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A project from the University of Cambridge which aims to enrich the mathematical experiences of all learners. NRICH focuses on problem solving and on creating opportunities for students to learn mathematics through exploration and discussion.

NRICH provides thousands of free online mathematics resources for ages 3 to 18, covering all stages of early years, primary and secondary school education – completely free and available to all.

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Math Concept:

Grade level:, math workshop rotation:.

The Joint Mathematical Council of the United Kingdom

Addressing the five ‘big questions’ in problem-solving with NRICH

nrich primary problem solving

The importance of ensuring learners acquire the problem-solving skills which will enable them to thrive both socially and economically in their increasingly automated world is widely recognised (Luckin et al., 2017). Nevertheless, government inspectors have reported serious concerns about the quality and quantity of problem-solving in our schools (Ofsted, 2015). This summer schools were challenged to reflect on ‘Five big questions for problem-solving’ (EEF, 2021). In this blog, we will consider each of those five questions and explore the ways that the NRICH team is supporting schools to address them.

Question one: Do teachers in your school select genuine problem-solving tasks for which pupils do not already have a ready-made method available?

Too often, learners are presented with routine word problems which merely require the application of a known algorithm. ‘Genuine’ problems enable them to make their own problem-solving decisions by choosing their own strategies and enabling them to compare their approach with those of other learners, thus developing their problem-solving efficiency and flexibility. At NRICH , our award-winning activities allow learners to develop these key skills alongside the confidence to tackle genuine problems. Moreover, our ‘ low threshold, high ceiling ‘ approach enables everyone to get started on the problem while ensuring a suitable level of challenge too, making them ideal for whole-class teaching.

Question two: Are pupils given the opportunity to see – through multiple worked examples – to use, and to compare different approaches to solving a problem?

Many problems can be explored in more than one way. Working flexibly, making connections between different areas of the curriculum and reflecting on various problem-solving approaches are key steps towards becoming a more fluent mathematician. NRICH encourages learners to develop these skills in these two ways:

Our primary , secondary and post-16 Live Problems invite learners to explore and submit their ideas to the team. We review each submission that we receive and publish a selection on our website showcasing different approaches and the reasoning behind them.

Our NRIC H online activities sometimes feature ‘hide and reveal’ buttons showcasing different starting points towards a solution for learners to explore further for themselves. This approach enables learners to widen their range of strategies for solving unfamiliar problems and develop alternative approaches to explore when they get stuck using their first-choice strategy.

Question three: Are pupils encouraged to use visual representations to support them to solve a problem?

One of the most important approaches towards solving an unfamiliar problem is drawing a good diagram. Learning to draw diagrams is a skill which we encourage learners of all ages to develop alongside their other mathematical skills and knowledge. From sketching graphs to drawing a bar model, good diagrams can help learners clarify their understanding and identify possible ways forward.

Our four steps towards problem-solving feature highlights the importance of drawing a diagram to enable young learners to get started on a problem. We often highlight a useful diagram, table or sketch graph in the solutions chosen for publication. As learners progress through their learning, the team model more specific drawing skills, such as sketching a graph to help solve a STEP problem.

Question four: Are pupils supported to monitor, reflect on, and communicate their reasoning and choice of strategies, possibly through the use of prompt questions?

NRICH  encourages learners to reflect on their learning using this approach inspired by the Strands of Mathematical Proficiency model introduced by Kilpatrick et al. (2001).

nrich primary problem solving

Our approach uses child-friendly language that teachers and parents can share with students five key ingredients that characterise successful mathematicians. At NRICH , we believe that learning mathematics is about much more than just learning topics and routines. Successful mathematicians understand the curriculum content and are fluent in mathematical skills and procedures, but they can also solve problems, explain their thinking and have a positive attitude about themselves as learners of mathematics.

With this in mind, we have created  this self assessment tool  to help learners recognise where their mathematical strengths and weaknesses lie. We hope learners will explore NRICH activities and then take time to reflect on their own mathematical capabilities using our model.

Question 5: Is professional development time allocated to develop teachers’ pedagogical understanding of problem-solving, with particular support for early career teachers?

NRICH supports teachers to maximise the potential of our activities by offering free, regular professional development for teachers .  Each session is delivered online, enabling teachers to access the support wherever they are based, reducing teacher travel and cover costs for schools. We also record the sessions and upload them to our website so that schools can access them for future professional development days or staff/department meetings in their settings.

