plagiarism presentation for high school

Plagiarism - Lesson presentation

Presentation with instructional support to understand and avoid plagiarism.

Turnitin Teaching and Learning Innovations Team

An overview of the resources available in this set and suggestions for their implementation.

plagiarism presentation for high school

Guided notes worksheet to support students while working through the Plagiarism Lesson Presentation.

This lesson presentation facilitates a discussion between students and educators about what plagiarism is, the many different types of plagiarism, and ways that students can actively work to avoid it in their work. Pair this lesson presentation with the Plagiarism lesson guided notes to actively engage students in the content of this lesson. The information in this lesson presentation directly ties to the information presented in the Avoiding plagiarism poster and Avoiding plagiarism handout . Download this file to use the presentation as is or to customize the information to suit your needs. **NOTE: Open in Google Slides for proper formatting and access to hyperlinked resources.**

Exploring Plagiarism, Copyright, and Paraphrasing

Exploring Plagiarism, Copyright, and Paraphrasing

  • Resources & Preparation
  • Instructional Plan
  • Related Resources

This lesson helps students understand copyright, fair use, and plagiarism by focusing on why students should avoid plagiarism and exploring strategies that respect copyright and fair use. The lesson includes three parts, each framed by a KWL chart. In the first part, focusing on plagiarism, students discuss plagiarism and look at examples to determine whether the passages are plagiarized. Part two introduces copyright and fair use. Students use a Think-Pair-Share strategy to explore questions about fair use, then read several scenarios and determine if the uses described are fair use. In the third part, students develop paraphrasing skills through direct practice with paraphrasing text book passages using an online notetaking tool. This lesson plan was developed as part of a collaborative professional project with the American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy and the American Association of School Librarians (AASL).

Featured Resources

  • Checklist for Fair Use : Use this checklist to determine if your use of copyrighted material is considered fair use.
  • ReadWriteThink Notetaker : Use this online tool to organize and reorganize notes.

From Theory to Practice

Students need multiple opportunities to practice citing sources and paraphrasing, to see examples of writing that properly uses paraphrasing and citations, and to reinforce these concepts. When students are taught information about these concepts early in their academic careers they are more likely to find success when the demands for research increase with the sophistication of their work. As their work becomes more sophisticated, students must have an understanding of fair use practices concerning copyright. Giving credit for a source is essential, but there are times when just a citation is not enough. Depending upon what part and how much of the text a writer uses, he or she may need to seek permission to use the material. By discussing and practicing paraphrasing and working through some fair use examples in this lesson, students should gain a better understanding of these concepts.

Further Reading

Common Core Standards

This resource has been aligned to the Common Core State Standards for states in which they have been adopted. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, CCSS alignments are forthcoming.

State Standards

This lesson has been aligned to standards in the following states. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, standard alignments are not currently available for that state.

NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts

  • 4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
  • 5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
  • 6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.
  • 7. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.
  • 8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
  • 12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Materials and Technology

  • Student textbook from a content area such as social studies or science
  • Internet connection and projection capabilities
  • Identifying Plagiarism PowerPoint Presentation
  • Paraphrasing Practice PowerPoint Presentation
  • Research Skills KWL
  • Checklist for Fair Use
  • Paraphrasing Practice handout
  • Identifying Plagiarism examples

Preparation

  • This lesson is designed to be co-planned and co-taught by the classroom teacher and the school library media specialist. Meet to decide responsibilities for teaching the lessons and assessing student work, as well as to arrange logistics for using the library media center.  In advance, agree upon lead and support educator roles for each session. Educators are strongly encouraged to alternate roles depending upon individual strengths and expertise.
  • Ideally, the library media specialist and English language arts teacher will also collaborate with a willing colleague from the science or social science department for the activities in this lesson.
  • Choose a section or chapter in the student textbook to use during each part of the lesson and as part of the student assessment. Textbook sections that have not/may not be covered in class work best.
  • Make copies of the Research Skills KWL handout and Checklist for Fair Use for each student.
  • Make arrangements to project the Paraphrasing Practice PowerPoint Presentation and the Identifying Plagiarism PowerPoint Presentation , or create separate transparencies for each sentence on the Paraphrasing Practice and Identifying Plagiarism sheets.
  • If students need additional practice, choose passages from available texts (e.g., an elementary level encyclopedia; student writing; unfamiliar school or college textbooks). Work together to create your own paraphrased and plagiarized versions of the passages to extend student options for identifying plagiarism.
  • The classroom teacher and library media specialist should test the ReadWriteThink Notetaker on the computers to familiarize themselves with the tool and to ensure the Flash plug-in is installed. Schools can download the plug-in from the Technical Support page .

Student Objectives

Students will:

  • define plagiarism, fair use, and paraphrasing.
  • recognize and provide examples of plagiarism, fair use, and paraphrasing.
  • use appropriate paraphrasing strategies to replace advanced-level words with age/grade/level appropriate vocabulary.

Note: In addition to the stated NCTE/IRA standards, this lesson is also aligned to the following American Association of School Librarians Standards for the 21st-Century Learner .

