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How to Address a PhD in Email

Last Updated: August 17, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Shannon O'Brien, MA, EdM and by wikiHow staff writer, Eric McClure . Shannon O'Brien is the Founder and Principal Advisor of Whole U. (a career and life strategy consultancy based in Boston, MA). Through advising, workshops and e-learning Whole U. empowers people to pursue their life's work and live a balanced, purposeful life. Shannon has been ranked as the #1 Career Coach and #1 Life Coach in Boston, MA by Yelp reviewers. She has been featured on Boston.com, Boldfacers, and the UR Business Network. She received a Master's of Technology, Innovation, & Education from Harvard University. There are 8 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 51,277 times.

Writing an email to a college professor with a Ph.D.? Do you call someone with a Ph.D. a doctor? Figuring out the right way to address someone with a doctorate is a lot easier than it may seem, and we’re going to break this down so that you can get it right. In this article, we’ll walk you through everything you need to know about how to address someone with a Ph.D.

Do you address someone with a Ph.D. as a doctor?

Yes, address someone with a Ph.D. as “Dr.”

How to Address an Email to Multiple Professors

Address each professor separately using their title and last name.

  • “Dear Professor Jones, Professor Smith, and Professor Ali.”
  • “Dr. Jones, Dr. Smith, and Professor Ali,”
  • “Dr. Jones and Professor Smith,”

What is the proper way to write a name with Ph.D.?

Write a name with a Ph.D. as “Dr. Jimmy Jones.”

  • You may have seen Ph.D. holders put “Ph.D.” at the end of their name. This is something authors do, but you shouldn’t need to write it this way.

Do you call a professor a doctor?

Adress a professor as

  • You’re very unlikely to get into any trouble by referring to your college teacher as “professor,” even if they are a doctor. At worst, they’ll kindly correct you.
  • In the United States, it is generally seen by most educators as socially acceptable to address a doctor who is also a professor as “professor.” It’s not technically correct, but you’re unlikely to offend any of your educators. As such, you can usually call a doctor a professor or Dr. in email. [3] X Research source

How do you address Ph.D. students?

Opt for “Mr.,” “Ms.,” or “Professor,” if you’re addressing a Ph.D. student.

  • A Ph.D. student is not a doctor yet, but they may still be a professor.
  • “Professor” traditionally refers to tenure-track educators at the collegiate level, but there’s no harm or risk of offense by calling an adjunct instructor, lecturer, or TA, “professor.” [5] X Research source
  • “Miss” has historically been used to address unmarried women, while “Mrs.” has referred to married women. These titles are going out of style since many people find them offensive, so you’re best off skipping these. [6] X Research source

Do the rules for addressing Ph.D. holders ever change?

The rules for addressing Ph.D. holders change from country to country.

  • For example, in Canada, you are not “officially” allowed to refer to non-medical doctors as “Dr.” You would address them as “Mr. Jones, Doctor of Mathematics.”
  • This also applies to the “Jimmy Jones, Ph.D.” form, too. In the United Kingdom, for example, you don’t use any periods. Someone in the UK would write, “Jimmy Jones, PhD” without the punctuation.

Expert Q&A

  • It doesn’t matter if someone has a Ph.D. is in philosophy, education, biology, math, or any other discipline. If a person has obtained a doctorate degree, they’re a doctor—even if they don’t see patients. [8] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Ph.D. is shorthand for doctor of philosophy. The word “doctor” comes from the Latin word “docere,” which means “to teach.” In ancient times, “Philosophy” was used to refer to any academic field. [9] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • The only exception, at least in the United States, are people with a law degree (they are technically “Juris Doctors”, or J.Ds). You do not use a special title or honorific to address someone with a law degree. [10] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

how to address phd

You Might Also Like

Access Email

  • ↑ https://www.universityaffairs.ca/career-advice/career-advice-article/what-should-i-call-my-professor/
  • ↑ https://www.purdue.edu/advisors/students/email.php
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.gmu.edu/guides/sending-email-to-faculty-and-administrators
  • ↑ https://www.bbc.com/news/world-40530920
  • ↑ https://healthenews.mcgill.ca/use-of-dr-doctor-in-quebec-and-updating-your-honorific-in-mcgills-systems/
  • ↑ https://www.cmaj.ca/content/re-who-entitled-be-called-doctor
  • ↑ https://www.qcc.cuny.edu/socialsciences/ppecorino/roark-textbook/Chapter-1.htm
  • ↑ https://moviecultists.com/do-you-call-someone-with-a-jd-doctor

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Strategies for Parents

How to Properly Address a PhD

By: Author Dr. Patrick Capriola

Posted on Published: February 5, 2021

Honorifics play an important role in the English language. Not only do honorifics signify rank, but they help to convey courtesy and respect. In academia, honorifics are especially important, so it’s vital to address someone correctly. Many people wonder if they should address a PhD as doctor.

You should address a PhD with the honorific term “Doctor,” followed by their name in both spoken and written situations. The term strictly applies to anyone who has obtained a PhD degree, MD (Doctor of Medicine), or JD (Doctor of Law). English derives the honorific “Doctor” from the Latin word docere, which means “to teach,” and it applies to a PhD because they have reached a level where they can teach others.

Honorifics exist across all languages and cultures and are significant when using and understanding a language. Who should have the title of “Doctor” is widely debated by the academic world, revealing just how important honorifics are in modern-day English.

What Is a PhD?

A PhD is also known as a Doctor of Philosophy. A PhD is considered a terminal degree in the academic world, which means that the person has obtained the highest formal degree in a specific field ( source ). 

A Doctor of Philosophy is considered to be the traditional doctoral degree. However, over the years, many other types of doctoral degrees have been introduced. Examples of these include the EdD, a Doctor of Education, and DBA, a Doctor of Business ( source ).

Furthermore, a Doctor of Philosophy is considered an academic degree, while other types of doctorates are deemed professional degrees.

If you are considering pursuing a PhD, then you may be interested in exploring this article, “ How to Set and Follow Through on Academic Goals; Examples for Success .”

How and When to Use the Honorific “Dr.”

The honorific “Doctor” or “Dr.” should be used when addressing someone with a PhD, whether via written or verbal correspondence, and it applies to both males and females.

People working towards a PhD, also known as an ABD (All but Dissertation), should not be given the title of “Doctor.” Instead, you should refer to them as “Mr.” or “Ms.” until they have officially completed their PhD.

Undoubtedly, the candidate who has earned their doctorate has worked hard, so it is understandable why they deserve to be addressed correctly. 

The Prenominal and Postnominal

When discussing the subject of addressing someone with a PhD, it’s vital to consider the prenominal “Dr.” and the postnominal “PhD.”

Dr . Douglas Ferguson (Dr. is the pronominal)

Douglas Ferguson, PhD (PhD is the postnominal)

When someone earns the title of “Dr.,” they lose the previous honorifics they may have carried, such as “Mr.” or “Ms.”

A postnominal and pronominal are never used together at the same time.

Furthermore, when discussing these terms grammatically, the prenominal is used in the third person, while the postnominal is most often used in the first person. However, this may change depending on the context.

Written 

In academic circles, a considerable amount of correspondence is done via email and the written word. If you want to send a letter addressed to someone with a PhD, such as a cover letter, you use the prenominal “Dr.” 

When writing in a formal or professional context, you do not need to include the first name.

Dear Dr. Fergsuon, I hope this email finds you well.

In written correspondence, if you are receiving an email from someone with a PhD, they may choose to sign off with either the prenominal or the postnominal.

Regards, Dr . Douglas Ferguson

Regards, Douglas Ferguson, PhD

If you are uncertain, check your previous correspondence with them. Most people will have a footer at the end of their email, which tells you their qualifications. 

white mailing envelope beside white petaled flower

When addressing a person with a PhD verbally, you never use the postnominal.  

Good morning Dr . Ferguson

Dr . Ferguson, I have a question regarding the upcoming exams.

That was an interesting lecture today, Dr . Ferguson.

When Is It “Dr.” and When Is It “Professor?”

Whether to use the term “Dr.” or “Prof.” will depend on several factors. “Professor” is a higher rank than “Dr.”

However, the title only exists within a university context. Someone with a PhD will always hold the title of “Doctor”; however, they would still have to meet other commitments to become a Professor.

It is important to remember that not all those with the title “Professor” have a PhD, so the terms aren’t always exchangeable. 

Often the person lecturing you will indicate how they wish to be addressed. They may want you to call them “Dr.” or “Prof.” or even by their first names. However, it is not recommended to call someone by their first name unless requested to do so.

If a person has a doctorate, the general rule is to call them “Dr.,” whether they are lecturing you or not.

When it is appropriate to use the term ‘Professor’ differs from country to country. In America and Canada, anyone lecturing is generally granted the name “Professor” despite factors such as seniority and tenure.

However, in countries such as the UK and Germany, only full-time professors may be called “Professor.”

The list of academic ranks changes from country to country, but we can examine three examples to get a general idea.

United States

  • Distinguished, Endowed, or University Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Assistant Professor
  • Master Instructor
  • Senior Instructor
  • Lecturer/Research Associate
  • Part-time Lecturer

United Kingdom

  • Distinguished Professor/Chair
  • Full Professor/Reader
  • Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor
  • Assistant Lecturer/Clinical Lecturer 
  • Associate Lecturer/Teaching Assistant/Departmental lecturer

South Africa

  • Full Professor
  • Senior Lecturer
  • Junior Lecturer

Honorifics in English

An English honorific refers to a prefix that occurs before a person’s name ( source ). Honorifics are not considered to be positions or titles that can appear without the person’s name, for example, the Queen or the President.

In English, honorifics are also often used to distinguish between males and females. However, some honorifics, such as “Dr.” and “General,” apply to both males and females.

This is because when these honorifics were first used, only males were able to obtain said titles.

