Sociology Courses

  • Social Sciences

Constellations

PredictionX: Omens, Oracles & Prophecies

An overview of divination systems, ranging from ancient Chinese bone burning to modern astrology.

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Big Data Solutions for Social and Economic Disparities

Join Harvard University Professor Raj Chetty in this online course to understand how big data can be used to measure mobility and solve social problems.

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CitiesX: The Past, Present and Future of Urban Life

Explore what makes cities energizing, amazing, challenging, and perhaps humanity’s greatest invention.

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This introduction to moral and political philosophy is one of the most popular courses taught at Harvard College.

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Big Data for Social Good

Think critically about social questions such as education policy, upward income mobility, and racial disparities, and understand how big data can answer these questions as well as impact policies that lead to improved outcomes around the world.

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Leadership, Organizing and Action: Leading Change

This program is designed to help leaders of civic associations, advocacy groups, and social movements learn how to organize communities that can mobilize power to make change.

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Theories About Family & Marriage: Crash Course Sociology #37

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Age & Aging: Crash Course Sociology #36

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Racial/Ethnic Prejudice & Discrimination: Crash Course Sociology #35

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Race & Ethnicity: Crash Course Sociology #34

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Theories of Gender: Crash Course Sociology #33

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Gender Stratification: Crash Course Sociology #32

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Sex & Sexuality: Crash Course Sociology #31

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Politics: Crash Course Sociology #30

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Economic Systems & the Labor Market: Crash Course Sociology #29

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Theories of Global Stratification: Crash Course Sociology #28

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Global Stratification & Poverty: Crash Course Sociology #27

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Social Mobility: Crash Course Sociology #26

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The Impacts of Social Class: Crash Course Sociology #25

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Social Class & Poverty in the US: Crash Course Sociology #24

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Social Stratification in the US: Crash Course Sociology #23

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Why is there Social Stratification?: Crash Course Sociology #22

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Social Stratification: Crash Course Sociology #21

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Crime: Crash Course Sociology #20

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Theory & Deviance: Crash Course Sociology #19

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Deviance: Crash Course Sociology #18

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Formal Organizations: Crash Course Sociology #17

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Social Groups: Crash Course Sociology #16

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Social Interaction & Performance: Crash Course Sociology #15

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Socialization: Crash Course Sociology #14

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Social Development: Crash Course Sociology #13

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How We Got Here: Crash Course Sociology #12

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Cultures, Subcultures, and Countercultures: Crash Course Sociology #11

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Symbols, Values, & Norms: Crash Course Sociology #10

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Max Weber & Modernity: Crash Course Sociology #9

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Harriet Martineau & Gender Conflict Theory: Crash Course Sociology #8

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Dubois & Race Conflict: Crash Course Sociology #7

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Karl Marx & Conflict Theory: Crash Course Sociology #6

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Émile Durkheim on Suicide & Society: Crash Course Sociology #5

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Sociology Research Methods: Crash Course Sociology #4

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Sociology & the Scientific Method: Crash Course Sociology #3

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Major Sociological Paradigms: Crash Course Sociology #2

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What Is Sociology?: Crash Course Sociology #1

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Crash Course Sociology Preview

SOC101: Introduction to Sociology

Course introduction.

  • Time: 31 hours
  • Free Certificate

Next, we use sociological theory to help us understand the world around us. These theories are not constraining or "right" and "wrong" but frameworks we use to examine society. We explore three classic sociological paradigms: structural-functional, social conflict, and symbolic interaction. Each paradigm is a different lens we can use to study society. Sociology uses the scientific method to explore the world through observation rather than opinion, religion, or political affiliation.

In this course, we explore the origins of sociology, major sociological theories, research methods, and basic sociological principles. We also study how the institutions and groups we belong to impact us as individuals. We will examine categories of inequality, such as social class, sex and gender, sexual orientation, and race and ethnicity. We will explore the impact of various institutions, such as culture, family, media, religion, economics, and politics. You should try to develop your sociological imagination as you progress through the course by relating the topics and theories you read to your life experiences. How have your institutions and categorizations shaped your personal story?

Course Syllabus

First, read the course syllabus. Then, enroll in the course by clicking "Enroll me". Click Unit 1 to read its introduction and learning outcomes. You will then see the learning materials and instructions on how to use them.

coursework sociology

Unit 1: What is Sociology?

Why should we study sociology? How can we apply it to the real world? Sociology is the systematic study of society. C. Wright Mills (1916–1962), the American sociologist, coined the concept of sociological imagination to encourage us to recognize the connections and distinctions between our personal lives and larger social issues.

For example, did you know the United States has the highest teen pregnancy rate in the industrialized world? Sociologists explore individual decisions through the lens of society. Using the scientific method, we can study how and why the trend of teen pregnancy exists. How do social issues influence this personal experience? Teenagers receive direction and influence from sex education in schools, religion, access to birth control, sexualization in the media, poverty, and women's alternatives to childbearing.

Humans create theories to make sense of the world. These theories are not necessarily "right" and "wrong" but frameworks we use to understand. For example, the earliest humans created theories about how the Earth originated and what happens when we die. Sociological theories examine our societal beliefs. We will explore three classical sociological paradigms; structural-functional, social conflict, and symbolic interaction. Each paradigm presents a different lens sociologists use to study society.

Finally, we examine why we should study sociology. For example, sociologists helped argue for ending "separate but equal" racial segregation in the United States. Sociology teaches how individuals fit into society and how we classify ourselves and others.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 4 hours.

Unit 2: Sociological Research

Sociologists rely on a philosophy called positivism which asserts we can only gain authentic knowledge or truth through empirical observations. We must experience our observations and make scientific measurements through sensory experience rather than rely on faith-based and emotional experiences.

In this Unit, we study the six steps of the scientific method and the importance of reliability and validity. We also examine different data collection methods in sociology research, including surveys, field research, participant observation, ethnographies, case studies, experiments, and secondary data analysis. Each data collection method has advantages and disadvantages and is best matched with certain theoretical perspectives and questions. For example, a macro question about women in society would most likely use surveys as a research method since we need to sample a large group to get a representative picture.

Finally, we discover the historical motivation for ethical standards when conducting research. We explore some infamous cases where the scientists had adopted a questionable and disturbing ethical rationale, such as the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male conducted from 1932–1972, Stanley Milgram's obedience experiment in 1961, and Philp Zimbardo's Stanford prison experiment in 1971. The negative ramifications of these experiments, including a prevailing lack of trust in the healthcare industry and research community, continue to this day.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 2 hours.

Unit 3: Culture

Our culture refers to our way of life or the framework we use to live in our community. Sociologists examine common characteristics of culture, such as our symbols, values, beliefs, and norms. As individuals, society influences us through its culture. We are born into a society and raised according to a culture that has defined values, beliefs, norms, and language.

Most sociologists encourage us to practice cultural relativism and judge other cultures by their standards rather than by our guidelines or norms (ethnocentrism). This sympathetic mindset can be difficult to develop since the goal of any culture is to get its members to adopt or internalize values, beliefs, and norms as our own. Throughout our lives, we discover examples of different cultures which the media describes as high, pop, sub, and counter.

Finally, we examine theoretical perspectives of culture: structural and social conflict and symbolic interaction. Notice the different focus each theory brings to the study of culture. Consider the impact your culture has had on you.

Unit 4: Socialization, Groups, and Social Control

Socialization describes the lifelong process of learning about our culture and developing our personality. We learn not only the language, the key to all socialization, but the values, beliefs, and norms of our culture. Scientists have debated the impact of nature (genetics and biology) and nurture (environment) for years. Today, most scientists agree there is a complex relationship between these two concepts – our biology and experiences. As social beings, humans spend much of their lives interacting with various groups. Consider the impact our primary groups have on our behavior and socialization during our lifetime. These include ingroups, outgroups, and reference groups. We will discuss the types and functions of secondary groups, which often become formal organizations. Notice the central characteristics of bureaucracies, organizations designed to promote efficiency and rationality.

Deviance is a violation of the norms or rules of a society. It can be positive or negative and is often met with methods of social control through sanctions to encourage good behavior and discourage bad. Every society exhibits instances of social deviance ranging from mild breaches of etiquette (folkways) to extreme violations of cultural taboos (mores).

Although deviance varies by time, location, and audience, most societies respond with efforts to maintain social order using informal and formal, positive and negative sanctions. At the end of Unit 4, we explore different types of crime which are a violation of our written rules. Discretion is possible at each stage from policing, courts, and corrections. Race and social class can impact our response.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 3 hours.

Unit 5: Social Stratification

In this unit, we examine how social stratification ranks our social worth. How does your relative position affect your life chances and opportunities? Consider how we rank people in our community, such as by the car they drive or the neighborhood they live in. Sociologists are most interested in how these ascribed characteristics impact opportunity. Ascribed characteristics are those you are born into or have no control over, such as race, sex, sexuality, and age.

Stratification is a universal component in society, we find it everywhere, but the factors we rank and the inequality of the ranking system varies. In this unit, we consider institutionalized inequalities, such as racism, sexism, and ageism, and how our prejudices continue to influence our outlook. Research shows that race and ethnicity continue to affect access to valuable resources, such as healthcare, education, and housing.

We will discuss gender, gender identity, sexuality, and the aging process as dimensions of stratification. In this Unit, we examine the social construction of the category and the prejudice and discrimination that still function in society. In sociology, we pay particular attention to institutionalized discrimination, or the bigotry and intolerance built into our laws, policies, and practices. Institutional discrimination does not require any malicious intent, yet the consequences are often devastating to the groups affected.

We also address issues of national and global inequality. Why are some countries wealthier than others? How can we address the needs of more than seven billion people worldwide? What metrics distinguish or categorize high-, middle-, and low-income nations? What is relative, absolute, and subjective poverty?

Compare modernization and dependency theory in terms of global stratification. What is the difference between global classification and inequality? What is extreme poverty in a global context? What efforts have the members of the United Nations made to eradicate global inequality and address the needs of the world's population? How do you explain the cyclical impact and consequences of poverty?

Completing this unit should take you approximately 8 hours.

Unit 6: Sociological Institutions 

Now, let's study our primary sociological institutions: the family, religion, education, government, and the workplace. Sociologists have witnessed dramatic changes in the structure of the American family, with decreases in marriage and childbearing and increases in cohabitation and diverse family forms. What impact do these changes have on society as a whole? What are some of the challenges families face?

From a sociological perspective, we also look at religious institutions, a second significant social and cultural indicator. Émile Durkheim, the French sociologist, said we use religion for healing and faith, as a communal bond, and to understand "the meaning of life". These social functions affect a community's structure, balance, and social fabric.

Education is another institution that can be a social solution and challenge. For example, many schools serve as change agents to break poverty and racism. They can also create barriers by fostering large drop-out rates and institutional disorganization. Schools have gained national attention and sowed political discord when community members protest a chosen curriculum, such as sex education or scientific evolution. Sociologists consider all of these trends.

Finally, we explore government institutions in terms of their political and economic structure from a sociological perspective. How do you define power? Do you inherit your social status at birth or earn it in the workplace? We end the unit by examining how various economic systems affect how societies function. Karl Marx had a lot to say on this topic.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 7 hours.

Unit 7: Social Change and Social Issues

In our final unit, we explore social change in societies that are constantly making cultural adjustments due to social movements and responding to challenges they face in their environments. Large-scale social movements can have a great social impact, become institutionalized, and evolve into a fixed and formal part of the social structure. For example, the "second wave of feminism" originated as a grassroots movement during the 1960s to protest inequalities between the sexes. Most original participants did not belong to formal organizations but publicized their cause through conscious-raising groups.

Population trends like urbanization and environmental toxification have impacted social change. Where you live impacts your experiences and opportunities. We explore the differences between urbanization, suburbs, exurbs, and concentric zones from various sociological perspectives. Demographic measures such as fertility and mortality rates have created population shifts, and governments have adopted different approaches to climate change, pollution, garbage, e-waste, and toxic hazards. Notice the inequality in environmental hazards based on race and location, called environmental racism.

We explore pressing issues related to access to healthcare and media. Notice how health disparities exist based on gender, socioeconomic status, race, and ethnicity. We also see different health and illness rates among high- and low-income nations. Consider our reaction to people with preventable diseases or ones aggravated by socially unacceptable activities. These diseases and complications, such as AIDS, sexually-transmitted diseases, certain cancers, and obesity, share varying degrees of social stigma.

Media technology allows us to remain in constant contact with people near and far. However, these connections are not distributed equally globally or within our communities. Notice the stratification in information access known as the knowledge gap. The "digital divide" refers to unequal access to technology based on categories of stratification such as income and race. How does this impact our relationships? Pay attention to the various privacy and security issues.

Completing this unit should take you approximately 5 hours.

Study Guide

This study guide will help you get ready for the final exam. It discusses the key topics in each unit, walks through the learning outcomes, and lists important vocabulary. It is not meant to replace the course materials!

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Course Feedback Survey

Please take a few minutes to give us feedback about this course. We appreciate your feedback, whether you completed the whole course or even just a few resources. Your feedback will help us make our courses better, and we use your feedback each time we make updates to our courses.

If you come across any urgent problems, email [email protected].

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Certificate Final Exam

Take this exam if you want to earn a free Course Completion Certificate.

To receive a free Course Completion Certificate, you will need to earn a grade of 70% or higher on this final exam. Your grade for the exam will be calculated as soon as you complete it. If you do not pass the exam on your first try, you can take it again as many times as you want, with a 7-day waiting period between each attempt.

Once you pass this final exam, you will be awarded a free Course Completion Certificate .

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Save 20% on your first month and spend summer getting ahead.

Knock out some college-level courses this summer with Sophia. Take 20% off your first month with promo code SUMMER24.

Offer is valid through July 15. The discount provides 20% off the first month. After the first month, you will be charged our normal $99 per month membership subscription fee, unless canceled. 

  • Introduction to Sociology: Embracing Diversity and Collaboration
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Introduction to Sociology: Embracing Diversity and Collaboration reviews

Sociology is a scientific approach to understanding why people behave the way they do, how relationships function, where commonly held values and beliefs come from, and what it means to live in a society.

