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10 Best Ways To Address A Cover Letter Without A Name

  • Cover Letter Format
  • Salutation and Greeting
  • Who To Address When Unknown
  • How To Start A Cover Letter
  • How To End A Cover Letter
  • Best Cover Letter Font And Size
  • Cover Letter Spacing
  • Cover Letter Length
  • Key Elements Of A Cover Letter
  • How To Write An Address
  • Official Letter Format
  • Cover Letter Opening

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Cover letters consume a fair amount of time in the application process, as the more personalized they are, the better. With the majority of the application process being automated and online now, the hiring manager ’s name can end up being an unknown quantity. If you don’t know the hiring manager’s name and don’t know what to do, then this article will help you.

If the hiring manager’s name is unknown, then you have a few options. The best, of course, is to find out what their name is and address the letter to them. But if that all fails, then there are proper ways to address a cover letter to an unknown recipient.

Key Takeaways:

Try to find the name of the person you are addressing using the job listing, company website, or contacting the company.

Don’t assume someone’s martial status and avoid using “Miss” and “Mrs.” whenever possible.

Avoid assuming gender, even if you do know the person’s name.

Use a professional and appropriate greeting and avoid sounding like you would when addressing your friend.

Who to Address Cover Letter To if Unknown

How to address a cover letter if you don’t know the recipient’s name

Why is addressing a cover letter correctly important, how to find out who to address your cover letter to, example cover letter, addressing a cover letter faq, final thoughts, expert opinion.

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There are a few rules to follow when addressing a cover letter: be professional, polite, and concise. That means that even if you don’t know the recipient’s name, you want to maintain the same professional tone in the letter and avoid overly stilted language or being too informal.

Here are some guidelines to follow when addressing a cover letter:

If you can find out the hiring manager’s name, do so. That means that you should spend time looking over the company website, checking LinkedIn profiles, or even calling the company.

Don’t assume the hiring manager’s gender. This is especially true when you don’t know their name. But even if you do find out the person’s name, avoid gendered language until you’re sure how they identify. Some people will put preferred pronouns in email signatures or on their LinkedIn profiles, so it might be a good idea to check.

Maintain a professional tone. There’s a common style and formality to business letters. Make sure that your cover letter has that tone. it’s different than a letter you’d write to a friend, and being too familiar with your writing can be off-putting to hiring managers.

Avoid assuming the person’s title. This applies to both marital status, such as using Mrs. or Miss, but also whether they have a doctorate. In general, unless this is someone you know, avoid using either Mrs. or Miss, because it can cause offense, even if used correctly.

Make sure you include a salutation. Even if you don’t know who you’re addressing, leaving one off entirely can end up either looking like a mistake or that you didn’t personalize the letter at all.

Be as specific as possible. Even if you can’t find out exactly who the hiring manager is, make sure to be specific in your greeting. Use Dear Marketing Hiring Manager rather than just Dear Hiring Manager if you’re applying for a marketing position.

Also, while HR is most often in charge of hiring, it’s best not to just address the HR department unless you know that they’re the ones who’ll be in charge of your application. Not every business has HR take care of all hiring tasks, especially if it’s a smaller company.

Examples of how to address a cover letter:

Dear Sir or Madam

Dear Hiring Manager

Dear Talent Acquisition Team

Dear [Company Name] HR Department

Dear [Company name] Hiring Manager

Dear Human Resources Manager

Dear Human Resources Department

Dear [Company Name] Recruiter

Dear [Department Name] Hiring Manager

Dear [Department Name] Hiring Team

Here are some examples of how NOT to address a cover letter:

Good Morning

To Whom It May Concern

Dear Mrs. Smith

Hi Sebastian!

Hey Sales Team

Addressing a cover letter correctly shows professionalism, diligence, and politeness. All of these are good for an employee to have and show you to be someone that’s worth investing further time in. While finding the proper person to address can be a chore, it helps you in several ways because:

Hiring managers get myriad applications. Remember that you aren’t the only one applying for a job. While you want to make your application stand out from the crowd if you can, you don’t want to stand out in a negative way — that’ll ensure you don’t get the job.

Individual people ultimately decide who gets hired. While the application process can feel faceless, formless, and impersonal, there are actual people at these companies that sort through resumes . And people form first impressions.

It shows that you’re willing to go the extra mile. Think about what the admired traits are in employees. If you’re willing to put in the additional effort or work to get a superior result, then that’s the sort of employee companies want to have to work for them.

It’s less impersonal. Of course the hiring process is somewhat impersonal. You’re petitioning people you don’t know and that don’t know you. But if you address a letter to Dear Hiring Manager, it doesn’t have the same effect as addressing it directly to the person.

Despite the importance of properly addressing a cover letter, not every company makes it easy for applicants to do. If the hiring manager’s name isn’t immediately apparent, then there are some other options open to you before addressing the cover letter to an unknown recipient.

Check the job listing. One simple way is to look at the application and double-check that the hiring manager’s name isn’t on the main listing. Sometimes the information isn’t on the application, but rather on the job listing. If it isn’t there you will then have to start doing a little bit more investigative work.

Check LinkedIn. You can check on LinkedIn and on the company’s website to find the hiring manager’s name. If nothing shows up, then you will have to start contacting someone at the company to find out.

Contact the company. Now, this does not mean you should contact some random person at the company who lists the company’s name on their profile. Find the contact information for the HR department, for someone who works in HR, or for the head of the department you are trying to work in and ask them if they know the name of the hiring manager for your application.

Sometimes, they will not give this information, simply so that the hiring manager can stay anonymous and not get a billion emails from applicants. This situation is more likely to happen with massive companies like Google or Apple.

If they give you a name, use it. If they don’t, then you will have to then move on to the next step of figuring out how to address a cover letter to an unknown person.

How to write a cover letter

Dear Sales Team Hiring Manager, As a fan of XYZ Inc.’s impressive technology products, I was ecstatic to see an opening for a Junior Sales Representative . After reading the job description, I am confident that I’m the right person for the job. With 4 years of experience selling cloud computing products and services, I would bring a unique perspective to the role. In my current role as a Sales Representative at ABC Corp., I’ve created technology presentations for all my clients, driving interest in new product sales and subscriptions by 84% year-over-year. Additionally, I’ve reduced the cost of customer acquisition by over 15% and consistently topped sales quotas by over 20% since starting at ABC. I know XYZ has amazing products and services that I would be honored to promote and sell. With my background in cloud computing, I would be able to hit the ground running and communicate your product’s benefits to customers. Please contact me if you have any further questions about my application or resume. I look forward to speaking with the Sales Team more about the role in an interview. Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely, Malia Freeman [email protected] 555-777-9999

How do you address a cover letter to an unknown recipient?

Address your cover letter to “Hiring Manager” or “[Department Name] Hiring Manager.” Always do whatever you can to try to find the name of the person you’re addressing, but if you can’t, address it to the generic position or team you’re trying to get in contact with.

Is To Whom It May Concern rude?

Yes, To Whom It May Concern can be considered rude. Not everyone will agree that it’s rude, but many people do find it rude, or at least impersonal and lazy on a cover letter, so it’s best to avoid this greeting

Is it okay to use Dear Hiring Manager?

Yes, it is okay to use Dear Hiring Manager as a cover letter greeting. It’s always best to address your cover letter to someone by name if you can find it, but many times you can’t. In this case, “Dear Hiring Manager,” is an appropriate greeting.

Who is the best person to address a cover letter to?

The best person to address a cover letter to would be the hiring manager. This should be their first and last name if you know it, but “dear hiring manager” is acceptable if you are unsure of their name.

The rule of thumb was to use titles such as Mr. or Ms. However, it’s also important not to assume the hiring manager’s gender. If you don’t know the person’s preferred pronouns, then it’s best to just use their full name.

If you don’t know the recipient’s name, how would you close the letter?

Sincerely or Regards are considered formal, professional closings for letters. If you’re writing a cover letter to someone you don’t know, it’s best to remain professional and polite. A sign-off such as best wishes will likely come off as too familiar.

If you are applying for a job and writing a cover letter, make sure you take the time to look over all the details in the cover letter. Not taking the time to look for the recipient of a cover letter or using a professional greeting will look lazy. ​ Your greeting is a small part of the cover letter. However, it’s one of the most important pieces because it’s the first thing the hiring managers will read. Using an appropriate generic greeting will set the tone for your cover letter, making you sound professional and willing to put in the effort to make your cover letter flawless. ​ Now that you know how to address a cover letter if the reader is the recipient is unknown, check out our other articles about cover letters and the job application process.

Applying for jobs can be stressful and tedious, but taking the time to learn tips on how to improve your application will help put you one step closer to landing your dream job .

Georgetown – Writing Cover Letters for Government

  • Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown

cover letter without name of recipient

Vimari Roman Career Strategist Coach Be Productive Coaching

My recommendation is to always send a customized cover letter when applying for any job and when in doubt, address your letter to the hiring team using “Dear Hiring Team.” In most cases the application will end up on a recruiter’s or an HR Business Partner’s desk, and if they like your cover letter and resume, then they will pass it on to the hiring manager or the hiring team. By addressing your letter to the “team” you’ve got everyone covered and they will all feel as if the letter was written directly to them.

Expert Tip To Find Contact Infoformation

cover letter without name of recipient

Sally Mikhail Founder of Recruit Petra LLC

Use LinkedIn to find out who to address your cover letter to you with a search of company personnel on the company careers page . However, if you are sending out a cover letter to an unknown hiring influence, you can address it to “Dear Hiring Team” or “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown Tip

cover letter without name of recipient

Chelsea Jay Certified Resume Writer and Career Coach

Make sure that you review the company’s “About Me” or “Staff” to view their leaders which often lists direct managers, HR professionals, and executive leadership staff. If you know what department you’ll be working for, I recommend addressing the leader of that department. If the website is for a larger organization and does not list individual staff, I recommend utilizing LinkedIn. You can do a quick company search and find employees who are currently working there. You may even find the original posting with the hiring manager’s name attached.