Honorifics are an essential part of the English Language and must be used when formally addressing people, whether it be verbal or written. 

Who Should Be Called “Doctor”?

In the Canadian Medical Association Journal, Dr. James P. Winter, a professor at the University of Windsor, argues that those with a PhD are the only ones who are entitled to be called “Doctor.”

In his argument, Winter poses some interesting questions concerning the evolution of the word “Doctor” and how it has changed over the last 700 years.

Winter argues that due to inappropriate use, the term “Doctor” has become overused and underappreciated.

Winters stated that in many countries, such as Canada, healthcare professionals who don’t have a medical degree, such as pharmacists, are allowed to call themselves “Doctor.”

Blue and Silver Stetoscope

Winters looks at the term from both a historical and linguistic point of view to support his argument. As the term “Doctor” is adopted from the Latin word docere, meaning “to teach,” those with the title should be teaching others. He argues that teaching others is not common practice outside of academia.

Furthermore, he argues that the title of “Doctor” originated in the 1300s when it was only used to describe distinguished scholars. 

Winter goes on to state that PhDs are the highest degree that anyone can obtain from a university, while many health professionals only achieve undergraduate degrees. He considers MDs to be professional degrees and not truly doctorates. 

He concludes that PhDs are the only “real” doctors as dictated by linguists and history. Many academics share Winter’s feelings, with many PhD holders feeling that they have earned the right to be called “Doctor.”

Dr. Fern Riddle, a historian and author, started a debate on Twitter in 2018 when she claimed she wanted only to be referred to only as “Doctor” rather than “Ms.” or “Miss” because she had earned her authority ( source ).

Her opinions received backlash when people called her arrogant and entitled. Yet, many female PhD holders prefer to be called “Doctor.”This is because it illustrates their achievement and status irrespective of whether they are married. 

Those in the medical field argue that the term “Doctor” is significant because it makes patients feel at ease. As such, any health professional who is helping someone should be allowed to bear the honorific ( source ). 

Who should rightfully be called “Doctor” is a topic that is continuously debated.

The reality is that the term “Doctor” has changed over the years to encompass a much wider circle of people. This includes not only professionals and academics but males and females. 

Whatever your perspective, it is clear that the title of “Doctor” is still much sought after and revered, and that is not likely to change anytime soon.

Final Thoughts

Those who have obtained a PhD have done so by working hard and dedicating years of their life to academia. As such, it is important when dealing with someone who has a PhD that you address them correctly.

The term “Doctor” and to whom it is applied is constantly changing from country to country. It remains to be seen who else will be awarded the title in the future and how those who hold the title will react to its evolution.

Universities vs. University’s: Understanding the Difference between Plural and Possessive

Sunday 21st of February 2021

[…] For an article on how to properly address a Ph.D., make sure you read our article on this subject. […]

Honor & Respect Logo

How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name

—- For more on the the use of Port-Nominal Abbreviations , see that page . —- For more on use of an Honorary Doctorate , see that page . How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name

Here are the forms to use when addressing a person addressed as Dr. See the discussion below “How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name 1-2-3-4-5” for more information on who typically does use Dr. as part of their name and who does not.

—- Envelope or address block on letter or email to their office/place of work: ——– (Full Name), (Post-nominal abbreviation for doctorate held). ——– ( Name of office/place of work if  appropriate) ——– (Address)

—- Social/Personal envelope: ——– Dr. (Full Name) ——– (Address)

—- Salutation – for both official & social: ——– Dear Dr. (Surname):  How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name

Robert Hickey author of “Honor & Respect”

How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name: 1-2-3-4-5

—- #1) Holders of doctorates who work in academia or research institutions are addressed as ‘Dr. (Name)’ professionally and socially in a salutation or conversation. Thus, a Ph.D. professor at a college, a Ph.D. in biology doing scientific research, and a Ph.D. principal at an elementary school all use Dr. (Name) and everybody thinks it is normal.

—- NOTE: At some universities it is traditional to address faculty holding of academic doctorates as ‘Mr. (Name)’ or ‘Professor (Name)’ and not to address as ‘Dr. (Name)’. For those outside the academic community it is acceptable to follow the insider’s rule or to address holders of doctorates as ‘Dr. (Name)’ in writing or oral address.

—- #2) Protestant clergy with doctorates are addressed as ‘Dr. (Name)’ in a salutation or conversation. I specify ‘Protestant’ here because not all clergy is. For example, neither priests – addressed in a salutation or conversation as Father [Name] – nor rabbis – addressed as Rabbi [Name] –  holding doctorates are ever addressed as Dr. [Name] . In a salutation or conversation they stick with Father[Name] and Rabbi [Name].

—- #3) Holders of doctorates who work outside academia or research don’t always prefer to be addressed as ‘Dr. (Name)’. in a salutation or conversation. —- —- A) In the USA ‘Dr.’ may be used depending on the work environment and/or when the degree isn’t pertinent to the conversation. E.g., a Ph.D. in finance working at a bank or a Ph.D. in American history working in software development are not likely to insist on being addressed as ‘ Dr. (Name)’ . But always ask for their preference. Use of, or omitting, the honorific can be a sensitive issue to some individuals! —- —- B) And, outside the U.S.A. everyone holding a doctorate will want to be addressed as ‘Dr. (Name)’ in every instance.

—- #4) In hospitals and healthcare environments historically there was a practice that only physicians (medical doctors, osteopaths, dentists, podiatrists, veterinarians, etc. ) are addressed as ‘Dr. (Name)’. This was explained to be out of consideration for the patients who want to know who ‘the doctors’ are and who are nurses and allied healthcare professionals.

—- That made for some unhappy professionals who earned doctorates in hospital administration, pharmacy, physical therapy and nursing, etc. – who felt they too were properly addressed as ‘Dr. (Name)’ . It’s my understanding that today all the holders of doctorates are addressed as Dr. (Name) and hospitals (etc.) have figured out other ways to define which doctor is a physician, which is a physical therapist and which is a nurse anesthetist.

—- #5) All that said, ultimately how one is addressed by others is up to the individual and usually everyone goes along. For example, if you and I meet a woman who identifies herself as ‘Monsignor Alice’ … I think it is unlikely she’s a Roman Catholic Monsignor. And, it’s unusual she has only one name, like Pink, Rhianna, Sting, Cher, or Madonna. But we should directly address her in conversation as ‘Monsignor Alice,’ it’s nice to meet you …’ because that’s what she says her name is. How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name

—- But, when she’s out of range, we will all be talking about her.

—- —- – Robert Hickey

Related Healthcare Links -V — — Chiropractor / Doctor of Chiropractic Medicine -V — — Dentist / Doctor of Dentistry -V — — Medical Doctor / Doctor of Medicine -V — — Military Physician / Armed Services -V — — Optometrist / Doctor of Optometry -V — — Osteopath / Doctor of Osteopathy -V — — Podiatrist / Doctor of Podiatry -V — — Veterinarian / Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

More Related Healthcare Links: -V — — Person holding a doctorate -V — — Pharmacist / Doctor of Pharmacy -V — — Psychologist -V — — Therapist

Related Links: —- —- —- Principal —- —- —- Headmaster —- —- —- President College University —- —- —- President of a School —- —- —- Chancellor —- —- —- Professor

When To Use Dr. (Name) and When To Use (Name), Ph.D.?

My daughter is receiving her Ph.D. and will be teaching. I would like to give her a name plate for her desk. Should it be ‘Dr. (Full Name)’ or ‘(Full Name), Ph.D. ‘? ——————- – AP

Dear AP,   How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name

‘(Full Name), Ph.D.’ is the official form of her name. You will use it on the envelope, or in the address block of a letter, when you write to her with regard to her professional pursuits. This is the form the university will use when she is listed among the faculty. It is used by the degree holder, when specifying the exact degree is pertinent – like on business cards or in a list of academics.

‘Dr. (Full Name)’ is the social form of her name. You will use it when you write her name on a personal letter’s envelope, e.g., one sent to her home. This is the form everyone will use on the envelope when they send her a birthday or holiday card. It is rarely used by the degree holder since one does not correctly give oneself an honorific. The degree holder – in their signature or when introducing him or herself – just uses their name … no ‘Dr.’ It’s up to the other person to add the ‘Dr.’ E.g., I just introduce myself as ‘Robert Hickey’ – never ‘Mr. Robert Hickey.’

Sometimes you will observe a physician in a healthcare setting introducing him or herself as ‘Dr. (Name)’ – but there it is for the patient’s benefit to know they are the physician in a field of people wearing seemingly identical white coats!

‘Dr. (Surname)’ is the conversational form of her name. Use it both officially and socially in a letter’s salutation as well as in oral conversation.

So, for an office name plate use the official form of her name – (Full Name), Ph.D.

– Robert Hickey

how to address phd

Doctors present the official form of their name to the public:  (Full Name) (Pertinent post-nominals for the service offered).   The social form of their name does not include their degree: Dr. (Full Name).   In both official and social salutations and conversations patients use Dr. (Name).

Forms of Address: How a conversation begins can have a huge impact on how the conversation - even the entire relationship - develops.

If My Doctorate is in Music, am I ‘Dr.’?

I hold a DMA, Doctorate in Music, from a Boston university and am a Church Music Director. Please could you advise me as to whether it is acceptable for the church where I work to list me in the service bulletins as: ‘Dr. (First name) + (Last name) ‘? —————- – CJ

Dear CJ: How to Use a Doctorate with your Name It is correct to list yourself in the bulletin using the professional form of your name … (First name) + (Last name), DMA.    It specifies your academic credential in your professional domain.

Among protestant denominations many address their clergy with a doctorate orally and in a salutation as  Dr. (Surname).   If your church is one of those, and it is your preference is to be Dr. (Surnhttps://formsofaddress.info/wp-admin/post.php?post=13983&action=edit#ame), tell everyone that it is your preference to be addressed Dr. (Surname).