The live sessions are led by NRICH team members and they link directly to our latest primary , secondary and post-16 Live Problems. This approach enables teachers to consider the possibilities of the activities with the NRICH team before exploring them the next day with their own classes. Later, they are invited to share their classwork with our team for possible publication on the NRICH website.

The five ‘big questions’ provide excellent starting points for evaluating the teaching and learning of problem-solving in different settings. I hope that this blog shares an insight into the different ways that NRICH can support schools to address the five questions for themselves by engaging with our activities, Live Problems and teacher webinars.

Dr Ems Lord FCCT

Director of NRICH

Centre for Mathematical Sciences

University of Cambridge

Selected references

EEF. (2021). EEF Blog: Integrating evidence into maths teaching – guiding problem-solving. Accessed from https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/news/eef-blog-integrating-evidence-into-mathematics-guiding-problem-solving /

Kilpatrick, J. Swafford, J., & Findell, B. (2001). Adding it up: Helping children learn mathematics (Vol. 2101). J. Kilpatrick, & National research council (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Luckin, R., Baines, E., Cukurova, M., Holmes, W., & Mann, M. (2017). Solved! Making the case for collaborative problem-solving. Accessed from http://oro.open.ac.uk/50105/1/solved-making-case-collaborative-problem-solving.pdf

Ofsted. (2015). Better Maths Conference Spring Keynote 2015. Accessed here https://www.slideshare.net/Ofstednews/better-mathematics-keynote-spring-2015

nrich primary problem solving

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Sign up to NRICH’s Problem-solving Schools programme

nrich primary problem solving

NRICH, a trusted provider of free problem-solving resources and teacher support, is launching the Problem-solving Schools programme.

Register for free to enhance problem-solving provision across your school and sign up to the Problem-solving Schools Charter.

Why is problem-solving so important?

With the rise of AI, problem-solving skills are more important than ever for students.

To thrive both inside and outside of the classroom, they need to develop resilience, be able to work collaboratively, and think creatively and flexibly. And, perhaps most importantly, they will need to be able to solve problems.

Problem solving opens up a world of possibilities. Students have to apply their knowledge, think laterally, and use their creativity to solve challenges.

Not only does problem solving serve a longer-term purpose of empowering students for the future, it is also a crucial part of helping them to discover the joy of mathematics.

Imagine only engaging with football through practice drills and never seeing Messi score, or learning music through scales and never hearing an orchestra play…

Problem solving is the light bulb moment for students when it comes to maths. They start to see the value in what they are doing.

Once they really understand its value, that’s when they become engaged and motivated to learn!

Highlighted by Ofsted

A new Ofsted report, published in July 2023, said that the teaching of mathematical problem solving remains an area “of weakness across many schools”, and emphasised the importance of teaching skills that “equip [pupils] for the next stage of education, work and life”.

As well as asking schools to teach specific problem-solving strategies, they want students to have plenty of opportunities to put these strategies into practice and choose the best one for each situation.

What is NRICH doing to support schools?

NRICH’s core mission is to develop confident, resilient problem-solvers who value and enjoy working mathematically. With that mission in mind, we are launching the Problem-solving Schools programme.

The aim of this new initiative is to help embed problem-solving in classrooms by providing:

  • Targeted problem-solving resources
  • Dedicated teacher CPD on how best to use them
  • Advice on engaging parents so they can support their children at home
  • A dedicated schools Charter to sign up for, demonstrating your school’s commitment to put problem solving at the heart of maths learning.

The programme is open to all schools with resources and CPD available for key stages 2–4.

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The Nature of Problem-solving in Primary Maths

The Educational Recording Agency, in collaboration with NRICH, has published the first set of investigative Maths lessons inspired by nature, on the Natural Curriculum website. The aim is to utilise the wealth of outstanding BBC Natural History footage in a creative, exploratory approach to teaching Mathematics that feeds off children’s wonder of the natural world.

nrich primary problem solving

Credit: BBC/John Downer Productions Ltd/Stephen Downer

Mathematics is a fundamental tool for solving problems and understanding the world around us. However, for many students, mathematics can be an intimidating subject, and they struggle to understand its abstract concepts.