If you cannot find the hiring manager’s name based on the posting, I recommend taking time to learn more about the specific department you’ll be working in. For example, if you discover that you’ll be working in the Communications department, the next step would be to learn about the specific team you’ll be part of. If you find out that it is the Public Affairs team, I encourage you to address “Public Affairs Team” at the beginning of your cover letter.

If you’re up for a bolder approach that is sure to get attention, address someone on the executive leadership team. I recommend addressing the President or Vice President of the organization (they should be easy to find since they are often the “face” of the organization). Of course, address them with a salutation along with their first name, last name, and title. In the beginning of the cover letter make sure to distinguish what department and position you are applying for. For example, Dear Mr. John Smith, President.

As an applicant, your goal is to stand out and showcase that you are informed and willing to go the extra mile (by doing research!).

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Heidi Cope is a former writer for the Zippia Career Advice blog. Her writing focused primarily on Zippia's suite of rankings and general career advice. After leaving Zippia, Heidi joined The Mighty as a writer and editor, among other positions. She received her BS from UNC Charlotte in German Studies.

Matt Warzel a President of a resume writing firm (MJW Careers, LLC) with 15+ years of recruitment, outplacement, career coaching and resume writing experience. Matt is also a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR) with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Marketing Focus) from John Carroll University.

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Status.net

How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name (Exact Examples)

By Status.net Editorial Team on December 25, 2023 — 11 minutes to read

Addressing the recipient without knowing their name might seem complicated, but there are ways to navigate this situation. Let’s take a look at a few strategies to make your cover letter feel personalized even when you don’t have a specific name to address.

Be Professional and Engaging

Using general salutations like “To Whom It May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam” can make your cover letter feel impersonal. Instead, opt for a more engaging opener such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear [Company Name] Team.” This type of greeting acknowledges the company and shows that you have researched the team you are addressing.

Focus on the Position and Company

Make sure to tailor the content of your cover letter to the job you are applying for by highlighting relevant qualifications, experience, and skills. Share specific examples of your successes that align with the responsibilities of the position. Mention the company’s values, goals, or recent successes to demonstrate how your values align with theirs. This can effectively showcase your interest and commitment to the role.

Use LinkedIn and Company Website Research

If you cannot find the hiring manager’s name in the job posting, you can turn to LinkedIn or the company website for clues. Search for professionals working in human resources or hiring roles at the company. If you find a specific contact, address your letter to that person while using their full name and title. Otherwise, continue with a professional and engaging salutation as mentioned earlier.

Here are two examples of how to start a cover letter without a name:

Dear Hiring Manager, As a passionate marketer with five years of experience, I am excited to apply for the Marketing Manager position at (…) Company. Achieving a 30% increase in leads generated through my previous campaigns, I am eager to contribute to the growth of your marketing department.
Dear ABC Inc. Team, With a strong background in project management and a proven track record of implementing cost-saving strategies, I am confident in my ability to excel as the Senior Project Manager at ABC Inc. Your company’s commitment to sustainable practices aligns with my values and I am thrilled to be considered for this opportunity.

By applying these strategies, you can create an impactful and personalized cover letter, even without knowing the recipient’s name. This attention to detail can set you apart from other applicants and leave a positive impression with your prospective employer.

How to Find the Hiring Manager’s Name

Sometimes locating the hiring manager’s name can be tricky, but there are several ways to find it. Let’s go through a few methods to help you address your cover letter without a name.

Using LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great resource for finding the hiring manager’s name. Here’s how you can use it:

  • Visit the company’s LinkedIn page.
  • Click on the “People” tab to browse through the employees.
  • Use the search bar and enter keywords such as “recruiter,” “hiring manager,” or the department you’re applying to.
  • Check the found profiles, and try to identify the right person responsible for hiring in your desired role.

Make sure to double-check that the person is currently working in the company to avoid using outdated information.

Checking Company Website

Another way to find the hiring manager’s name is by checking the company website:

  • Locate the “About Us” or “Team” page, where you might find a list of employees along with their titles and roles.
  • Look for a person who has a recruiting or hiring-related title within the department you’re targeting with your application.
  • If you cannot find the necessary information on the website, try checking a company’s press releases or blog. Sometimes they include names of important team members.

Making a Phone Call

When all else fails, you’re left with one more option – making a phone call.

  • Call the company’s main line and politely ask the receptionist for the name of the hiring manager or the person responsible for recruitment in the department you’re interested in.
  • Be prepared to provide the job title and a job reference number (if available) to help the receptionist find the right person.

Finding the hiring manager’s name isn’t always possible. If you cannot locate it, don’t worry. Addressing your cover letter as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” is still better than not sending a cover letter at all.

How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: Sample Phrases

Starting with job title.

When you cannot find the recipient’s name, use their job title to address the cover letter. This shows that you can connect and direct your message to the relevant person. Here are some examples:

  • Dear Hiring Manager, – This is a common and universally understood phrase for addressing a cover letter without a name.
  • Dear [Job Title], – Use the specific job position that the recipient holds, for instance, Dear Marketing Director .
  • To the [Job Title] Selection Committee, – This approach can be useful when applying for a role advertised by a team or committee that will handle the hiring process, such as To the Scholarship Selection Committee .

Referring to Department

Another approach is to address the cover letter to the department that the position is within. This helps to direct your message to the appropriate team or group. Here are some examples:

  • Dear [Department] Team, – Mention the department you are applying for, such as Dear HR Team, or Dear Sales Team .
  • Greetings, [Department] Department, – Use the department name to address the letter, like Greetings, IT Department .
  • To Whom It May Concern in the [Department], – This is a formal alternative when you don’t know the recipient or department’s name, for example, To Whom It May Concern in the Finance Department .

Using these approaches will ensure that your cover letter appears professional and well-directed, even when you don’t have the exact name of the recipient. Focus on the content and the skills you bring to the position to make the best impression on the reader.

Crafting Content for Cover Letters

When you’re unsure of the recipient’s name, you might feel a little lost on how to address your cover letter. Don’t worry. You can still create an engaging and professional cover letter that gets the job done. Here are some tips and examples to help you craft the perfect content for an anonymous cover letter.

Start with a professional, yet friendly, greeting. If you don’t know the hiring manager’s name, use a general opening line such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” . These greetings are widely accepted and show respect towards the person receiving the letter.

Next, dive into your strengths, skills, and achievements. Mention the qualifications that make you a strong candidate for the position. Share relevant accomplishments from your previous roles, such as leading a successful project or boosting sales. Be specific when describing your skills and use quantifiable results when possible. For example:

“During my time at Company (…), I managed a team of 10 and successfully increased sales by 25% within six months.”

Show enthusiasm for the job and demonstrate your knowledge of the company. Research the organization’s goals, values, and recent projects, then incorporate this information into your cover letter. This will help you tailor your letter to the company’s needs and show that you’d be a good fit for their culture. You could say something like:

“As a long-time admirer of your company’s commitment to sustainability, I’m excited about the opportunity to contribute to the upcoming eco-conscious product line.”

Close your cover letter with a strong call-to-action. Express your interest in further discussing your qualifications and offer your availability for an interview. Thank the hiring manager for considering your application and include your contact information. A sample closing paragraph could look like this:

“I’m eager to discuss how my expertise in digital marketing could contribute to the success of your team. Thank you for considering my application. You can reach me at (555) 555-5555 or [email protected] to schedule a conversation.”

Keep your cover letter concise and focused on your unique selling points. Even without knowing the recipient’s name, following these guidelines will allow you to create a memorable and attention-grabbing cover letter that leaves a lasting impression on potential employers.

Tips on Prefix Usage

When you’re addressing a cover letter without a specific name, it’s good to think about the appropriate prefix to use. Here are some tips to help you choose the right one:

First, consider using a general and gender-neutral prefix like Dear Hiring Manager . It will work well if you don’t know the recipient’s name or aren’t aware of their gender. This is a widely accepted way to address a cover letter without a specific name.

For example:

Dear Hiring Manager, I came across your job posting for a Graphic Designer, and I am excited to apply for the role.

If you happen to know the job title of the person who will read your cover letter, you can use it. This shows that you have put effort into researching the company and position.

Dear Marketing Director, I am writing to express my interest in the open Digital Marketing Specialist position at your company.

In some cases, you might know the name of the department that the job is in. In this case, you can address your cover letter to the entire department.

Dear Finance Team, I was thrilled to see an opening for a Financial Analyst at your company and would like to apply for the position.

When you’re unable to find any specific details or when addressing a larger company, you can opt for a broad salutation like To Whom It May Concern . Just be aware that it may come off as impersonal, so it’s best to use this as a last resort.

To Whom It May Concern, I am submitting my application for the Content Writer position posted on your careers website.

The key is to maintain a professional tone throughout your cover letter. Regardless of which prefix you choose, always customize your content to suit the specific job and company you’re applying to. By doing so, you demonstrate a genuine interest in the role and leave a positive impression on the hiring manager.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Sending a cover letter without addressing it to a specific person can be a pitfall. It might make the recipient feel unimportant or signal that you didn’t do your research. To make your application stand out, be mindful of these common mistakes:

  • Not being specific about the role: Your cover letter should not only address the person but also the specific role you’re applying for. Tailor your letter according to the job and the company. For instance, instead of writing “I wish to apply for the marketing position”, be more specific like “I am interested in applying for the Digital Marketing Specialist role at [CompanyName].”
  • Focusing too much on yourself: Although your achievements are important, the cover letter should focus on how your skills can benefit the company. Frame your accomplishments in a way that highlights the value you can bring to the organization.
  • Being overly formal or stiff: While it’s important to maintain a professional tone, being too formal might come across as insincere or impersonal. Use a friendly tone and avoid jargon or buzzwords to keep your cover letter genuine and relatable.
  • Spelling errors and typos: Even the smallest of typos can create a negative impression. Double-check your cover letter to make sure there are no mistakes. Keep an eye out for incorrect spellings, especially when addressing the recipient.

The goal of your cover letter is to make a personal connection and showcase how you are a great fit for the company. Taking the time to address your letter properly, proofread for errors, and customize your content demonstrates your attention to detail and commitment to the position.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can i properly address a cover letter when the recipient’s name is unknown.