Usually academics and researchers who go by Dr. (Surname) professionally – use Dr. (Surname)  socially. But ultimately whether a particular Ph.D. holder is ‘Dr. (Name)’ socially … especially outside of healthcare, academia or research … is at the preference of the bearer. Some insist, some don’t care, others say they answer to anything they are called. Ultimately your name belongs to you and if you want to be Dr. (Surname), then it’s your right to request everyone address you that way.

– Robert Hickey   How to Use a Doctorate with your Name

May I Call Myself Dr. (Name)  if my Degree Is Not Related to the Service I Offer?

I have a Ph.D. and license in counseling. Recently I sent out an announcement for a yoga class I will be teaching. The state of Colorado says I should not teach yoga as   “Dr. (Name)”. How can I convince them I can? ——– – Kevin S., Ph.D., L.P.C., C.M.T., I.K.Y.T.A. ,  Counseling, Yoga Therapy, Integrative Health & Healing

Dear Dr. Kevin, How to Use a Doctorate with your Name

Your Ph.D. is in a field not related to the service you are offering.

A couple of typical practices I observe in the USA come to mind:

Professionals use with their name the degrees pertinent to their profession service. The degrees and certifications are provided for the benefit of the public so the public can quickly evaluate your credentials.

Here’s what I mean by pertinent . A pastor who would be the Reverend (Full Name)  & Pastor (Name) at church on Sundays, would not use the Reverend (Full Name) & Pastor (Name)  when teaching English Monday through Friday, at the local high school. That he or she is the Reverend  might be mentioned in a complete biography or introduction. It just isn’t part of his/her name at school.

So, I can see if you are using ‘Dr. (Name)’ when offering a class in yoga, and your doctorate is not directly to the service you are offering, say a doctorate physical therapy or kinesthetics …. it would be confusing to me … and the state officials must think it is misleading to the public.

– Robert Hickey How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name

how to address phd

Should I Use Dr. or Ph.D. on an Invitation?

If a person holds a Ph.D., should his or her name be ‘Dr. (name)’ a wedding invitation? Or ‘( Name), Ph.D.’ ?  Is this true for the father of the bride?  The groom?  Is the rule for names on wedding invitations and wedding envelopes different that the guidelines for social correspondence? ————– – Beverly Russell, Winchester, Virginia

Dear Ms. Russell: Wedding invitations and their envelopes are social correspondence. Post-nominal abbreviations ( Ph.D. is a post nominal abbreviation) aren’t used on social correspondence:

—- —- DON’T use Ph.D.

—- —- DO use Dr. (Name)

Another question that typically comes up is whether to use Doctor or Dr. (spelled out or abbreviated) on the invitation or on the mailing envelope?

The rule is to spell out everything and not to use abbreviations unless space is an issue.

But, Mr., Mrs., Dr., and Ms. (for which there is no spelled-out version) are typically used on invitations and when addressing invitations in even the most formal circles. I think ‘Doctor (Name)’ looks oh-so-highly precious, but I know some wedding planners who would wrestle me to the mat on that one.

When Should You Use the Forms on this Page?

You can use these forms of address for any mode of communication: addressing a letter, invitation, card or Email. (If there are differences between the official and social forms of address, I will have mentioned the different forms.)  The form noted in the salutation is the same form you say when you say their name in conversation or when you greet them. ___ What I don’t cover on this site are  many things I do cover in my book: all the rules of forms of address, about names, international titles, precedence, complimentary closes, details on invitations, place cards, all sorts of introductions , etc. I hope you’ll get a copy of the book if you’d like the further detail.

Not Finding Your Answer?

—- #1)    At right  on desktops , at the bottom of every page on tablets and phones , is a list of all the offices, officials & topics covered on the site.

—- #2)   If you don’t see the official you seek included or your question answered send me an e-mail . I am pretty fast at sending a reply: usually the next day or so  (unless I am traveling.)   Note: I don’t have mailing or Email addresses for any of the officials and I don’t keep track of offices that exist only in history books.

—- #3)   If I think your question is of interest to others, Sometimes I post the question  – but always change all the specifics.

— Robert Hickey 

Recommended Resources:    The Protocol School of Washington (PSOW)  and  Protocol and Diplomacy International – Protocol Officers Association (PDI-POA)     For more information see the Protocol Resources page.

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How to Address an Envelope to a PhD

Chanté griffin, 25 jun 2018.

How to Address an Envelope to a PhD

Although you probably conduct most of your written communication via email, you may encounter a scenario where you need to send a letter or a card to a Ph.D. holder; knowing how to properly address the envelope is critical.

Scenario 1: You meet a man with a Ph.D. at a social engagement, and you want to send him a letter requesting mentorship.

Scenario 2: You conduct an informational interview with a married woman who holds a Ph.D. in a field you want to explore, and you want to send her a thank you card.

Scenario 3: You want to invite a couple (each person holds a Ph.D.) to a formal event.

What is the correct way to address the envelope? Is it similar to how you’d address a medical doctor or a dentist? If you’re friends with the person, should you even include a title?

Explore this article

  • What Is a Ph.D.?
  • Getting the Title Right
  • What If the Ph.D. Is Married?
  • Addressing a Couple With Two Ph.D.s
  • One More Tip

1 What Is a Ph.D.?

A Ph.D. is a “doctor of philosophy” degree, referred to as “PhD” and “Ph.D.”

It is the highest degree that a university or college awards. Colleges and universities confer Ph.D.s in numerous fields such as computer science, psychology and communication. Ph.D. holders often teach at the university level because they're experts in their respective fields.

2 Getting the Title Right

When addressing an envelope to a Ph.D. holder, be sure to include the title, even if the person is a friend. The only exception would be if the person has asked for the title to be excluded.

On the envelope, write the person’s name, a comma and “Ph.D.” For example, if you wanted to send a card to Chanell Johnson, you’d write:

"Chanell Johnson, Ph.D."

You would not need to indicate her marital status on the envelope.

3 What If the Ph.D. Is Married?

If Chanell were married, and you wanted to send an invitation to her and her partner (who share the same last name), you would use “Dr.” in front of her name. Her partner’s name would follow.

"Dr. Chanell and Mr. Stephen Johnson" or "Dr. Chanell and Mrs. Stephanie Johnson"

If Chanell were married, and she and her partner had different last names, you'd use a similar format.

"Dr. Chanell Johnson and Mr. Stephen Smith" or "Dr. Chanell Johnson and Mrs. Stephanie Smith"

4 Addressing a Couple With Two Ph.D.s

If Chanell and her partner shared the same last name and held Ph.D.s, you’d acknowledge both degrees by using the plural of Doctor and omitting their first names.

"The Doctors Johnson"

If they did not share the same last name, you'd write:

"Dr. Chanell Johnson and Dr. Stephanie Smith" or "Dr. Chanell Johnson and Dr. Stephen Smith"

5 One More Tip

While communication etiquette is less formal today than fifty years ago, it’s still better to err on the side of formality when addressing doctors. Why risk offending someone when you could applaud her accomplishments instead?

The card or letter inside the envelope would simply say, “Dear Dr. Johnson."

  • 1 The Emily Post Institute: Guide to Addressing Correspondence
  • 2 The Knot: Q&A: Invitations: Addressing One to a Professor?
  • 3 The Emily Post Institute: Professional Titles
  • 4 Boston.com: “Dr. and Mr.” or “Mr. and Dr.”? Which is correct?
  • 5 Dictionary.com: Ph.D. Definition
  • 6 Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary: PhD Definition

About the Author

Chanté Griffin is a Los Angeles-based writer who covers education, race, and arts/entertainment.

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Criteria and Etiquette for Addressing Someone With a PhD Title

  • John Garger
  • Categories : Postgraduate , Education
  • Tags : Education postgraduate topics doctorate

Criteria and Etiquette for Addressing Someone With a PhD Title

Dr. Livingstone, I Presume…

The PhD is a mysterious degree for many people who have never gone through the process. The term doctor is usually associated with

someone who holds a medical degree (like scientist/missionary/explorer Dr. Livingstone) and actively practices medicine. Calling someone doctor who doesn’t have a medical degree can seem awkward or inappropriate.

The criteria for whether it is appropriate to address or introduce someone as doctor is quite clear. Unfortunately, there are times when addressing someone as doctor can seem pretentious when taken out of context. Read on for five tips concerning the etiquette of addressing and introducing someone who holds a PhD.

1 - Formal and Academic Situations

In formal or academic social situations, it is most appropriate to address someone who holds a PhD as doctor. This is true for both face-to-face and written communication. Someone with a PhD has completed extensive study and research in his or her area of expertise. In academic situations, assume that it is always appropriate to use the prefix Dr and allow the individual the opportunity to decide whether he/she prefers to be addressed in common.

2 - University Setting

Most people who hold a PhD are professors in a university setting. In some universities, all titles are dispensed with and everyone addresses everyone else with a first name only. Some universities reserve this privilege to professors who hold the same rank. It isn’t uncommon for senior faculty (associate professors, full professors) to expect junior faculty (assistant professors) to address them with a formal title attached. Your best bet in these situations is to assume a formal address until you learn the particulars and norms of the culture.

3 - Doctoral Students

It is never appropriate to address or introduce a doctoral student as doctor. Until someone has the degree, never address him/her as doctor or with PhD after the name. Some ABD doctoral students whose graduation is imminent will prematurely take on the prefix Dr and place PhD after their name. This is inappropriate and would not be tolerated in most academic circles.

