your individual IRS account information.

Hope this helps! Best Regards, Katharina Reekmans

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Still not very clear on 6475. Wife and I file jointly in 2021 and now again in 2022. We both received a 6475 letter. We both show $2,100 on each letter. On the Turbotax form on the question for 6475 do we add both the amounts, $2,100 from wife’s letter + the $2,100 from my letter, TOTAL of $4,200 in to the form or just one $2,100?

If you received joint payments with your spouse, the letter 6475 show the total amount of payment. If you file a married filing joint tax return, you will enter the one amount ($4,200 based on the details you shared). If you file separate 2021 tax returns, each of you must enter half of the amount of the payment.

Hope this provides some clarity. Best Regards, Katharina Reekmans

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From what I understand, the 3rd stimulus was “non-taxable”. When I came to the part regarding putting that information in, I noticed that if you put the total amount you received in the box, your tax refund drops like 90%. If you don’t put your total amount of the 3rd stimulus in, then your tax refund amount doesn’t drop.

Why is that my tax refund goes down if I report my $1400 on my tax return but stays the same if I don’t?

You are correct, the stimulus payments are not considered taxable income. When completing your tax return, until you put in the amount that you received for the third stimulus payment, the software assumes that you did not receive any money. Once you input the amount of the stimulus payment you received the refund amount will be decreased by that number as you already received the money.

Hope this provides more clarity! Sincerely, Katharina Reekmans

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Your explanation is still not clear

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I am married filing jointly and both my spouse and I both received a letter 6475 from the IRS with the same amount on each (in our case $4900 on both). Am I supposed to claim the combined amount ($9800) or claim the $4900?

If you are married filing jointly you and your spouse will both receive a letter 6419 from the IRS. The amounts on each letter 6419 need to be added together to claim the correct amount of the credit on your tax return. The letter 6475 will include information on amount of your stimulus payment in 2021 (just the third stimulus payment).

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Hi Katharina –

I have the same question. My question is not about letter 6419, but letter 6475. The TurboTax software instructs the tax filer to enter the amount from both letters 6419 if you are married filing jointly (the amounts are entered in two separate boxes). The TurboTax software does not instruct the tax filer to do the same with the amount from letter 6475 (there is only one box). Should the amount entered be from only one letter 6475 or the combined amount from both letters 6475 when married filing jointly. Thanks.

If you received a joint payment with your spouse, the letter 6475 shows the total amount of payments. If you file separate 2021 tax returns, each of you must enter your half of the amount of the payment shown on Letter 6475. So if you and your spouse are filing a married filing joint return you can enter the one amount (adding the amounts) from both letters as the total in that one box on the TurboTax software.

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If both parents received these letters and they are the same numbers as far as number of children and the amounts received, do you add them 2 $ amounts together?

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Child Tax Credit: If You Didn’t Receive IRS Letter 6419, Do This

Shot of couple getting their children ready for the school.

This tax season, parents and families will need to pay special attention to their filing in order to reconcile the child tax credit amounts they may or may not have received throughout 2021 . The IRS has sent out a letter to families, Letter 6419, detailing the amount of money taxpayers received last year in terms of advance payments. You will need this letter in order to file your taxes — spelling out how much you did, or did not, receive. It will also detail how much of a credit you are still eligible for in 2022.

If you did not receive the letter, here’s what you can do. 

The IRS has stated that these letters went out in January, so if you still have not received one it’s best to wait a few days to see if it arrives shortly. If not, you can use the online CTC portal to check if your information, such as your current mailing address, is correct. You can also contact the IRS via phone at 1-800-829-1040.

If you did receive the letter — but lost or misplaced it — the process will be the same. Contact the IRS or access the CTC portal as soon as possible to make sure you can file accurate taxes. This letter is particularly important for reconciling the correct amount of the enhanced credit you are to receive, as to avoid owing the IRS any money.

If, for example, there is any discrepancy in your income — or let’s say, you recently divorced — by having this letter there will be no question as to how much you received (or are owed) this year for the enhanced child tax credit. The credit is based on 2020 and 2019 tax returns, meaning if there was a significant change of status in the last year (such as significantly increased income) it could mean money owed to the IRS . 

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5 things to know about IRS Letter 6419 and the child tax credit

Parents are flooded with paperwork every single day of the year. But this year, they absolutely want to keep track of one key letter — Letter 6419, to be sent to you by none other than the Internal Revenue Service.

Do not throw this letter away. Keep this letter with all of your other important tax paperwork, including your W-2s. Repeat, keep this letter to do your taxes.

The IRS said in early January that it started issuing these letters in December to those who received advance child tax credit money last year. But many parents had yet to spot this letter in the mail as of Jan. 19. It's important to keep an eye out for this information.

The IRS will kick off the tax season on Jan. 24 when it will first begin accepting and processing tax returns.

Some families may want to hold off a bit when it comes to filing a return until they spot the letter, which can help file an accurate return and avoid delays. Others who don't want to wait may need to review their own records and check their specific information at the IRS "Child Tax Credit Update Portal Site."

Someone who normally does not make enough money to be required to file a tax return will still need to keep this letter to claim extra money that could be owed for the child tax credit when you file a 2021 federal income tax return. "Even if you had $0 in income," the IRS notes, "you could have received advance Child Tax Credit payments if you were eligible."

Families who received the advance child tax credit in 2021— the money went out from July through December — must reconcile what they received last year with what their financial situation is this year and file a Schedule 8812.

The monthly advance payments, part of a temporary expanded program, were designed so that half the total credit amount would be paid in advance monthly payments from July through December last year.

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The tax filer will claim the other half when filing a 2021 income tax return. The IRS issued the first advance payment on July 15, 2021.

What does Letter 6419 look like?