If you don’t know the recipient’s name, consider using a general salutation instead. For example, “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear Recruitment Team” acknowledges the recipient without using a specific name. You can also research the company’s website or LinkedIn to try to find the appropriate contact person.

What alternatives are there to ‘To Whom It May Concern’?

There are several alternatives to ‘To Whom It May Concern’ that can help make your cover letter stand out:

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Company] Team
  • Dear [Department or Job Title] Hiring Team
  • Dear [Company] Recruitment Team

How do I determine the appropriate salutation for my cover letter?

To determine the right salutation for your cover letter, do a bit of research on the company or organization you’re targeting. This may help you uncover the specific department or hiring manager’s name. If not, use one of the general salutations mentioned earlier to address your cover letter in a more personalized manner.

What are examples of cover letter openings without using names?

Here are some examples of cover letter openings without using specific names:

  • “Dear Hiring Manager, I am excited to submit my application for the [Job Title] position at [Company].”
  • “Dear [Department or Job Title] Hiring Team, As a passionate professional with experience in [Industry], I am eager to contribute to [Company] as a [Job Title].”
  • “Dear [Company] Team, I recently came across the [Job Title] opening at [Company], and I am confident that my skills and experience make me a strong candidate.”

How can I avoid common mistakes when addressing cover letters without names?

To avoid mistakes when addressing cover letters without names, follow these tips:

  • Do thorough research on the company and the job posting
  • Be concise and professional in your language
  • Use an appropriate general salutation if you can’t find a specific name
  • Double-check for spelling and grammatical errors before sending the cover letter
  • Avoid using outdated or overused phrases, such as ‘To Whom It May Concern’ or ‘Dear Sir/Madam’

By following these guidelines, you can create a strong and effective cover letter that stands out to hiring managers, even if you don’t have a specific name to address.

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Click here to directly go to the complete cover letter without name sample

How to address a cover letter without a name?

According to a study, every corporate job opening gets roughly 250 resumes , out of which only 3-4 applicants land an interview.

That means if your cover letter feels generic and lacks personal touch, it may end up in the trash.

However, what if there is a circumstance for addressing a cover letter with no name?

Read on to get an insight into the following FAQs:

  • How do you write a cover letter if you don't know the hiring manager?
  • How to format the cover letter address correctly?
  • Who to write a cover letter to without a contact?
  • Which method of delivering a cover letter is not appropriate?
  • What are the practical ways to find the hiring manager’s name?
  • Additional tips to write a cover letter without name

Whom to Address a Cover Letter To?

Who do you address a cover letter to when there is no name?

To understand how to address a cover letter, you need to know to whom to address it.

A cover letter should be addressed in the following ways:

  • If the hiring manager’s name is given in the job description, you should always address the cover letter to them.
  • If the hiring manager’s email address is not there in the job description, you can address the cover letter to the department manager.

There is no point in sending the cover letter to the CEO or founders because they are not the ones who usually handle the recruitment process.

Also Read: How to address a cover letter?

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name?

A cover letter for a job is not similar to a letter to a friend.

The purpose of a cover is to impress the hiring manager with your professional expertise to score an interview.

But addressing cover letters with no name may get rejected by the recruiters.

We understand how important it is to know how to write a cover letter without a name as per these statistics.

Also Read: How to write a cover letter?

Here are some steps on how to address a cover letter without a name:

1. Address the Cover Letter with “Dear Hiring Manager”

It is the most common way to address a hiring manager with no name and hiring managers prefer this salutation over no salutation at all.

This salutation allows the hiring manager to quickly focus on the main body of the cover letter, instead of rejecting the cover letter right away.

However, the best way to address a cover letter is by personalizing it.

2. Address the Cover Letter to the Team

When in doubt, you can address the whole team so that anyone from the team can receive your cover letter and respond accordingly.

It can be the hiring manager, assistant, or anyone from the department who may interview you during the job application process.

You can phrase it as:

  • Dear Recruiting Team
  • Dear Project Manager Hiring Team
Also Read: What can a cover letter explain that a résumé cannot?

3. Maintain Professional Approach

Maintain a professional approach and avoid informal phrases or words such as "Hello!", "Good Evening/Morning", or "Hi!"

Keep it simple and professional by using the term, "Dear" followed by the designation.

For Example:

  • Dear Hiring Head
  • Dear Recruitment Supervisor

4. Do Not Assume Gender or Marital Status

You often know the hiring manager’s name but do not know their gender or marital status.

Assuming someone's gender may seem disrespectful and unprofessional hence you should avoid making such mistakes by keeping it gender-neutral. Avoid the term "Sir" or "Madam" and simply address the recipient as "Dear (Profile)".

The best way to find the hiring manager’s gender is by doing a quick LinkedIn search.

The LinkedIn profile may contain a profile picture wherein you can determine the hiring manager’s gender.

If the hiring manager’s gender is Male, address the hiring manager with “Mr.”.

  • “Mr. Xavier,”

If the hiring manager is female, it can be confusing.

As you don’t know the marital status, avoid using Miss. or Mrs. to address the hiring manager. Instead, use a generic “Ms..”

  • Dear Ms. Moore
  • Dear Ms. Kyle
  • Dear Mrs. Lane
  • Dear Miss Maximoff
Also Read: How to reach out to recruiters on LinkedIn?

5. Include Job Profile and Professional Titles

Are you asking yourself continuously, “How to address a cover letter without a contact name?”

Here is the answer for you.

Instead of using only “ Dear Hiring Manager ,” include the department name or the title of the person who will be reading the cover letter to make it more specific.

  • Dear Marketing Department,
  • Dear Head of the Sales Department,
  • Dear VP of Marketing

By personalizing the addresses in this way, you can grab the hiring manager’s attention to read your resume.

This shows that you are not throwing a rock blindly. You have done your research and have some idea about the company.

Don’t forget to include the hiring manager’s academic title or professional title in the cover letter address.

These types of hyper-personalization can grab the hiring manager’s attention even more and entice them to read your cover letter.

How to Write the Academic Title in the Cover Letter Address?

You can write the academic title in full form.

  • Dear Doctor Green,
  • Dear Professor Geller,

Alternatively, you can use the abbreviation of the titles as well.

  • Dear Dr. Murphy,
  • Dear Prof. Goodwin,
  • Dear Sgt. Moore,
  • Dear Principle Alan,

Where to Place the Cover Letter Address?

Not just the proper format, but the placement of the cover letter address also plays an important role.

  • The cover letter heading will go at the top.
  • Write the date below the heading.
  • Leave one line space and write the hiring manager’s name.
  • Write the address of the company.
  • Leave one space and then write the position you are applying for.
  • Leave one space and then write the salutation.

Cover letter without name

Best Way to Address a Cover Letter with No Name or Email

Writing an email cover letter address is fundamentally similar but with some tweaks.

If you are sending a digital cover letter, you need to start with a professional subject line.

John Doe: Application for Video Editor Position, Reff: Anthony Moore

Then add your cover letter salutation based on the same rule.

Add a line space and then start your cover letter by adding the necessary information that gives an insight into your professional experience and skills.

Subject Line: John Doe: Application for Project Manager Position, Reff: Charles Moore

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am a 5+ years experienced project management professional…

Appropriate Method of Delivering a Cover Letter

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Committee
  • Dear (department name) Hiring Committee
  • Dear Hiring Team
  • To the (department name) Hiring Manager
  • Dear Team (For smaller companies)
  • To the Recruiting Team
Also Read: What are the benefits of using a cover letter builder?

Inappropriate Method of Delivering a Cover Letter

  • Dear Sir or Madam — Ancient salutation does not work anymore
  • To Whom It May Concern — It is not personalized
  • Hello, Hi, or Greetings — Informal salutation
  • Happy Sunday! — Casual salutation
  • Good Morning — Not practical as you have no idea when they will read the letter
Also Read: How to draft a professional message to the hiring manager?

How to Find the Hiring Manager's Name?

How do you write a cover letter if you don't know the name?

Well, you can simply address your cover letter as, "Dear Hiring Manager". But if you feel the need to add the name of the hiring manager then there are ways to do so.

Finding the hiring manager’s name is the best way to address a cover letter.

So, before calling it quits, let us look at some ways to find the hiring manager’s name.

Read the Job Description Thoroughly

Always read the job description carefully!

Usually, the hiring manager’s name or the title of the reporting manager is given in the job description or under the job description.

For instance, “ The digital marketer will report to the Marketing Manager. ”

You can use the title to then find their name on the company website or LinkedIn.

Sometimes the job description includes the hiring manager’s email address.

For Example: “ Send your cover letter and resume to johndoe@hiration[dot]com" .

You can find the hiring manager’s name in the email address.

Visit the Profile of the Job Publisher

Sites like LinkedIn or AngelList have this unique feature to show you the name of the one who posts the job.

You can go to their profile to see if they are the hiring manager and include their name in the cover letter.

Call the Company Front Desk

Calling the company is the easiest way to find the hiring manager's name. But, job candidates reserve it as the last option.

  • Call the company desk
  • Tell them that you are applying for a “vacant position” in their company and would like to know the hiring manager’s name.

Here’s an example of the script:

“ Hi, my name is Alex, and I’m currently applying for the video editor position in your company. Would it be possible for you to provide me the name and email id of the hiring manager so that I can address the cover letter properly?”

Do a Quick LinkedIn Search

According to a study, 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn regularly . That means, if you search for the hiring manager of a certain company on LinkedIn, there is a high chance for you to find their name.

Many job descriptions specifically tell the reporting manager’s title in the job description. Then you need to address the cover letter to the reporting manager.

The process of finding the reporting manager’s name is similar.

  • Go to LinkedIn
  • Search the job title and company name
  • In the search result, you can find the profile of the designated person
  • Sometimes, there might be more than one similar position for a big company so you need to narrow your search by location to find the reporting manager
Also Read : How to Make the Best Use of LinkedIn Search Feature?

Network with People

LinkedIn is the best way to find and connect with people who have connections in the company you are applying for. If you can create a good rapport with these professionals, you can ask for a reference.

It is an easy but time-consuming process.