4 - Written Communication

In written communication, it is usually not necessary to use the Dr prefix and also affix the letters PhD after the last name of someone who holds a PhD; use either one or the other but not both. For situations in which you want to give the PhD holder his or her due respect, use the prefix Dr. In situations where you want to be clear which type of degree the individual has, affix PhD at the end of the person’s name. However, this is for written addresses and introductions only. In speech, prefix the individual’s name with Dr but never speak the letters PhD.

5 - Breaking the Rules

Although the criteria for calling someone Dr are quite clear, it is perfectly fine to break the rules based on the individual’s preferences. Some doctors I know will correct you if you call them Mr or Ms while others aren’t concerned about projecting their academic achievements to others in public. The one rule you should always remember when addressing someone who has completed the study and research necessary to be called Dr is assume a formal address unless otherwise directed by the individual.

Image Credit: [Wikimedia Commons]( https://heritage.scotsman.com/timelines.cfm?cid=1&id=40822005 through en-wiki), in the public domain

Tips for Writing an Email to Faculty about Research

For many students, the best way to get involved in research is to email faculty/principle investigators directly to ask about research opportunities. An email is an opportunity to highlight your shared interest in their research topic and to highlight attributes that will make you a good undergraduate researcher to work with. This page will help you write a concise and targeted email to maximize your chance at a reply.

The subject

Be short, but be clear what you are writing about. Something like “Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Your Lab” or “Openings for Undergraduates to do Research in [your research topic]” should work. Do not simply use “Hi” or “Research” as a subject.

The greeting

A formal greeting is always a safe bet, so always address the recipient using a proper title. When contacting faculty or postdoctoral fellows, “Dear Dr. ______,” is appropriate. If you are contacting someone without a doctorate or M.D., use “Dear Mr. ______,” or “Dear Ms.______” If you are unsure, always err on the side of using “Dr.” Never open an e-mail with “To whom it may concern” or any similarly vague phrase.

The main text

In the first line, identify yourself with your year in school and your major or anticipated major as well as your interest in research (e.g., “I’m a sophomore political science and public policy major looking to do research on voting rights in the South.” or “I’m a first year Neuroscience major and hope to get involved in Alzheimer’s research as soon as I can.”). You also want to explain why you why you are contacting this faculty in particular. It helps to mention how you know the recipient or where you got their contact information. If you took a class with them or have spoken with someone doing research with them, say so. If you are contacting them based on their profile on the department website, it is fine to say something like “When lookin for research opportunities in [subject area], I found information about your research on the department’s website.”

Next, explain your specific interest in this faculty’s research . Your goal here is to establish a shared passion for the particular area in which this faculty member conducts research — the more specific, the better. Are there aspects of their research that fascinate you? Do you want to be able to contribute to the understanding of some specific problem or issue? Is there something about your past classwork or research experience that sparked your interest? If there are broader motivations that drive you, include a sentence in your email explaining them. In addition, it can be helpful to pick a recent paper or book they’ve published and read or skim it. You don’t have to sound like an expert, but it helps to mention a recent finding that interests you and possibly ask a good question about their research (e.g., “Is the protein you study also regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner?”). Be sure to describe any relevant experience or completed courses that would make you well suited to do research with the faculty, but keep in mind your shared interest/passion may be just as important as your background.

One word of caution: you don’t want to make it seem that their lab or their research project is only a stepping stone to the next step in your career (graduate school or medical school) — this might turn off many who are devoted to research and want to recruit students with a shared passion.

Grades and your CV/resume

While grades are certainly not the only factor faculty will consider, you may wish to include your GPA if you feel that it merits mentioning. However, refrain from making it the focal point of a sentence; instead, you can bring it up in the context of wanting some experience outside of class (e.g., “I am enjoying my classes so far and doing well (my GPA is 3.7), but I feel that I will learn a lot more by exploring my interests beyond the classroom”). Similarly, if you have a CV/resume that includes relevant research experience, you may want to include it (e.g., “I’ve attached my resume in case it might be helpful for you to know a bit more about me.”). If your academic qualifications are not as great as you’d hoped (for example, your GPA is on the lower end), you can put off attaching the CV for now and just state that you would be happy to send a CV or any other material if needed.

Concluding sentences and closing

Now you are ready to wrap up with a brief concluding statement. Thank the recipient for their time and ask for an opportunity to meet with them to discuss their research projects and to how to get involved in the type of research they do. A warm but simple closing (“Sincerely,” or “Best regards,”) is fine. It may help to include your email or phone number under your name if you have invited the recipient to contact you.

General considerations and next steps

First, remember to keep the email reasonably short. Two small paragraphs should cover everything you need say. Also, remember to proofread carefully. Spelling and grammar errors will reflect negatively and your attention to detail. Don’t use slang or abbreviations common in texting. Think of the email as something you would turn in for a grade. That said, be yourself! While it is best to be formal, the email does not have to be bland; let some of your personality show through. Lastly, if you don’t receive a reply after about two weeks, it’s okay to follow up by forwarding your original email back to the recipient and politely add “Dear Dr. ______, I’m writing to follow up on my earlier email about research opportunities in [your area of research]. I remain interested in speaking with you about your research if you are able. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration.” Faculty are very busy and your persistence may be appreciated, so it’s even okay to send another follow up email after another few weeks if you don’t hear back. After that, it may be time to move on to other opportunities.

Sample email

Dear Dr. ______,

I am a sophomore Computer Science major, and I am especially interested in your research on artificial intelligence.

With artificial intelligence constantly evolving, I am interested in exploring its true capabilities and how machine learning can improve language processing. While looking for research opportunities to explore my passions within artificial intelligence, I came across your Natural Language Processing Group at UNC. Connecting the capabilities of artificial intelligence and exploring its ability to communicate with human language is very captivating. I am enjoying my classes so far and doing well (My GPA is 4.0), but I am eager to supplement my classroom learning with a research opportunity. I feel that I would be able learn more about artificial intelligence by becoming a part of your research group or a similar project on campus. I’ve attached my resume in case it’s helpful for you to know a bit more about me and my research background.

I would appreciate an opportunity to briefly meet with you or someone in your research group to discuss your research and how I might be able to support your work at some point in the next three years. If you are able to meet with me, please let me know some times you are available to talk. Thank you in advance for your time and consideration, and I look forward to hearing from you.

[include a signature with your Name, Major, Class of 202_]

The Classroom | Empowering Students in Their College Journey

How to Correctly Use the Titles Dr. & PhD With a Name

How to Reference a Person With a PhD

How to Reference a Person With a PhD

When someone has earned a Doctor of Philosophy, or Ph.D., degree, that person is subsequently referred to as “doctor” in formal speech. The same is true of a person who is a medical doctor, psychologist, dentist or veterinarian. In formal speech, that person should be referred to as “doctor.” However, the rules are different in written form when addressing someone who is called “doctor” in formal speech. In written form, the titles “Dr.” and “Ph.D.” are not interchangeable.

Determine the Type of Doctor

First, you should identify what type of doctor you are addressing. Doctors of medicine and psychology, doctors of dentistry and doctors of veterinary medicine must be addressed differently in comparison to academic doctors who have earned a Doctor of Philosophy doctoral degree. Be advised that there are different types of doctoral degrees. A Doctor of Philosophy degree is just one kind of doctoral degree. There’s also, for example, a Doctor of Education doctoral degree and a Doctor of Psychology doctoral degree. The titles associated with the various doctoral degrees are not interchangeable. Only a person who has earned a Doctor of Philosophy degree should be addressed as Ph.D.

Addressing a Doctor in Writing

Place the title of “Dr.” before the name of a person who is a doctor of medicine or psychology, doctor of dentistry, or doctor of veterinary medicine. For example Dr. George Ross. Always write the word “doctor” in its abbreviated form when it goes before the person’s name. Never write, for example, Doctor George Ross. Do not combine the title of “Dr.” with any other title even if the person could appropriately be addressed by a different title. Never write, for example, “Dr. George Ross, Ph.D.,” even if the person is a medical doctor who has also earned a Doctor of Philosophy degree. Pick one title. Do not use the “Dr.” title when referring to someone who is solely an academic doctor.

Put a comma followed by the title “Ph.D.” after the name of a person who has earned a Doctor of Philosophy doctoral degree. For example Stacey Childs, Ph.D. Do not combine the title of “Ph.D.” with any other title even if the person could appropriately be addressed by a different title. For instance, even if the person being addressed is a doctor of medicine who has also earned a Ph.D., never write, for example, Dr. Stacey Childs, Ph.D. Pick one title. Do not use the “Ph.D.” title when referring to someone who not earned a Doctor of Philosophy doctoral degree.

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  • The Emily Post Institute: What are some professional titles to know?

Maya Austen began freelance writing in 2009. She has written for many online publications on a wide variety of topics ranging from physical fitness to amateur astronomy. She's also an author and e-book publisher. Austen has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from the New England Institute of Art and currently lives in Boston, Mass.

Academia Insider

How to use the PhD title and all the little doctorate “rules”

There are many conventions in the academic world that can make it difficult to navigate the PhD title. The PhD title is awarded to those who have completed a doctoral degree but, not many people know how to use it once they have it.

This article will go through everything you need to know about using the PhD title and when you can start using it.

The “rules” are relatively simple and can be broken as they are not officially set in stone – other than when you can officially call yourself a doctor.

There is no one correct answer but it may be misleading if you use the PhD title incorrectly. Here are the recommendations for effective communication.

It very much depends on the setting. Here are some examples of how I would use my PhD titles awarded to me after my PhD degree.

How do you Write PhD correctly after a name? Is it ph d or phd?

It can be confusing to know exactly how to write PhD after your name. Which bits are capitalised? Is there a ‘.’ In the middle?

When writing a name with a PhD after it, the correct way to do so is to use “PhD” or “Ph.D. or Ph.D”

Depending on the preference of the individual, either form can be used.

However, if the individual has a business card that states their degree in full, then the more formal “Doctor of Philosophy” should be used.