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This is a pass/fail course. You must complete 12 Challenges (formative assessments), 4 Milestones (summative assessments), and 2 Touchstones (project-based or written assessments) with an overall score of 70% or better.

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Supporting Victims of Domestic Violence

Learn to recognise the signs of domestic violence and support domestic violence survivors as a health or social care worker.

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  • 3 weeks, 3 hours a week
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Incarceration: Are Prisons a Suitable Punishment?

Explore life inside UK prisons. Learn whether this type of punishment reduces crime and if rehabilitation can prevent reoffending.

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Model Thinking

Learn how to think with models to better understand and navigate our complex world. Gain a foundation for future social science classes. Offered by the University of Michigan. 12 weeks long.

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Introduction to Intercultural Studies: Language and Culture

Explore intercultural communication by understanding the relationship between language and cultural identity.

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Introduction to Intercultural Studies: Crossing Borders

Take a closer look at geographical and cultural borders and understand their effects on people who occupy them or cross them.

Paradoxes of War

The Paradoxes of War teaches us to understand that war is not only a normal part of human existence, but is arguably one of the most important factors in making us who we are.

Classical Sociological Theory

Explore classical sociological theories with the University of Amsterdam's 8-week course. Dive into influential works by Marx, Weber, and Durkheim.

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Questionnaire Design for Social Surveys

Learn how to design and evaluate effective questionnaires for social surveys in this 6-week course from the University of Michigan.

Introduction to Intercultural Studies: Defining the Concept of Culture

Understand intercultural communication by learning about the concepts of culture and interculturality.

Introduction to Intercultural Studies: Intercultural Contact

Learn how the principles of intercultural contact may challenge the way in which you think about social interaction.

Introduction to Communication Science

Learn the history, theories, and models of communication science in this 4-week course from the University of Amsterdam.

Ignorance! | 无知!

A course about ignorance, what it is, where it comes from, what people do with it, its roles in society and culture, and how to deal with it. New expanded version. | 这是一门关于无知的课程。无知是什么?无知从何而来?人们怎样处理无知?无知在社会和文化中扮演什么角色?我们该如何对待无知?这是新版本课程。

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Stanford Seminar - How the Chinese Government Fabricates Social Media Posts for Strategic Distraction

Stanford University's seminar provides an in-depth look at China's strategic use of social media for propaganda, including evidence and analysis of 50c Party posts. Less than 1hr workload.

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The Department of Sociology at Yale University provides concentrations in the fields of Comparative and Historical Sociology, Cultural Sociology and Social Theory, and Social Stratification and Life Course Research. In addition, faculty publish and teach in the areas of Gender and Sexuality, Political Sociology, Sociology of Religion, Economic Sociology, Urban Sociology and Ethnography, and Chinese Society. The Sociology department offers two undergraduate programs leading to the B.A. degree. The standard program provides a rigorous introduction to sociological concepts, theories, and methods. The combined program–sociology with another subject–introduces students to sociological perspectives, principles and research as a contribution to an interdisciplinary perspective on all fields in which social processes are relevant. Learn more at http://www.yale.edu/sociology/ .

This course provides an overview of major works of social thought from the beginning of the modern era through the 1920s. Attention is paid to social and intellectual contexts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and contributions to contemporary social analysis. Writers include Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Adam Smith, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim.

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Undergraduate Program

Sociology is the study of society, of the social frameworks within which we live our lives. It is a study of social life at every level, from two-person relationships to the rise and fall of nations and civilizations. Sociology nurtures question formation and critical thinking through its mixed-methods approach, encompassing quantitative analysis, ethnography, interviews, historical and comparative studies, computer-based analysis, and theoretical explorations. Through their methodologically diverse coursework, students learn how to apply sociological theories and methods to real-world issues.

Sociologists are often concerned with intellectual questions relating to the distribution of resources in society and to social organization. The graduate program in sociology aims to contribute to society by providing students the training and tools to take up these questions. The program aims to produce creative and intellectually independent researchers who read broadly across fields, who generate work that is theoretically, empirically, and analytically rigorous, who exhibit collegiality as scholars, and who excel as teachers and communicators.

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Arizona State University

Online Bachelor of Science in Sociology

Arizona State University’s Bachelor of Science in sociology explores how humans interact, create change and coexist in social structures. Upon graduation, you’ll be prepared to conduct research, analyze information and think critically about various topics, such as relationship building and community interactions.

Quick facts

Next start date: 08/22/2024

Total classes: 41

Weeks per class: 7.5

Total credit hours: 120

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What is sociology?

What you’ll learn in this online sociology program, what can you do with a sociology degree, will my diploma say ‘online’.

No, Arizona State University’s diplomas don’t specify whether you earn your degree online or in person. All diplomas and transcripts simply say “Arizona State University.”

Sociology courses

Throughout this sociology degree’s coursework, you’ll engage in interactive online discussions, written projects and experiential projects. Course topics specialize in sociological theory and research methods. As you progress in this degree, you may customize your learning experience with a variety of sociology elective topics, such as gender, social thought, race and ethnicity and more.

The jobs you can get with a sociology degree

This online sociology degree provides you with the knowledge and skills needed to pursue  career opportunities in business, education, government, law and social services. This degree may also pave the way toward graduate work and careers in sociological research, as advanced degrees or certifications may be required for academic or clinical positions.

Career examples include, but aren’t limited to:

Human Behavior Researcher

Human resources specialist (hr specialist), mental health counselor, probation officer, rehabilitation counselor, social services director, social worker, study with experts in the field of sociology.

The School of Social and Family Dynamics is home to prestigious faculty members who excel in research and teaching.

  • Centennial Professor.
  • Dean’s Excellence in Teaching.
  • MacArthur Fellow.
  • Most Inspirational Professor.
  • National Council on Family Relations Fellow.
  • Outstanding Faculty Mentor.
  • Outstanding Lecturer.
  • Professor of the Year.
  • William T. Grant Foundation Scholars.

How to apply

  • first-year student
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You’re considered a first-year student for application purposes if you’ve never attended college or have fewer than 12 transferable credit hours.

Learn how to apply .

Competency requirements

To be admitted to ASU, you must hold a high school diploma or equivalent and have completed at least 14 of the following courses.

  • Four years of math.
  • Four years of English (non-ESL/ELL courses).
  • Three years of lab sciences (One year each from biology, chemistry, earth science, integrated sciences or physics).
  • Two years of social sciences (including one year of American history).
  • Two years of the same second language.
  • One year of fine arts or career and technical education.

Note: You cannot have course deficiencies in both math and lab sciences competencies.

Additional admission requirements

Applicants must meet at least one of the following:

  • Top 25% in your high school graduating class.
  • 3.00 GPA in competency courses (4.00 = A).
  • ACT score of 22 for Arizona residents (24 nonresidents) or SAT Reasoning score of 1120 for Arizona residents (1180 nonresidents).*

*Additional information about ACT / SAT:

  • ASU doesn’t require the writing portion of these tests.
  • ACT or SAT scores are not required for admission but may be submitted for ASU course placement.

High school equivalency

Besides a high school diploma, applicants may also meet undergraduate admission requirements through one of the following:

  • 50 or above for tests completed before 2002.
  • 500 or above for tests completed between 2002 and 2013.
  • 170 or above for tests completed after 2013.
  • Total score of 75.
  • A minimum total score of 2700.
  • A minimum score of 500 on each of the five content areas.
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The courses listed below are provided by the  JHU Public Course Search . This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found on the  Student Information Services (SIS) website .

MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM Edwards, Zophia Olin 305 Open 4/12 INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM Edwards, Zophia Olin 305 Open 1/13 INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM Edwards, Zophia Olin 305 Open 5/12 INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM Edwards, Zophia Olin 305 Open 4/13 INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-ECON MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM Chen, Feinian Krieger 307 Open 7/20 n/a TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM White, Alexandre Ilani Rein Hodson 303 Open 9/27 INST-PT TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM Kuo, Huei-Ying Shriver Hall 001 Open 6/18 INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, CES-CC, CES-PD MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM Edwards, Zophia Gilman 313 Open 4/17 INST-AP, MSCH-HUM, CES-RI T 1:30PM - 4:00PM Perrin, Andrew Jonathan Abel Wolman House 100 Open 11/15 INST-AP, INST-CP, INST-IR, AGRI-ELECT TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM Greif, Meredith Krieger 307 Waitlist Only 0/15 n/a TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM Naveh Benjamin, Ilil Smokler Center 301 Open 2/18 INST-IR, CES-ELECT Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM Silver, BEVERLY Judith 3505 N. Charles 102 Open 6/15 INST-GLOBAL, INST-ECON, INST-IR TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM Sharma, Sonal Ames 320 Open 5/18 n/a M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM Agree, Emily Hodson 110 Waitlist Only 0/15 PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM Agree, Emily Hodson 110 Waitlist Only 0/15 PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM Agree, Emily Hodson 110 Waitlist Only 0/15 PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM Agree, Emily Hodson 110 Waitlist Only 0/15 PHIL-BIOETH, MSCH-HUM, SPOL-UL TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM Morgan, Stephen L Mergenthaler 252 Open 9/15 INST-AP, AGRI-ELECT TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM Kuo, Huei-Ying Shriver Hall 001 Open 1/18 INST-ECON, INST-PT, CES-BM, CES-GI, CES-RI, CES-TI TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM Greif, Meredith Krieger 302 Open 1/20 INST-AP, CES-CC, CES-LE TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM Naveh Benjamin, Ilil Smokler Center 301 Waitlist Only 0/18 INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR, CES-BM, CES-LSO MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM Thornton, Christy Ames 218 Open 1/18 INST-ECON, INST-CP, INST-IR, INST-GLOBAL, MSCH-HUM, CES-PD, CES-FT TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM Henning, Stefan Mergenthaler 266 Open 2/15 INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM Henning, Stefan Mergenthaler 266 Open 8/15 ISLM-ISLMST, INST-CP, CES-ELECT Th 9:30AM - 12:00PM Morgan, Stephen L Mergenthaler 526 Open 12/12 n/a TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM Prasad, Monica Krieger 308 Open 6/15 AGRI-ELECT, CES-FT, CES-PD, CES-LC, CES-TI MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 9/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 10/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 13/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 13/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 13/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 9/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 10/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 10/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 10/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 12/15 n/a MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM Calder, Ryan Remsen Hall 101 Reserved Open 10/15 n/a MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM Reese, Mike J BLC 5015 Open 9/20 n/a MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM Reese, Mike J BLC 5015 Open 10/20 n/a TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM Kuo, Huei-Ying Gilman 413 Waitlist Only 0/18 INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR, CES-FT, CES-LE TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM Burdick-Will, Julia Burdick Krieger 300 Open 3/19 n/a MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM Chen, Feinian Gilman 119 Open 10/19 CES-GI, CES-LC, CES-PD TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM Naveh Benjamin, Ilil Gilman 219 Waitlist Only 0/18 INST-IR, MSCH-HUM, CES-ELECT M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM Agree, Emily Gilman 132 Waitlist Only 1/15 MSCH-HUM M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PM Agree, Emily Gilman 132 Waitlist Only 0/15 MSCH-HUM M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM Agree, Emily Gilman 132 Waitlist Only 0/15 MSCH-HUM M 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PM Agree, Emily Gilman 132 Waitlist Only 0/15 MSCH-HUM W 9:00AM - 11:30AM Levien, Michael Hodson 203 Open 12/18 INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, MSCH-HUM, CES-LE, CES-TI TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM Kuo, Huei-Ying Gilman 413 Open 3/18 INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP, CES-BM, CES-RI Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM Greif, Meredith Krieger 302 Waitlist Only 0/25 INST-AP, CES-CC, CES-LE T 4:30PM - 7:00PM Liu, Mingtang Mergenthaler 526 Open 18/18 n/a F 1:30PM - 4:30PM Edwards, Zophia; Valdez, Inés Mergenthaler 526 Approval Required 6/8 n/a TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM Naveh Benjamin, Ilil Gilman 219 Open 2/25 INST-GLOBAL, INST-IR T 1:30PM - 4:00PM Burdick-Will, Julia Burdick Mergenthaler 526 Open 4/9 n/a TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM Henning, Stefan Mergenthaler 266 Open 5/15 INST-CP, INST-GLOBAL, CES-RI TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM Henning, Stefan Mergenthaler 266 Open 8/15 INST-CP, CES-LSO TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM Schrader, Stuart Laurence Croft Hall G02 Waitlist Only 0/18 n/a MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM Boselovic, Joseph Leonard; Liu, Mingtang Hodson 210 Open 10/24 n/a MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM Boselovic, Joseph Leonard; Liu, Mingtang Hodson 210 Waitlist Only 0/15 n/a MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM Boselovic, Joseph Leonard; Liu, Mingtang Hodson 210 Open 2/15 n/a Reese, Mike J   Open 19/40 n/a MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM Boselovic, Joseph Leonard; Liu, Mingtang Hodson 210 Open 10/29 n/a
Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Location Term Course Details
AS.230.150 (01)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMEdwards, ZophiaOlin 305Spring 2024

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

AS.230.150 (02)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMEdwards, ZophiaOlin 305Spring 2024

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

AS.230.150 (03)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMEdwards, ZophiaOlin 305Spring 2024

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

AS.230.150 (04)Issues in International DevelopmentMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMEdwards, ZophiaOlin 305Spring 2024

Why do billions of people continue to live in poverty? What obstacles stand in the way of secure and dignified lives for all? Who is most likely to bring about change, what strategies should they follow, and what kinds of institutions should they put in place? This course will introduce the main theoretical perspectives, debates, and themes in the field of international development since the mid-20th century. It has three sections. The first section focuses on debates over the optimal conditions and strategies for generating economic growth and on the relationship between growth, human welfare, and inequality. The second section presents critical assessments of development interventions from various perspectives. The third section considers the role of social movements in shaping development and social change in the 21st century.

AS.230.202 (01)Research Methods for the Social SciencesMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMChen, FeinianKrieger 307Spring 2024

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.

AS.230.213 (01)Social TheoryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWhite, Alexandre Ilani ReinHodson 303Spring 2024

This course will focus on four classical social theorists whose ideas have greatly influenced how we study and understand society: Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and W.E.B. DuBois. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of how each theorist answered three major questions: 1) what is the origin, structure and historical dynamic of modern society?; 2) how do we gain an accurate knowledge of society?; 3) what are the conditions of possibility for freedom in modern society? In comparing, applying and critiquing their respective theories, students will advance their own theory of society.