With a quarter of a million children entering secondary school without basic Maths and English , and roughly 175,000 children failing their Maths GCSE every year , addressing the prevailing negative attitudes towards the subject has become the key issue facing Maths educators, according to Dr Ems Lord, Director of NRICH .

One way in which this can be achieved is by making Maths more relevant and relatable to children’s experiences and interests from a young age.

NRICH is a collaboration between the Faculties of Mathematics and Education at the University of Cambridge, which focuses on problem solving and on creating opportunities for students to learn Mathematics through exploration and discussion. Its aim is to enrich and enhance the experience of the Mathematics curriculum for all learners.  Dr Lord explains :

“At NRICH, we actively seek engaging contexts so that learners want to explore the Maths, derive enjoyment from the tasks and are encouraged to persevere with solving problems and finding solutions,”

It seems that we only need to look outside the classroom window for an answer.

The natural world is an excellent source of inspiration for learning Mathematics. It is something that children can see, touch, and experience in their everyday lives. When students can see how mathematical concepts apply to the world around them, they are more likely to be interested and engaged in the learning process.

One teacher who preaches this sentiment is David Millington, the man behind the Natural Curriculum, which originally launched in 2020 with an online collection of KS2 grammar lessons inspired by clips from the BBC’s ground-breaking natural history programmes. When David approached the Educational Recording Agency about using clips under the terms of the ERA Licence, their value as a means of inspiring and engaging pupils was immediately evident to the CEO, Helena Djurkovic, and the ERA Board agreed to fund the development of the website. Its launch in 2020 was just in time to make an invaluable contribution to the remote education landscape during lockdown.

Keen to expand on the resource’s initial impact, David, together with the educational resource team at ERA, sought to maximise the potential that the natural world (supported by compelling footage from the BBC), could have in core-subject learning, with Mathematics being the natural (pun intended) next step. The Bristol-based teacher recounts:

“The first ever natural world film clip that I used in a Maths lesson was from the BBC Blue Planet series. In the clip, Sir David Attenborough reels off some impressive number facts about the size of the mighty blue whale. With my then Year 5 class captivated, it was the perfect way to kick start a unit on measurement and length.” 

nrich primary problem solving

David Millington, teacher and content creator for Natural Curriculum

In the academic year 2021/22 the Natural Curriculum joined forces with NRICH to explore the best way of using natural history clips to teach primary Maths.

Four online problem-solving Mathematics lessons were developed and piloted with primary-aged learners from 9 schools out of 70 that applied to take part. The findings of the study revealed that bringing the natural world into the classroom was a popular teaching and learning approach among many Year 3 and Year 4 learners, with more than three-quarters of the participants (75.6%) reporting that they had learnt something new about nature, and a significant number mentioning that they had learnt something new about Maths.

Building on the success of the pilot project, the team has designed a detailed range of new resources for practising Maths problem-solving in areas such as measurement, geometry and statistics, with inspiring BBC natural history clips featuring fascinating animals such as narwhals, armadillos and bears.

“NRICH is delighted to be collaborating with the Natural Curriculum team. Our team has drawn inspiration from the BBC's world-class library of natural history footage. We have worked closely with the Natural Curriculum to develop exciting and engaging problem-solving challenges for young learners which link to their school curriculum.”

Dr Lord continues , “Our initial pilot project reinforced the value of bringing together Mathematics and the natural world in the classroom, and we were thrilled to expand this collaboration further and release this new suite of resources.”

nrich primary problem solving

Click above to visit the Natural Curriculum & NRICH project

The Natural Curriculum and NRICH partnership leverages world-class content from David Attenborough and the BBC to capture that fascination with nature and promotes an enjoyment of Mathematics that is so vital to instil from an early age. The first lessons for Year 3 are now available for free on the Natural Curriculum website with more in development.

These resources support the wider movement now evident in schools to include the natural world in learning. Speaking at the Association for Science Education Conference back in 2011, David Attenborough told teachers:

“Bringing nature into the classroom can kindle a fascination and passion for the diversity of life on earth and can motivate a sense of responsibility to safeguard it.”

Wise words. A new Natural History GCSE will finally launch in 2025 – just in time for the many thousands of young pupils who have been inspired to respect and care for their planet by the Natural Curriculum and are keen to continue on their educational journey.