It is important to note that using “PhD” without any periods is incorrect; this abbreviation should only be used in informal contexts such as emails or text messages. I tend to use PhD in my YouTube videos and some people have pointed out that this is incorrect…

Following the individual’s preferred format will ensure that their name and credentials are properly represented.

Should you use Dr as well as PhD?

Some people like to use Dr and PhD in their official titles. There are a couple of important points that you need to know about markers and academic titles.

  • A person can have more than one marker in their name. For example my full title is Dr Andrew Stapleton, PhD, MChem.
  • The doctor title at the front can be used as a variant to the PhD at the end.

It can be a little bit ambiguous if I was to use Dr Andrew Stapleton, PhD as there are two markers. This could mean that I have two PhD’s, it could mean that I have a PhD and a medical doctorate, or it could just be that I want to use both the doctor and the PhD tags for the one degree.

However, in my experience, I still like to use the doctor title at the front and the PhD tag at the end of my name for official purposes.

Academics would rarely use the PhD suffix in everyday communication. They would much rather just use the doctor title.

What is the proper title for a PhD?

The proper title for a PhD is Doctor of Philosophy. However, some teachers and professors like to be referred to without their official title.

If you are not sure about how your professor, lecturer, or friend with a PhD wishes to be officially addressed you can ask them.

Most of the time, I like to refer to my colleagues with their doctor title for official purposes, but I do not include the PhD at the end of their name. That is much better suited to a business card.

Your lecture may wish to be referred to as:

  • Dr [last name]
  • Dr [first name]

Asking them in the early stages of your relationship is the best way to work out which one they prefer.

If in doubt, always go for the more formal name and nomenclature.

When can you start to use your PhD title after your doctorate?

When you have earned your PhD, you can start using your title immediately. Although, it can be a little bit confusing as to when you have actually passed your PhD. Is it when you have submitted your dissertation? Is it when you have received the comments back?

The University of Adelaide says that you can use it from your conferral date:

Students can be conferred on one of five dates during the year and for PhD students the conferral date will be the first available following the completion of all the academic requirements of your degree, including final thesis lodgement and the disbursement of any outstanding financial obligations to the University.

I started using my PhD title as soon as my confirmation letter arrived at my house. It was the first letter from the University that referred to me as Dr Stapleton. It was incredibly excited.

Generally, it is acceptable to use the title “Dr.” both professionally and socially but socially, people very rarely use it – at least in Australia. But you should never use it if you are a PhD student, PhD candidate or enrolled in a PhD program without a previous PhD qualification. 

I do use it in professional settings but it always makes me feel a little bit awkward.

However, there may be some restrictions for certain settings. For example, if have a research degree resulting in a doctor title and you are working in a medical setting – some institutions do not like you to use Dr as it can confuse patients into thinking that you have a medical degree. 

Instead, they ask that you use the PhD tag at the end of your name rather than the doctoral title for official and professional communications.

What is the correct way to write PhD?

When writing about someone’s PhD, the correct way is to write the term in full and capitalize each letter.

This should be done for all academic degrees, not just PhDs.

For example, it would be “Doctor of Philosophy” or “PhD” instead of “Ph.D.”, “Dr.”, or “DPhil”.

Additionally, it is common to mention the field of study in which the degree was earned if known, such as “Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics”. It is also good practice to include the institution that granted the degree if it is a recognized one.

When writing about someone’s PhD, use proper capitalization and include relevant information like field of study and institution if known to ensure accuracy.

How do you put a PhD in a title?

Putting a PhD in a title is not as complicated as it may sound.

Generally speaking, the proper way to list a PhD in an academic or professional setting is by writing “Dr.” before the name, followed by the person’s full name and the appropriate abbreviations for their degree.

For example, if John Smith has earned a doctorate in psychology, his credentials would be listed as “Dr. John Smith, Ph.D.”

In some cases, such as when addressing someone formally in speech or on a business card, it may also be acceptable to list their credentials as “John Smith, Ph.D.”

Depending on context and personal preference, some people may also choose to list their higher degrees after their names by writing out the entire degree instead of just its abbreviation.

For example, John Smith could choose to write his full title as “John Smith, Doctor of Psychology”

However, I have not seen this in real academic life.

Should the font size of Ph.D. be the same as someone’s name?

The question of whether the font size of a Ph.D. should be the same as someone’s name is an interesting one.

On one hand, it could be argued that the Ph.D. deserves to be highlighted and therefore should be given a larger font size than someone’s name to denote its importance.

On the other, it could be argued that this would not be necessary or appropriate, and that treating everyone equally regardless of their title or degree is more important.

It depends on context and usage – if both names appear in the same document then they should likely have the same font size; however, if one appears in a formal setting such as a diploma or certificate, then it may make sense to give it a larger font size than someone’s name to emphasize its importance and significance.

Ph.Ds (or PhDs) are an important academic achievement and should be respected accordingly but without going overboard by giving them overly large fonts sizes which can take away from rather than add to their importance.

Wrapping up – doctoral title rules

this article has been over everything you need to know that using the PhD title properly and effectively.

The doctor title can be used in place of the PhD and for incredibly formal communications, such as a business email or card, you can use both.

However, sometimes using both can cause confusion as to whether or not there is a reason first using both the doctor and PhD tags. Nonetheless, many people still use both.

how to address phd

Dr Andrew Stapleton has a Masters and PhD in Chemistry from the UK and Australia. He has many years of research experience and has worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow and Associate at a number of Universities. Although having secured funding for his own research, he left academia to help others with his YouTube channel all about the inner workings of academia and how to make it work for you.

Thank you for visiting Academia Insider.

We are here to help you navigate Academia as painlessly as possible. We are supported by our readers and by visiting you are helping us earn a small amount through ads and affiliate revenue - Thank you!

how to address phd

2024 © Academia Insider

how to address phd

What Should I Call My Professor?

Academia has its own customs and traditions that can be confusing for students. Even simple things like emailing your professor can seem like a minefield. Should you refer to them as “Professor”, “Doctor” or something else? These tips should help you avoid any gaffes.

The general rule is if someone’s title includes the word professor, then you can (and should) address them as “Professor Last Name.” In Canada and the US, this includes assistant, associate, clinical, and research professors, as well as full professors. In the UK, this applies only to full professors, not lecturers or senior lecturers.

Anyone who has earned a doctoral degree can be addressed as “Dr. Last Name”. The most common doctoral degree is a PhD, but you might also encounter instructors with other doctoral degrees such as a Doctor of Theology (DTh), Doctor of Public Health (DrPH), or Doctor of Engineering (DEng).

When in doubt, “Dr. Last Name” is the safest way to address an academic you don’t know anything about. It is generally the standard form of address for instructors who do not hold the rank of professor such as lecturers, readers, senior lecturers, and research associates.

While the titles of “Dr.” and “Professor” often overlap, they are not always interchangeable. Not all professors have PhDs. In fine arts, social work, and law, many professors will have an MFA, MSW, or JD (respectively) rather than a doctoral degree. And although some professors might also be doctors, “Professor” is a higher rank and thus tends to be preferred.

Mr. and Mrs.

When you were a kid, you might have been taught that the polite way to address an authority figure was as “Mr.” or “Mrs.” This is generally not true in academia. Calling a professor or someone with a doctorate “Mr.” or “Mrs.” can be disrespectful as it does not acknowledge the years of work they have done to earn the title of “Dr.” or “Professor”. This is especially true for women as “Mrs.” reduces a woman to her marital status and ignores her academic accomplishments.

However, you are addressing an instructor who is not a professor and does not have a PhD (such as a TA or lab instructor) you can call them “Mr.” or “Ms”. Unless your instructor you instructor specifically expresses a preference for “Mrs.” or “Miss”, “Ms” is now the standard English title for an adult woman—married or not.

First Names

Some professors prefer that their students call them by their first names while others find it rude and presumptuous. For this reason, it’s best to avoid calling your instructors by their first name unless they explicitly tell you that you can. This includes graduate student instructors as well.

Your instructors will often make this all very easy for you by indicating how they want to be addressed when they introduce themselves at the start of the class. If you still have doubts about what to call an instructor, err on the side of being overly respectful.

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how to address phd

How to address other academics by email?

Provides suggestions on the best way to address academics by email

Anne-Wil Harzing - Thu 18 May 2017 07:40 (updated Tue 13 Feb 2024 17:20)

how to address phd

You have done your hard work of networking at conferences, and now you want to write to some of the people you met. Or you have read someone’s work and want to alert them to some of your work, without of course resorting to mass email .

How do you address fellow academics

But how do you address them? It is quite important to get it right as the wrong form of address can be very off-putting to some people.

  • As in “real life”, the first rule of thumb is that it is better to start out too formal than to start out too informal. Few people will take offense at a formal way of address, unless of course you had become best friends at the conference. In that case they might well wonder what went wrong.
  • The second rule of thumb is that the less face-to-face contact you have had with the person before, the more formal your manner of address should be. So for someone you have met at a conference, you might use a less formal way of address than for someone you have never met before.
  • The third rule of thumb is that more junior you are and the more senior the person you are writing to, the more likely it is that a “formal” form of address, such as “Dear Professor [Family Name]” or “Dear Dr. [Family Name]” would be appropriate. If you are a PhD student and the person you are writing to is a Professor in their fifties, “Hi Peter” or “Hi Anne” would probably sound a little strange even for someone who normally doesn’t insist on formalities.
  • The fourth rule of thumb is to adjust to their expectations . Different cultures expect different levels of formality or simply different ways of address. It is hard to give hard and fast rules on this, but the piece I did on how to address your teacher might give you some clues. The problem is that most academics address people in the way they address their compatriots. I receive many emails from Indian students addressing me as Ma’m, or from Dutch students addressing me as Mrs. Harzing (my least favourite way of address!).
  • A fifth rule of thumb is specific to academia: use the official title more often than you would in other situations. In many countries Professor and Dr. are not seen as a signal of hierarchy, they simply acknowledge someone’s seniority and expertise. That’s why, although to Western ears it might sound a little odd, the solution that many Asian students use when the lecturer wants them to use their given name – Professor [given name] or Dr. [given name] – is perfectly appropriate.
  • A sixth rule of thumb is to pay equal respect where equal respect is due , a Professor is a Professor regardless of their age or gender. I am sure I am not the only woman to have been introduced without title and with her given and last name or even with her given name only, whereas my male colleagues were invariably introduced as Professor [Last Name]. Interestingly, someone has even done research on the effects of this tendency ( Why Curie's no Einstein ).

how to address phd

What if you are more senior yourself?