AS.230.228 (01)Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested LegaciesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-YingShriver Hall 001Spring 2024

This course surveys the impacts of colonialism in East and Southeast Asia. Special attention will be paid to the social and economic development in British Singapore and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Korea and Taiwan. Topics include free-trade imperialism, colonial modernity, anticolonial movements, pan-Asianism, and post-war U.S. hegemony.

AS.230.242 (01)Race and RacismMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMEdwards, ZophiaGilman 313Spring 2024

Race has been important in social classifications and producing inequalities. This course is designed to provide you with a global understanding of how racial categories are created and maintained, how they change over time, and how they vary from place to place. It is organized in four parts. The first part introduces the concepts and analytical tools used by social scientists to study race. Of particular concern is power and the social construction rather than “natural” categories of race, as well as the general social processes involved in the maintenance and reproduction of these boundaries. In the second part, we will study the theories and dynamics racial category formation in the United States with attention to forms and processes of racial exclusion and oppression, and evidence of socio-economic inequalities based on race. In the third part of the course, we will compare these processes in the U.S. to those occurring in other countries. The fourth and final part of the course examines how race and racism shape political struggles and resistance movements.

AS.230.250 (01)Knowledge, Evidence, and DemocracyT 1:30PM - 4:00PMPerrin, Andrew JonathanAbel Wolman House 100Spring 2024

Fake news. Alternative facts. Follow the science. Misinformation. Disinformation. How can we understand the role of information, evidence, and scientific inquiry in politics? Where does information come from? How is it used? How can evidence, argument, and listening improve public conversations? This seminar will examine the connections between information, knowledge, evidence, and democracy, focusing mostly on the United States but with global examples as well.

AS.230.322 (01)Quantitative Research PracticumTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMGreif, MeredithKrieger 307Spring 2024

This course provides “hands on” research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Quantitative methods will be emphasized, including how to access publicly available survey data, data management, and the presentation of results. Each student will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. Juniors and seniors only. Sophomores require instructor's permission.

AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNaveh Benjamin, IlilSmokler Center 301Spring 2024

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

AS.230.337 (01)Global Crises: Past and PresentTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSilver, BEVERLY Judith3505 N. Charles 102Spring 2024

This course will compare the current global crisis with previous major crises of historical capitalism through a combination of theoretical and historical readings. Throughout, we will ask: What can a study of past crises tell us about the nature and future trajectory of the current global crisis? We will be particularly concerned to understand the ways in which social, economic and geopolitical crises intertwined, as well as the differential social and geopolitical impact of the crises. Which social classes bore the brunt of the disruptions in economic activity in each crisis? Which geographical areas or geopolitical groupings lost out (or benefited) from the crisis? What kinds of movements of protest emerged and how did they affect the trajectory of the crises? How have environmental and ecological challenges resurfaced in each crisis including today?

AS.230.338 (01)Sociology of Social ReproductionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSharma, SonalAmes 320Spring 2024

Social Reproduction is a critical theme in contemporary sociology. In our daily lives, social reproduction includes activities such as caring for children and elderly, performing household work, caring for the sick family members, schooling for children, to name a few. In other words, social reproduction refers to a wide range of activities that reproduce society and its members on a daily basis and generationally. Gendered division of labor is central to understanding institutions and social units through which social reproduction is managed in societies. For instance, women in general tend to do a lot more of unpaid ‘reproductive labor’ in households and communities. The course will focus on developing countries, which are incorporated into global capitalism differentially and unequally, to understand how capitalist relations shape the practices of social reproduction for various societies in the global south. The idea of ‘reproduction’ as separate from ‘production’ is specific to the history of capitalism. Therefore, by examining ‘social reproduction’ in context of developing world, the course will also offer a critical reading of expansion of capitalism itself, since it will engage with how marketization breaks down traditional ties, institutions, and networks that are instrumental for survival of communities outside the developed world. In short, this course will introduce students to theories of social reproduction and engage with ongoing sociological writings on the topic with a focus on developing world. By the end of this course, students should be familiar with key theories of social reproduction and be able to critically examine them in context of contemporary capitalism. Some specific themes that will be covered in the course include childcare, medical care, old age care, surrogacy, household work, schooling, mental health, and climate change.

AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyHodson 110Spring 2024

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyHodson 110Spring 2024

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyHodson 110Spring 2024

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyHodson 110Spring 2024

This course introduces students to core concepts that define the sociological approach to health, illness and health care. Topics include: health disparities, social context of health and illness, and the Sociology of Medicine.

AS.230.365 (01)Public Opinion and DemocracyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMMorgan, Stephen LMergenthaler 252Spring 2024

How does public opinion shape electoral behavior and the contours of democracy in the United States, and how have these relationships changed as techniques for measuring public opinion have evolved since the early twentieth century? To consider this question, the course introduces alternative perspectives on the features of a healthy democracy, including both historical perspectives and current arguments. Interweaved with this material, the course examines how public opinion is measured and interpreted by private pollsters, survey researchers, and data journalists. Emphasis is placed on the alternative claims that opposing analysts adopt, as well as how the technologies of data collection and analysis shape the permissibility of conclusions. Students will learn to interpret public opinion patterns, which requires a brief presentation of basic concepts from survey sampling, including what to make of the polling industry’s most boring concept: margin of error.

AS.230.369 (01)Sociology in Economic LifeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingShriver Hall 001Spring 2024

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.

AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGreif, MeredithKrieger 302Spring 2024

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilSmokler Center 301Spring 2024

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

AS.230.397 (01)The Political Economy of Drugs and Drug WarsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMThornton, ChristyAmes 218Spring 2024

In the United States, we spend more than $100 billion annually on illegal drugs—and the government spends more than $50 billion a year to combat their sale and use. These statistics raise important and complicated social questions. This course will examine the production, sale, use, and control of illegal drugs from a historical and sociological perspective. We will have three objectives: to understand the social construction of drug use and illegality in the United States and other rich countries; to uncover the political and economic consequences of drug trafficking in those countries that produce drugs, particularly in Latin America; and to examine the political economy of drug control through the so-called War on Drugs, both domestically and internationally.

AS.310.329 (01)Women, Patriarchy, and Feminism in China, South Korea, and JapanTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMHenning, StefanMergenthaler 266Spring 2024

We will try to get a quick overview of the recent history of patriarchy in China, South Korea, and Japan from the mid-twentieth century to our present and then compare the initiatives of feminists to transform the lives of women throughout these three societies. We will also debate whether or how it makes sense to adapt the Western notions of patriarchy and sexism as well as the Western political program of feminism to the non-Western context of East Asia by reading books by historians, anthropologists, and sociologists.

AS.310.331 (01)Islam in AsiaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHenning, StefanMergenthaler 266Spring 2024

You will learn about the efforts of ordinary, non-elite Muslims to shape the relation between their communities and the state as well as to (where applicable) the non-Muslim majority through collective organizing over the last forty years. We will read and discuss books by anthropologists, historians, and sociologists studying Iran, Pakistan, India, China, Malaysia, and Indonesia.

AS.001.136 (01)FYS: Cults, Communes, and ConspiraciesTh 9:30AM - 12:00PMMorgan, Stephen LMergenthaler 526Fall 2024

Cults, communes, and conspiracies are unusual social and ideological organizations. How should we understand their origins, structure, and functioning? In our First-Year Seminar, we will assess the value of alternative explanatory concepts from the social sciences, such as charismatic leadership, organizational ecology, network structure, status competition, social influence, and belief propagation. We will then interpret cases in comparative perspective, asking, for example, how cults differ from religious sects, how communes differ from political movements, and how organized crime groups differ from legal businesses.

AS.197.210 (01)Global CapitalismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPrasad, MonicaKrieger 308Fall 2024

We examine how capitalism has unfolded as a system over the past century around the world, with the goal of understanding whether there are realistic alternatives to our current social order. We ask what communism was, and why people fear it; why there is more poverty and inequality in the U.S. than other developed countries; how some developing countries have managed to become rich; and the recent rise of “neoliberalism.”

AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (02)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (05)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (07)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (08)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (09)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (10)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.101 (11)Introduction to SociologyMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMCalder, RyanRemsen Hall 101Fall 2024

The course introduces students to the discipline of sociology. You will learn about (a) theoretical approaches in sociology; (b) some of the subject matters that sociologists study, including inequality, capitalism, labor, the state, social control, race, gender, sexuality, culture, religion, population dynamics, and health; and (c) sociological methods. Most importantly, you will learn (d) how to see the world as a sociologist. That is, you will become a sociologist.

AS.230.205 (01)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMReese, Mike JBLC 5015Fall 2024

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

AS.230.205 (02)Introduction to Social StatisticsMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMReese, Mike JBLC 5015Fall 2024

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.

AS.230.239 (01)Coffee, Tea and EmpiresTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 413Fall 2024

The course examines the modern transformation of social life from the prism of coffee and tea. It traces the mass consumption of these two caffeinated beverages from the expansion of Eurocentric capitalism from the long sixteenth century onwards. It shows the changes in the coffee and tea culture from their respective Asian contexts to the age of mass consumption at the turn of the twentieth century. The topics include cash-crop production, plantation and peasant economy, the public sphere, and food heritage and nationalism.

AS.230.312 (01)Education & SocietyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBurdick-Will, Julia BurdickKrieger 300Fall 2024

The education system plays an important and multi-faceted role in modern society. Schools socialize students, allocate rewards and status, promote national identities, train future workers, feed into the criminal justice system, and make some people a lot of money. Sometimes these roles work together and sometimes they are in direct conflict with one another. This course will provide a sociological perspective on the education system as a whole by examining the historical process of educational expansion, the role of formal education in society, and how the education system interacts with other social institutions, such as the courts and labor market.

AS.230.334 (01)Family DemographyMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMChen, FeinianGilman 119Fall 2024

In this class, we will examine changes in family/household behaviors and relationships from a demographic perspective. We will investigate how culture, economics, and population characteristics can shape family structures, how the role of families has changed in recent decades, and how families are important in people’s lives. We will study diverse familial forms in the U.S. as well as those in the international context. We will study important (and measurable) events in people’s family lives, such as cohabitation, marriage, divorce, and childbearing. We will study how family roles are changing for fathers, mothers, and grandparents. We will also learn about the health implications of various familial relationships. We will use demographic tools and data to compare families across time periods, across social groups, and (to some extent) across countries. You will be doing your own quantitative analyses. You will develop your skills at interpreting and critiquing demographic data that researchers use to support their arguments about the family. You will also develop your skills at making your own accurate and compelling arguments using demographic data.

AS.230.335 (01)Medical HumanitarianismTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 219Fall 2024

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.

AS.230.341 (01)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyGilman 132Fall 2024

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

AS.230.341 (02)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 3:00PM - 3:50PMAgree, EmilyGilman 132Fall 2024

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

AS.230.341 (03)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyGilman 132Fall 2024

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

AS.230.341 (04)Sociology of Health and IllnessM 3:00PM - 4:50PM, W 4:00PM - 4:50PMAgree, EmilyGilman 132Fall 2024

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.

AS.230.348 (01)Climate Change and SocietyW 9:00AM - 11:30AMLevien, MichaelHodson 203Fall 2024

This course will focus on the social dimensions of climate change. Drawing on global and multi-disciplinary scholarship, we will address such issues as: the relationship between fossil fuels and capitalism; the relationship between social inequality and “vulnerability” to climate change; and the political economy of “adaptation.” The longest section of the course will be devoted to understanding the social and political dimensions of proposed solutions to climate change, including renewable energy transitions, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and geoengineering. Students will write a final research paper on a sociological aspect of climate change.

AS.230.352 (01)Chinese Diaspora: Networks and IdentityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKuo, Huei-YingGilman 413Fall 2024

This course surveys the relationship between China and its migrants and their descendants from the mid-nineteenth century onwards. It highlights the transnational foundation of modern Chinese nationalism. It also compares the divergent formations of the “Chinese question” in North America and postcolonial Southeast Asia. Key concepts include transnationalism, diaspora, ethnic politics, racism, Orientalism, and “united front” work.

AS.230.370 (01)Housing and Homelessness in the United StatesTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMGreif, MeredithKrieger 302Fall 2024

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.

AS.230.371 (01)Development in the Age of GlobalizationT 4:30PM - 7:00PMLiu, MingtangMergenthaler 526Fall 2024

Diverging from conventional courses on international development that often center around the golden age of development (1950s-1970s), this course shifts the focus towards the subsequent era—the age of neoliberal globalization, its promises and discontent, and its potential alternatives. Over the last four decades or so, the new global trends of deepening marketization, globalized supply chains, freer trans-border flow of capital, and technological progress have posed new challenges as well as opportunities to developing countries. This course will provide an upper-level undergraduate introduction to the studies and practices of international development in the age of globalization.

AS.230.375 (01)Arrighi Center Undergraduate SeminarF 1:30PM - 4:30PMEdwards, Zophia; Valdez, InésMergenthaler 526Fall 2024

Arrighi Center’s General Seminar will focus on the relationship between racism and capitalism. It explores the major theoretical and empirical writings about the role of race and racism in the development of capitalism, the ongoing functioning of the global political economy, and in relation to the question of dependent development. Participants in the Arrighi Center’s weekly general seminar include faculty and students (graduate and undergraduate) from a wide range of social science and humanities departments/programs. Undergraduates signing up under 230.375 will participate in both the main General Seminar with faculty and graduate students, followed by a special discussion section for undergraduates

AS.230.378 (01)Refugees, Human Rights, and SovereigntyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNaveh Benjamin, IlilGilman 219Fall 2024

What is a refugee? Since World War II, states that have pledged to offer protection to refugees have frequently been drawn instead to the dictates of nationalism and communitarianism, which prioritize concern for their own citizens, rather than to the needs of forced migrants. As a result, even those migrants that have been formally recognized as refugees according to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention have not been assured of protection, and other migrants have been even less assured. In this course, we will locate the reasons for this reality in the legal, political, and historical underpinnings of political asylum. What is the difference between an asylum seeker and a refugee? How has the refugee category been redefined and contested by international bodies since 1951? How are the ambiguities of real-life violence and persecution simplified in asylum adjudication interviews that require clear, factual narratives? What kinds of protections are offered to asylum seekers, whether by UN bodies, NGOs, or host governments, and how have such protections varied geographically and historically? Finally, what protections, if any, are afforded to those migrants who are fleeing not persecution but rather “merely” endemic poverty or climate-induced displacement? The course draws on literature from sociology, history, anthropology, and international refugee law in order to understand the capacity (or lack thereof) of human rights discourses and declarations to contravene state sovereignty in the name of protecting the rightless.