While many have not yet seen the letter, I reviewed a sample copy of IRS Letter 6419 that is posted online at IRS.gov. It was found on the IRS page called "Understanding Your Letter 6419."

Letter 6419 is a black-and-white one-page letter with an IRS logo on the top left corner. It is issued by the Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service.

The letter has a big box at the top stating: "2021 Total Advance Child Tax Credit (AdvCTC) Payments."

The letter states in bold: "Keep this important tax information. You need it to prepare your 2021 income tax return."

The very top of the correspondence does not state "Letter 6419" in bold letters across the top. But it is marked as "Letter 6419" on the very bottom right-hand corner.

The term "Letter 6419" is also listed in Box 1 at the top of the letter in the sentence that refers to married couples filing a joint return for tax year 2021.

Will I get one or two of these letters?

Great question. You might expect one letter. After all, a married couple who files a joint return files just one tax return, so it would be logical that one couple would receive one letter. No, that's not the case at all.

The IRS will be sending two letters — and you're going to need to keep both of them — to married couples filing a joint return, according to April Walker, lead manager for tax practice and ethics with the American Institute of CPAs.

According to instructions on the example posted at IRS.gov: "If you file a joint return for tax year 2021, you must add the amounts in Box 1 from both Letters 6419 and enter the total amount on Schedule 8812."

Keep both letters. Do not assume you got a duplicate letter out of the blue and throw one away.

What key information is on Letter 6419?

The letter itself spells out two key components that were used to calculate your advance child tax credit payments in 2021.

Box 1, which is at the very top of this letter, will tell you the total dollar amount of money you received for the advance child tax credit payments over six months in 2021. You need to enter that amount on Schedule 8812 called "Credits for Qualifying Children and Other Dependents" on line 14f or line 15e, whichever applies.

Box 2, which is right under Box 1, lists the number of qualifying children that were taken into account when the advance payments were determined for 2021. (Note: If you are dressing and feeding two little ones in the morning — including a baby born in 2021 — the box will likely list one child. Parents who had a baby born in 2021 did not receive advance payments last year but now can claim that child on their 2021 income tax returns to receive money.)

The IRS notes that "families who received advance payments need to file a 2021 tax return and compare the advance payments they received in 2021 with the amount of the child tax credit they can properly claim on their 2021 tax return."

Why does any of this matter?

If you lose the letter — and do not come up with a number that exactly matches the IRS files — you're likely to face lengthy delays in processing your income tax return.

And yes, you'll wait a long time to get your federal income tax refund.

Schedule 8812 notes specifically on Line 14f: "Caution: If the amount on this line doesn’t match the aggregate amounts reported to you (and your spouse if filing jointly) on your Letter(s) 6419, the processing of your return will be delayed."

Mark Steber, Jackson Hewitt’s Chief Tax Information Officer, cautioned tax filers that taxpayers need to make sure their total dollar amount for what was received for the advance payments is accurate when they file their tax returns.

"If this information isn’t correct on the 2021 tax return, taxpayers risk a delay in receiving their refund," Steber warned.

Antonio Brown, a CPA in Flint, said on Jan. 20 that he had not heard of any of his clients getting the letter yet.

It is possible, he said, to file the tax return without the letter but you need to know exactly how much advance child tax credit you have received and how many dependents the money covered in 2021.

In general, Brown said, it is important to refer to Letter 6419 before you file a return because in some cases, a taxpayer could have received a different amount for one child under age 5 and another amount for the dependent ages 6 through 17. Some families could be confused about how much was received.

As part of the monthly payments, families received up to $300 for each child through age 5 or up to $250 each for child from age 6 through 17.

"The letter breaks down how much was received and how many dependents it was for," Brown said.

If taxpayers have not received the letter, taxpayers can look up the amounts on the IRS website at the "Child Tax Credit Update Portal." But you're going to need to create a user account with the IRS.

Brown noted that his early filer clients did not have the letter to prepare the return but they were able to go to the IRS website to obtain this information, or they reviewed their bank statements to find it.

George Smith, a CPA with Andrews Hooper Pavlik in Bloomfield Hills, said he has one earlier filer client who fortunately did receive the letter already and they were able to easily file the return.

Can I get more money from the child tax credit?

Quite possibly. You want to file Schedule 8812 to claim any of your remaining money for the child tax credit.

"If you are eligible for the child tax credit, but did not receive advance child tax credit payments, you can claim the full credit amount when you file your 2021 tax return during the 2022 tax filing season," according to the IRS.

And again, you want to keep Letter 6419 to help you accurately report the total dollar amount you've already received upfront in 2021.

The total child tax credit for 2021 itself amounts to up to $3,600 per child ages 5 and younger and up to $3,000 for each qualifying child age 6 through 17.

If you have one child age 3, you likely could have received $300 a month from July through December for a total of up to $1,800. Now, when you'd file your 2021 federal income tax return you could be owed another bit of money, up to $1,800.

The tax rules, though, are complicated and the actual amount you'd receive now for your child tax credit is based on your 2021 income. If your income went up substantially in 2021, you might not qualify for more credit cash.

Those monthly payouts in 2021 — via direct deposit into bank accounts or by paper check in the mail — were based on information from an income tax return you already filed or information you entered in the IRS non-filer sign-up tool in 2020 or 2021.

A lot might have changed in 2021, of course. Maybe you made more money last year and qualify for a smaller amount for the child tax credit than initially calculated.

The IRS suggests that you review each monthly payment, including any changes, at IRS.gov/ctcportal and then click “Manage Advance Payments.”

If you did not receive one or more payments for the advance child tax credit, you should contact the IRS at 800-908-4184 before filing your return.

Contact Susan Tompor: [email protected] . Follow her on Twitter @ tompor . To subscribe, please go to freep.com/specialoffer. R ead more on business and sign up for our business newsletter .