In many ways it can be more difficult to decide how to address someone if you are a bit more senior yourself. Using a very formal way of address might lead the recipient to mistake you for a student, especially in Anglo and Nordic countries, where the use of first names is common. On the other hand, if you are addressing a senior academic you want to signal that you are respecting their position and knowledge.

For me the fourth rule of thumb is paramount. I will rarely write to Asian academics using only their first name until I know them very well. For Brits and Nordics, the person would need to be quite senior for me to use a formal way of address. If unsure, I use a compromise with a dual form of address, e.g. “Dear Professor Smith, dear Peter,”. Another compromise that I have seen other people use is “Dear [given name] [last name].”

Ensure you get someone’s name right!

Whatever you do though, make sure you spell the name correctly. Spelling errors in an email are annoying, but spelling errors in someone’s name are really unforgivable . So check and double-check before you send your email. My given name for instance is Anne-Wil, not Annewil, Ann-Wil, Anne-Will, Ann-Will, Annwil, Annwill, or Anvil [yes, I do really get them all!]. I’ll forgive you Anne, but Ann is really stretching it! Oh… and one final thing. If you don’t know what part of someone’s name is their given name and what part is their family name, look it up! Otherwise, you might end up being very disrespectful quite by accident.

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What Should You Call a Professor?

Dr Harry Hothi

  • By Dr Harry Hothi
  • August 18, 2020

What do you call a professor?

As you progress through your higher education at university, you’re going to come across many different academic job titles. Most you’ll have heard of already, some you won’t have; our guide on this will help you better understand what each of these mean.

Another thing you’ll soon realise is that within STEM subjects at university, virtually all of the academics delivering lectures and supervising undergraduate, postgraduate and PhD projects have PhDs or similar research degrees such as a DPhil.

If you take a look at their university profile pages, some academics have Dr. in front of their names whilst others have Professor (sometimes shortened to Prof). This can start to get confusing, especially if you’re planning your first one-on-one meeting with the academic, perhaps to start a research project under their supervision; what do you call them? How do you address them?

Let’s say your supervisor’s name is James Bond and they have a PhD; should you call him Mr Bond, Dr Bond, Professor Bond or simply James? The easiest way to definitively answer that question would be to just ask your supervisor what he’d prefer (he’ll probably correct you if you get it completely wrong anyway!).

It is important though that you have an understanding of the significance of these different terms and why formally you might call someone with a PhD a Doctor, whilst someone else who also has a PhD could be a Professor.

To help you with this, I’ve written a list of answers to the most commonly asked questions I’ve heard around the subject.

If someone has a PhD, are they a Doctor?

PhD stands for Doctor of Philosophy. If an individual holds a PhD degree, common terminology dictates that they have a doctorate, doctoral degree or a PhD in XXXX (fill in the blank here, e.g. PhD in Materials Science). PhD holders are entitled to write doctor (shortened to Dr) in front of their names and so may be called Dr. Surname. An individual with a PhD is not a Medical Doctor unless they also hold a medical degree, such as an MBBS in the UK.

How do you to address someone with a PhD?

Someone with a PhD can use the title Dr. Surname and your safest bet as a student would be to use this term when meeting a PhD holder within a formal academic or research setting; they may ask you to just use their first name or tell you that it’s actually Professor Surname! In job environments where a PhD is of less direct significance to the office environment (e.g. a Maths PhD working in banking), it’s less likely that an individual would use the doctor title in their name and you may not even know that they hold a PhD.

Do you call a Professor with a PhD a Doctor?

The distinction to be clear of here is that the title of Dr. is used to denote a PhD degree holder (or a similar doctoral degree) whilst the title of Professor is an academic job title given to an individual employed by the University as a Professor. If an academic uses the title Professor, then they should be called Professor Surname even if they have a PhD, which most STEM Professors will. It’s accepted that the title of Professor is higher than a Doctor.

Who can be called a Professor?

An academic should only be called Professor Surname if they hold the job title of professor at a university. Some universities in the UK and elsewhere also employ academics as associate professors, typically the equivalent to senior lecturers, in addition to full professors. However usually only full professors are addressed as Professor Surname.

Do you need a PhD to be a Professor?

In most STEM subjects, holding a PhD or equivalent doctoral degree is essentially a pre-requisite to becoming a professor. However, you do not always need a PhD to be a professor in other disciplines; there are certainly very successful professors within the area of modern languages, for example, that hold Master’s level degrees but not doctorates.

Is a Professor higher than a Doctor?

It is widely accepted that the academic title of Professor is higher than a Doctor, given that the job title of professor is the highest academic position possible at a university. Remember that the Doctor title here refers specially to a PhD (or equivalent doctoral degree) holder and not a medical doctor. There are certainly many examples of medical doctors holding both their medical degree (e.g. MBBS) and a PhD; these are clearly highly motivated, research minded doctors, many of whom balance their clinical work with work as a senior lecturer or even go on to become a professor themselves.

This post should answer most, if not all, of the questions you had about the use of Professor and Doctor titles within a university setting. Do check out our article on the hierarchy of academic job titles in the UK and feel free to get in touch if you have any more questions.

PhD_Synopsis_Format_Guidance

This article will answer common questions about the PhD synopsis, give guidance on how to write one, and provide my thoughts on samples.

Statistical Treatment of Data in Research

Statistical treatment of data is essential for all researchers, regardless of whether you’re a biologist, computer scientist or psychologist, but what exactly is it?

What is Scientific Misconduct?

Scientific misconduct can be described as a deviation from the accepted standards of scientific research, study and publication ethics.

Join thousands of other students and stay up to date with the latest PhD programmes, funding opportunities and advice.

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Browse PhDs Now

how to address phd

Starting your PhD can feel like a daunting, exciting and special time. They’ll be so much to think about – here are a few tips to help you get started.

Writing Habits That Work

There’s no doubt about it – writing can be difficult. Whether you’re writing the first sentence of a paper or a grant proposal, it’s easy

how to address phd

Dr Karki gained his PhD in the field of Nuclear and Particle Physics from Ohio University in March 2020. He is currently working as a postdoctoral associate in Prof. Haiyan Gao’s research group in Duke University.

how to address phd

Dr Grayson gained her PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Cornell University in 2016. She now works in industry as an Applications Portfolio Manager and is a STEM Speaker and Advocate.

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  • Guide to Addressing Correspondence

addressing etiquette

Address book, cup of tea and stationery at the ready, you start addressing invitations for your husband’s fortieth birthday party. All of a sudden you realize you are in a potential etiquette minefield. Jane and John are married, but she does not want to be addressed as “and Mrs. John Kelly;” Sam and Sue are not married, but live together; and Tanya is separated but not yet divorced. What are the correct forms of address for each of these invitations? Simply refer to our handy list and take the mystery out of addressing your social correspondence correctly.

Mx. Is the universal title that can be used by anyone. It is gender non-identifying. Even if you identify specifically with a gender you may still use Mx. and you may see Mx. used when the sender is unaware of your title.

Addressing a Man

Mr. is the title designated for an adult man age 16 or older. Short for Mister or Monsieur in french.

The abbreviated plural for Messieurs is Messrs. While some are under the assumption that Messrs. is used for brothers, it is actually used to indicated multiple gentleman (or also multiple companies ie Messrs. Sotheby) Messers. could also be used to indicate two married men. We suggest that you ask male couples if they prefer to be Mr. and Mr. Smith or the Messrs. Smith.

Addressing a Woman

Maiden name.

Ms. Jane Johnson

Miss Jane Johnson*

*Usually ‘Miss’ is for girls under 18

Married, keeping maiden name

Married, uses husband’s name socially.

Mrs. John Kelly Mrs. Jane Kelly* *Nowadays this is acceptable Ms. Jane Kelly

Separated, not divorced

Mrs. John Kelly Mrs. Jane Kelly Ms. Jane Kelly

Mrs. Jane Kelly Ms. Jane Kelly Ms. Jane Johnson (maiden name)

Mrs. John Kelly* *If you don’t know the widow’s preference, this is the traditional and preferred form Mrs. Jane Kelly Ms. Jane Kelly

Addressing a Couple

Married, she uses her husband’s name socially.

Mr. and Mrs. John Kelly

NOTE: Traditionally, a woman’s name preceded a man’s on an envelope address, and his first and surname were not separated (Jane and John Kelly). Nowadays, the order of the names—whether his name or hers comes first—does not matter and either way is acceptable. The exception is when one member of the couple ‘outranks’ the other—the one with the higher rank is always listed first.

Married, she prefers Ms.