AS.230.428 (01)Introduction to Computational Social ScienceT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBurdick-Will, Julia BurdickMergenthaler 526Fall 2024

The rapid expansion of digitized data about human behavior has revolutionized social science research. These days companies and governments are creating and collecting data on just about everything we do. We can now observe behavior on a scale and with a level of detail never before imaginable. We can ask questions of whole populations that previously required expensive and time-consuming surveys. In order to take advantage of these new opportunities we need change the way we think about research ethics, study design, statistical inference, and the logic of inquiry. This course provides an introduction to these new approaches as well as a discussion of their risks and limitations. The focus will be on sociological logic of inquiry and how to answer questions about the social world. Coding experience will be helpful, but is not required.

AS.310.332 (01)Ethnicity in ChinaTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMHenning, StefanMergenthaler 266Fall 2024

Ever since the Chinese Empire fell in 1911, Chinese have tried to think of themselves as modern and to build a modern Chinese state. Among the Western concepts that Chinese appropriated to define and comprehend themselves were the notions of ethnicity, culture, nationality, and race. We will try to answer the following questions: What was the allure of arcane and elusive Western categories on culture, ethnicity, and race for Chinese scientists in the 20th century, and how did these categories come to underpin the rule of the Chinese state over its enormous population since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949? How have the Chinese state’s policies on nationality and ethnicity shaped the minds of American China scholars as they study ethnicity and nationality in China?

AS.310.336 (01)Rebellion and Its Enemies in China TodayTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMHenning, StefanMergenthaler 266Fall 2024

On 13 October 2022, a middle-aged upper-middle class Chinese man staged a public political protest on an elevated road in Beijing. Peng Lifa, or “Bridge Man,” as he has become known in allusion to Tank Man from the Tiananmen demonstrations in 1989, demanded elections and reforms. How have urban Chinese been able to be so content or even happy despite their lack of political freedom? The class readings will introduce you to different kinds of activists who have confronted the authoritarian state since the late 1990s, among them human rights lawyers, reporters, environmental activists, feminists, religious activists, and labor activists. We will ask whether freedom, an obviously Western notion, is useful as an analytical category to think about China. Does freedom translate across the West/non-West divide?

AS.362.115 (01)Introduction to Police and PrisonsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSchrader, Stuart LaurenceCroft Hall G02Fall 2024

This introductory course will examine policing and prisons in the United States and beyond, with a focus on racial inequality. It will consist of three parts. First, we will define key concepts in police and prison studies. Then, we will explore the contemporary state of prisons and policing in the United States and look at debates around the rise of “mass incarceration” and aggressive forms of policing in the final third of the 20th century. Third, we will explore policing and prison in other parts of the globe in the contemporary moment, highlighting similarities and differences from the U.S. case. What can studying the instruments of social control in other societies reveal about our own? Students will develop an understanding of major trends, keywords, and debates in the literature on policing and prisons, with particular reference to race and racism.

AS.230.101 (03)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBoselovic, Joseph Leonard; Liu, MingtangHodson 210Spring 2024

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

AS.230.101 (01)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMBoselovic, Joseph Leonard; Liu, MingtangHodson 210Spring 2024

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

AS.230.101 (06)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBoselovic, Joseph Leonard; Liu, MingtangHodson 210Spring 2024

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

AS.230.101 (87)Introduction to SociologyReese, Mike J Summer 2024

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

AS.230.101 (04)Introduction to SociologyMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBoselovic, Joseph Leonard; Liu, MingtangHodson 210Spring 2024

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.

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Bachelor’s Degree In Sociology: Everything You Need To Know

Kayla Missman

Updated: May 30, 2023, 2:15am

Bachelor&#8217;s Degree In Sociology: Everything You Need To Know

If you want to better understand humanity, a bachelor’s degree in sociology may be a good fit. Sociology majors ask why things are the way they are: Which social constructs influence how people act? How do these influences change over time

Earning a bachelor’s degree in sociology teaches skills that you can apply to jobs in many fields. Read on to learn about sociology BA programs, common coursework in sociology degree programs and what you can do with a sociology degree .

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What Does a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology Entail?

What is sociology ? This field studies social groups and human behavior. Sociologists examine how different institutions, political beliefs, cultural practices and religions influence people. These researchers investigate trends related to categories such as race, class and gender. They also analyze how group dynamics impact populations like families and organized crime syndicates.

Some sociology programs offer concentrations in areas like the economy and society, American studies, and culture and communication.

Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology Admission Requirements

Admission requirements vary by institution but typically include an academic transcript reflecting a high school degree or its equivalent, a personal statement and letters of recommendation.

Some programs require students to declare a major during admissions, while others allow learners to do so later. Many sociology programs require passing grades in introductory sociology classes for admission. Meet with an academic advisor once enrolled at an institution to ensure you take the right classes to earn a bachelor’s degree in sociology.

Bachelor of Science vs. Bachelor of Arts

To start your sociology career , most professionals need at least a bachelor’s degree in sociology.

You can pursue a bachelor of science (BS) or a bachelor of arts (BA) in the field. Though both degree types offer similar curricula, BS programs usually include more math and science requirements. Learners who enjoy data collection, math, statistics and analysis may prefer a BS in sociology.

Sociology BA programs, on the other hand, often require more humanities general education courses. These stipulations may include classes in a second language. Developing proficiency in another language or pursuing a minor in a different field can expand your expertise and help you qualify for an array of careers.

Common Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology Courses

Courses vary by program, but most sociology classes cover the social structures that influence society. Read more about common classes below.

Social Science Research Methods

This course teaches enrollees to use research methods to explain social phenomena. Students analyze existing research and how the media reports on it, draft research proposals and conduct new research using surveys and experiments.

Sociology of Social Problems

This class teaches students how social problems affect people. Learners examine society through lenses like race, religion, sexism and ageism.

Sociological Perspectives

This course covers prominent voices in sociology. Students learn to think critically about society, inspecting social groups, patterns and institutions to understand how these factors impact populations.

Sociology of the Family

The concept of “family” is just one of the social groups many sociology majors investigate. This course breaks down the family unit—including concepts like marriage, sex and caretaking structures—to explore its permutations and implications in society.

Sociology of Gender

In this class, students learn about the social construct of gender, including gender identity, sexuality and gendered power structures. Learners investigate how gender labels impact individuals and society.

Careers for Bachelor’s in Sociology Graduates

Undergraduate sociology degrees can lead to various entry-level sociology careers . They also prepare students to apply for master’s or doctoral degrees. Below, we explore job options for bachelor’s in sociology degree holders using data sourced from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Corrections Officer

Median Annual Salary: $47,920 Projected Job Growth (2021-2031): -10% Job Description: Correctional officers oversee inmates in prisons. Their duties include maintaining order and safety, inspecting detention center facilities and transporting inmates. Corrections officers can pursue social casework , classroom teaching or responsible rehabilitation work—all relevant fields for sociology graduates.

High School Teacher

Median Annual Salary: $61,820 Projected Job Growth (2021-2031): +5% Job Description: High school teachers create lesson plans and teach classes of ninth- to 12th-grade students, usually in one subject area. They mentor students and prepare them for college. Typically, full-time teachers need to complete a state-approved educator preparation program, pass teacher exams and hold a teaching certificate.

School and Career Counselors and Advisors

Median Annual Salary: $60,510 Projected Job Growth (2021-2031): +10% Job Description: Advisors help students overcome behavioral issues, develop interpersonal skills and improve academic performance. Counselors may report abuse and provide resources to struggling students or parents. Career advisors help students identify their skills, choose a career path and search for jobs.

Social and Community Service Managers

Median Annual Salary: $74,000 Projected Job Growth (2021-2031): +12% Job Description: Social and community service managers direct programs for populations in need, including children, veterans and people experiencing homelessness. These professionals handle administrative tasks and manage workers. They draft initiatives, analyze data and report performance.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Bachelor’s Degrees in Sociology

Is sociology a ba or a bs.

You can pursue either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science in sociology. A BS degree typically includes more math and science general education classes, while a BA usually involves more humanities requirements like language coursework.

Does a sociology degree pay well?

Earning a sociology bachelor’s degree can lead to multiple career paths, many of which pay higher-than-average salaries. Earning a master’s in sociology can increase earning potential and career options.

Are sociology majors in demand?

Sociology majors can qualify for various careers, including high school teacher, school counselor and community service manager. All are projected to grow from 2021 to 2031, according to the BLS. A degree in sociology imparts transferable skills that graduates can apply to many fields.

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Curriculum for the Sociology Major

Core requirements.

The following core courses are required of majors (approximately 20 units): 

  • OR  SOC 1:  Introduction to Sociology
  • SOC 180A:  Foundations of Social Research
  • SOC 180B:  Introduction to Data Analysis
  • It is recommended that students take the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement during Junior year  or  as early as possible during Senior year. Students pursuing the regular BA should take SOC 204. WIM course substitutions from other departments may be accepted.
  • *Students considering honors are encouraged to enroll in SOC 202, instead of SOC 204. Sociology Honors program.

Please note that the Sociology major will require a capstone sequence for students beginning with the Class of 2025 .

  • For students completing an honors thesis, students should take SOC 202 in their junior year and the thesis will fulfill the capstone.
  • For seniors not completing an honors thesis, the capstone project will be completed over a three-course sequence: SOC 204A, SOC 204B, and SOC 204C. The project will be designed in SOC 204A in the fall, and work will be accomplished with guidance through SOC 204B in the winter, and SOC 204C in the spring, culminating in a presentation at the end of the Spring Quarter. A wide variety of capstone projects will be allowed, including team projects. In this case, students would not take SOC 202 and instead, only enroll in SOC 204A/B/C. 

Foundation Courses

Arches of the Main Quad

In addition to core courses, students must complete at least three foundation courses (for 12-15 units). It is recommended to take three different courses in three different areas of study, but it is not required. For detailed information, see Areas of Study. Foundation courses, classified by area of study, are as follows:

  • Organizations, Business, and the Economy:  SOC 114, SOC 160, SOC 162, or SOC 187
  • Social Movements, Comparative Politics, and Social Change : SOC 118, SOC 119, SOC 130, or SOC 176
  • Social Psychology and Interpersonal Processes : SOC 2, SOC 8, SOC 120, SOC 121, or SOC 127
  • Social Stratification and Inequality : SOC 3, SOC 135, SOC 140, SOC 141, SOC 144, SOC 149, SOC 152, SOC 156A, or SOC 179A
  • Race, Gender, Immigration, Identity, and Policy:  SOC 142, SOC 145, SOC 147, SOC 150, SOC 155, or SOC 189

Elective Courses

Four Social Science electives (20 units) are required for the major. You may take all four courses in Sociology if you wish. Students may choose their elective courses according to personal interest. Non-Sociology courses must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies. A maximum of 10 units taken in other Social Science departments (Anthropology, Communication, Economics, Political Science, Psychology) may be counted towards the 60 units required for the Sociology B.A.

Statistics Course

Any one additional methodology or research methods class, quantitative or qualitative, statistics, computer science, field research methods, etc are all allowed.

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All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice.

For course descriptions not found in the UC San Diego General Catalog 2024–25 , please contact the department for more information.

Lower Division

SOCI 1. Introduction to Sociology (4)

An introduction to the organizing themes and ideas, empirical concerns, and analytical approaches of the discipline of sociology. The course focuses on both classical and contemporary views of modern society, on the nature of community, and on inequality, with special attention to class, race, and gender. Materials include both theoretical statements and case studies. Will not receive credit for SOCI 1 and SOCL 1A.

SOCI 2. The Study of Society (4)

A continuation of Sociology/L 1A. The focus here is on socialization processes, culture, social reproduction and social control, and collective action. As in 1A, materials include both theoretical statements and case studies. While 1B may be taken as an independent course, it is recommended that students take 1A and 1B in sequence, as the latter builds on the former. Will not receive credit for SOCI 2 and SOCL 1B.

SOCI 10. American Society: Social Structure and Culture in the U.S. (4)

An introduction to American society in historical, comparative, and contemporary perspectives. Topics will include American cultural traditions; industrialization; class structure; the welfare state; ethnic, racial, and gender relations; the changing position of religion; social movements; and political trends. Will not receive credit for SOCI 10 and SOCI 10R or SOCI 10 and SOCL 10.

SOCI 10R. American Society: Social Structure and Culture in the U.S. (4)

This fully online course is an introduction to American society in contemporary, historical, and comparative perspectives. Topics include American culture, inequality, poverty, the family, religion, the role of government, crime, social movements, and politics. Will not receive credit for SOCI 10R and SOCI 10 or SOCI 10R and SOCL 10.

SOCI 20. Social Change in the Modern World (4)

A survey of the major economic, political, and social forces that have shaped the contemporary world. The course will provide an introduction to theories of social change, as well as prepare the student for upper-division work in comparative-historical sociology. Will not receive credit for SOCI 20 and SOCL 20.

SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society (4)

A series of case studies of the relations between society and modern science, technology, and medicine. Global warming, reproductive medicine, AIDS, and other topical cases prompt students to view science-society interactions as problematic and complex. Will not receive credit for SOCI 30 and SOCL 30.

SOCI 40. Sociology of Health-Care Issues (4)

Designed as a broad introduction to medicine as a social institution and its relationship to other institutions as well as its relation to society. It will make use of both micro and macro sociological work in this area and introduce students to sociological perspectives of contemporary health-care issues. Will not receive credit for SOCI 40 and SOCL 40.