This article originally appeared on Detroit Free Press: 5 things to know about IRS Letter 6419, taxes and the child tax credit

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Everything Parents Need To Know About Letter 6419 From The IRS

And what to do if you threw it away, because it happens.

If you received Advance Child Tax Credit (ACTC) payments in July through Dec. of 2021 (the only six months they were sent out), then you probably received the Letter 6419 from the International Revenue Service (IRS) in the mail. Hopefully you didn’t mistake it for junk mail and throw it out, but if you (or your partner) is like me and you indiscriminately chuck things into the trash can, you may not be totally out of luck. Here we’ll break down what Letter 6419 is, why it’s important when filing your 2021 taxes, why the information could seem wrong, and of course, what to do if it’s in a landfill now instead of in your filing cabinet.

What is Letter 6419?

In its simplest form, Letter 6419 is a letter parents need to do their taxes. It contains information of how much you received in ACTC payments, plus the number of kids you received payments for. Generally, if you received all six months of payments it will total $3,600 for kids who were 5 and under at the end of 2021 and $3,000 for children ages 6 through 17. (There are no payments for children 18 and over.)

The reason it’s so important to save the letter is because you will need to report it on your 2021 tax return. The IRS will use this figure to help reconcile your ACTC payment; basically so that they can figure out how much they still owe you (or you owe them).

Because payments were only made for six months, parents can (and should) claim the other half on their 2021 tax return. So, for example, if you have one 4-year-old and you meet the eligibility requirements, you should receive an addition $3,600 in your tax return. Score.

One thing to remember if you’re filing jointly is that each spouse will receive a copy of IRS letter 6419, and you will both need to report the information on your letter in the return, even when filing jointly. Last year, there was a major uptick in the amount of “ math errors notices ” sent by the IRS, and this was largely because of mistakes made when reporting stimulus check gains — according to CNBC it’s expected that user errors are also likely to be made when reporting ACTC amounts to the IRS (which is understandable as it can be confusing). These errors will result in a slower processing and payments, so try your best to be accurate.

Why is my Letter 6419 inaccurate?

According to CNBC, some people are reporting that letter 6419 contains incorrect information (i.e. the amount they received in credits does not match the amount recorded in the letter). This is frustrating, but can happen for several reasons. The numbers in your Letter 6419 might be wrong if you had another child or gained another dependent since you last filed your taxes.

It may also contain incorrect information if you moved in 2021 or changed bank accounts (in both of these scenarios, the IRS would have either sent a check or deposited money which you did not actually receive, though they think you did).

If there is an unexplained discrepancy, you can log into the Child Tax Credit Portal and see if there is an updated figure. Things still look off? “If the details on your child tax credit letter aren't correct , wait for further instructions from the IRS. The agency said it is working to provide people with the updated information they need to file their taxes,” per CNET.

Do I have to repay my Advance Child Tax payments?

Your eligibility for ACTC payments was determined by your 2020 taxes. If your 2021 income rose over the threshold for child tax credit eligibility ($150,000 if married and filing a joint return or if filing as a qualifying widow or widower; $112,500 if filing as head of household; or $75,000 if you are a single filer or are married and filing a separate return, per the IRS) you will likely have to make repayments.

You may also have to make child tax credit repayments if your child turned 18 in 2021, or if you’re divorced and you claimed your child in 2020 but your child’s other parent will claim that as a dependent in 2021, per CNBC. If your main home was not in the United States for over half of 2021, you may also be required to pay back some of the money.

When was the IRS 6419 letter mailed?

The IRS started mailing these letters in December and continued to do so through January 2022. If your Letter 6419 was mailed at the tail-end of January, it’s entirely possible that you have not yet received it, so keep an eye out in the first few weeks of February as it should be coming soon.

How can I get a new IRS 6419 letter?

Okay so you (or someone in your family, not pointing any fingers here) threw away your Letter 6419. Not ideal, but it’s not the end of the world either. When you’re ready to file but the all-important letter is nowhere to be found, “you can use the IRS Child Tax Credit portal with an ID.me account to verify the details from the letter,” according to H&R Block . Here is a link to the IRS website to create the appropriate log-in.

Like so much to do with both parenting in 2021 and tax season in general, the IRS’s Letter 6419 feels confusing and complicated, but it’s actually not too bad one you know what it’s for. The hardest part may be not losing it in a sea of paperwork, and the good news is, you’ll likely be eligible for more money once you file.

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Lookout for advance child tax credit letter.

Lookout for Advance Child Tax Credit Letter

There have been important changes to the Child Tax Credit that allowed families to receive advance payments in 2021. 

Families with qualifying children received financial assistance during the year rather than waiting for 2022 after the tax return was filed.

Do not discard Letter 6419

The IRS began sending Letter 6419, 2021 advance Child Tax Credit, in December 2021. The letter includes the total amount of advance payments sent to the taxpayer and the number of qualifying children used to calculate the advance payments.  

Keep this letter; you will need to provide it to your tax preparer to ensure your return is prepared optimally. 

The advance payments were based on 2020 information about family residency, composition, and number of qualifying children. However, things change, and the actual family situation in 2021 could be different. 

letter 6419

The credit eligibility FAQ presents an extensive list of eligibility criteria.

The first eligibility criterion: you or your spouse (if filing jointly) must have lived in the United States for more than six months during the 2021 year.

Credit received, but no longer eligible = taxable income

Importantly - if the family received the advance payments based on 2020 information, but no longer qualifies, the advance credit money will become taxable income.

  • If the family qualified but the number of children was different in 2021 than it was in 2020, the amount of the credit gets recalculated. It may be increased or reduced vs the amount already received. 
  • If a joint couple divorced, this presents other challenges.