Mr. John Kelly and Ms. Jane Kelly Ms. Jane Kelly and Mr. John Kelly *Do not link Ms. to the husband’s name: Mr. and Ms. John Kelly is incorrect

Married, informal address

Jane and John Kelly John and Jane Kelly

Married, she uses maiden name

Mr. John Kelly and Ms. Jane Johnson Ms. Jane Johnson and Mr. John Kelly

If you can’t fit the names on one line: Mr. John Kelly and Ms. Jane Johnson *Note the indent, either name may be used first

Unmarried, living together

Mr. John Kelly & Ms. Jane Johnson Note: Use one line

A woman who outranks her husband: elected office, military rank

The Honorable Jane Kelly and Mr. John Kelly

If you can’t fit both names on one line (note indent): The Honorable Jane Kelly and Mr. John Kelly

A woman who outranks her husband: professional or educational degree

Dr. Jane Kelly and Mr. John Kelly

Both are doctors (PhD or medical) and use the same last name

The Doctors Kelly (omit first names) Drs. Jane and John Kelly / Drs. John and Jane Kelly Dr. John Kelly and Dr. Jane Kelly / Dr. Jane Kelly and Dr. John Kelly

Both are doctors (PhD or medical), she uses her maiden name

Dr. Jane Johnson and Dr. John Kelly Dr. John Kelly and Dr. Jane Johnson

Ms. is the default form of address, unless you know positively that a woman wishes to be addressed as Mrs.

Professional designations—use only for business

Jane Kelly, CPA

Note: Do not use Ms. or Mr. if using a professional designation. Socially, drop the professional designation and use Mr., Ms., or Mrs.: Ms. Jane Kelly

Esquire: Attorneys and some court officials

Jane Kelly, Esquire

Note: If using Esquire, do not use Ms. or Mr. In conversation or socially, ‘Esquire’ is not used; use Mr. or Ms.: Ms. Jane Kelly

Attorney at Law

Ms. Jane Kelly Attorney at Law

Note: This is an alternative to ‘Esquire’ for attorneys. Use Mr. or Ms. and use two lines with no indent.

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How Do You Address a Letter to a Ph.D.?

how to address phd

When sending a letter to someone with a Ph.D., the envelope should be addressed using the title, “Dr.” For example, “Dr. John Doe” should be written above the address. With a Ph.D., the designation is primarily used professionally, but it is not bad etiquette to use the title socially.

When addressing a letter to a married couple with the same last name, and one of the pair has a Ph.D., the two are addressed as Dr. and Mrs. John Doe or Dr. Jane Doe and Mr. John Doe. If both have doctorates, they should be identified as The Doctors Doe, Drs. Jane and Joe Doe, or Dr. Jane Doe and Dr. John Doe. If the couple do not share the same last name, they are listed separately: Dr. Angela Williams and Dr. John Doe. In the case of double doctorates, the order of the names does not matter.

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how to address phd

How Should One Address the Holder of a Ph.D.?

how to address phd

  • When you write to a medical doctor, use Dr. James Brown or James Brown, M.D. (medical doctor or psychiatrist); D.O. (osteopathic physician); D.D.S. (dentist), D.V.M. (veterinarian), N.D. (naturopathic physician);
  • When you write to a holder of an academic doctorate, use Dr. William Green or William Green, Ph.D.
  • When you have a Ph.D., sign your name either as Dr. Ernest Smith or Ernest Smith, Ph.D.
  • If you have a Ph.D. you should engrave all your personal envelopes or labels with either Dr. Ernest Smith or Ernest Smith, Ph.D.
  • An analogous procedure should be used when signing your e-mails: For formal or professional correspondence always sign, Dr. Ernest Smith, or Ernest Smith, Ph.D.; for correspondence with family members or close friends, you may sign your first name, but below it, at the left margin of the page, your full name should appear preceded by Dr. or followed by Ph.D.; in the line below your name repeat your e-mail address.
  • Never write both Dr. and Ph.D. before and after your name; nor should you use both designations when you write to another person who holds a doctorate - Dr. William Green, Ph.D. It is a redundancy.
  • If you have a close relationship or are on a first name basis with someone who holds a doctorate, then on the envelope use his formal official title, Dr. William Green, and in the letter you may start with Dear Bill.
  • When someone has earned a Ph.D. degree he must subsequently be referred to as “Doctor” in formal speech. The same is true of a person who is a medical doctor, psychologist, dentist, veterinarian, osteophatic or naturopathic physician.
  • When a holder of a Ph.D. makes a telephone call and is asked “Who is speaking?” or “Who is calling?” he should answer Dr. William Green.
  • The same applies to any other type of presentation. When introduced to a new acquaintance by a common friend, the friend would say: “I would like you to meet Dr. Ernest Smith..." then, the holder of a Ph.D. should only say, "Ernest Smith at your service." Should the person introducing you leave out your title - “I would like you to meet my friend Ernest, it is appropriate to say amiably: “Dr. Ernest Smith at your service.”
  • If you are introducing someone who holds a Ph.D. as a speaker before an audience, you must use his title: “I have the pleasure to introduce Dr. William Green, who will instruct us this evening on the fruit of his studies on such and such a topic.”

medieval doctorate

  • "The English excerpts are n from The Admirable Life of Mother Mariana Vol. I and vol. II , (Los Angeles: TIA, 2006); The Spanish excerpts are from Vida admirable de la Madre Mariana de Jesús Torres y Berriochoa (Quito: Fundación Jesús de la Misericordia).

Blason de Charlemagne

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How to Write a Personal Statement for a PhD Program Application

Personal statement guidelines, general guidelines to keep in mind:.

  • One size does not fit all : Tailor your personal statement to each program and department you are applying to. Do your research to learn what is unique about each of your choices and highlight how this particular program stands out.
  • Yes, it’s personal : Showcase your unique strengths and accomplishments. Explain what influenced your personal decisions to pursue the program. Ask yourself, could this be applied to your friend or neighbor? If so, you need to be more specific and provide examples. Saying that you are a “good scientist” isn’t enough. Provide examples of your previous research experience, projects you’ve completed, and what technical skills you learned. Explain how you overcame any challenges along the way.
  • Set aside enough time :  Although personal statements are generally short in length (approx. 700 words; 1-2 pages), give yourself ample time to write a strong, well-written statement. It takes more time than you think to develop a final draft for submission.
  • Focus on your spelling, grammar, and vocabulary :  It’s important to present a well-written statement with good grammar and vocabulary. Write concrete, succinct sentences that flow well. Avoid flowery language. Visit the  Writing Center  for additional review and feedback.
  • Proofread one more time:  Check your grammar and spelling again before submitting your final draft. Ask a friend, professor, or advisor to proofread your final draft one more time before sending it in. 

YOUR PERSONAL STATEMENT SHOULD ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:

  • Why do you want to complete further research in this field?  Write down a list of reasons as to why you are interested in pursuing further study in the field. When did you become interested in the field and what knowledge have you gained so far? Describe how your previous work provided the foundation and for further study.
  • Why  have you  chosen to apply to this particular university ? Does the institution have a particular curriculum, special research facilities/equipment, or interesting research that appeal to you?
  • What are your strengths ? Demonstrate how you stand out from other candidates. Highlight relevant projects, dissertations thesis or essays that demonstrate your academic skills and creativity. Include IT skills, research techniques, awards, or relevant traveling/ study abroad experience.
  • What are your transferable skills?  Be sure to emphasize transferable skills such as communication, teamwork, and time management skills. Give examples of how you have demonstrated each of these with specific examples.
  • How does this program align with your career goals?  It’s okay if you don’t know the exact career path you plan to take after completing your PhD. Provide an idea of the direction you would like to take. This demonstrates commitment and dedication to the program.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

For examples of successful personal statements, visit the  Online Writing Lab (OWL) .

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  • CORRESPONDENCE
  • 02 April 2024

How can we make PhD training fit for the modern world? Broaden its philosophical foundations

  • Ganesh Alagarasan 0

Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Tirupati, India.

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

You have highlighted how PhD training assessment has stagnated, despite evolving educational methodologies (see Nature 613 , 414 (2023) and Nature 627 , 244; 2024 ). In particular, you note the mismatch between the current PhD journey and the multifaceted demands of modern research and societal challenges.

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Nature 628 , 36 (2024)

doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-024-00969-x

Competing Interests

The author declares no competing interests.

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PhD position (all genders) in AI for biomedical data analysis Part time  | Temporary | Arbeitsort: Hamburg-Eppendorf UKE_Zentrum für Molekulare Ne...

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Postdoctoral fellow in structure determination of membrane proteins using cryo-EM

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Kaiser Permanente Center for Research and Evaluation

Courtney McCracken, PhD

Courtney McCracken Headshot

Research Investigator

Dr. Courtney McCracken is a Research Investigator at the Center for Research and Evaluation. Her clinical research interests include Child and Adolescent Health, Congenital Diseases, and Mental Health Disorders. Her statistical expertise includes longitudinal modeling, survival analysis, and methods for adjusting for confounding.

Dr. McCracken received her PhD in Biostatistics from the Medical College of Georgia in 2013. Prior to joining the Center for Research and Evaluation, Dr. McCracken spent nine years in the Department of Pediatrics at Emory University, where she was a Biostatistician and Director of the Pediatric Biostatistics Core. Dr. McCracken serves on the executive board for the Congenital Cardiac Research Collaboration and is a member of the Mental Health Research Network.

Publications: NCBI Collections

Selected Research:

Engaging staff to improve covid-19 vaccination rates at long term care facilities ( enspire study ).

This study is designed to generate evidence about the types of communication and engagement strategies that are most effective for improving vaccine uptake and addressing vaccine hesitancy for populations within the long-term care facilities workforce who are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Funder: Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute End Date: 7/31/2024

Understanding and addressing disparities in vaccination rates among black members

The overarching goal of this project is to better understand factors contributing to racial disparities in vaccination rates among Kaiser Permanente members.

Funder: Kaiser Permanente Garfield Memorial Fund End Date: 9/30/2023

Pathways to care and health outcomes among disorders of sexual development patients

This project addresses critical gaps in our understanding of how the management of patients with disorders of sexual development, including treatment patterns, impacts the development of comorbidities and long-term health outcome outcomes.