SOCI 50. Introduction to Law and Society (4)

Interrelationships between law and society, in the U.S. and other parts of the world. We examine law’s norms, customs, culture, and institutions, and explain the proliferation of lawyers in the U.S. and the expansion of legal “rights” worldwide. Will not receive credit for SOCI 50 and SOCL 50.

SOCI 60. The Practice of Social Research (4)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of the design of social research. It examines the key varieties of evidence, sampling methods, logic of comparison, and causal reasoning researchers use in their study of social issues. Will not receive credit for SOCI 60 and SOCL 60.

SOCI 70. General Sociology for Premedical Students (4)

This introductory course is specifically designed for premedical students and will provide them with a broad introduction to sociological concepts and research, particularly as applied to medicine.

SOCI 87. First-year Student Seminar (1)

The First-year Student Seminar Program is designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. First-year student seminar topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference given to entering first-year students.

SOCI 98. Directed Group Study (4)

Small group study and research under the direction of an interested faculty member in an area not covered in regular sociology courses. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: lower-division standing; completion of thirty units of UC San Diego undergraduate study; minimum UC San Diego GPA of 3.0; completion and approval of Special Studies form. Consent of instructor and department approval required.

SOCI 99. Independent Study (4)

Individual study and research under the direction of an interested faculty member. P/NP grades only. Prerequisites: lower-division standing; completion of thirty units of UC San Diego undergraduate study; minimum UC San Diego GPA of 3.0; completion and approval of Special Studies form. Consent of instructor and department approval required.

Upper Division

SOCI 100. Classical Sociological Theory (4)

Major figures and schools in sociology from the early nineteenth century onwards, including Marx, Tocqueville, Durkheim, and Weber. The objective of the course is to provide students with a background in classical social theory, and to show its relevance to contemporary sociology. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 100 and SOCA 100.

SOCI 102. Network Data and Methods (4)

Social network analysts view society as a web of relationships rather than a mere aggregation of individuals. In this course, students will learn how to collect, analyze, and visualize social network data, as well as utilize these techniques to answer an original sociological research question. Prerequisites: SOCI 60 or CSS 2, and upper-division standing.

SOCI 103M. Computer Applications to Data Management in Sociology (4)

Develop skills in computer management and analysis of sociological data. Practical experience with data produced by sociological research. Students will develop competency in the analysis of sociological data, by extensive acquaintance with computer software used for data analysis and management (e.g., SPSS). Prerequisites: SOCI 60 or CSS 2, and upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 103M and SOCA 103M.

SOCI 104. Field Research: Methods of Participant Observation (4)

Relationship between sociological theory and field research. Strong emphasis on theory and methods of participant observation: consideration of problems of entry into field settings, recording observations, description/analysis of field data, ethical problems in fieldwork. Required paper using field methods. Prerequisites: SOCI 60 and upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 104 and SOCA 104.

SOCI 104Q. Qualitative Interviewing (4)

This course provides students with tools to conduct original research using qualitative interviews. Students will learn how to prepare, conduct, and analyze qualitative interviews. Special emphasis will be placed on the presentation of research in written form. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 104Q and SOCA 104Q.

SOCI 105. Ethnographic Film: Media Methods (6)

(Conjoined with SOCG 227.) Ethnographic recording of field data in written and audiovisual formats including film, video, and CD-ROM applications. Critical assessment of ethnographies and audiovisual ethnographic videotape. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor for SOCG 227 and SOCI for SOCI 105. Will not receive credit for SOCI 105 and SOCA 105.

SOCI 106. Comparative and Historical Methods (4)

A broad-based consideration of the use of historical materials in sociological analysis, especially as this facilitates empirically oriented studies across different societies and through time, and their application in student research projects. Prerequisites: SOCI 60 and upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 106 and SOCA 106.

SOCI 106M. Holocaust Diaries (4)

Methods for interpreting diaries, letters, and testaments written by victims and perpetrators of the Holocaust. Students use these sources for original research about life in hiding, ghettos, and death camps. Includes techniques for making comparisons and for generalizing from evidence. Prerequisites: SOCI 60 and SOCI 178 or the consent of instructor. Will not receive credit for SOCI 106M and SOCA 106M.

SOCI 107. Epidemiological Methods: Statistical Study of Disease (4)

Epidemiology is the statistical study of disease, and epidemiological methods are a powerful tool for understanding the causes of certain diseases, e.g., AIDS, scurvy, cholera, and lung cancer. These fundamental epidemiological methods will be taught. Prerequisites: SOCI 60 and upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 107 and SOCA 107.

SOCI 108. Survey Research Design (4)

Translation of research goals into a research design, including probability sampling, questionnaire construction, data collection (including interviewing techniques), data processing, coding, and preliminary tabulation of data. Statistical methods of analysis will be limited primarily to percentaging. Prerequisites: SOCI 60 and upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 108 and SOCA 108.

SOCI 109. Analysis of Sociological Data (4)

Students test their own sociological research hypotheses using data from recent American and international social surveys and state-of-the-art computer software. Application of classical scientific method, interpretation of statistical results, and clear presentation of research findings. Prerequisites: CSS 2 or SOCI 60 or SOCL 60 and upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 109 and SOCA 109.

SOCI 109M. Research Reporting (4)

Students learn to write a research report/article. Course covers the architecture of reports, different audiences, scientific writing style, the literature review, and how to present methodology and findings. Students write a research report using research they conducted in other classes. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 110. Qualitative Research in Educational Settings (4)

Basic understanding of participant observation, interviewing, and other ethnographic research techniques through field experiences in school and community settings sponsored by CREATE. Students will learn to take field notes, write up interviews, and compose interpretive essays based on their field experiences. Prerequisites: SOCI 60 and upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 110 and SOCA 110A.

SOCI 111. Local Lives, Global Problems (4)

This course surveys the variety of ways that scholars across disciplines have studied local-global phenomena and developed theoretical, methodological, and empirical orientations that incorporate concern for place, space, and scale into their analytical lens. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 112. Social Psychology (4)

This course will deal with human behavior and personality development as affected by social group life. Major theories will be compared. The interaction dynamics of such substantive areas as socialization, normative and deviant behavior, learning and achievement, the social construction of the self, and the social identities will be considered. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 112 and SOCB 112.

SOCI 113. Sociology of the AIDS Epidemic (4)

This course considers the social, cultural, political, and economic aspects of HIV/AIDS. Topics include the social context of transmission; the experiences of women living with HIV; AIDS activism; representations of AIDS; and the impact of race and class differences. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 113 and SOCB 113.

SOCI 114. Just a Joke?: Sociology of Humor (4)

Telling jokes is fun, but it is also quintessentially a social act. How we make jokes and who we make jokes with is socially prescribed. We use humor every day in our social interactions to solidify social ties, but also to keep us apart. The course will examine the social dynamics of humor, paying specific attention to dimensions of race, gender, sexuality, disability, and national origin. Different types of humor will be analyzed, as well as the role of social media in altering joke culture. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 115. Social Problems (4)

Analyzes selected social problems in the United States, such as those regarding education, race relations, and wealth inequality from various sociological perspectives. The course also examines the various sites of debate discussion, like political institutions, TV and other media, and religious institutions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 115 and SOCB 115.

SOCI 116. Gender and Language in Society (4)

(Same as LIGN 174.) This course examines how language contributes to the social construction of gender identities, and how gender impacts language use and ideologies. Topics include the ways language and gender interact across the life span (especially childhood and adolescence); within ethnolinguistic minority communities; and across cultures. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 116 and SOCB 118A.

SOCI 117. Language, Culture, and Education (4)

(Same as EDS 117.) The mutual influence of language, culture, and education will be explored; explanations of students’ school successes and failures that employ linguistic and cultural variables will be considered; bilingualism; cultural transmission through education. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 117 and SOCB 117.

SOCI 118. Sociology of Gender (4)

An analysis of the social, biological, and psychological components of becoming a man or a woman. The course will survey a wide range of information in an attempt to specify what is distinctively social about gender roles and identities; i.e., to understand how a most basic part of the “self”—womanhood or manhood—is socially defined and socially learned behavior. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 118 and SOCB 118.

SOCI 118E. Sociology of Language (4)

An examination of how the understanding of language can guide and inform sociological inquiries and a critical evaluation of key sociological approaches to language, including ethnomethodology, frame analysis, sociolinguistics, structuralism and poststructuralism, and others. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 118E and SOCB 118L.

SOCI 119. Sociology of Sexuality and Sexual Identities (4)

Introduction both to the sociological study of sexuality and to sociological perspectives in gay/lesbian studies. Examines the social construction of sexual meanings, identities, movements, and controversies; the relation of sexuality to other institutions; and the intersection of sexuality with gender, class, and race. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 119 and SOCB 119.

SOCI 120. Sociology Through Literature (4)

In this course, we will examine how literature and poetry may illuminate and sometimes go beyond sociological writings in highlighting and spelling out sociological concepts and social processes. This course will cover basic concepts (social role, power), economic concepts (class, greed), and political concepts (colonialism, revolution). Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 120T. Special Topics in Culture, Language, and Social Interaction (4)

This course will examine key issues in culture, language, and social interaction. Content will vary from year to year. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 121. Economy and Society (4)

An examination of a central concern of classical social theory: the relationship between economy and society, with special attention (theoretically and empirically) on the problem of the origins of modern capitalism. The course will investigate the role of technology and economic institutions in society; the influence of culture and politics on economic exchange, production, and consumption; the process of rationalization and the social division of labor; contemporary economic problems and the welfare state. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 121 and SOCI 121R or SOCI 121 and SOCC 121.

SOCI 121R. Economy and Society (4)

This fully online course explores the relationship between economy and society, with special attention (theoretically and empirically) to the problem of contemporary inequality. The course will investigate the way networks, institutions, and cultures constitute the economic world; the role of class, gender, and race in reproducing and justifying economic inequality; the rise of markets and financialization; and theoretically-informed alternatives to contemporary economic systems. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 121R and SOCI 121 or SOCI 121R and SOCC 121.

SOCI 122. Social Networks (4)

This course takes a social network approach to the study of society, examining the complex web of relationships— platonic, familial, professional, romantic—in which individual behavior is embedded. Special emphasis is placed on the unprecedented opportunities created by contemporary social media (e.g., Facebook, mobile phones, online dating websites) for answering fundamental sociological questions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 123 Japanese Culture Inside/Out: A Transnational Perspective (4)

We examine cultural production in Japan and abroad, national and transnational political-economic and social influences, the idea of Japan in the West, and the idea of the West in Japan. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 124. The Good Society (4)

What institutions and policies are conducive to liberty, economic security, opportunity, a vibrant economy, shared prosperity, social cohesion, health, happiness, and other desirable features of a modern society? Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 125. Sociology of Immigration (4)

Immigration from a comparative, historical, and cultural perspective. Topics include factors influencing amount of immigration and destination of immigrants; varying modes of incorporation of immigrants; immigration policies and rights; the impact of immigration on host economies; refugees; assimilation; and return migration. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 125 and SOCB 125.

SOCI 125M. Sociology of Refugees, Asylum, and Forced Migration (4)

This course analyzes the origins of refugee flows, government policies, the role of nongovernmental organizations, and refugee experiences. It explores the debates about who is a refugee, how refugees decide when and where to move, the centrality of violence and persecution, and the place of refugees within the broader category of forced migration. The theoretical discussion engages concrete examples drawn from around the world in countries of origin, asylum, resettlement, and return. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 126. Social Organization of Education (4)

(Same as EDS 126.) The social organization of education in the U.S. and other societies; the functions of education for individuals and society; the structure of schools; educational decision making; educational testing; socialization and education; formal and informal education; cultural transmission. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 126 and SOCC 126.

SOCI 127. Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity (4)

Examination of the role that race and ethnicity play in immigrant group integration. Topics include theories of integration, racial and ethnic identity formation, racial and ethnic change, immigration policy, public opinion, comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 127 and SOCB 127.

SOCI 128. Religion and Popular Culture in East Asia (4)

(Same as HIEA 119.) Historical, social, and cultural relationships between religion and popular culture. Secularization of culture through images, worldviews, and concepts of right and wrong which may either derive from, or pose challenges to, the major East Asian religions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 129. The Family (4)

An examination of historical and social influences on family life. Analyzes contemporary families in the United States, the influences of gender, class, and race, and current issues such as divorce, domestic violence, and the feminization of poverty. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 129 and SOCC 129.

SOCI 130. Population and Society (4)

This course offers insight into why and how populations grow (and decline), and where and under what conditions changes in population size and/or structure change have positive and negative consequences for societies and environment. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 130 and SOCD 130.

SOCI 130E. Sociology of Higher Education (4)

This course introduces students to sociological theory and research as they apply to colleges and college life. It focuses on how colleges are organized and how variation within and between colleges affects individuals and society. Topics covered include college missions and outcomes, curriculum and pedagogy, college-to-work transitions, and access, equity, and inclusion. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 131. Sociology of Youth (4)

Chronological age and social status; analysis of social processes bearing upon the socialization of children and adolescents. The emergence of “youth cultures,” generational succession as a cultural problem. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 131 and SOCB 131.

SOCI 132. Gender and Work (4)

Examination and analysis of empirical research and theoretical perspectives on gender and work. Special attention to occupational segregation. Other topics include the interplay between work and family; gender, work and poverty; gender and work in the Third World. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 132 and SOCC 132.

SOCI 133. Immigration in Comparative Perspective (4)

Societies across the world are confronting new immigration. In this course, we will focus on Europe, Asia, and North America, and examine issues of nationalism, cultural diversity and integration, economic impacts, and government policy. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 133 and SOCB 133.

SOCI 133E. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity (4)

This course introduces students to sociological perspectives on race, ethnicity, and racial inequality. Students will develop an understanding of social forces that influence racial and ethnic identity and interactions. There will be particular emphasis on ways race and ethnicity shape experiences with social institutions (e.g., schools, government, media) and the emergence and persistence of racial inequality. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 134. The Making of Modern Medicine (4)

A study of the social, intellectual, and institutional aspects of the nineteenth-century transformation of clinical medicine, examining both the changing content of medical knowledge and therapeutics, and the organization of the medical profession. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 134 and SOCC 134A.