Bringing nature into the classroom can kindle a fascination and passion for the diversity of life on earth and can motivate a sense of responsibility to safeguard it.

nrich primary problem solving

Bringing the Outside In: The Natural Curriculum

Bristol-based primary school teacher David Millington talks about his inspiring website, the Natural Curriculum, made in partnership with ERA, which provides free grammar lessons for Years 4-6.

nrich primary problem solving

Natural Curriculum

Grammar and maths lessons for KS2 centred on captivating clips from the BBC’s natural history archives.

nrich primary problem solving

Tackling Climate Change with Young Climate Warriors

Young Climate Warriors have curated a series of video playlists to teach primary aged pupils about the causes, impacts and solutions of climate change.

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The Royal Society

Problem solving resources

In 2018, 33 schools across the UK were chosen to receive a small grant to set up a new mathematics or computing focused problem-solving club for their students. The clubs took place at lunchtime or after school on a regular basis, with each club developing its own programme of activities, with support from the Royal Society.

You can find out more about the pilot scheme through the  Problem-solving clubs  post on the Schools Network blog.

Teachers from the Royal Society Schools Network trialed and identified a number of simple activities that can be used at primary level to help students develop problem solving skills. These skills are valuable for a wide variety of subjects in school, and for a wide variety of careers, including (but not limited to) those involving science, mathematics and computing. The guide below provides advice on the areas of the primary curriculum these activities support and some of the words and approaches it helps students to learn. Many of the activities featured in this document have been sourced from the University of Cambridge's NRICH Roadshow. You can access them free of charge via their website .

Problem solving activities

Age 5-11 (Key stage 1 + 2)

  • Problem solving activities (PDF)

If you use any of these resources with your class or club, please do  email us  with any feedback you have so we can review the impact these resources are having in schools across the UK.

Related Resources

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Machine learning resources

Sharing curriculum linked resources, developed by teachers in the Royal Society Schools Network, based on the Machine learning reports by the Royal Society.

Example alt

Green energies resources

Sharing curriculum linked resources, identified by teachers in the Royal Society Schools Network, linking to green energies.

Example alt

Genetic technologies resources

Sharing curriculum linked resources, identified by teachers in the Royal Society Schools Network, linking to genetic technologies.

Example alt

Digital skills resources

Sharing curriculum linked resources, identified by teachers in the Royal Society Schools Network, linking to digital skills.

Example alt

AI and machine learning mini-clips

Sharing curriculum linked mini-clips, identified by teachers in the Royal Society Schools Network, linking to AI and machine learning.

Cambridge University Faculty of Mathematics

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Advanced Problem Solving Module 1

nrich primary problem solving

Working through this module will help you to consolidate your existing knowledge before extending your thinking. For more details about the Advanced Problem Solving programme, READ THIS .

nrich primary problem solving

A Guide to Problem Solving   Age 16 to 18

nrich primary problem solving

Problems with Many Solution Methods   Age 16 to 18

nrich primary problem solving

Classic Problems   Age 16 to 18

  • Prepare for University - Pure Mathematics
  • Prepare for University - Applied Mathematics
  • NRICH and Olympiads

Or search by topic

Number and algebra

  • The Number System and Place Value
  • Calculations and Numerical Methods
  • Fractions, Decimals, Percentages, Ratio and Proportion
  • Properties of Numbers
  • Patterns, Sequences and Structure
  • Algebraic expressions, equations and formulae
  • Coordinates, Functions and Graphs

Geometry and measure

  • Angles, Polygons, and Geometrical Proof
  • 3D Geometry, Shape and Space
  • Measuring and calculating with units
  • Transformations and constructions
  • Pythagoras and Trigonometry
  • Vectors and Matrices

Probability and statistics

  • Handling, Processing and Representing Data
  • Probability

Working mathematically

  • Thinking mathematically
  • Developing positive attitudes
  • Cross-curricular contexts
  • Physical and digital manipulatives

Advanced mathematics

  • Decision Mathematics and Combinatorics
  • Advanced Probability and Statistics

For younger learners

  • Early Years Foundation Stage

Become a Problem-Solving School

Problem-solving Schools is an exciting new initiative to help schools raise the profile of mathematical problem-solving and nurture better problem-solvers.

At the heart of our initiative is our Charter , which offers a framework to help you reflect on your current practice and to agree on areas for development. The Charter highlights five key areas:

  • Vision and ethos
  • Leadership and PD
  • Curriculum, pedagogy and assessment
  • Classroom culture
  • Problem-solving beyond the classroom.