2021 Form 1040 contains new section for Advance Child Credit

The IRS dedicated a whole new section inside the tax return 2021 to Child Credit review and calculations. The process involves recalculation of the allowed credit amount by comparing the 2020 data to 2021 information. Completion of this section by tax preparer will require additional research and document analysis. This is an entirely new work step compared to the child credit processing in prior years. 

Importantly, every family with dependent children claimed on the 2021 tax return, including families who never received the child credit before, must have the section related to the Child Tax Credit eligibility completed.

IRS sent additional letter 6475

Separate from the Advance Child Credit, many taxpayers will have received IRS Letter 6475. This letter details how much stimulus money you received in 2021, including plus-up payments. It will be sent out in late January to everyone who received the third round of stimulus checks. See  article  for more information.

copy of letter 6419 irs

Susan Tompor: 5 things to know about IRS Letter 6419 and the child tax credit

Parents are flooded with paperwork every single day of the year.

But this year, they absolutely want to keep track of one key letter – Letter 6419, to be sent to you by none other than the Internal Revenue Service.

Do not throw this letter away. Keep this letter with all of your other important tax paperwork, including your W-2s. Repeat, keep this letter to do your taxes.

The IRS said in early January that it started issuing these letters in December to those who received advance child tax credit money last year.

But many parents had yet to spot this letter in the mail as of Jan. 19. It’s important to keep an eye out for this information.

The IRS kicked off the tax season on Monday when it began accepting and processing tax returns.

Some families may want to hold off a bit when it comes to filing a return until they spot the letter, which can help file an accurate return and avoid delays.

Others who don’t want to wait may need to review their own records and check their specific information at the IRS “ Child Tax Credit Update Portal Site.”

Someone who normally does not make enough money to be required to file a tax return will still need to keep this letter to claim extra money that could be owed for the child tax credit when you file a 2021 federal income tax return.

“Even if you had $0 in income,” the IRS notes, “you could have received advance Child Tax Credit payments if you were eligible.”

Families that received the advance child tax credit in 2021 – the money went out from July through December – must reconcile what they received last year with what their financial situation is this year and file a Schedule 8812.

The monthly advance payments, part of a temporary expanded program, were designed so that half the total credit amount would be paid in advance monthly payments from July through December last year.

The tax filer will claim the other half when filing a 2021 income tax return. The IRS issued the first advance payment on July 15.

What does Letter 6419 look like?

While many have not yet seen the letter, I reviewed a sample copy of IRS Letter 6419 that is posted online at IRS.gov.

It was found on the IRS page called ”Understanding Your Letter 6419.”

Letter 6419 is a black-and-white one-page letter with an IRS logo on the top left corner.

It is issued by the Department of Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service.

The letter has a big box at the top stating: “2021 Total Advance Child Tax Credit (AdvCTC) Payments.”

The letter states in bold: “Keep this important tax information. You need it to prepare your 2021 income tax return.”

The very top of the correspondence does not state “Letter 6419” in bold letters across the top.

But it is marked as “Letter 6419” on the very bottom right-hand corner.

The term “Letter 6419” is also listed in Box 1 at the top of the letter in the sentence that refers to married couples filing a joint return for tax year 2021.

Will I get one or two of these letters?

Great question.

You might expect one letter.

After all, a married couple who files a joint return files just one tax return, so it would be logical that one couple would receive one letter. No, that’s not the case at all.

The IRS will be sending two letters – and you’re going to need to keep both of them – to married couples filing a joint return, according to April Walker, lead manager for tax practice and ethics with the American Institute of CPAs.

According to instructions on the example posted at IRS.gov : “If you file a joint return for tax year 2021, you must add the amounts in Box 1 from both Letters 6419 and enter the total amount on Schedule 8812.”

Keep both letters. Do not assume you got a duplicate letter out of the blue and throw one away.

What key information is on Letter 6419?

The letter itself spells out two key components that were used to calculate your advance child tax credit payments in 2021.

Box 1, which is at the very top of this letter, will tell you the total dollar amount of money you received for the advance child tax credit payments over six months in 2021.

You need to enter that amount on Schedule 8812 called “Credits for Qualifying Children and Other Dependents” on line 14f or line 15e, whichever applies.

Box 2, which is right under Box 1, lists the number of qualifying children that were taken into account when the advance payments were determined for 2021.

(Note: If you are dressing and feeding two little ones in the morning – including a baby born in 2021 – the box will likely list one child. Parents who had a baby born in 2021 did not receive advance payments last year but now can claim that child on their 2021 income tax returns to receive money.)

The IRS notes that “families who received advance payments need to file a 2021 tax return and compare the advance payments they received in 2021 with the amount of the child tax credit they can properly claim on their 2021 tax return.”

Why does any of this matter?

If you lose the letter – and do not come up with a number that exactly matches the IRS files – you’re likely to face lengthy delays in processing your income tax return.

And yes, you’ll wait a long time to get your federal income tax refund.

Schedule 8812 notes specifically on Line 14f: “Caution: If the amount on this line doesn’t match the aggregate amounts reported to you (and your spouse if filing jointly) on your Letter(s) 6419, the processing of your return will be delayed.”

Mark Steber, Jackson Hewitt’s Chief Tax Information Officer, cautioned tax filers that taxpayers need to make sure their total dollar amount for what was received for the advance payments is accurate when they file their tax returns.

“If this information isn’t correct on the 2021 tax return, taxpayers risk a delay in receiving their refund,” Steber warned.

Antonio Brown, a CPA in Flint, said on Jan. 20 that he had not heard of any of his clients getting the letter yet.

It is possible, he said, to file the tax return without the letter but you need to know exactly how much advance child tax credit you have received and how many dependents the money covered in 2021.

In general, Brown said, it is important to refer to Letter 6419 before you file a return because in some cases, a taxpayer could have received a different amount for one child under age 5 and another amount for the dependent ages 6 through 17.

Some families could be confused about how much was received.