  • Search the company name and see the professionals active on LinkedIn
  • Start engaging with their content and leave thoughtful comments
  • Send them a personalized connection invite after engaging with their content for a couple of days
  • Do not ask for a reference abruptly; instead, start building a rapport with them by sharing helpful industry information, blog, article links, videos, etc.
  • If possible, move the connection offline and meet in person
  • After you develop a good rapport with the professionals, you can ask for a reference or introduce yourself to the hiring manager
Also Read : How to Connect with People on LinkedIn?

Tips for Addressing a Cover Letter with No Name

Always use a formal address in the cover letter.

Whether you know the hiring manager’s name or not, always keep the address formal in the cover letter. Even if the company has an informal culture, do not use any casual address unless you are a part of the organization.

  • Dear Ms. Lane,
  • Dear Prof. Luther,
  • Dear Ms. Ann,
  • Hello Maya,
  • Greetings Max,

Avoid Using “To Whom It May Concern”

This salutation is too generic and does not address anyone at all; however, according to a survey, 17% of hiring managers prefer this salutation over others .

But the problem is 83% of hiring managers don’t prefer it.

So we suggest that you avoid it altogether.

Avoid Addressing the Cover Letter to the Recruiters

A recruiter’s job is to sort the resumes based on skills and experience and pass them to the hiring managers. They don’t generally read the cover letter.

So, it’s a waste of opportunity if you address the cover letter to the recruiter.

Instead, always address the cover letter to the hiring manager.

Ensure That You Are Addressing the Cover Letter to the Right Person

Online information is not updated regularly. Often, the concerned persons leave the job, but their email id is still there on the website.

So, who to address cover letter to if unknown? Or you are unsure? It is best to acresully research the hiring manager’s name and crosscheck if you have any doubts by calling the company directly.

Do Not Mess up the Hiring Manager’s Name

There is a saying that “The first impression is the last impression.”

Try to make an excellent first impression by writing the hiring manager’s name using the correct spelling.

Don’t Stress Too Much

If you have the relevant skills and experience for a job, addressing a cover letter to the wrong person might not be a big deal. So, if you can’t find the hiring manager’s name and wondering how to address a cover letter without a name, just write “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Make Sure the Cover Letter is Short and Easy to Read

You should not make the cover letter more than 400-500 words long. It will make it difficult to read.

A short and crisp cover letter will intrigue the hiring managers as compared to a long one.

Also Read: How long should a cover letter be?

Cover Letter Without Name Sample

Hiration cover letter builder.

Create a polished, professional cover letter in minutes with an AI-powered tool that helps you create a personalized cover letter based on the job description.

It comes with the following features:

  • Option to save unlimited cover letters
  • Intuitive next text suggestion
  • 15+ cover letter designs
  • Full rich-text editor
  • Unlimited PDF downloads
  • 30+ pre-filled cover letter templates
  • 1-click design change
  • A sharable link
  • LIVE cover letter editor

FAQs on "How to Address a Cover Letter Without Name?"

With that, we have answered all of your questions on “how to address a cover letter without a name?”.

Addressing a cover letter to an unknown person should not be difficult if you can keep some points in mind regrading how to go about in this situation. Here are a few FAQs that will help you gain a quick recap:

Q. How to address a cover letter to an unknown person?

A. In cases where you are wondering how to address a cover letter without name, you can opt for "Dear Hiring Manager," or "Dear {Company Name} Recruiting Team,".

Q. Who to address cover letter to with no contact?

A. When addressing a cover letter without a specific contact, it's best to use a generic but professional greeting such as "Dear {Company Name} Recruiting Team" or "Dear Hiring Team." This shows that you have taken the time to tailor your application to the company while acknowledging that you don't have a specific contact person.

Hiration provides you with a personalized 360-degree ChatGPT-powered career service platform for all your professional needs - from building a shortlist-worthy resume and cover letter to optimizing your LinkedIn profile, preparing for interviews, and more!

For any queries or concerns, feel free to drop a mail at support{@}hiration.com

cover letter without name of recipient

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How to Start a Cover Letter Without a Recipient Name

Last Updated: July 7, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Amber Rosenberg, PCC and by wikiHow staff writer, Jennifer Mueller, JD . Amber Rosenberg is a Professional Life Coach, Career Coach, and Executive Coach based in the San Francisco Bay Area. As the owner of Pacific Life Coach, she has 20+ years of coaching experience and a background in corporations, tech companies, and nonprofits. Amber trained with the Coaches Training Institute and is a member of the International Coaching Federation (ICF). This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 29,405 times.

If you're writing a cover letter to submit with your résumé to apply for a job, ideally, it should be addressed to a specific recipient. Knowing the hiring manager's name sends the message that you've done your homework and are serious about the job. However, sometimes you simply can't find the name of the appropriate person despite your best efforts. In that situation, it's okay to address the recipient by their job title. You might also consider addressing your letter to the head of the department where you're applying to work. [1] X Research source

Finding the Right Name

Step 1 Check the job post for a specific name.

  • If the job listing instructs you to address your cover letter to a job title or other designation, follow those instructions exactly. The company may be using a filter to collect applications, particularly if you're submitting your cover letter and résumé by email.

Step 2 Look for the hiring manager on the company's website.

  • Some small, privately held companies or startups may not have a list of employees on their website. Extremely small "mom and pop" companies may not even have a website at all. In that case, do a general internet search for the name of the company and see what comes up.
  • You can also search the company on career networking sites, such as LinkedIn. You may be able to find the name of someone in charge of hiring new employees. [5] X Research source

Tip: If the job is posted on LinkedIn, use the name of the person who posted the listing. Even if they aren't the hiring manager, they are likely involved in the hiring process and can get your cover letter and résumé to the right person.

Step 3 Call the company and ask who's in charge of hiring new employees.

  • If you're applying to a larger corporation, you may want to provide the job title you're interested in or the department where you're applying to work. Larger corporations likely have more than one hiring manager, depending on the job.
  • For the largest companies, you'll have better luck asking to be connected to human resources. Someone in that department would be more likely to know the name you'll need than a receptionist or operator.

Using a Job Title

Step 1 Look for the name or job title of an executive or department head.

  • For example, if you're applying for an accounting position, you might address your cover letter to the "Chief Financial Officer."

Tip: Use an internet search to come up with a list of executives for the company. If all else fails, you could address your cover letter to the president or chief executive officer of the company.

Step 2 Tailor your greeting to the job you're applying for.

  • For example, if you're applying for a job as a senior analyst, you might address your cover letter to the "Senior Analyst Hiring Manager."

Step 3 Use

  • In a smaller company or startup, you don't have to worry as much about your cover letter and résumé getting to the right person. It's likely that everyone who works for the company knows that they're hiring, and knows who's in charge of reviewing applicants.

Formatting Your Letter

Step 1 Start off formally by including

  • Sometimes "hello" is appropriate, particularly if you're sending your cover letter using email. However, unless you know the company is more casual, including the "dear" won't hurt – even in email correspondence.

Step 2 List the name of the recipient.

  • For example, if the recipient has her name listed on the company's website as "Mrs. Shirley Jackson," it's okay to address her as "Mrs. Jackson" in your cover letter.
  • If you're not sure about the recipient's gender identity, use their first and last name instead of "Mr." or "Ms."

Tip: Make sure you don't confuse the recipient's first name and family name. If you're not familiar with the order, err on the side of caution and use both.

Step 3 Include an academic or professional title if appropriate.

  • For example, if Dr. Sam Greene is the head of the department where you're applying for a job, you don't need to know whether Sam is a man or a woman. You can simply address your letter to "Dr. Greene."
  • Check the company's website or do an internet search if you think the recipient is part of an ethnic group that lists the family name first. For example, if you were writing a letter to Dr. Yang Yuanqing, who is Chinese, you would address your letter to "Dr. Yang," since the family name is listed first in Mandarin.

Step 4 Follow the name or job title with a colon or comma.

  • If you've addressed your cover letter to a group of people, such as "Dear Web Content Hiring Team," a colon may look better than a comma. Again, this is typically simply a matter of personal preference.
  • If you choose to simply address the person by name, rather than including the word "dear," follow their name with a colon instead of a comma.

Expert Q&A

  • Never use generic, formal greetings such as "To Whom It May Concern" or "Dear Sir or Madam" on a cover letter. Not only are these greetings are antiquated and impersonal, but they can give off the impression that you didn't bother to research the company you supposedly want to work for. [14] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

You Might Also Like

Write a Subject Line when Sending Your CV by Email

  • ↑ https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/resumes-cover-letters/how-to-address-a-cover-letter-with-examples
  • ↑ Amber Rosenberg, PCC. Pacific Life Coach. Expert Interview. 8 July 2022.
  • ↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/cover-letters/how-to/write/how-to-address-a-cover-letter
  • ↑ https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/open-close-cover-letter-0421
  • ↑ https://icc.ucdavis.edu/materials/cover-letters
  • ↑ https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/resumes-cover-letters/address-cover-letter-without-name

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How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations

Cover letters can be a bit of an art form when they include the proper salutation to their recipient. Since you’re creating your own cover letter and don’t have a name to address it to, you might feel a little stuck.

Don’t worry; there are plenty of ways to still address your cover letter appropriately, even if you don’t have this information readily available.

Let’s take a look at five different ways on how to address a cover letter without a name.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations

Table of Contents

5 Popular Ways to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

How long a cover letter should be is important somehow. What matters is that it is addressed directly to someone specific, such as Dear Mr. Jones or Dear Recruiter.

If there is no name in the email asking you to submit your cover letter, then try these five ways on how to address a cover letter without a name:

List of salutations when you don't know the name

1. To the Hiring Manager

If you don’t know who will be reading your cover letter, it’s best to start with To the hiring manager and follow that up with a more personal introduction. These words should sound professional so that they’re easy for whoever is reading them to digest while they’re reviewing your resume/cover letter.

For example:

To the Hiring Manager: I am writing to you because I am interested in the position of __. I have seen that you are looking for candidates and my qualifications seem to be a good fit. I believe that I have what it takes to do this job well. Please find my CV attached for your review and consideration. Thank you so much for your time, and looking forward to your response. If you have any questions about anything, please feel free to contact me at __. I’m happy to answer any questions and provide additional information as needed.