SOCI 135. Medical Sociology (4)

An inquiry into the roles of culture and social structure in mediating the health and illness experiences of individuals and groups. Topics include the social construction of illness, the relationships between patients and health professionals, and the organization of medical work. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 135 and SOCC 135.

SOCI 136. Data and Society (4)

This course explores the roles, challenges, and impacts of data and information technologies in contemporary societies. Information regarding discussion section is to be discussed in the first week of class. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 136E. Sociology of Mental Illness: A Historical Approach (4)

An examination of the social, cultural, and political factors involved in the identification and treatment of mental illness. This course will emphasize historical material, focusing on the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries. Developments in England as well as the United States will be examined from a historical perspective. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 136E and SOCC 136A.

SOCI 136F. Sociology of Mental Illness in Contemporary Society (4)

This course will focus on recent developments in the mental illness sector and on the contemporary sociological literature on mental illness. Developments in England as well as the United States will be examined. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 136F and SOCC 136B.

SOCI 137. Sociology of Food (4)

Topics include food as a marker of social differences (e.g., gender, class, ethnicity); the changing character of food production and distribution; food as an object of political conflict; and the symbolic meanings and rituals of food preparation and consumption. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 137 and SOCB 137.

SOCI 138. Genetics and Society (4)

The class will first examine the direct social effects of the “genetic revolution”: eugenics, genetic discrimination, and stratification. Second, the implications of thinking of society in terms of genetics, specifically—sociobiology, social Darwinism, evolutionary psychology, and biology. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 138 and SOCC 138 or SOCI 138 and SOCI 138GS.

SOCI 138GS. Genetics and Society (4)

This course explores how genetics shapes public thinking and policy on topics like health and disability, reproduction, intelligence, delinquency, personal identity, and race and ethnicity. We will also see how social forces shape genetics research itself, and discuss controversies around gene patenting, cloning, newborn screening, eugenics, and genetic testing for disease, risk, and ancestry. Our discussions and field trips in Edinburgh will help us grasp genetics and society here in the U.S. Prerequisites: upper-division standing; students must apply and be accepted to the Global Seminar Program. Students cannot receive credit for both SOCI 138GS and SOCI 138.

SOCI 139. Social Inequality: Class, Race, and Gender (4)

Massive inequality in wealth, power, and prestige is ever present in industrial societies. In this course, causes and consequences of class, gender, racial, and ethnic inequality (“stratification”) will be considered through examination of classical and modern social science theory and research. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 139 and SOCC 139.

SOCI 140. Sociology of Law (4)

This course analyzes the functions of law in society, the social sources of legal change, social conditions affecting the administration of justice, and the role of social science in jurisprudence. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 140 and SOCC 140.

SOCI 140A. Defund Police and Prisons?—Alternatives to Punitive Social Control (4)

Mass protests against police brutality and racial injustice have introduced the public to radical critiques of policing and prisons. Abolitionist activists envision a world where punitive control is replaced with alternative approaches to social problems. This class will draw on sociological research to consider the arguments and evidence for such alternatives as drug and mental health courts, more “humane” prison models, restorative justice, and even the wholesale abolition of punishment. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 140F. Law and the Workplace (4)

This course examines how the US legal system has responded to workplace inequality and demands for employee rights. Particular attention is given to racial, gender, religious, and disability discrimination, as well as the law’s role in regulating unions, the global economy, and sweatshop labor. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 140F and SOCC 140F.

SOCI 140J. Sociology of Social Justice (4)

This course examines concrete historical attempts to build more free and equal societies and institutions. From the Paris commune to Black Lives Matter, we will study the challenges and consequences of real efforts to break down power, distribute economic resources fairly, and provide everyone with the opportunity to flourish as individuals. By analyzing these efforts through a sociological lens, the course provides a framework for thinking critically and empirically about social justice. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 140K. Law and Society in China (4)

This course offers an overview of the courts of China. The focus is not on blackletter law. Instead, we look at what grassroots courts do on a daily basis. China has arguably the largest court system in the world. What does it do? How are the courts organized internally? What is the relationship between the courts and other government bureaucracies? Is there the rule of law in China? The course will address these questions by reviewing latest empirical research on the subject area. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 141. Crime and Society (4)

A study of the social origins of criminal law, the administration of justice, causes, and patterns of criminal behavior, and the prevention and control of crime, including individual rehabilitation and institutional change, and the politics of legal, police, and correctional reform. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 141 and SOCC 141.

SOCI 142. Social Deviance (4)

This course studies the major forms of behavior seen as rule violations by large segments of our society and analyzes the major theories trying to explain them, as well as processes of rulemaking, rule enforcing, techniques of neutralization, stigmatization and status degradation, and rule change. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 142 and SOCB 142.

SOCI 143. Suicide (4)

Traditional and modern theories of suicide will be reviewed and tested. The study of suicide will be treated as one method for investigating the influence of society on the individual. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 143 and SOCB 143.

SOCI 144. Forms of Social Control (4)

The organization, development, and mission of social control agencies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with emphasis on crime and madness; agency occupations (police, psychiatrists, correctional work, etc.); theories of control movements. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 144 and SOCC 144.

SOCI 145. Violence and Society (4)

Focusing on American history, this course explores violence in the light of three major themes: struggles over citizenship and nationhood; the drawing and maintenance of racial, ethnic, and gender boundaries; and the persistence of notions of “masculinity” and its relation to violence. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 145 and SOCB 145.

SOCI 146. Criminal Punishment (4)

This course examines the historic and contemporary responses to criminal behavior in the United States. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 147. Organizations, Society, and Social Justice (4)

Organizations are dynamic forces in society. This course examines how organizations address human health and social justice issues in national and international settings, focusing on the links between internal dynamics of organizations and macro-level political, economic, and cultural factors. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 147 and SOCC 147.

SOCI 148. Political Sociology (4)

Course focuses on the interaction between state and society. It discusses central concepts of political sociology (social cleavages, mobilization, the state, legitimacy), institutional characteristics, causes, and consequences of contemporary political regimes (liberal democracies, authoritarianism, communism), and processes of political change. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 148 and SOCC 148.

SOCI 148E. Inequality and Jobs (4)

Some people do much better than others in the world of work. Causes and consequences of this inequality will be examined: How do characteristics of individuals (e.g., class, gender, race, education, talent) and characteristics of jobs affect market outcomes? Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 148E and SOCC 148L.

SOCI 148GS. Political Sociology (4)

Course focuses on the interaction between state and society. It discusses central concepts of political sociology (social cleavages, mobilization, the state, legitimacy), institutional characteristics, causes, and consequences of contemporary political regimes (liberal democracies, authoritarianism, communism), and processes of political change. Prerequisites: students must apply and be accepted to the Global Seminar Program. Students cannot receive credit for both SOCI 148 and SOCI 148GS.

SOCI 149. Sociology of the Environment (4)

The environment as a socially and technically shaped milieu in which competing values and interests play out. Relation of humanity to nature, conflicts between preservation and development, environmental pollution and contested illnesses. Will not receive credit for SOCI 149 and SOCC 149.

SOCI 150. Madness and the Movies (4)

Hollywood has had an ongoing obsession with mental illness. This course will examine a number of important or iconic films on this subject. By examining them against a background provided by relevant scholarly materials, we shall develop a critical perspective on these cultural artifacts. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 150 and SOCC 150.

SOCI 151. Social Movement from Civil Rights to Black Lives Matter (4)

A treatment of selected social movements dealing primarily with the struggles of African-Americans, Hispanics, and women to change their situation in American society. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 152. Social Inequality and Public Policy (4)

(Same as USP 133.) Primary focus on understanding and analyzing poverty and public policy. Analysis of how current debates and public policy initiatives mesh with alternative social scientific explorations of poverty. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 152 and SOCC 152.

SOCI 153. Urban Sociology (4)

(Same as USP 105.) Introduces students to the major approaches in the sociological study of cities and to what a sociological analysis can add to our understanding of urban processes. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. Will not receive credit for SOCI 153 and SOCC 153.

SOCI 154. Religious Institutions in America (4)

Examination of sociological theories for why people have religious beliefs. Also examines types of religious organizations, secularization, fundamentalism, religion and immigration, religion and politics, and religiously inspired violence and terrorism. The class will tend to focus on the American context. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 154 and SOCC 154.

SOCI 155. The City of San Diego (4)

A research-oriented course studying a specific city. Students will describe and analyze a local community of San Diego. Additional work on one citywide institution. Guest lecturers from San Diego organizations and government. Readings largely from city reports and news media. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 155 and SOCC 155.

SOCI 156. Sociology of Religion (4)

Diverse sociological explanations of religious ideas and religious behavior. The social consequences of different kinds of religious beliefs and religious organizations. The influence of religion upon concepts of history, the natural world, human nature, and the social order. The significance of such notions as “sacred peoples” and “sacred places.” The religious-like character of certain political movements and certain sociocultural attitudes. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 156 and SOCC 156.

SOCI 157. Religion in Contemporary Society (4)

Sacred texts, religious experiences, and ritual settings are explored from the perspective of sociological analysis. The types and dynamic of religious sects and institutions are examined. African and contemporary US religious data provide resources for lecture and comparative analysis. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 157 and SOCC 157.

SOCI 158. Islam in the Modern World (4)

The role of Islam in the society, culture, and politics of the Muslim people during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; attempts by Muslim thinkers to accommodate or reject rival ideologies (such as nationalism and socialism); and a critical review of the relationship between Islam and the West. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 158 and SOCD 158.

SOCI 159. Special Topics in Social Organizations and Institutions (4)

Readings and discussion of particular substantive issues and research in the sociology of organizations and institutions, including such areas as population, economy, education, family, medicine, law, politics, and religion. Topics will vary from year to year. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 160. Sociology of Culture (4)

This course will examine the concept of culture, its “disintegration” in the twentieth century, and the repercussions on the integration of the individual. We will look at this process from a variety of perspectives, each focusing on one cultural fragment (e.g., knowledge, literature, religion) and all suggesting various means to reunify culture and consequently the individual. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 160 and SOCB 160.

SOCI 160E. Law and Culture (4)

This course examines major formulations of the relationship between law and culture in the sociological literature. Topics include formal law versus embedded law, law and morality, law and the self, legal consciousness, the rule of law, and the construction of legality. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 160E and SOCB 160L.

SOCI 161. Sociology of the Life Course (4)

This course explores concepts, theory and empirical research related to demographic, sociopsychological, and institutional aspects of the different stages of human development. It considers social influences on opportunities and constraints by gender, class, race/ethnicity, and historical period. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 161 and SOCB 161.

SOCI 162. Popular Culture (4)

An overview of the historical development of popular culture from the early modern period to the present. Also, a review of major theories explaining how popular culture reflects and/or affects patterns of social behavior. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 162 and SOCB 162. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 163. Migration and the Law (4)

Provides a global sociological perspective on the development and consequences of laws regulating migration within and across nation-state borders. The ability of the nation-state to control migration using law and its policy instruments. The effects of different legal statuses on political and socioeconomic outcomes. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 163 and SOCC 163.

SOCI 165. Predicting the Future from Tarot Cards to Computer Algorithms (4)

No one can see the future but everyone must try. When we act with purpose, we must form an idea of the consequences of our actions and the world in which our action will unfold. We must form expectations about the future, and therefore, we must predict, often in the face of great uncertainty, what will and won’t happen. This course surveys the social devices from tarot cards to computer algorithms designed to solve the problem of prediction. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 165A. American News Media (4)

History, politics, social organization, and ideology of the American news media. This course,165A, surveys the development of the news media as an institution, from earliest newspapers to modern mass news media. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 165A and SOCC 165A.

SOCI 166. Sociology of Knowledge (4)

This course provides a general introduction to the development of the sociology of knowledge and will explore questions concerning social determination of consciousness as well as theoretical ways to articulate a critique of ideology. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 166 and SOCB 166.

SOCI 167. Science and War (4)

This class examines how science has been mobilized in the development of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction. The class applies sociological concepts to the analysis of modern technological violence. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 167 and SOCC 167.

SOCI 168. Marxism (4)

This course examines Marxism as social theory and social movement. It covers the origins and historical development of Marxist ideas, the history of Marxist movements and organizations, and the interaction between theory and political practice. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 168E. Sociology of Science (4)

A survey of theoretical and empirical studies concerning the workings of the scientific community and its relations with the wider society. Special attention will be given to the institutionalization of the scientific role and to the social constitution of scientific knowledge. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 168E and SOCC 168E.

SOCI 168G. Populism: Then and Now (4)

The rise of radical right-wing, authoritarian populism in democratic societies is one of the most remarkable features of our time. It inevitably awakens the memory of fascism in the 1930s. We will examine their distinct features, such as leadership cult, xenophobia, mockery of facts, disdain for the rule of law, and differences. Our focus will be the connection between the growth of economic inequality and racial animosity and the rise of contemporary populism in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 169. Debating Citizenship Rights (4)

Will survey the liberal, communitarian, social-democratic, nationalist, feminist, postnationalist, and multicultural views on the construction of the modern citizen and good society. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 169 and SOCD 169.

SOCI 170. Gender and Science (4)

Scientific practices have had a tremendous impact on our understandings of gender. Gender relations have also significantly influenced the character of scientific inquiry. The course will consider how and why these two processes intertwine. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 171. Technology and Society (4)

Does improved technology mean progress? Or, are environmental pollution and social alienation signs that technology is out of control? This class uncovers the social problems of key modern technologies such as automobile transport, factory farming, biotechnology, and nuclear power. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 168T and SOCI 171.

SOCI 172. Films and Society (4)

An analysis of films and how they portray various aspects of American society and culture. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 172 and SOCB 172.

SOCI 173. Sociology of Health, Illness, and Medicine (4)

This course will explore the social forces that shape our health and the way we understand illness. Themes will include American public health and health care, inequality and biomedicine, as well as special topics like suicide, lead, autism, and HIV/AIDS. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 174. Human Rights I: Introduction to Human Rights and Global Justice (4)

(Same as HMNR 100 and HITO 119.) Explores where human rights come from and what it means to integrate them into a history of modern society, from the conquest of the Americas and the origins of the Enlightenment, to the Holocaust and the contemporary human rights regime. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 175. Nationality and Citizenship (4)

Surveys the development of nationality and citizenship law in historical and comparative perspective with an emphasis on the United States, Latin America, and Europe. Examines competing sociological accounts for national variation and convergence; consequences of the law; and local, transnational, and extraterritorial forms of citizenship. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 175 and SOCD 175.