As part of the monthly payments, families received up to $300 for each child through age 5 or up to $250 each for child from age 6 through 17.

“The letter breaks down how much was received and how many dependents it was for,” Brown said.

If taxpayers have not received the letter, taxpayers can look up the amounts on the IRS website at the ”Child Tax Credit Update Portal.” But you’re going to need to create a user account with the IRS.

Brown noted that his early filer clients did not have the letter to prepare the return but they were able to go to the IRS website to obtain this information, or they reviewed their bank statements to find it.

George Smith, a CPA with Andrews Hooper Pavlik in Southfield, said he has one earlier filer client who fortunately did receive the letter already and they were able to easily file the return.

Can I get more money from the child tax credit?

Quite possibly. You want to file Schedule 8812 to claim any of your remaining money for the child tax credit.

“If you are eligible for the child tax credit, but did not receive advance child tax credit payments, you can claim the full credit amount when you file your 2021 tax return during the 2022 tax filing season,” according to the IRS.

And again, you want to keep Letter 6419 to help you accurately report the total dollar amount you’ve already received upfront in 2021.

The total child tax credit for 2021 itself amounts to up to $3,600 per child ages 5 and younger and up to $3,000 for each qualifying child age 6 through 17.

If you have one child age 3, you likely could have received $300 a month from July through December for a total of up to $1,800. Now, when you’d file your 2021 federal income tax return you could be owed another bit of money, up to $1,800.

The tax rules, though, are complicated and the actual amount you’d receive now for your child tax credit is based on your 2021 income. If your income went up substantially in 2021, you might not qualify for more credit cash.

Those monthly payouts in 2021 – via direct deposit into bank accounts or by paper check in the mail – were based on information from an income tax return you already filed or information you entered in the IRS non-filer sign-up tool in 2020 or 2021.

A lot might have changed in 2021, of course. Maybe you made more money last year and qualify for a smaller amount for the child tax credit than initially calculated.

The IRS suggests that you review each monthly payment, including any changes, at IRS.gov/ctcportal and then click “Manage Advance Payments.”

If you did not receive one or more payments for the advance child tax credit, you should contact the IRS at 800-908-4184 before filing your return.

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IRS letter 6419 is important for filing taxes this year: What is it? What if you’ve thrown it away?

  • Published: Jan. 25, 2022, 6:39 a.m.

BIZ-PFP-TOMPOR-COLUMN-DE

If you received money for the child tax credit in 2021, you want to keep track of one key letter -- Letter 6419 from the Internal Revenue Service. (Susan Tompor/Detroit Free Press/TNS) TNS

We’re all accustomed to keeping up with paperwork needed to file taxes. There’s an extra document you will likely need this year, however, and it’s coming straight from the Internal Revenue Service.

The IRS started sending Letter 6419 in December with more coming this month. The letter, being sent to people who received the advanced child tax credit last year, should be saved for tax filing purposes.

According to the IRS, the letter is critical in helping parents accurately report the amount of money they received upfront in 2021. People who received less than the amount they are eligible for can claim a credit for the difference; those who received more than they were eligible for may be on the hook for the difference.

The expanded credit provided up to $300 per month per child 5 and younger – or $250 per month for children ages 6-17 – from July to December 2021. The remaining equal amount can be claimed when filing 2021 taxes.

What if you haven’t gotten a letter?

Keep an eye on the mailbox – it may not have arrived yet.

However, if you haven’t received a notice by the time you’re ready to file your taxes you will have to use the online child tax credit portal to confirm your information or contact the IRS directly by phone at 1-800-829-1040, CNET reported.

If you’ve gotten a letter but lost it, you can find your child tax credit information via the child tax credit portal on the IRS website. You’ll be required to register for an IRS account to access the info.

If you purchase a product or register for an account through a link on our site, we may receive compensation. By using this site, you consent to our User Agreement and agree that your clicks, interactions, and personal information may be collected, recorded, and/or stored by us and social media and other third-party partners in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

News and Announcements

Letter 6419: what it is and why you need to hang onto it.

IRS letter next to pile of $20 bills

What Is Letter 6419?

In 2021, most parents received a source of income that was brand new: the expanded child tax credit. Letter 6419 is a statement from the IRS showing how much you received in those advanced child tax credit payments last year. It will also list the number of qualifying dependents that the IRS used to calculate the total credit amount you received.

Now, you might be thinking, “Why do I need a letter from the IRS for the tax return I’ll send to the IRS?” As redundant as this process sounds, Letter 6419 is simply your opportunity to double check the IRS’s math and ensure you received the correct amount in advanced payments last year.

What’s Likely to Be Incorrect?

How likely is it that the IRS calculated your advanced child tax credits incorrectly? The odds are actually pretty low—so long as your number of dependents didn’t change. However, if you had a baby since you filed your last tax return, for example, you would have one more qualifying dependent than what the IRS has on their records. This would mean that you’d qualify for additional child tax credit payments.

Why Should You Hang onto It?

As with any tax form, it’s important to hang onto Letter 6419 as a proof of your income. You might think, “But the IRS has this information, so I don’t need to hang onto it.” The fact of the matter is, the IRS has information for your other sources of income too—your employer reports it to them as well—but you need to retain this information to support the numbers you put on your tax return.

Additionally, it’s worth noting that most taxpayers don’t actually know exactly how much they should have received in advanced child tax credit payments last year. This was a never-before-seen source of income, and understanding exactly what you were receiving at the time wasn’t high on most people’s priority lists at the time. Now that it’s time to file, this letter can help you to understand how much you received, why you received that amount, and give you a point of reference for determining whether or not you received the right amount.

What If You Never Got It?