2. Dear Hiring Manager

It is important to address the cover letter recipient with a formal greeting. And when making cover letters, the most commonly used term is Dear, which is often used before the recipient’s name.

Since this is a formal greeting, any titles that follow should use this style. If possible, avoid salutations that are gender specific. Also, avoid informal salutations, such as those that include the words Hi and Hello.

It is important that you specify what kind of work experience you have in the cover letter and why this job is right for you. Let the Hiring Manager know that they can reach out to you anytime during their application process if they want to talk more about it.

Lastly, make sure that you end your cover letter properly.

Dear Hiring Manager, I hope you’re having a great day! I’m writing in response to your recent posting. My name is __, and I’m excited about the possibility of working with you. I noticed that the company is looking for someone who has experience in __ , and I would love to share my qualifications with you. Feel free to contact me at _ so we can talk more about it. Thank you for your time, and have a great day!

3. Dear [Company Name]

There are a lot of reasons why you might not have a name in your cover letter. Maybe you’re applying for a job, and the company hasn’t been formally named yet, or maybe you’ve applied to an organization that doesn’t use names in their communications.

Whatever the reason, it can be tricky to address your cover letter without a name. But that doesn’t have to be a cause of headaches. In such a case, use Dear Company Name.

  • Are Cover Letters Necessary?
  • How Long Should a Cover Letter Be?

This option is the best way to go if the company has already publicly announced its name. For example, you can say, “Dear Google”.

For example: Dear Google, I’m writing this cover letter to apply for the __ role. [Add career highlights and other relevant experiences.] Please feel free to reach out to me with any questions that you may have. Enjoy the rest of the day!

Hello is one of the most common ways to address a cover letter without a name. If you are making your cover letter formal, use Dear Hiring Manager, but if you are using a more casual tone, try something like Hello.

If you know who will be reviewing your application, it’s also appropriate to use their name in the salutation.

For example: Hello Hiring Manager, My name is __. I hope you’re doing well. I was reading your job listing and noticed that you’re looking for someone to fill the position of (job title). I’m very interested in this opportunity because __. Thank you for taking the time to read my cover letter, and I’d love to learn more about your company, so feel free to reach out if there’s anything else you need from me!

5. Dear Sir or Madam

Finding the right words when creating a cover letter you will send to an unknown person or company is always difficult. But there are many ways to address your cover letter that will have your potential employer reading it and considering you for the position. Dear Sir or Madam is just one example.

The use of Dear is typically seen as a more formal way to address your cover letter, and Sir or Madam is used when you don’t know the gender of the person reading your correspondence. When in doubt, stick with these two options for addressing a cover letter without knowing the recipient’s name.

However, this is only ideal if you know the gender of the hiring manager but don’t know their name. If you are not sure whether the hiring manager is he or she, consider using a gender-neutral salutation.

Dear Sir/Madam, I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to apply for the __ position you recently posted on the __ job site. I am confident that my knowledge, skills, and experience would be an asset to your awesome team. I am enclosing my resume/CV for your consideration. Thank you very much for taking the time to read my letter and considering me for this opportunity.

Other Salutations to Use When You Don’t Have a Name

There are many different ways to start a cover letter , but if you don’t have the name of the person you are addressing, then it can be difficult to come up with a good opening.

The most common way to address someone in a cover letter is by using their title and last name. If this isn’t possible, there are other ways that you can use as well. One way is to start off with any of the salutations mentioned above. Another option is to start off with these options:

  • Dear Hiring Committee
  • Dear [Department Name] Hiring Team
  • To the Recruiting Team
  • Dear Recruiting Team
  • Dear Human Resources Manager
  • Dear [Title of the Person You Would Be Reporting to]
  • Dear [Company Name] Recruiter
  • Dear [Position Title] Recruiting Manager
  • To the [Department Name of the Position You Are Applying for]
  • Dear Hiring Manager or Interviewer
  • Dear Hiring Manager of Company X
  • Dear Person in Charge of Hiring

Tips to Find the Names of Employers and Hiring Managers

A cover letter may seem like a small part of the hiring process, but it has an enormous impact on whether or not your resume will even be opened by the company you’re applying to.

One way to ensure your cover letter isn’t ignored is by addressing it properly, which can be difficult if you don’t know to whom you’re writing it!

To help you figure out the name of the cover letter’s recipient , here are some tips:

Tip #1: Check the company’s website.

If you know the company’s name and they have a website with contact information, that’s usually the best place to start.

Tip #2: Review job listing sites.

If you’re applying through an online job application site like Indeed, then there will be an option to check to whom the cover letter will be sent. The job posting usually provides you with the names of employers or hiring managers.

Tip #3: Use LinkedIn.

The easiest way to find out the name of the Hiring Manager is to check LinkedIn. The job posting usually includes information about the Hiring Manager. Visit the profile, where it’ll list their current position as well as past positions on their profile page.

Tip #4: Check the job description.

Check the job description to find the name of potential hiring managers. Sometimes, it’s just there. All you need to do is read through the job posting.

Tip #5: Search social media.

You can probably find the names of recruiters on social media. See Facebook or Twitter for any information you can use in writing the cover letter.

How to Make the Perfect Cover Letter

When sending your cover letter without the name, you must be sure that you are addressing the person who is in charge of hiring. Avoid using To Whom It May Concern at all costs. If it is unavoidable, aim to get personal as soon as possible. If you’re emailing a large company, mention specific people you have spoken with over email or via social media in your letter.

To make the perfect cover letter , use an online cover letter maker. This is the best and easiest way to address your cover letter without knowing the name of the company.

The cover letter maker will have all of your information and personalize it for you. Plus, it will give tips on what to include in your cover letter. An online cover letter maker will walk you through each step and ensure that your cover letter looks professional.

You can also get help from other people who are reviewing cover letters if you need more advice on how to approach this. They will know everything about how these companies operate and be able to provide insight into what might work for them.

Final Thoughts

Writing a cover letter can seem like one of the most time-consuming and overwhelming parts of your job search, especially when you don’t know who the person you’re writing to is. However, cover letters are necessary.

If you don’t know the name of the person you’re writing to, that doesn’t mean you should throw in the towel and not write one at all, though. These five ways on how to address a cover letter without a name will ensure that your application still gets noticed.

10 thoughts on “ How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations ”

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I guess you can get some more tips from our complete guide “How to Write a Cover Letter” https://resumekit.com/blog/how-to-write-a-cover-letter/

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20 Examples Of How To Address a Cover Letter to an Unknown Recipient

Introduction.

Imagine sending out dozens of job applications, only to realize that you've been addressing your cover letters incorrectly. As it turns out, addressing a cover letter to an unknown recipient can be a tricky task. In this comprehensive guide, we'll provide strategies for finding the right name, using job titles as an alternative, formatting the letter, avoiding common mistakes, leveraging professional networking, and understanding the importance of personalization. By following our advice, you can increase your chances of landing that job interview and making a great first impression.

Finding the Right Name

Before you give up on finding the recipient's name, consider these research strategies:

Check the job post for a specific name. Sometimes, the name of the hiring manager or contact person is listed in the job posting. Read the post carefully to see if a name is mentioned.

Search the company website for a company directory or listing of key personnel. Many organizations have a "Meet Our Team" or "About Us" section that introduces their staff members. Look for someone with a relevant title, such as "Hiring Manager" or "Human Resources Director."

Call the company directly and ask for the appropriate contact person. If you're unable to find the name online, consider calling the company and asking for the name of the person responsible for hiring for the position you're applying for. This approach can be particularly effective for smaller organizations.

Utilize professional networking platforms like LinkedIn to find the recipient. LinkedIn is a powerful tool for job seekers. Try searching for employees at the company with relevant titles, then check their profiles for clues about their role in the hiring process. You can learn more about how to find the name of the hiring manager using LinkedIn in this helpful article.

Personalize your cover letter. Addressing your cover letter to a specific individual shows that you've done your homework and are genuinely interested in the position. This extra effort can make a big difference in how your application is perceived by the recipient.

Using a Job Title

If you're unable to find the recipient's name, consider using a job title or department head as an alternative:

Address the letter to the job title of the reader. For example, you might write "Dear Hiring Manager" or "Dear Human Resources Director." This approach is more specific and professional than using a generic greeting like "To Whom It May Concern."

Consider addressing the letter to the head of the department where you're applying to work. If you know the department your job falls under, try addressing your cover letter to the department head, such as "Dear Marketing Director" or "Dear IT Manager."

Explain why using a job title or department head can still demonstrate professionalism and personalization. Although it's not as ideal as using a specific name, addressing your letter to a relevant job title shows that you've put some thought into your application and have a clear understanding of the company's structure.

Provide examples of different job titles to use as salutations. You can find a list of different job titles to use as salutations in this resource.

Discuss the potential impact of using job titles on the success of the job application. While using a job title may not guarantee success, it can increase your chances of making a favorable impression. A personalized salutation indicates that you're genuinely interested in the position and have taken the time to research the company.

Formatting the Letter

When addressing a cover letter to an unknown recipient, follow these formatting tips:

Always use "Dear" to start the address. This is a professional and respectful way to begin a cover letter.

Use a gender-neutral title (such as Ms.) if the recipient's gender is unknown. If you're unsure of the recipient's gender, it's better to use a neutral title like "Ms." rather than making assumptions.

For non-gender-specific names, use the recipient's full name. If you can't determine the recipient's gender based on their name, address the letter using their full name, such as "Dear Taylor Smith."

Maintain a professional tone even when the name is unknown. Even if you don't know the recipient's name, it's crucial to keep your language and tone professional throughout your cover letter.

Provide examples of well-formatted cover letter salutations.