We invite all schools who are committed to nurturing confident mathematical problem-solvers to apply to become Problem-solving Schools.

Registering your school

During the registration process, you’ll be invited to provide:

  • key details about your school
  • the results of an initial review of your provision, using the Charter as your guide
  • details of three agreed areas for development.

Start registration

What happens next?

After your registration is complete, your school will receive its Welcome Pack and a copy of your initial reflections and action plan.

Your Welcome Pack will include information about the support material and webinars available to you, to help your school move forward on its problem-solving journey. You will also receive a Problem-solving Schools badge to display on letterheads and webpages, highlighting your school’s commitment to nurturing problem-solvers.

Problem-solving Schools status is renewable annually, so we’ll get back in touch during the summer term to support schools to reflect on their progress as Problem-solving Schools.

If you have any questions or comments about the Problem-solving Schools initiative, please email [email protected]

IMAGES

  1. Addressing the five ‘big questions’ in problem-solving with NRICH

    nrich primary problem solving

  2. NRICH Problem-Solving Activities for Students Aged 14-16

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  3. Part 1: Problem solving with NRICH

    nrich primary problem solving

  4. Nrich Problem Solving

    nrich primary problem solving

  5. Addressing the five ‘big questions’ in problem-solving with NRICH

    nrich primary problem solving

  6. NRICH Posters : nrich.maths.org

    nrich primary problem solving

VIDEO

  1. problem solving

  2. PROBLEM SOLVE !!

  3. problem 3

  4. Problem 4

  5. Ch-2 Example Problems

  6. Problem 4

COMMENTS

  1. Problem Solving

    Problem Solving. This feature is somewhat larger than our usual features, but that is because it is packed with resources to help you develop a problem-solving approach to the teaching and learning of mathematics. Read Lynne's article which discusses the place of problem solving in the new curriculum and sets the scene.

  2. Primary Students

    The Nrich Maths Project Cambridge,England. Mathematics resources for children,parents and teachers to enrich learning. Problems,children's solutions,interactivities,games,articles.

  3. NRICH

    The Nrich Maths Project Cambridge,England. Mathematics resources for children,parents and teachers to enrich learning. ... Learn about our exciting new intiative to embed non-routine problem-solving opportunities in your maths curriculum ... What we do and why we do it. Why not take a look at the key ideas that inform our work? Primary ...

  4. Primary Teachers

    The Nrich Maths Project Cambridge,England. Mathematics resources for children,parents and teachers to enrich learning. ... Primary Teachers. Curriculum-linked problems. ... Developing mathematical thinking. Collections of NRICH tasks designed to develop learners' key problem-solving skills. Developing positive attitudes. Collections of tasks ...

  5. A Guide to Problem Solving

    This collection of NRICH problems is designed for younger students, but it's very worthwhile having a go at a few to practise the problem-solving technique in a context where the mathematics should be straightforward to you. Then as you become a more confident problem-solver you can try more past STEP questions.

  6. PDF The Problem-solving Classroom

    The Problem-solving Classroom By NRICH Primary Team and Jenny Earl This article forms part of our Problem-solving Classroom Feature, exploring how to create a space in which mathematical problem solving can flourish. At NRICH, we believe that there are four main aspects to consider: • Highlighting key problem-solving skills

  7. What Is Problem Solving?

    What Is Problem Solving? In this article I model the process of problem solving and thinking through a problem. The focus is on the problem solving process, using NRICH problems to highlight the processes. Needless to say, this is not how problems should be taught to a class! What is problem solving?

  8. NRICH

    NRICH focuses on problem solving and on creating opportunities for students to learn mathematics through exploration and discussion. NRICH provides thousands of free online mathematics resources for ages 3 to 18, covering all stages of early years, primary and secondary school education - completely free and available to all. Go to Resource.

  9. Part 1: Problem solving with NRICH

    Read part 1 of 2 guest posts from Liz Woodham, Primary Coordinator at NRICH, with advice on how their mathematical tasks can be used in the classroom. ... NRICH, and explores how important it is to choose appropriate tasks. The second will explore how you can structure the problem-solving process, and embed problem solving into every school day

  10. Addressing the five 'big questions' in problem-solving with NRICH

    The live sessions are led by NRICH team members and they link directly to our latest primary, secondary and post-16 Live Problems. This approach enables teachers to consider the possibilities of the activities with the NRICH team before exploring them the next day with their own classes.