At this point, most taxpayers should have received Letter 6419. However, it’s no secret that postal service has been slower than normal over the last several months. So, keep an eye on your mailbox, and hopefully it will come in soon. If you haven’t received your letter by the time that you’re ready to file, there could be an issue. You’ll need to use the online child tax credit portals to confirm your 2021 payments, or contact the IRS directly by mail or phone.

What If You Lost or Threw It Away?

If you got your letter already, didn’t realize its importance, and already threw it away, don’t panic. While we obviously urge people to keep Letter 6419 with all of their other tax documents (and you generally don’t want to throw out anything you get from the IRS), we recognize that mistakes do happen—and the IRS knows this too. Your child tax credit information is available through the IRS website on their child tax credit portals.

If you haven’t yet registered for an account on the IRS website, this can take some time and patience to verify your identity. However, once your account is set up, all of the information you need will be in your portal, and you can use it just as you would have used Letter 6419 to prepare your taxes.

Will You Get an Additional Child Tax Credit Payment?

The answer to this depends on how much you received on 2021 and how much you actually qualified for. For example, if you opted out of the advanced payments altogether, you’ll get your full expanded child tax credit when you file your return. However, if you received the full advanced payment amount, and it was calculated correctly, you won’t receive any additional child tax credit payments when you file.

Obviously, this means that the answer to whether or not you can expect an additional child tax credit payment will vary for every person. So if you’re unsure and need assistance with filing your tax return, contact us. We’ll help you understand those advanced child tax credit payments and ensure you get the full amount you deserved.

WJW-TV Cleveland

What to do if you get this letter from the IRS

(WJW) – If you get this letter from the IRS , don’t throw it away.

LT38 Notices started being sent out at the beginning of the year.

Nearly 3.7 million people will get one.

Here’s what it means:

Collection notices that were suspended during the pandemic are coming back.

LT38 Notices are a reminder about outstanding balances as normal operations resume. The notices will include a balance and options to resolve your account.

Here’s what the IRS says to do:

  • Read your notice and follow the instructions
  • File missing tax returns (if any)
  • Pay your balance or make payment arrangements

The letter will contain information on how much is owed and when it is due. The IRS says outstanding balances will also collect interest.

Still have questions? Here are some answers from the IRS .

For the latest news, weather, sports, and streaming video, head to Fox 8 Cleveland WJW.

What to do if you get this letter from the IRS

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IRS shares 7 warning signs Employee Retention Credit claims may be incorrect; urges businesses to revisit eligibility, resolve issues now before March 22

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IR-2024-39, Feb. 13, 2024

WASHINGTON — With a key March deadline quickly approaching, the Internal Revenue Service today highlighted special warning signs that an Employee Retention Credit (ERC) claim may be questionable to help small businesses that may need to resolve incorrect claims.

The agency alerted businesses about seven suspicious warning signs that could signal future IRS problems involving ERC claims. The indicators, built on feedback from the tax professional community and IRS compliance personnel, center on misinformation some unscrupulous ERC promoters used. Many of these groups urged taxpayers to ignore advice from trusted tax professionals and claim the pandemic-era credit even though they may not qualify.

“IRS compliance activity continues increasing involving Employee Retention Credit claims, and those claiming this pandemic-era credit need to quickly review their situation to avoid future problems,” said IRS Commissioner Danny Werfel. “Many businesses were wildly misled about the qualifications, and the IRS is taking a special step to highlight common problems being seen about these claims. The IRS urges ERC claimants to get with a trusted tax professional and review their qualifications before time runs out on IRS disclosure and withdrawal programs. The ‘suspicious seven’ signs released today are clear red flags that ERC claimants should carefully review.”

The alert comes as a March 22, 2024, deadline approaches for the ERC Voluntary Disclosure Program for anyone that filed a claim in error and received a payment; the disclosure program allows businesses to repay just 80% of the claim. Taxpayers who filed a claim previously that hasn’t been processed should also review the guidelines and quickly pursue the claim withdrawal process if they now see their claim is ineligible.

The IRS took steps on the ERC program after the well-intentioned pandemic-era program came under aggressive, misleading marketing that oversimplified or misrepresented eligibility rules. Promoters pushed more applicants into the program, frequently by taking a percentage of the payout. The IRS wants businesses to know about these warning signs, revisit their claim if there are questions and act quickly before the special disclosure and withdrawal programs end. Resolving an incorrect claim through the IRS’s special programs will avoid penalties and interest.

“We’ve heard from the tax pro community and others that sharing more warning signs can help point well-intentioned people in the right direction,” Werfel said. “Many of these taxpayers were misled by overzealous and unscrupulous promoters taking advantage of honest taxpayers. The most beneficial time to resolve any incorrect claims is now before this special window closes.”

The ERC, sometimes called the Employee Retention Tax Credit or ERTC, is complex, and the IRS urged claimants to talk to a reputable tax professional for help with an ERC claim. Taxpayers should avoid working with anyone who doesn’t ask for details or business records, such as payroll records.

7 suspicious signs an ERC claim could be incorrect

Here are some of the common red flags being seen on ERC claims that the IRS is focusing on:

  • Too many quarters being claimed. Some promoters have urged employers to claim the ERC for all quarters that the credit was available. Qualifying for all quarters is uncommon, and this could be a sign of an incorrect claim. Employers should carefully review their eligibility for each quarter.
  • Government orders must have been in effect and the employer’s operations must have been fully or partially suspended by the government order during the period for which they’re claiming the credit.
  • The government order must be due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • The order must be a government order, not guidance, a recommendation or a statement. Some promoters suggest that an employer qualifies based on communications from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This is generally not true. See the ERC FAQ about OSHA communications and the 2023 legal memo on OSHA communications PDF for details and examples. The frequently asked questions about ERC – Qualifying Government Orders section of IRS.gov has helpful examples. Employers should make sure they have documentation of the government order related to COVID-19 and how and when it suspended their operations. Employers should avoid a promoter that supplies a generic narrative about a government order.  
  • Too many employees and wrong calculations. Employers should be cautious about claiming the ERC for all wages paid to every employee on their payroll. The law changed throughout 2020 and 2021. There are dollar limits and varying credit amounts, and employers need to meet certain rules for wages to be considered qualified wages , depending on the tax period. The IRS urges employers to carefully review all calculations and to avoid overclaiming the credit, which can happen if an employer erroneously uses the same credit amount across multiple tax periods for each employee. For details about credit amounts, see the Employee Retention Credit - 2020 vs 2021 Comparison Chart .  
  • Business citing supply chain issues. Qualifying for ERC based on a supply chain disruption is very uncommon. A supply chain disruption by itself doesn’t qualify an employer for ERC. An employer needs to ensure that their supplier’s government order meets the requirements. Employers should carefully review the rules on supply chain issues and examples in the 2023 legal memo on supply chain disruptions PDF .  
  • Business claiming ERC for too much of a tax period. It's possible, but uncommon, for an employer to qualify for ERC for the entire calendar quarter if their business operations were fully or partially suspended due to a government order during a portion of a calendar quarter . A business in this situation can claim ERC only for wages paid during the suspension period, not the whole quarter. Businesses should check their claim for overstated qualifying wages and should keep payroll records that support their claim.  
  • Business didn’t pay wages or didn’t exist during eligibility period. Employers can only claim ERC for tax periods when they paid wages to employees. Some taxpayers claimed the ERC but records available to the IRS show they didn’t have any employees. Others have claimed ERC for tax periods before they even had an employer identification number with the IRS, meaning the business didn’t exist during the eligibility period. The IRS has started disallowing these claims, and more work continues in this area as well as other aspects of ERC.  
  • Promoter says there’s nothing to lose. Businesses should be on high alert with any ERC promoter who urged them to claim ERC because they “have nothing to lose.” Businesses that incorrectly claim the ERC risk repayment requirements, penalties, interest, audit and potential expenses of hiring someone to help resolve the incorrect claim, amend previous returns or represent them in an audit.

Resolving incorrect ERC claims

Businesses that are not eligible for ERC but have received it – as a check that’s been cashed or deposited, or in the form of a credit applied to a tax period – may be able to participate in the IRS’s ERC Voluntary Disclosure Program . The special program runs through March 22, 2024, and allows eligible participants to repay their incorrect ERC, minus 20%.

If a taxpayer’s ERC is incorrect and is paid after Dec. 21, 2023, they aren’t eligible for the ERC VDP. They should not cash or deposit their check. They can withdraw the claim , return the check and avoid penalties and interest.

The withdrawal option lets certain employers withdraw their ERC submission and avoid future repayment, interest and penalties. Businesses can use this option if they haven’t received the payment, or they've received a check but haven’t deposited or cashed it. If a taxpayer’s withdrawal request is accepted, the IRS will treat the claim as though it was never filed.

Resources and tools to learn more about ERC eligibility

The IRS’s frequently asked questions on ERC include links to additional resources and some helpful examples. The IRS also has an interactive ERC Eligibility Checklist that tax professionals and taxpayers can use to check potential eligibility for ERC. It’s also available as a printable guide PDF .

Eligibility highlights

The ERC is available to eligible employers that paid qualified wages to some or all employees after March 12, 2020, and before Jan. 1, 2022. Eligibility and credit amounts vary depending on when the business impacts occurred. The ERC is not available to individuals.

  • For 2020 and the first two calendar quarters of 2021, an employer may qualify if their trade or business operations were fully or partially suspended due to a government order related to COVID-19 or they experienced the required decline in gross receipts .
  • For the third quarter of 2021 , an employer may qualify if their trade or business operations were fully or partially suspended due to a government order related to COVID-19, they experienced the required decline in gross receipts, or they were considered a recovery startup business .
  • For the fourth quarter of 2021 , only recovery startup businesses are eligible.
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IMAGES

  1. IRS to Send Letter 6419 Regarding Advance CTC Payments

    copy of letter 6419 irs

  2. copy of letter 6419 irs

    copy of letter 6419 irs

  3. IRS urges parents to keep Letter 6419 in order to file taxes in 2022

    copy of letter 6419 irs

  4. copy of letter 6419 irs

    copy of letter 6419 irs

  5. IRS Letter 6419 Explained

    copy of letter 6419 irs

  6. What is IRS Letter 6419 and why does it matter before you file taxes

    copy of letter 6419 irs

VIDEO

  1. Download Taxpayer's IRS Transcripts Instantly Without a 2848 8821

COMMENTS

  1. Understanding your letter 6419

    Letter 6419 includes: Total amount of 2021 advance Child Tax Credit (CTC) payments Number of qualifying children used to calculate advance payments, and repayment protection when filing your 2021 federal tax return See Topic H in the FAQs for advance Child Tax Credit Payments information

  2. 2021 Child Tax Credit and Advance Child Tax Credit Payments

    Will I need to repay advance Child Tax Credit payments back to the IRS if they were greater than the Child Tax Credit amount that I am allowed on my 2021 tax return? (updated January 11, 2022) Q H4. How do I know if I don't qualify for the repayment protection for filers based on their income during 2021? (updated February 1, 2022) Q H5.

  3. IRS Letter 6419

    The letter 6419 is the official documentation that has the details you need to report your advance Child Tax Credit (CTC) payments.* Specifically, it will show you: The total amount of advance CTC payments you received for 2021. This information will go on Schedule 8812, line 14f or 15e as applicable.

  4. IRS sending information letters to recipients of advance child tax

    To help taxpayers reconcile and receive all the 2021 child tax credits to which they are entitled, the IRS started sending Letter 6419, 2021 advance CTC, in late December 2021 and will continue into January.