While it's always best to try and find the name of the hiring manager or recruiter, there may be times when you just can't find that information. Don't let it deter you. Below are 20 examples of how you can address your cover letter when the recipient is unknown:

1. Dear Hiring Manager, 2. To the Recruitment Team, 3. Dear Human Resources Team, 4. Attention Hiring Committee, 5. Dear [Job Title] Hiring Team, 6. To the [Company Name] Team, 7. Dear [Company Name] Recruiter, 8. To Whom It May Concern, 9. Dear Hiring Authority, 10. Attention [Company Name] Hiring Professionals, 11. Dear Talent Acquisition Team, 12. Hello [Company Name] Selection Panel, 13. Dear Recruitment Advisor, 14. To the [Industry] Professionals at [Company Name], 15. Attention [Company Name] Talent Scouts, 16. Dear Hiring Advocate, 17. To the Selection Committee for [Job Title], 18. Dear [Company Name] Staffing Team, 19. Attention [Job Title] Recruitment Panel, 20. Dear [Company Name] Hiring Panel,

Remember, the goal is to be as respectful and professional as possible in your salutation. Even if you don't know the recipient's name, demonstrating courtesy in your greeting will set a positive tone for the rest of your cover letter.

Also, avoid overly casual greetings like 'Hello' or 'Hi there,' which might seem unprofessional, and stay clear of outdated phrases such as 'Dear Sir or Madam.' Instead, opt for more modern, inclusive alternatives. Be sure to follow your greeting with a comma or a colon, then leave a space before starting the body of your letter.

Avoiding Common Mistakes

When addressing a cover letter to an unknown recipient, it's essential to avoid these common mistakes:

Using generic greetings like "To Whom It May Concern." This phrase is outdated and impersonal, and using it can make your application seem generic and unprofessional. Instead, try to find a specific name or use a job title, as discussed in previous sections.

Using incorrect titles or making assumptions about the recipient's gender. Making assumptions about someone's gender or using an inappropriate title can potentially offend the recipient and hurt your chances of landing an interview. Stick to gender-neutral titles or use the recipient's full name when in doubt.

Addressing the letter to the wrong department or job title. Be sure to double-check that you're addressing your letter to the appropriate person or department. Sending your application to the wrong person can result in your application being overlooked or discarded.

Failing to proofread the cover letter for errors, even in the salutation. Typos and other errors can make a poor impression on the recipient. Be sure to proofread your entire cover letter, including the salutation, before submitting it.

Provide examples of mistakes that could hurt the applicant's chances of landing an interview. Some examples of common errors include misspelling the recipient's name, using an informal greeting (such as "Hey"), or addressing the letter to an unrelated department (e.g., "Dear Accounting Manager" when applying for a marketing position).

Utilizing Professional Networking

Leveraging your professional network can be an effective way to find the name of the recipient for your cover letter:

Use platforms like LinkedIn to research the company and its employees. As mentioned earlier, LinkedIn is a valuable resource for job seekers. You can use the platform to find employees with relevant titles, learn more about the company culture, and even discover mutual connections who might be able to provide an introduction or additional information.

Connect with current employees or alumni of the company. Networking with people who work at the company or have worked there in the past can give you valuable insights into the hiring process and help you identify the appropriate contact person for your cover letter.

Search for the appropriate contact person within your professional network. Use your connections to find people who work at the company you're applying to, and ask if they know who the hiring manager for your desired position is.

Networking can help job seekers get noticed by potential employers. Building relationships with people at the company can increase your chances of getting noticed and potentially even lead to a referral. Learn more about how networking can help job seekers get noticed by potential employers in this article.

Offer examples of successful job seekers who found the recipient's name through networking. For instance, this cover letter that landed a job seeker a role at LinkedIn is a great example of how personalizing your cover letter and leveraging your network can help you stand out.

Importance of Personalization

Personalizing your cover letter can make a significant difference in the success of your job application:

Discuss the impact of personalization on the reader's impression of the applicant. A personalized cover letter demonstrates that you've done your research and are genuinely interested in the position, which can make a positive impression on the recipient.

Provide statistics on the success rate of personalized cover letters compared to generic ones. According to resume statistics , candidates with typos in their cover letters or resumes are 58% more likely to be dismissed, while those who do not include specific employment dates are 27% more likely to be dismissed.

Offer expert opinions on the importance of addressing cover letters to specific individuals. Many career experts agree that addressing cover letters to specific individuals can increase your chances of landing an interview.

Explain how personalization demonstrates research skills and genuine interest in the company. Taking the time to research the recipient and tailor your cover letter to the specific position and company shows that you're not only a thorough and detail-oriented candidate, but also genuinely interested in the opportunity.

Share anecdotes of successful job seekers who personalized their cover letters and landed interviews. For example, one job seeker found the recipient's name through LinkedIn and personalized his cover letter , which helped him land an interview and ultimately secure the position.

Conclusion and Final Thoughts

In summary, addressing a cover letter to an unknown recipient can be challenging, but by following our tips and strategies, you can make a strong impression on potential employers. Remember to:

  • Research the recipient's name or use a relevant job title.
  • Personalize your cover letter to demonstrate genuine interest in the position.
  • Maintain a professional tone and formatting throughout your cover letter.
  • Avoid common mistakes that can hurt your chances of landing an interview.
  • Leverage your professional network to find the appropriate contact person.

By applying these tips to your job search, you'll increase your chances of success and make a lasting impression on potential employers. Good luck with your job applications!

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No Name? No Company Address? Here’s How to Address Your Cover Letter

Cover letter.

You were almost done with your application, but approaching the finish line, you hit a snag. How are you supposed to write a cover letter without the company address? How about a cover letter without the name of the hiring manager? You don’t want to make a bad first impression, and you don’t want your application to be misplaced. Fortunately, there are a few ways around this.

Addressing a Cover Letter with No Name

Letters are a type of social interaction, so it’s best to address letters to their recipient. But, if you don’t know the name of the person receiving your resume and cover letter, you do have options:

  • Do some light research. Before addressing a letter to an unknown recipient, start by searching the company websites for the name of hiring managers, recruiters, and HR employees. You can also search through LinkedIn, or by using GlassDoor’s interview section. For many smaller organizations, it’s also possible to email and ask.  
  • Keep it professional. Sometimes your research won’t turn up anything and you’ll be left without a name to address. In that case, instead of addressing the letter to an individual, you can address the letter to the job title of the reader. For example, “Dear Hiring Manager of [Company].” If you can’t narrow down a job title, there’s always “To whom it may concern.”

Addressing a Cover Letter without a Company Address

Companies with several locations may have multiple addresses. Companies involved with remote work may have no address at all. When writing a cover letter without an address, you have several options:

  • Double-check for an address online. You may not have found it immediately, but diligent research can often turn up results. Consider checking the contact/about section of a company’s website, or searching for a Google My Business listing. Beyond that, you may also consider contacting the Department of Revenue to learn their state location, and follow up with their local chamber of commerce.  
  • Use the address of the company headquarters. It’s descriptive, professional, and better than leaving the address blank. This approach often makes sense for remote work, and for larger organizations where applications are passed through an HR department.  
  • Use their P.O. box number. If you can’t find a headquarters address, using a P.O. box number is the next best thing. Like with a headquarters address, it shows you made an effort.  
  • Leave the address blank. While an address can help prevent busy HR departments from misplacing your letter, outside of those circumstances, going without an address on your cover letter is not a grievous mistake. Hiring managers usually have more important things to worry about.

Find More Interview Advice on the MyPath Blog

Taking these kinds of small steps can help probably won’t define you as a candidate, but they can fine-tune your application for success. For your next step, you’ll want to learn how to Describing Yourself in an Interview , master the “Strengths and Weaknesses” Question , and then Crafting a Post-Interview Follow-Up Email .

There’s always more you can learn to set yourself on the path for career success. If you’re still searching for the right career path, try our Career Wizard Tool to see how your abilities and interests may align with a career in risk management.

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How to Address a Cover Letter: Tips + Examples for Every Type

Learn how to address a cover letter under different circumstances and how to find a contact to send the letter to when you don’t have a name.

[Featured Image]: A woman with curly hair and in a yellow blouse is examining a cover letter she is working on.

When you're applying for a job or contacting an employer speculatively, the format of your cover letter will vary depending on whether you have a named contact and the reason for your letter. It's important that you address a cover letter properly as it's the first thing the reader will see, so you should strive to make a good first impression with it.

In this article, you'll learn what a cover letter is and why it's important along with tips on how to address different recipients for various types of cover letters.

What is a cover letter and why is it important?

A cover letter is a document sent in conjunction with your resume or application for a job opening. A great cover letter expresses your reason for applying and pulls together all the main evidence supporting why you're the best person for the job, as outlined in your resume, application, and any other supporting documents.

Each cover letter you write is highly tailored to the position you’re applying for and the hiring company. It should address essential criteria and elaborate on important points in your resume. Consider your cover letter to be your sales pitch. A great cover letter will be an invitation for a recruiter to read your resume or application.

Who do you address a cover letter to?

Your cover letter should be addressed to the person responsible for recruitment. If you don’t know the name of the person, there are ways to find out. Getting this can be the difference between your letter being read or lost in the pile, so follow the guidelines below to make sure you address your cover letter most effectively.

Addressing a cover letter with a name

If you have a name for your recipient, this is the best start. It means the letter will likely be delivered to the appropriate person, rather than get lost or sent to someone without the decision-making power you require.

A cover letter is a formal document, and so it should be addressed as such. The most professional way to do this is with “Dear.” For example:

Dear Mr. Miller,

Dear Ms. Jones,

Dear Dr. Lopez,

If you don’t know the person’s gender or preferred pronouns, you can use their first name. For example: “Dear James Miller.” Follow the salutation with a comma. 

What about "Mrs."?

Traditionally, "Mrs." was used to address married women who took their partner's surname after they tied the knot. Today, though, it's less common in professional settings and likely best to avoid, unless your recipient has explicitly used it to refer to themselves in their correspondence with you.

For female identifying recruiters, u se "Ms." instead of "Mrs." in most cases. This will help ensure that you don't inadvertently offend your recipient, who may be unmarried or who is married but didn't adopt their partner's last name.

Addressing a cover letter to a recipient with a professional title

If the recipient of your cover letter has a professional title, always include it. Someone with a PhD will be "Dr." rather than "Mr./Ms." This also makes things easier if you are unsure of which personal pronoun to use.

Addressing a cover letter without a named recipient

When you're uncertain what the name of your recipient is, it’s definitely worth taking the time to find it. This is covered in more detail in our "First steps in determining a recipient" section below.