Funder: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development End Date: 5/31/2024

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April 19, 2024 Seminar - Optically-Assisted Hypersensitive NMR of Amino Acids and Proteins

Silvia cavagnero, phd.

Despite many recent technical advances in structural biology, the analysis of biomolecules in  solution (as opposed to the crystalline, power or vitrified-ice state) at atomic resolution  remains challenging. While liquid-state NMR spectroscopy is in principle able to meet this  challenge, the wide applicability of this technique is hampered by its extremely low sensitivity. Low-concentration photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (LC-photo-CIDNP)  is a powerful technology for the hyperpolarization of aromatic amino acids in solution, in  isolation and within proteins. In this lecture, recent advances and applications will be  discussed. Remarkably, LC-photo-CIDNP enables rapid NMR data collection in the low  nanomolar range. 1D and 2D NMR spectra of amino acids and proteins can be easily acquired.  The LC-photo-CIDNP technology works well for the structural analysis of amino acids and  proteins in buffered solution and in highly complex media, including cell-like milieux. The  above exciting advantages pave the way to a variety of applications targeting biological  questions in situ, at extremely low, and physiologically relevant, sample concentrations.

When:  April 19, 2024

Where:  North Classroom 1131

Time:  11:00 am - 12:00pm

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IMAGES

  1. How To Cite Someone With A PhD In MLA

    how to address phd

  2. How do I write my name as Dr or PhD?

    how to address phd

  3. Reference Letter For A Phd Candidate

    how to address phd

  4. Different Sample Email To Professor For Acceptance 2

    how to address phd

  5. How To Address Someone With A Phd In A Letter

    how to address phd

  6. How To Write a Cover Letter For a PhD Application?

    how to address phd

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Address a PhD in Email: Professors, Doctors, and More

    Separate their names with a comma. You can use the salutation "Dear" at the beginning if you'd like. If you aren't sure who has a Ph.D. and who doesn't, just use "Professor" for all of them. [2] You might write: "Dear Professor Jones, Professor Smith, and Professor Ali.". "Dr. Jones, Dr. Smith, and Professor Ali,".

  2. How to Properly Address a PhD

    In academic circles, a considerable amount of correspondence is done via email and the written word. If you want to send a letter addressed to someone with a PhD, such as a cover letter, you use the prenominal "Dr.". When writing in a formal or professional context, you do not need to include the first name. Examples.

  3. Doctorate

    How to Use a Doctorate with Your Name: 1-2-3-4-5 —-#1) Holders of doctorates who work in academia or research institutions are addressed as 'Dr. (Name)' professionally and socially in a salutation or conversation.Thus, a Ph.D. professor at a college, a Ph.D. in biology doing scientific research, and a Ph.D. principal at an elementary school all use Dr. (Name) and everybody thinks it is ...

  4. How to Address an Envelope to a PhD

    Although there are many rules for how to address doctors and scholars, the rules for addressing an envelope to a Ph.D. are easy to follow, once you know them. When addressing an envelope to a Ph.D. holder, be sure to include the title, even if the person is a friend or family member. ... A Ph.D. is a "doctor of philosophy" degree, referred ...

  5. Criteria and Etiquette for Addressing Someone With a PhD Title

    Read on for five tips concerning the etiquette of addressing and introducing someone who holds a PhD. 1 - Formal and Academic Situations. In formal or academic social situations, it is most appropriate to address someone who holds a PhD as doctor. This is true for both face-to-face and written communication.

  6. Is it correct for a PhD holder to sign as "Dr. J. Doe, PhD"?

    In addition, "Dr. X Y, PhD" would be correct if the person actually holds two different doctoral degrees: a Dr. and a PhD. - lighthouse keeper. Oct 8, 2016 at 6:51. 4. I would like to add that in some fields and (sub)cultures, adding the ", PhD" bit after your name may seem unnecessarily pretentious. - Gimelist.

  7. Professional Title Etiquette: When to Use Your Dr. Title

    When a married woman uses the title "Dr." (either medical or academic) socially, addressing social correspondence to the couple is a little trickier. If her husband is not a doctor, address letters to Dr. Sonia and Mr. Robert Harris. Her name comes first because her professional title "outranks" his social title.

  8. Tips for Writing an Email to Faculty about Research

    General considerations and next steps. First, remember to keep the email reasonably short. Two small paragraphs should cover everything you need say. Also, remember to proofread carefully. Spelling and grammar errors will reflect negatively and your attention to detail. Don't use slang or abbreviations common in texting.

  9. How to Correctly Use the Titles Dr. & PhD With a Name

    Put a comma followed by the title "Ph.D." after the name of a person who has earned a Doctor of Philosophy doctoral degree. For example Stacey Childs, Ph.D. Do not combine the title of "Ph.D." with any other title even if the person could appropriately be addressed by a different title. For instance, even if the person being addressed ...

  10. How to use the PhD title and all the little doctorate "rules"

    When writing a name with a PhD after it, the correct way to do so is to use "PhD" or "Ph.D. or Ph.D". Depending on the preference of the individual, either form can be used. However, if the individual has a business card that states their degree in full, then the more formal "Doctor of Philosophy" should be used.

  11. What Should I Call My Professor?

    However, you are addressing an instructor who is not a professor and does not have a PhD (such as a TA or lab instructor) you can call them "Mr." or "Ms". Unless your instructor you instructor specifically expresses a preference for "Mrs." or "Miss", "Ms" is now the standard English title for an adult woman—married or not.

  12. How to cold e-mail for a PhD

    Look at the researcher's listing on their university website and take guidance from there. Take note of how the researcher signs off — you can use this in subsequent e-mails. I always sign off ...

  13. How to address other academics by email?

    The third rule of thumb is that more junior you are and the more senior the person you are writing to, the more likely it is that a "formal" form of address, such as "Dear Professor [Family Name]" or "Dear Dr. [Family Name]" would be appropriate. If you are a PhD student and the person you are writing to is a Professor in their ...

  14. What Should You Call a Professor?

    The distinction to be clear of here is that the title of Dr. is used to denote a PhD degree holder (or a similar doctoral degree) whilst the title of Professor is an academic job title given to an individual employed by the University as a Professor. If an academic uses the title Professor, then they should be called Professor Surname even if ...

  15. How To Address An Envelope or Letter

    Mr. and Mrs. John Kelly. NOTE: Traditionally, a woman's name preceded a man's on an envelope address, and his first and surname were not separated (Jane and John Kelly). Nowadays, the order of the names—whether his name or hers comes first—does not matter and either way is acceptable. The exception is when one member of the couple ...

  16. What to call someone that is currently studying for their PhD?

    9. The title would likely be "Mr." / "Mrs." / "Ms.". There is no prepended academic title that means "will likely have a doctorate at some point". In other news, a PhD student is probably not a good reference in the first place. You should look for somebody who has been in the game a bit longer and provide a reference that more plausibly ...

  17. How to address Phd dissertation committee members in email?

    Should I address them as committee members or Professors ABC, PQR, XYZ or Sirs, etc. What would be the best option to address them: Dear Committee members. Dear Committee. Dear Professors ABC, PQR, XYZ. Respected Sirs. Sirs. Dear All. phd.

  18. How Do You Address a Letter to a Ph.D.?

    When sending a letter to someone with a Ph.D., the envelope should be addressed using the title, "Dr.". For example, "Dr. John Doe" should be written above the address. With a Ph.D., the designation is primarily used professionally, but it is not bad etiquette to use the title socially. When addressing a letter to a married couple with ...

  19. How to Address the Holder of a Ph.D.

    When you write to a holder of an academic doctorate, use Dr. William Green or William Green, Ph.D. When you have a Ph.D., sign your name either as Dr. Ernest Smith or Ernest Smith, Ph.D. If you have a Ph.D. you should engrave all your personal envelopes or labels with either Dr. Ernest Smith or Ernest Smith, Ph.D.

  20. How to Write a Personal Statement for a PhD Program Application

    Set aside enough time: Although personal statements are generally short in length (approx. 700 words; 1-2 pages), give yourself ample time to write a strong, well-written statement. It takes more time than you think to develop a final draft for submission. Focus on your spelling, grammar, and vocabulary: It's important to present a well ...

  21. How can we make PhD training fit for the modern world? Broaden its

    02 April 2024. How can we make PhD training fit for the modern world? Broaden its philosophical foundations. By. Ganesh Alagarasan. You have highlighted how PhD training assessment has stagnated ...

  22. Courtney McCracken, PhD

    Dr. Courtney McCracken is a Research Investigator at the Center for Research and Evaluation. Her clinical research interests include Child and Adolescent Health, Congenital Diseases, and Mental Health Disorders. Her statistical expertise includes longitudinal modeling, survival analysis, and methods for adjusting for confounding.

  23. How to address a military officer with Ph.D?

    2. CPT John Smith, Ph.D.; MAJ James Dean, M.D.; or LTC John Doe, J.D. are more correct when addressing doctorate officers in writing. Although this is true that Military rank usually comes before academic in most cases, there are some exceptions. Doctors in the Medical Corps are often addressed as "doctor."

  24. Dr Brown on the Potential for Pirtobrutinib to Address Treatment

    Jennifer R. Brown, MD, PhD, director, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Center, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Worthington and Margaret Collette Professor of Medicine in the Field of Hematologic ...

  25. PHD $0.0₁₁4005

    $0.000000000004005 Nerd's Currency (PHD) realtime price charts, trading history and info - PHD / SOL on Solana / Raydium

  26. April 19, 2024 Seminar

    Silvia Cavagnero, PhD Abstract. Despite many recent technical advances in structural biology, the analysis of biomolecules in solution (as opposed to the crystalline, power or vitrified-ice state) at atomic resolution remains challenging. While liquid-state NMR spectroscopy is in principle able to meet this