  5. Advance Child Tax Credit Payment (AdvCTC) Letters

    Letter 6419 is sent to help you reconcile and report your 2021 CTC when you file your 2021 federal tax return; the IRS sent Letter 6419 between late December 2021 and January 2022. You should keep this, and any other IRS letters about AdvCTC payments, with your tax records.

  6. Child Tax Credit: How to Get Your Money if You Lost the IRS Letter

    If you accidentally disposed of Letter 6419, lost it or never got it, you can still claim the rest of your money. Your child tax credit information is available via the IRS website, but...

  7. Child tax credit IRS Letter 6419: What to know about advance payments

    Why IRS Letter 6419 is critical to filing your 2021 taxes. Susan Tompor Detroit Free Press 0:00 2:29 Parents are flooded with paperwork every single day of the year. But this year, they...

  8. IRS Letters 6419 and 6475 for the Advance Child Tax Credit and Third

    Create an account The IRS is sending two new forms this year. One to people who received the monthly advance Child Tax Credit Payments and one to people who received a stimulus payment in 2021. If you got either of those, you will need these forms to file - don't throw them out!

  9. Child Tax Credit: If You Didn't Receive IRS Letter 6419, Do This

    The IRS has sent out a letter to families, Letter 6419, detailing the amount of money taxpayers received last year in terms of advance payments. You will need this letter in order to file your taxes — spelling out how much you did, or did not, receive. It will also detail how much of a credit you are still eligible for in 2022.

  10. What to do if you can't find your IRS Letter 6419 and other FAQs

    The Child Tax Credit Letter 6419 will serve as a reminder to log into your IRS tax account and make sure the payments the IRS says you received match up with what was deposited into your account. What to do after receiving the letter 6419 from the IRS? The IRS recommends you keep this letter for your records and include it with your tax documents.

  11. 5 things to know about IRS Letter 6419 and the child tax credit

    While many have not yet seen the letter, I reviewed a sample copy of IRS Letter 6419 that is posted online at IRS.gov. It was found on the IRS page called "Understanding Your Letter 6419."

  12. IRS Letter 6419 For Parents: Why It's Important & How To ...

    Feb. 4, 2022 If you received Advance Child Tax Credit (ACTC) payments in July through Dec. of 2021 (the only six months they were sent out), then you probably received the Letter 6419 from...

  13. IRS issues information letters to Advance Child Tax Credit recipients

    To help taxpayers reconcile and receive all of the Child Tax Credits to which they are entitled, the IRS will send Letter 6419, 2021 advance CTC, starting late December 2021 and continuing into January.

  14. Parents: Don't throw away this IRS letter

    The IRS has mailed families Letter 6419, which states how much they received in monthly child tax credit payments from July through December. It also notes the number of kids the agency used to ...

  15. IRS Letter 6419: What You Need to Know Before Reporting Child Tax

    The IRS began sending Letter 6419, 2021 advance Child Tax Credit, in December 2021. The letter includes the total amount of advance payments sent to the taxpayer and the number of qualifying children used to calculate the advance payments. Keep this letter; you will need to provide it to your tax preparer to ensure your return is prepared ...

  16. Susan Tompor: 5 things to know about IRS Letter 6419 and the child tax

    According to instructions on the example posted at IRS.gov: "If you file a joint return for tax year 2021, you must add the amounts in Box 1 from both Letters 6419 and enter the total amount on ...

  17. IRS letter 6419 is important for filing taxes this year: What is it

    The IRS started sending Letter 6419 in December with more coming this month. The letter, being sent to people who received the advanced child tax credit last year, should be saved for tax filing ...

  18. Letter 6419: What It Is and Why You Need to Hang onto It

    Letter 6419 is a statement from the IRS showing how much you received in those advanced child tax credit payments last year. It will also list the number of qualifying dependents that the IRS used to calculate the total credit amount you received.

  19. Child Tax Credit Update Portal

    中文 (繁體) 한국어 Русский Tiếng Việt Kreyòl ayisyen 2021 Tax Filing Information Get your advance payments total and number of qualifying children in your online account and in the Letter 6419 we mailed you. You can use your username and password for the Child Tax Credit Update Portal to sign in to your online account.

  20. IRS ERC letters latest evidence of tax-credit fraud concerns

    Small-business owners are receiving letters from the IRS asking for information about their claimed Employee Retention Credits — and an invitation to withdraw if they realize they no longer qualify.

  21. Susan Tompor: 5 things to know about IRS Letter 6419 and the child tax

    While many have not yet seen the letter, I reviewed a sample copy of IRS Letter 6419 that is posted online at IRS.gov. It was found on the IRS page called "Understanding Your Letter 6419."

  22. What to do if you get this letter from the IRS

    (WJW) - If you get this letter from the IRS, don't throw it away. LT38 Notices started being sent out at the beginning of the year. Why local EMA says you should stock up on food, fuel & water ...

  23. Understanding Your Letter 6417

    Letter 6417 highlights key changes to the 2021 Child Tax Credit that affect families with dependents under the age of 18. This letter is on White House letterhead and is signed by President Joseph R. Biden Jr. The American Rescue Plan Act expanded the Child Tax Credit to provide needed tax relief to almost all working families with children ...

  24. IRS information letters about Economic Impact Payments and the Recovery

    English 中文 (繁體) FS-2021-06, April 2021 For taxpayers who received a letter from the Internal Revenue Service about their Recovery Rebate Credit, here are answers to frequently asked questions. Why did I get more than one letter from the IRS about my Economic Impact Payments?

  25. IRS shares 7 warning signs Employee Retention Credit claims may be

    IR-2024-39, Feb. 13, 2024 — With a key March deadline quickly approaching, the Internal Revenue Service today highlighted special warning signs that an Employee Retention Credit claim may be questionable to help small businesses that may need to resolve incorrect claims.