But, if you absolutely can’t find a name, address your cover letter to the appropriate department within the company or organization. For example: “Dear [Department] Hiring Team.” If you know the job title of the person you need to send your letter to and it’s just their actual name that eludes you, address their position instead. For instance: “Dear Head of [Department]” or “Dear Director of [Department].”

Addressing a speculative cover letter

When writing a speculative cover letter—one that isn't in response to a job posting—the principles are much like the above. You may or may not know the name of the person you're trying to reach. If you do, so much the better. Include the name.

The difference with a speculative letter is that you may have been given the name of the appropriate recipient by a mutual connection. If this is the case, mention that connection in your introduction. For example:

Dear Mr. Morris, 

I was given your details by my former employer, Jenny Lee, of Brandenburg and Associates following news of the development of your new customer service department.

Addressing a cover letter sent by email

Addressing a cover letter to send via email is slightly different from a printed letter. A printed letter would include the address of the recipient and the date, which is not necessary in an email, as the letter will simply be the body of the email.

However, your email still needs to be as professional as a traditional cover letter. Use a formal way of addressing the letter, just as you would in a printed cover letter. 

The subject line is all-important with an email cover letter in order to be noticed amid the hundreds of emails a recruiter might receive. Include your name, the job title you’re applying for or reason for contact, and what is included in the documents you're sending. An example of an appropriate email subject line might be:

Helen Williams – Marketing Manager Position – resume and cover letter

If you have a recipient’s name but you're sending your email to an ‘info’ address, you can include ‘ FAO ’ (For the attention of) in your title:

FAO Mark Booth – Helen Williams – Marketing Manager Position

How to find the right recipient

If you don’t have a recipient for your cover letter, you'll need to do some research. It might even be the case that you have a name, but not an email address. Here are some tips for hunting down elusive contacts and their addresses.

1. Research websites

Check out the company website and social media sites. Use Google to piece together what you know and find details on lesser-known websites, such as About pages. For example, if you know the desired department to contact, you can search for, “Head of Marketing for [Department]” and see what it brings up.

If you have a name but no contact address, you can search your contact: “Mr Jones, Head of Marketing at [Company].” You may be lucky enough to find a social media page this way, if not a contact email address.

2. Call the company

The good old-fashioned telephone is an excellent way to find out a contact for your cover letter. Call the company, explain why you are calling, and ask them to whom you should send your cover letter and resume.

3. Check LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great tool for finding people thanks to its built-in and highly effective search function. You can search by the person's name if you have one, and for more advanced searches, you can even add in the company and location. If you find the person you’re looking for, you will see a ‘Contact info’ link on their profile under their name, so you can attempt to message them and ask. 

If you don’t have a name, you can search the company and see who is listed as an employee. If the person you want isn’t listed, you may be able to contact someone in a related department, such as HR, and ask for assistance. You may even be able to get an introduction from a mutual connection.

Read more: Letter of Introduction Writing Guide + Samples

Formatting your cover letter

The format of your letter is as important as who you send it to. When you’ve put in the effort of tracking down the most appropriate recipient, you’re going to want the rest of the letter to stand out, too.

Address and date

Your letter should be professionally formatted with your name, address, phone number, and email address in the top left. On the next line down, add the date, followed by the name and address of the recipient. As with any document, you begin writing the cover letter with ‘Dear [Name]’ on the left of the page.

If you are sending your letter digitally, which is far more common these days, your letter should be in the body of the text and you need to include the date, your city/state, phone number and email address at the top, but not the recipient's name and address. 

Cover letter template

Using a cover letter template can be very helpful. Generally, cover letters follow the same format (aside from the address at the top) and should ideally be no longer than a page, whether they are printed or emailed. Feel free to download this cover letter template for your use.

Get started

When deciding how to address a cover letter and who to send it to, your efforts in finding the right person and formatting your cover letter professionally can help you get the interview you're looking for. For further help on crafting cover letters that get you noticed, you can check out the Writing Winning Resumes and Cover Letters course offered by the University of Maryland on Coursera. 

Keep reading

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This content has been made available for informational purposes only. Learners are advised to conduct additional research to ensure that courses and other credentials pursued meet their personal, professional, and financial goals.

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How to Address a Cover Letter With Examples

cover letter without name of recipient

Options for Addressing a Cover Letter

  • Letter Without a Contact Person
  • Non-Gender-Specific Names

What Title to Use

  • Address an Email Cover Letter
  • Review a Sample Cover Letter

Before You Send Your Letter

One of the trickiest parts of writing a cover letter comes at the very beginning. Much of the time, you won’t know exactly who will read your letter. How do you address your cover letter when you don’t have the contact person’s name and/or gender ?

First of all, try to find out the name of the contact person. Some employers will think poorly of an applicant who does not take the time to learn the hiring manager’s name. Also, take care not to assume that you know the gender of the recipient based on the name. Many names are gender-neutral, and some hiring managers may identify as a gender other than male or female.

It’s also possible that you’ll do your research and still be unable to figure out to whom you are addressing your letter. In that case, it's better to be safe and use a generic greeting . It's also acceptable to start a letter without a greeting and start with the first paragraph of your letter .

You have a lot of options when addressing your letter. Learn more about the possibilities before you make your choice.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Contact Person

There are a variety of general cover letter salutations you can use to address your letter. These general cover letter salutations do not require you to know the name of the hiring manager.

In a survey of more than 2,000 companies, Saddleback College found that employers preferred the following greetings:  

  • Dear Sir/Madam (27%)
  • To Whom It May Concern  (17%)
  • Dear Human Resources Director (6%)
  • Leave it blank (8%)

Do keep in mind that terms like "To Whom It May Concern" may seem dated, so the best options may be either to use "Dear Hiring Manager" or not to include a greeting at all. Simply start with the first paragraph of your letter.

How to Address a Cover Letter for a Non-Gender-Specific Name

If you do have a name but aren't sure of the person's gender, one option is to include both the first name and the last name in your salutation, without a title that reveals gender:

  • Dear Sydney Doe
  • Dear Taylor Smith
  • Dear Jamie Brown

With these types of gender-ambiguous names,  LinkedIn  can be a helpful resource. Since many people include a photo with their profile, a simple search of the person's name and company within LinkedIn could potentially turn up the contact's photograph.

Again, you can also check the company website or call the company’s administrative assistant to get more information as well.

Even if you know the name and gender of the person to whom you are writing, think carefully about what title you will use in your salutation.

For example, if the person is a doctor or holds a Ph.D., you might want to address your letter to “Dr. Lastname” rather than “Ms. Lastname” or “Mr. Lastname.” Other titles might be “Prof.,” “Rev.,” or “Sgt.,” among others.

When you address a letter to a female employer, use the title “Ms.” unless you know for certain that she prefers another title (such as “Miss” or “Mrs.”).

“Ms.” is a general title that does not denote marital status, so it works for any female employer.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

Hiring managers get a lot of emails each day. Make it easy for them to scan your email and follow up by including a clear subject line and a signature with your contact information. It's important to address the email cover letter correctly, including the name of the person hiring for the position if you have a contact, to ensure that your letter gets noticed.

Subject Line of Email Message

Never leave the subject line blank. There is a good chance that if a hiring manager receives an email with no subject line, they’ll delete it without even bothering to open it, or it could end up in their spam mailbox. Instead, write a clear subject indicating your intentions.

List the job you are applying for in the  subject line of your email message , so the employer knows what job you are interested in. They may be hiring for multiple positions, and you will want them to identify the position you’re interested in easily.

How to Address the Contact Person

There are a variety of  cover letter salutations  you can use to address your email message. If you have a contact person at the company, address the letter to Ms. or Mr. Lastname. If you aren’t given a contact person, check to see if you can  determine the email recipient's name .

If you can’t find a contact person at the company, you can either leave off the salutation from your cover letter and  start with the first paragraph  of your letter or use a  general salutation .

How to Format the Salutation

Once you have chosen a salutation, follow it with a colon or comma, a space, and then start the first paragraph of your letter. For example:

Dear Hiring Manager:

First paragraph of the letter.

Body of Email Cover Letter

The body of your cover letter  lets the employer know what position you are applying for, and why the employer should select you for an interview. This is where you'll sell yourself as a candidate. Review the job posting and include examples of your attributes that closely match the ones they are looking for.

When you're sending an  email cover letter , it's important to follow the employer's instructions on how to submit your cover letter and resume.

Make sure that your email cover letters are as well-written as any other documents you send.

If you have attached your resume, mention this as part of your conclusion. Then finish your cover letter by thanking the employer for considering you for the position. Include information on how you will follow up. Include a closing, then list your name and your  email signature .

Your email signature should include your name, full address, phone number, email address, and  LinkedIn Profile URL  (if you have one) so it is easy for hiring managers to get in touch.

Firstname Lastname  Street Address  (optional) City, State Zip Code  Email  Phone  LinkedIn

Sample Cover Letter

This is a cover letter example. Download the cover letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

Sample Cover Letter (Text Version)

Mary Garcia 12 Rogers Avenue Townville, New Hampshire 03060 555-555-5555 mary.garcia@email.com

February 17, 2021

Franklin Lee

CBI Industries 39 Main Street Townville, New Hampshire 03060

Dear Mr. Lee:

I was excited to see your ad for the operations assistant position in your Townville offices.

I have five years of experience as an operations assistant/associate. In my most recent role at ABC Corp., I fulfilled orders, resolved customer issues, ordered supplies, and prepared reports. In previous roles, I’ve done bookkeeping, data entry, and sales support. Basically, anything your department needs to run smoothly, I can do – and most likely, I already have experience doing it.

My other skills include:

  • Strong communication skills, in person, in writing, and on the phone
  • Excellent attention to detail and organization skills
  • Top-notch customer service
  • Experience in the industry and passion for the product
  • Adept at all the usual professional software, including Microsoft Office Suite

I’ve included my resume for your review. Please contact me if you have questions or would like to schedule an interview. Thank you for your consideration.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Mary Garcia

Review Cover Letter Samples: It’s hard to write cover letters from scratch. To make life easier – and to make sure you don’t forget any of those pesky formatting rules —start by reviewing cover letter samples . Sending an email version instead? Look at a few examples of email cover letters to get started.