SOCI 176. Transnational Japan Research Practicum (4)

Focusing on Japan and its transnational relationships, this course combines analysis of readings with instruction in writing academic research papers. Students will spend about half their time on readings and half on their own research projects. We will analyze domestic and international contexts within which Japanese cultural forms emerge and influence others. Topics include Japanese approaches to popular culture, art, environment, social relationships, and social problems. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 177. International Terrorism (4)

(Same as POLI 1420.) This course covers the definitions, history, and internationalization of terrorism; the interrelation of religion, politics and terror; and the representation of terrorism in the media. A number of organizations and their activities in Europe and the Middle East are examined. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 177 and SOCD 177.

SOCI 178. The Holocaust (4)

The study of the unique and universal aspects of the Holocaust. Special attention will be paid to the nature of discrimination and racism, those aspects of modernity that make genocide possible, the relationship among the perpetrators, the victims and the bystanders, and the teaching, memory, and denial of the Holocaust. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 178 and SOCD 178.

SOCI 179. Social Change (4)

Course focuses on the development of capitalism as a worldwide process, with emphasis on its social and political consequences. Topics include precapitalist societies, the rise of capitalism in the West, and the social and political responses to its expansion elsewhere. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 179 and SOCD 179.

SOCI 180. Social Movements and Social Protest (4)

An examination of the nature of protests and violence, particularly as they occur in the context of larger social movements. The course will further examine those generic facets of social movements having to do with their genesis, characteristic forms of development, relationship to established political configurations, and gradual fading away. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 180 and SOCC 180.

SOCI 181. Modern Western Society (4)

This course examines the nature and dynamics of modern western society in the context of the historical process by which this type of society has emerged over the last several centuries. The aim of the course is to help students think about what kind of society they live in, what makes it the way it is, and how it shapes their lives. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 181 and SOCD 181.

SOCI 182. Ethnicity and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America (4)

Ethnicity and the reassertion of Indian identity in contemporary Latin America. Issues related to these trends are examined in comparative perspective, with attention to changes in global conditions and in the socioeconomic, political, and cultural contexts of Latin American modernization. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 182 and SOCD 182.

SOCI 183. The Geography of American Opportunity (4)

How does where you grow up affect where you end up? This course explores “who gets what where and why” by examining spatial inequalities in life chances across regions, rural and urban communities, and divergent local economies in the U.S. We will “place” places within their economic, socio-cultural, and historical contexts. Readings and exercises will uncover spatial variation in inequalities by race/ethnicity, immigrant status, gender, class, and LGBTQIA status that national averages obscure. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 183 and USP 183.

SOCI 184. Gender and Film (4)

This class will examine issues of masculinity and femininity through analysis of films. Emphasis is on contemporary American society and will include varying issues such as race, class, and sexualities; worlds of work; romance, marriage, and family. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 184 and SOCC 184.

SOCI 185. Globalization and Social Development (4)

Social development is more than sheer economic growth. It entails improvements in the overall quality of human life, particularly in terms of access to health, education, employment, and income for the poorer sectors of the population. Course examines the impact of globalization on the prospects for attaining these goals in developing countries. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 185 and SOCD 185.

SOCI 185GS. Globalization and Social Development (4)

Social development is more than sheer economic growth. It entails improvements in the overall quality of human life, particularly in terms of access to health, education, employment, and income for the poorer sectors of the population. Course examines the impact of globalization on the prospects for attaining these goals in developing countries. Students cannot receive credit in this course if they have already taken SOCI 185. Prerequisites: students must apply and be accepted to the Global Seminar Program.

SOCI 187. African Societies through Film (4)

Exploration of contemporary African urbanization and social change via film, including 1) transitional African communities, 2) social change in Africa, 3) Western vs. African filmmakers’ cultural codes. Ideological and ethnographic representations, aesthetics, social relations, and market demand for African films are analyzed. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 187 and SOCD 187.

SOCI 188. Field Research in Migrant Communities—Practicum (4)

Mexican Migration Field Research Program: Students work closely with faculty to conduct direct on-the-ground field research in a migrant community. Students work as teams, conducting either surveys, interviews, or ethnographic observations. Students are expected to produce an outline of a research paper based on the results from fieldwork. Prerequisites: students must apply and be accepted to the Mexican Migration Field Research Program (MMFRP).

SOCI 188D. Latin America: Society and Politics (4)

Course focuses on the different types of social structures and political systems in Latin America. Topics include positions in the world economy, varieties of class structure and ethnic cleavages, political regimes, mobilization and legitimacy, class alignments, reform and revolution. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 188D and SOCD 188D.

SOCI 188E. Community and Social Change in Africa (4)

The process of social change in African communities, with emphasis on changing ways of seeing the world and the effects of religion and political philosophies of social change. The methods and data used in various village and community studies in Africa will be critically examined. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 188E and SOCD 188A.

SOCI 188F. Modern Jewish Societies and Israeli Society (4)

Contradictory effects of modernization on Jewish society in Western and Eastern Europe and the plethora of Jewish responses: assimilation, fundamentalism, emigration, socialism, diaspora nationalism, and Zionism. Special attention will be paid to issues of discontinuity between Jewish societies and Israeli society. Simultaneously, we will scrutinize the influence of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict on Israeli society, state, and identity. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 188F and SOCD 188F.

SOCI 188G. Chinese Society (4)

The social structure of the People’s Republic of China since 1949, including a consideration of social organization at various levels: the economy, the policy, the community, and kinship institutions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 188G and SOCD 188B.

SOCI 188GS. Change in Modern South Africa (4)

Using sociological and historical perspectives, this course examines the origins and demise of apartheid and assesses the progress that has been made since 1994, when apartheid was officially ended. Contrasts of racism in South Africa and the United States. Will not receive credit for SOCI 188GS and SOCI 188J. Prerequisites: students must apply and be accepted to the Global Seminar Program.

SOCI 188I. The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (4)

In this course we will examine the national and colonial dimensions of this long-lasting conflict and then turn our attention to the legal, governmental/political, and everyday aspects of the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza following the 1967 war. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 188J. Change in Modern South Africa (4)

Using sociological and historical perspectives, this course examines the origins and demise of apartheid and assesses the progress that has been made since 1994, when apartheid was officially ended. Contrasts of racism in South Africa and the United States. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 188J and SOCD 188J.

SOCI 188K. American Society (4)

Comparative and historical perspectives on US society. The course highlights “American exceptionalism”: Did America follow a special historical path, different from comparable nations in its social relations, politics, and culture? Specific topics include class relations, race, religion, and social policy. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 188K and SOCD 188K.

SOCI 188M. Social Movements in Latin America (4)

Course examines theories of social movements and changing patterns of popular protest and contentious mobilization in Latin America since the mid-twentieth century. Case studies include populism, guerrillas, liberation theology and movements of workers, peasants, women, and indigenous groups. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 188O. Settlements and Peacemaking in Israel (4)

We will examine the social, political, and religious factors that affect the nexus of Israeli settlements and Israeli-Arab and Israeli-Palestinian peace making. Special attention will be paid to the period after the 1967 War when these processes begun as well as to alternative resolutions to the conflict. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 189. Special Topics in Comparative-Historical Sociology (4)

Readings and discussion in selected areas of comparative and historical macrosociology. Topics may include the analysis of a particular research problem, the study of a specific society or of cross-national institutions, and the review of different theoretical perspectives. Contents will vary from year to year. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 189GS. Making of a Modern Colony: Puerto Rico in the Twentieth Century (4)

This course presents an overview of the US-PR colonial relationship since 1898, focusing on key elements of its political and economic history. Special attention is given to the sugar cane era, the major social transformations of the mid-twentieth century, the expansion of US military installations, the collapse of the “Operation Bootstrap” development model, and the formation of a Puerto Rican diaspora. Prerequisites: students must apply and be accepted to the Global Seminar Program.

SOCI 190GS. Contemporary Problems, Politics, and Potentialities in Puerto Rico (4)

An exploration of political governance of Puerto Rico and its history, this course introduces students to a variety of contemporary struggles to address the problems Puerto Ricans face and move Puerto Rico beyond its political status impasse. Prerequisites: students must apply and be accepted to the Global Seminar Program.

SOCI 192. Senior Seminar in Sociology (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in sociology (at the upper-division level). Topics will vary from quarter to quarter. Senior Seminars may be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Enrollment is limited to twenty students, with preference given to seniors. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: instructor permission or department stamp, upper-division standing.

SOCI 194. Research Seminar in Washington, DC (4)

(Same as PS 194, COGN 194, ERTH 194, HIST 193, USP 194.) Course attached to six-unit internship taken by students participating in the UCDC Program. Involves weekly seminar meetings with faculty and teaching assistant and a substantial research paper. Prerequisites: department approval. Participating in UCDC Program. Will not receive credit for SOCI 194 and SOCE 194.

SOCI 196A. Honors Seminar: Advanced Studies in Sociology (4)

This seminar will permit honors students to explore advanced issues in the field of sociology. It will also provide honors students the opportunity to develop a senior thesis proposal on a topic of their choice and begin preliminary work on the honors thesis under faculty supervision. Prerequisites: acceptance into Department of Sociology Honors Program.

SOCI 196B. Honors Seminar: Supervised Thesis Research (4)

This seminar will provide honors candidates the opportunity to complete research on and preparation of a senior honors thesis under close faculty supervision. Prerequisites: completion of SOCI 196A.

SOCI 198. Directed Group Study (4)

Group study of specific topics under the direction of an interested faculty member. Enrollment will be limited to a small group of students who have developed their topic and secured appropriate approval from the departmental committee on independent and group studies. These studies are to be conducted only in areas not covered in regular sociology courses. Prerequisites: upper-division standing and department approval required.

SOCI 198RA. Research Apprenticeship (4)

Students work on a graduate student’s research project supervised by the graduate student’s faculty mentor. Students assist with research tasks, gather material for a research report to be written in SOCI 109M. May be taken for credit up to two times. Prerequisites: students must apply and be accepted to the research apprenticeship course. Participants must be majors in sociology with junior or senior standing and a GPA of 3.2 in all sociology courses taken at UC San Diego. Individual projects may require other training, such as SOCI 60.

SOCI 199. Independent Study (4)

Tutorial: individual study under the direction of an interested faculty member in an area not covered by the present course offerings. Approval must be secured from the departmental committee on independent studies. Prerequisites: upper-division standing and department approval required.

SOCG 200. Introductory Methods/Epistemology (4)

This course introduces various methods for observing and analyzing the social world, principles for choosing among them, and general issues of research design. Coverage emphasizes common qualitative and quantitative methods in sociology in preparation for further methods courses. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 201. Classical Sociology Theory (4)

This course discusses major themes in the work of nineteenth- and twentieth-century social thinkers, including Tocqueville, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 202. Contemporary Sociological Theory (4)

Themes important for social theory at the turn of the twenty-first century: Marxism (Gramsci, Althusser), critical theory (Adorno, Habermas), interpretation (Geertz), social systems (Parsons), post-structuralism (Foucault), postmodernism, and social constructivism (Bourdieu). Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 203. Field Methods (4)

Research will be conducted in field settings. The primary focus will be on mastering the problems and technical skills associated with the conduct of ethnographic and participant observational studies. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 204. Text and Discourse Analysis (4)

Techniques of gathering and analyzing transcripts of naturally occurring conversations, interviews, discourse in institutional settings, public political discourse, and text of historical materials. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 205. Quantitative Methods I (4)

This course covers some of the elementary techniques used 1) to select random samples, 2) to detect statistical patterns in the sample data, and 3) to determine whether any patterns found in sample data are statistically significant. The course also stresses the benefits and drawbacks of survey and aggregate data and some common ways in which these data are used incorrectly. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 206. Quantitative Methods II (4)

The course covers some of the more advanced techniques used 1) to select random samples, 2) to detect statistical patterns in the sample data, and 3) to determine whether any patterns found in sample data are statistically significant. The course also stresses the benefits and drawbacks of survey and aggregate data and some common ways in which these data are used incorrectly. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 207. Comparative-Historical Methods (4)

A broad-based consideration of the use of historical materials in sociological analysis, especially as this facilitates empirically oriented studies across different societies and through time. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 208A. Graduate Student Seminar (1)

Introduction to the sociology graduate program and faculty. Course includes themes to connect student with the sociological community, a variety of departmental scholarly research, and focus on practical tools for student success. Students may not receive credit for SOCG 208A and SOCG 208. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 208B. Graduate Student Seminar (1)

Second part of the introduction to the sociology graduate program and faculty. Course includes themes to connect student with the sociological community, a variety of departmental scholarly research, and focus on practical tools for student success . Students may not receive credit for SOCG 208B and SOCG 208. Prerequisites: SOCG 208A; graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 209. Social Networks (4)

This course provides an accessible, graduate level introduction to social network analysis as a theoretical and methodological approach—one takes relationships rather than individuals as the fundamental unit of analysis. While the course will focus on concepts and applications rather than statistical models, students will also become acquainted with basic analytic techniques as well as learn how to collect, store, inspect, and visualize original network data. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 211. Introduction to Computational Social Science (4)

This course provides an overview and practical, hands-on introduction to some of the common tools employed in computational approaches to social science research. Students will acquire sufficient skills to use existing tools to conduct computational social science research, such as basic Python language. Recommended preparation: knowledge of or background in statistics. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 212. Social Stratification (4)

The causes and effects of social ranking in various societies. Theories of stratification; the dynamics of informal social grouping; determinants of institutional power, and the nature of struggles for power; the distribution of wealth and its causes; the dynamics of social mobility; the effects of stratification on lifestyles, culture, and deviance. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 214. Urban Sociology (4)

A survey of topics in urban sociology, including the city and suburb as social forms, civility among strangers, urbanism and culture, the political economy of metropolitan development, urban poverty, and racial residential segregation. Classical and contemporary approaches will be considered. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 215. Social Psychology (4)

An examination of theories of human behavior and personality development as affected by social group life. Major theories will be compared. The interaction dynamics of such substantive areas as socialization, normative and deviant behavior, the social construction of the self, and group processes and status structures will be considered. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 216. Sociology of Culture (4)

The history of the concept of culture; cultural pluralism in advanced industrialized societies; the differentiation of cultural institutions; cultural policy and social structure; culture as a property of social groups; conflict and accommodation over efforts to change and sustain traditional culture.  Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 222. Social Movements (4)

An examination of theories accounting for the causes and consequences of social movements, including a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of such theories for understanding historically specific revolutions, rebellions, and violent and nonviolent forms of protest in various parts of the world. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 224. Populism: Then and Now (4)

The rise of radical right-wing, authoritarian populism in democratic societies is one of the most remarkable features of our time. It inevitably awakens the memory of fascism in the 1930s. We will examine their distinct features, such as leadership cult, xenophobia, mockery of facts, disdain for the rule of law, and differences. Our focus will be the connection between the growth of economic inequality and racial animosity and the rise of contemporary populism in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 225. Comparative Political Economy (4)

An examination of the history and performance of key economic, political, and social institutions and policies in the United States and other nations. Special attention to similarities and differences across countries, and to strategies of comparative analysis. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 226. Political Sociology (4)

This course discusses the relationship between state and society in a comparative perspective. The focus is on the interaction among states, domestic economic elites, and external economic and political processes in the determination of different developmental paths. Analytically, it includes topics such as characteristics and functions of the state in different types of society throughout history (with an emphasis on the varieties of capitalist and socialist state), the autonomy of the state and its causes in different settings, and developmental and predatory consequences of state activity. Readings will include both theoretical and empirical materials, the latter dealing mostly with nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe and twentieth-century Latin America. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 227. Ethnographic Film: Media Methods (6)

Ethnographic recording of field data in written and audiovisual formats, including film, video, and CD-ROM applications. Critical assessment of ethnographies and audiovisual data in terms of styles, format, and approaches. Graduate students are required to submit a fifteen-page midterm paper comparing a written and an audiovisual ethnography and a final video ethnography with a project abstract. Prerequisites: graduate standing; SOCI 1, SOCI 2; or consent of instructor.