  11. Primary Curriculum Mapping Documents

    Our Curriculum Mapping Documents link NRICH tasks to curriculum objectives. (See our Primary Curriculum page for more resources that will help you to embed problem solving into your curriculum.). England. NRICH tasks embrace the aims of the mathematics national curriculum in England (problem solving, reasoning and fluency) as well as curriculum 'content'.

  12. NRICH launches new Problem-Solving Schools initiative

    30 Nov 2023. Our NRICH programme has launched a new initiative to help schools prioritise problem-solving in maths. The NRICH Problem-Solving Schools programme will offer free resources, advice and teacher professional development training. Problem-solving is a critical skill when it comes to empowering students for the future. It opens up a ...

  13. Part 2: Problem solving with NRICH

    Part 2: Problem solving with NRICH. Read the second of two guest posts from Liz Woodham, Primary Coordinator at NRICH, with more advice on how their mathematical tasks can be used in the classroom. In Abacus, we currently link out to a number of NRICH's enriching mathematical tasks. Whilst these resources are a great "next step" for ...

  14. Millennium Mathematics Project

    The NRICH Problem-Solving Schools programme will offer free resources, advice and teacher professional development training. Read more. Mapping the impact of NRICH. NRICH's impact has been highlighted in a report and new interactive map produced by the University of Cambridge. The map showcases the social and economic benefits of University of ...

  15. Getting Started with Solving Rich Tasks

    In summary, it is always helpful to bear in mind these problem solving tips. 1) Don't be afraid to experiment: try a few special case numbers to get a feel for the situation. 2) Don't be afraid to provide a partial solution to a problem. Many rich tasks are 'open': there is sometimes not necessarily a set, final answer.

  16. Sign up to NRICH's Problem-solving Schools programme

    Dedicated teacher CPD on how best to use them. Advice on engaging parents so they can support their children at home. A dedicated schools Charter to sign up for, demonstrating your school's commitment to put problem solving at the heart of maths learning. The programme is open to all schools with resources and CPD available for key stages 2-4.

  17. The Problem-Solving Schools' Charter

    Curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. We are committed to: Regularly embedding non-standard problem-solving opportunities in our maths curriculum for all. Ensuring that problems, and classroom support, offer opportunities for all to experience both struggle and success. Allocating time to developing key problem-solving skills and positive attitudes.

  18. The Nature of Problem-solving in Primary Maths

    In the academic year 2021/22 the Natural Curriculum joined forces with NRICH to explore the best way of using natural history clips to teach primary Maths. Four online problem-solving Mathematics lessons were developed and piloted with primary-aged learners from 9 schools out of 70 that applied to take part. The findings of the study revealed ...

  19. Using NRICH Tasks to Develop Key Problem-solving Skills

    Pattern spotting. Working backwards. Reasoning logically. Visualising. Conjecturing. The first two in this list are perhaps particularly helpful. As learners progress towards a solution, they may take the mathematics further (stage 3) and two more problem-solving skills become important: Generalising. Proving.

  20. Problem solving resources

    Teachers from the Royal Society Schools Network trialed and identified a number of simple activities that can be used at primary level to help students develop problem solving skills. These skills are valuable for a wide variety of subjects in school, and for a wide variety of careers, including (but not limited to) those involving science ...

  21. Advanced Problem Solving Module 1

    Our first Advanced Problem Solving module provides a gentle introduction to being a problem-solver. ... age 5-11 primary students; secondary age 11-18 secondary students; Post 16 age 16+ post 16; Teachers; early years ... The NRICH Project aims to enrich the mathematical experiences of all learners. To support this aim, members of the NRICH ...

  22. Become a Problem-Solving School

    Become a Problem-Solving School. Problem-solving Schools is an exciting new initiative to help schools raise the profile of mathematical problem-solving and nurture better problem-solvers. At the heart of our initiative is our Charter, which offers a framework to help you reflect on your current practice and to agree on areas for development.

  23. The Problem-solving Schools' Charter

    We have a shared belief that: Mathematical ability is not fixed: everyone can learn and make progress. Problem-solving often involves taking wrong turns and making mistakes: every learner has the right to struggle and the right to enjoy success. Everyone should have the opportunity to develop the skills and attitudes necessary to become ...