Customize Your Cover Letter: Why personalize your cover letter every time you apply for a job? Because even similar job titles have different requirements. The goal of a cover letter is to show the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for this particular job. Customizing your cover letter will help you emphasize your skills and experience and how they fit with the job requirements .

Spell-Check Names: Before sending your cover letter, make absolutely sure that you have spelled the hiring manager’s name correctly. That is the kind of small error that can cost you a job interview.

Carefully Proofread Your Letter: Whether you're sending an email or uploading or attaching a printable cover letter, it's important to make sure that your cover letter and resume are written as well as any other business correspondence. If you can, have a friend proofread before you hit send, to pick up any typos or grammatical errors.

Saddleback College. " Your Resume is Your 1st Interview ," Page 14. Accessed Feb. 17, 2021.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Recipient Name

  • Post author By Caitlin Lemon

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Recipient Name

You’ve just seen a listing for your dream job. You read the job description and realize you’re more than qualified, so you quickly begin your application. You carefully upload your resume and start drafting a cover letter—only to realize you don’t know who to address it to. 

Baffled, you double-check the job description, but the name of the hiring manager isn’t listed. So, what do you do?

Below, we go over a few steps you can take to address your cover letter when you don’t have a name.

Search for the Hiring Manager’s Name

Conduct an online search to find the name of the hiring manager. Tools like LinkedIn can be great for this. You can search a company’s LinkedIn profile to find the name of the person in that position.

For example, if you know the job ad says you’d report to the senior software engineer, you could use the company’s LinkedIn page to search for employees that hold that title. Then, once you find the name, address that person in the cover letter (make sure to double-check the spelling!).

Focus on Their Position

If you absolutely can’t find their name, focus instead on the position the person holds . For example, if you’re reporting to the content manager, you might try “Dear Content Manager” or “Dear Content Team” when addressing your cover letter.

A Last Resort

If you’ve tried the first three steps with absolutely no luck, it’s OK to use “Dear Hiring Manager.” If you have a name or title, that is preferable to something more generic. But using “Dear Hiring Manager” in your cover letter will suffice when all else fails . 

Avoid These Common Mistakes

There are some common cover letter mistakes that can be costly for job seekers. Even if you don’t know who the hiring manager is, avoid using “To Whom It May Concern,” as this is too vague . At the same time, “Dear sir or madam” is too formal (in addition, some people may not identify with these personal pronouns ). 

Also, avoid time-specific greetings. “Good morning” or “Good evening” aren’t considered a best practice for cover letters, since you have no idea when the hiring manager will be reading them. 

Address Your Cover Letter to the Right Person

Cover letters are still a necessary part of the job search process . However, it can be challenging to craft a compelling cover letter when you don’t know who to address it to. If a name isn’t provided, do your research to find out who your recipient is. And if all else fails, “Dear Hiring Manager” will suffice in a pinch.

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Manage suggested recipients in the To, Cc, and Bcc fields

When you start typing in the To , Cc , and Bcc fields in Outlook, you'll see suggestions appear based on what you've entered.

Important:  Steps may be different between  new  and classic Outlook for Windows. To determine which version of Outlook you're using, look for  File  on the ribbon. If there's no  File  option, follow the steps under the New Outlook tab. If the  File  option appears, select the tab for Classic Outlook .

Depending on the account you're using, Contact Suggestions use personal contacts, contacts from your organization (such as contacts from a Global Address List), and by saving the names and addresses you previously used when sending messages.  

Use the Contact Suggestions List and Recent People suggestions

As you begin to type a name in a To , Cc , or Bcc box, the Contact Suggestions List shows up to five matching names or addresses.

If you type a " b " character in one of the recipient fields, for example, the list presents suggested matches. The   Contact Suggestions list is searched by first name, last name, email address as well as other contact information such as a phone number, if available. The list is refined with each character you type. So, if you end by typing " Bo ," then the Auto-Complete List would further refine to only show Bob Kelly.

Hide your contacts in Web screenshot one

With each new person you email, additional message recipients are added to the Auto-Complete List.

Tip:  To remove or hide names from this list, see the section  Hide one or more suggested contacts , and for information about resetting your search, see  Turn off or reset your suggested contacts .

Unsure of a name?

If you're unsure of a name, and it's not showing up in your suggestions list, you can also select the To , Cc , or Bcc button from the address area of your message to open the Add recipients window.

From Add recipients select the contact list you want to search from. This might be your personal contact list or the Global Address List (GAL) for your organization.

In Search this list of contacts , scroll the list of names or begin typing the name of the contact you're looking for.

Note:  If the Search list is blank, it is likely because you're adding a name from your organization's Global Address List (GAL) which contains more than 450 contacts. You'll need to begin typing characters for the first name, last name, or email address to begin the search.

Plus sign icon

When you're finished adding names, select Save . You'll return to your message and the names you selected will appear in the address area of your message.

Hide one or more suggested contacts in the Suggestion List

If you want to hide a contact from your suggestion list, do this in the contact suggestion list when addressing an email. This can do this for personal contacts, contacts we discovered on your communications, and contacts from in your organization (such as contacts from a Global Address List). Contacts hidden this way won't be returned as suggested contacts in Microsoft 365 products (e.g. Outlook, Teams, etc.) 

Forward, reply, or create an email.

Hide a contact screenshot address line

Select the X  and the contact will be removed from the list and will also be hidden for later use.

If you accidentally hid the contact, select Undo  in the message at the bottom center of the screen. This message will remain for 5 seconds after hiding a contact.

Hide a contact screenshot remove recipient

If you want to un-hide a contact, send an email to the contact by replying to an old mail or by typing the full email address on a new mail. After approximately 24 hours, the contact will be unhidden from the suggestion list.

Turn off or reset your suggested contacts 

Microsoft allows you to control what information we keep about your contacts in the suggested contacts search. Suggested contact search understands who you communicate with frequently and uses that information to make it easier to find contacts.  

Go to    Settings  > General  > Privacy and data .

Under Privacy and data , select the account you want the settings applied to.

Under Suggested people , select Clear data and turn off . (If this is already set to off and you want to turn it on, select Activate expanded contacts suggestions .)

Note:  Saved personal contacts will still be suggested under suggested contact search unless that contact is deleted (see Create, view, and edit contacts and contact lists in Outlook ). Contacts from your organization will still be suggested under suggested contact search unless removed by the organization Administrator. 

Important: 

Exchange Online on Microsoft 365 provides some search features via Microsoft Search . This includes suggested recipients when composing a new email. Starting with Outlook for Microsoft 365 Version 2202 (Build 14931.20604), if you are connected to an Exchange Online mailbox, the compose suggestions for To/CC/BCC are powered by Microsoft Search and some information in this article doesn't apply. For example, the Recent People and Other Suggestions categories are notused.

A Note has been added to each section that does apply to Outlook for Microsoft 365 version 2202 connected to an Exchange Online mailbox.

Contact Suggestions are generated within the Microsoft 365 Service using personal contacts, contacts from your organization (if applicable), and by saving the names and addresses you've previously used when sending messages.  

If you type a " b " character in one of the recipient fields, for example, the list presents suggested matches. The   Contact Suggestions list is searched by first name, last name, email address as well as other contact information such as phone number, if available. The list is refined with each character you type. So, if you end by typing " Bo ," then the Auto-Complete List would further refine to only show Bob Kelly.

Manage suggested recipients in the To, Cc, and Bcc boxes with Auto-Complete Web screenshot one

If you want to hide a contact from your suggestion list, it is possible to do so in the contact suggestion list while addressing an email. This can be used for personal contacts, contacts we have discovered on your communications, and contacts in your organization (as applicable). Contacts hidden this way will not be returned as suggested contacts in Microsoft 365 products (e.g. Outlook, Teams, etc.) 

Hide a contact screenshot close out

You can manage this information on the Privacy dashboard for your account. Which Privacy dashboard to use depends on if you’re using a work or school account, or a personal Microsoft account such as an Outlook.com or Hotmail.com account.  

Note:  This settings applies to suggested contact search information for your account and all places where that account information is used in Microsoft (Bing, Calendar, Delve, Excel, LinkedIn, Office Document Sharing, Office.com, OneDrive, OneNote, Outlook Desktop, Outlook Mac, Outlook Mobile, Outlook Web Access (OWA), OWA Mini, People, PowerPoint, Project, SharePoint, Teams for Life, Teams for Work, Windows Search, Windows Share Sheet, Word, Yammer). This doesn't apply to Xbox.   

For work or school accounts do the following:

Go to Settings & Privacy for your work or school account.

Select the  Privacy tab, and under Data options , expand Manage Contact Search .

You can Reset Index , Download Contacts , or turn off Capture implicit contacts and contact ranking from my communications .

For Microsoft accounts, do the following: 

Go to the Privacy page for your Microsoft account, and if prompted sign in with your Microsoft account.

Scroll down to Privacy settings in our products and select Expanded people suggestions .

Set the toggle to Off .

Note:  Saved personal contacts will still be suggested under suggested contact search unless that contact is deleted (see Create, view, and edit contacts and contact lists in Outlook ). Contacts from your organization's address book will still be suggested under suggested contact search unless the contact is removed by the IT admin. 

mobile search directory

Here’s how it works in Outlook: 

Manage suggested recipients in the To, Cc, and Bcc boxes with Auto-Complete mobile screenshot

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    In the body. The first line of your email should address the recipient, which differs slightly from paper cover letters. In cover letters, you usually add a header that includes your name and contact information, the date, and the recipient's name and contact information. After addressing the recipient, you can add your full cover letter in the ...

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  25. Manage suggested recipients in the To, Cc, and Bcc fields

    Important: Exchange Online on Microsoft 365 provides some search features via Microsoft Search.This includes suggested recipients when composing a new email. Starting with Outlook for Microsoft 365 Version 2202 (Build 14931.20604), if you are connected to an Exchange Online mailbox, the compose suggestions for To/CC/BCC are powered by Microsoft Search and some information in this article doesn ...