SOCG 229. Sociology of Family and Households (6)

The overall goal of this graduate seminar is to provide students with a working knowledge of conceptual frameworks and theories relevant to the sociological study of families. The course focuses on how families function in society and as society. In addition to engaging various micro- and macro-level theories about family form and function, students will also interrogate how demographic variables such as sex, race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status affect family structure and interaction. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 230. Advanced Approaches to Sociological Theory (4)

This course is a discussion of recent topics in sociological theory, usually focusing on a single approach, like postcolonialism, feminism, or Western Marxism. May be repeated as the topics change. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 232. Advanced Issues in the Sociology of Knowledge (4)

The social construction of knowledge and the social institutions in which these processes take place are examined. Topics include relationships between knowledge and social institutions, foundations of knowledge in society, knowledge and social interactions, and contrasting folk and specialized theories. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 234. Intellectual Foundation of the Study of Science, Technology, and Medicine (4)

This course focuses on some classic methodological and theoretical resources upon which the sociology of science, technology, and medicine all draw. It gives special attention to relationships between knowledge and social order, and between knowledge and practice, that are common to science, technology, and medicine. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 238. Survey of the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge (4)

An introduction to some enduring topics in the sociology of scientific knowledge and to some resources for addressing them. Attention is drawn to problems of accounting for scientific order and change, and to recurrent debates over the proper method for sociological accounts of science. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

SOCG 243. Sociology of Social Control (4)

An examination of the sociological literature on social control, looking at theoretical developments over time and examining the contemporary literature dealing with social control in historical and comparative perspective. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

SOCG 244. Sociology of Race and Ethnicity (4)

Analysis of enduring topics in the study of race and ethnicity, including stratification, discrimination conflict, immigration, assimilation, and politics. Other topics include racial and ethnic identity and the social construction of race and ethnic categories. A special focus is on the role of “culture” and “structure” for explaining race/ethnic differentiation. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 245. Gender, Work, and the Economy (4)

This course studies social constructions of gender within economic opportunities and constraints. We read classical sociological theory on this topic; feminist critiques; and newer research on careers, organizations, and markets. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 246. The Welfare State (4)

Surveys major theories of the development and functioning of the welfare state, addressing the roles of economic development, political institutions, stratification, and culture. The course focuses on the development of the US social provision in comparison with other advanced industrial societies.

SOCG 247. Madness and Society (4)

An examination of changing Western responses from the age of Bedlam to the age of Prozac. Topics include the rise and decline of the total institution; the emergence of psychiatry; changing cultural meanings of madness; and the therapeutics of mental disorder. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 252. Research Practicum I (4)

In this seminar students work on a research project, which might have originated in a paper written for another course. The goal is to produce the first draft of a paper that will be submitted to an academic journal. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 253. Research Practicum II (4)

In this seminar students revise an existing research paper (usually the one they wrote for Sociology 252) for submission to an academic journal. Emphasis is placed on conceptual development, writing style and structure, and drawing links to the existing theoretical and empirical literature. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 255A. Introduction to Science Studies: Part I (4)

(Same as Phil 209A, HIGR 238, and COGR 225A.) Study and discussion of classic work in history of science, sociology of science, and philosophy of science, and of work that attempts to develop a unified science studies approach. Required for all students in the Science Studies Program. Prerequisites: enrollment in Science Studies Program.

SOCG 255B. Seminar in Science Studies (4)

(Same as Phil 209B, HIGR 239, and COGR 225B.) Study and discussion of selected topics in the science studies field. Required for all students in the Science Studies Program. Prerequisites: enrollment in Science Studies Program.

SOCG 255C. Colloquium in Science Studies (4)

(Same as Phil 209C, HIGR 240, and COGR 225C.) A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress in science studies, by graduate students, faculty, and visitors. Required of all students in the Science Studies Program. Prerequisites: enrollment in the Science Studies Program.

SOCG 255D. Introduction to Science Studies: Part II (4)

(Same as COGR 225D, HIGR 241, Phil 209D.) Continuing the introduction developed in Part I, this course examines recent key topics and problem situations in science studies. Emphasis is on recent theoretical perspectives and empirical studies in communication, history, philosophy, and sociology of science and technology, and the interplay between them. Prerequisites: SOCG 255A is a prerequisite for SOCG 255D; enrollment in Science Studies Program or instructor’s permission.

SOCG 256. Sociology of Religion (4)

This course examines religion as a social institution that liberates and oppresses, serves as catalyst for and impediment to social change, and intersects with other social institutions. Students will explore the relationship between religion and the affect, behaviors, and cognition of religious people; religious organizations and organizational leadership; and the effects of religion and religiosity on other social institutions (e.g., family, politics) and individual outcomes (e.g., health). Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 258. Institutional Change in the Contemporary World; Latin American Societies in a Comparative Perspective (4)

This course explores institutional change in contemporary Latin America and compares this area with other transitional societies. Issues include social consequences of economic liberalization, changing forms of inequality, dynamics of civil society, conceptions of citizenship, quality and future of democracy. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 263. Graduate Seminar in the Sociology of Art (4)

This seminar explores the production and interpretation of art forms in cross-cultural context. Processes of symbolic and economic exchange in art worlds will be examined from sociological and semiotic perspectives. Contemporary and popular art forms will be analyzed as types of cultural reproduction. Graduate students will be required to submit a project abstract and final research paper of twenty-seven pages. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 264. Economic Sociology (4)

This course provides an overview of the classical and current debates in the economic sociology literature. It presents theories of the rise of industrial economics and addresses how economic activities are constituted and influenced by institutions, culture, and social structure. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 267. Sociology of Gender (4)

Course examines social construction of gender focusing on recent contributions to the field, including micro- and macro-level topics, i.e., social psychological issues in the development of gender, gender stratification in the labor force, gender and social protest, feminist methodologies. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 269. The Citizenship Debates (4)

Will examine the controversies surrounding the construction of the modern citizen and the good society of the liberal outlook, and their alternatives in the communitarian, social-democratic, nationalist, feminist, and multiculturalist perspectives. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 270. Sociology of Education (4)

The course will begin by discussing the history and goals of education, as well as how sociologists have sought to understand this institution. We will then examine important topics including educational inequality; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in education; higher education; and social and political forces for change in educational forms. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 278. Immigration, Assimilation, and Identity (4)

This course focuses on theoretical and empirical approaches to the study of immigration, assimilation, and identity. The course will focus primarily on the post-1965 immigrants, but consideration will also be given to earlier waves of immigration. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 280. Sociology of Forced Migration (4)

This course analyzes the origins of refugee flows, government policies, the role of nongovernmental organizations, and refugee experiences. It explores the debates about who is a refugee, how refugees decide when and where to move, the centrality of violence and persecution, and the place of refugees within the broader category of forced migration. The theoretical discussion engages concrete examples drawn from around the world in countries of origin, asylum, resettlement, and return. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 282. Immigration and Citizen (4)

Alternative theories of the relations of immigrants and host societies, and an examination on the debates on, and dynamic of, immigration expansion and restriction. Comparison of the bearing of liberal, communitarian, and ethnic citizenship discourses on the inclusion and exclusion of immigrants and their descendants. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 284. Contemporary Biomedicine (4)

Develops central themes in medical sociology in order to understand twentieth- and twenty-first century medical practice and research. Topics include authority and expertise; health inequalities; managed care; health activism; biomedical knowledge production; and the construction of medical objects and subjects. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 288. Knowledge Capitalism (4)

This seminar examines the place of scientific knowledge and information and communication technology in the transformation of capitalist economy and society. The class explores new interactions between science studies and social theory of advanced capitalism. Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 290. Graduate Seminar (4)

A research seminar in special topics of interest to available staff, provides majors and minors in sociology with research experience in close cooperation with faculty. (S/U grades permitted.) Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 298. Independent Study (1–8)

Tutorial individual guides study and/or independent research in an area not covered by present course offerings. (S/U grades only.) Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology; department approval.

SOCG 299. Thesis Research (1–12)

Open to graduate students engaged in thesis research. (S/U grades only.) Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology.

SOCG 500. Apprentice Teaching (2–4)

Supervised teaching in lower-division contact classes, supplemented by seminar on methods in teaching sociology. (S/U grades only.) Prerequisites: graduate standing in sociology. Technology done under the direction of a faculty member. College stamp required. Pass/Not Pass grade only.

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The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment

The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment

  • Stephen Edgell - University of Salford, UK
  • Heidi Gottfried - Wayne State University, USA
  • Edward Granter - University of Birmingham, UK
  • Description

The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment is a landmark collection of original contributions by leading specialists from around the world. The coverage is both comprehensive and comparative (in terms of time and space) and each ‘state of the art’ chapter provides a critical review of the literature combined with some thoughts on the direction of research. This authoritative text is structured around six core themes: 

  • Historical Context and Social Divisions
  • The Experience of Work
  • The Organization of Work
  • Nonstandard Work and Employment
  • Work and Life beyond Employment
  • Globalization and the Future of Work.      

Globally, the contours of work and employment are changing dramatically. This handbook helps academics and practitioners make sense of the impact of these changes on individuals, groups, organizations and societies. Written in an accessible style with a helpful introduction, the retrospective and prospective nature of this volume will be an essential resource for students, teachers and policy-makers across a range of fields, from business and management, to sociology and organization studies.

ISBN: 9781446280669 Hardcover Suggested Retail Price: $200.00 Bookstore Price: $160.00
ISBN: 9781473922815 Electronic Version Suggested Retail Price: $120.00 Bookstore Price: $96.00

See what’s new to this edition by selecting the Features tab on this page. Should you need additional information or have questions regarding the HEOA information provided for this title, including what is new to this edition, please email [email protected] . Please include your name, contact information, and the name of the title for which you would like more information. For information on the HEOA, please go to http://ed.gov/policy/highered/leg/hea08/index.html .

For assistance with your order: Please email us at [email protected] or connect with your SAGE representative.

SAGE 2455 Teller Road Thousand Oaks, CA 91320 www.sagepub.com

An authoritative, engaging and extremely timely collection. From global trends in paid and unpaid employment to the impacts on individuals and communities, the Handbook makes a powerful case for the centrality of work to both society and sociology. Across a range of themes, debates and topics, we are confronted with the social realities of today’s working lives and compellingly reminded of the importance of the sociological imagination.

The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment provides a comprehensive introduction to contemporary issues in the sociology of work. Together with leading contributors, editors Edgell, Gottfried, and Granter advance novel and timely sociological understandings of the dynamics behind major trends in paid and unpaid work and employment and their impacts on individuals, groups, organizations and societies. The Handbook is an informative text that will serve as an excellent resource for undergraduate students and scholars alike.

I cannot welcome enough The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment . As a collection it is not only wide-ranging and instructive but also original and stimulating.   In assembling such high quality works by world leading authorities Steve Edgell, Heidi Gottfried and Ed Granter have made a significant contribution to the study of occupations and organizations. The various sections engage the reader in discovering the contemporary context and experience of work in a vibrant text which reports the latest developments in theory and practice. This is a marvellous volume and teachers and students will love it.

The present volume, in its encyclopaedic coverage, is an achievement in mapping out the contours of a classic field of sociological study, as well as demonstrating its pertinence to the present day.

This Handbook conclusively demonstrates how the sociology of work and employment has long transcended any such narrow boundaries and continues to push further in key respects, providing a firm basis for coming to grips with the profound changes in work and employment that are currently underway. Highlighting a rich topical literature and identifying emerging research agendas...this is a valuable source book for all students of the sociology of work and employment.

I have no hesitation in commending the Handbook to students, academics and policy makers who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of contemporary issues associated with employment and work in the 21st Century. 

As several contributors recognize, the old caricature of SWE as the study of male, unionized, manual workplaces was never entirely adequate, but this Handbook conclusively demonstrates how the SWE agenda has long transcended any such narrow boundaries and continues to push further in key respects, providing a firm basis for coming to grips with the profound changes in work and employment that are currently underway… A valuable source book for all students of the sociology of work and employment.

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Sample materials & chapters.

Introduction: Studies of Work and Employment at the Global Frontier

Chapter 7: Good Jobs, Bad Jobs

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