  • Respect copyright/intellectual property rights of creators and producers.
  • Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information
  • Use information and technology ethically and responsibly.
  • Respect the principles of intellectual freedom.

Session One

  • Distribute the Research Skills KWL handout, and ask the students to complete the "know" and "want to know" columns for each of the three items.
  • The classroom teacher and library media specialist should co-lead a discussion of the students' responses for the "know" and "want to know" columns of the plagiarism section of the worksheet.
  • Create a class definition of plagiarism, using the information on students KWL chart. Be sure that the class definition includes the idea of using another person's words or ideas without crediting the original writer.
  • Failure of the assignment or course
  • Requirement to do the work over
  • Suspension/expulsion
  • Lawsuit, fines, and/or firing for workplace plagiarism
  • Paraphrase with appropriate citations
  • Give credit through footnotes/endnotes, a works cited page, or a bibliography
  • Share examples from the  Identifying Plagiarism PowerPoint Presentation or Identifying Plagiarism Sheet , and ask students to determine whether the passages are plagiarized. Add examples from class texts to expand this practice at identifying plagiarism.
  • During the class discussion of the passages, consider the following advice from Laura Hennessey DeSena's book Preventing Plagiarism: Tips and Techniques : "In teaching students how to paraphrase, I tell them to put the text aside for a few moments and try to remember what the writer said--the ideas, the insights.  Then I ask students to try to write down these ideas.  I have them compare the two versions, their translation with the original text.  Integrity of ideas much remain intact.  If student writers change the meaning, then they will have to try again.  If they, unintentionally, appropriated exact language, then they will have to try again.  If students are unable to remember what they have read, then they should view the passage as a whole and synthesize the main points in their own words.  Encourage them to change sentence structure, in addition to altering diction.  In changing language choices, they should try to use their own words, before consulting a dictionary or thesaurus." (49). DeSena, Laura Hennessey.  2007. Preventing Plagiarism: Tips and Techniques . (Chapter 3). Urbana, IL:  NCTE.

Have students complete the "learned" column for plagiarism on the Research Skills KWL handout.

If time permits, share this school media center Website on plagiarism to review the concepts that have been covered and point out available resources.

Session Two

  • Begin with a brief review of the previous session.
  • Discuss the students' responses for the "know" and "want to know" columns of the fair use section of the Research Skills KWL handout.
  • The Copyright Office at the Library of Congress defines fair use as "purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered ‘fair,' such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research."
  • The 1961 Report of the Register of Copyrights on the General Revision of the U.S. Copyright Law cites examples of activities that courts have regarded as fair use: "quotation of excerpts in a review or criticism for purposes of illustration or comment; quotation of short passages in a scholarly or technical work, for illustration or clarification of the author's observations; use in a parody of some of the content of the work parodied; summary of an address or article, with brief quotations, in a news report; reproduction by a library of a portion of a work to replace part of a damaged copy; reproduction by a teacher or student of a small part of a work to illustrate a lesson; reproduction of a work in legislative or judicial proceedings or reports; incidental and fortuitous reproduction, in a newsreel or broadcast, of a work located in the scene of an event being reported." ( Factsheet on fair use of copyrighted works . U.S. Copyright Office, July 2006.)
  • Using the information from Copyright Kids! Copyright Basics & FAQs , share each question with students and have them use the Think-Pair-Share strategy (think about it on your own, pair with a neighbor, share with a larger group) to answer the question.
  • When students have had a chance to consider all the questions, reveal the answers from the Website .
  • in school: for assignments such as term papers, class plays, presentations
  • personal life: Internet downloads, podcasts, personal writings
  • To expand the discussion to include music downloads, show the class the first two and a half minutes of the Ball State University Libraries video "What Do You Think about Intellectual Property?" from their Copyright for Students page.
  • Have students discuss their thoughts and reactions.
  • Distribute and review the Checklist for Fair Use handout.
  • John is writing a science term paper on the life of a ferret. He has used two books, a general encyclopedia, and several Websites to gather his information. He has put much of the information into his own words but has used a few direct quotes, citing information that is not his own. Is his work okay according to the Checklist for Fair Use ? Why or why not? (Answer: yes—educational purposes; only a portion of information used; factual information; paraphrased; and credit given.)
  • Mary and her friends like the poems of Shel Silverstein, so she copied a bunch of the poems using the school photocopier, stapled them together, and made plans to sell the booklet to anyone who wants it. Is this fair use? Why or why not? (Answer: no—the poems being reproduced are not the student's own work; entire poems used; heart of the work used; creative work; copies sold, therefore depriving author of income.)
  • Uncle Marty always videotapes family events. He has put together a video CD with some of the highlights and is giving out the CDs to family members. He has asked each recipient to pay him for the cost of the blank CD so he can continue to make more copies. Is this fair use? Why or why not? (Answer: yes—originator doing the reproduction.)
  • Taylor has purchased music from iTunes and placed it on her MP3 player. She also gave the music to three of her friends. Are these uses fair? Why or why not? (Answer: yes and no—The download to Taylor's MP3 player is fine because she paid for the download; however, giving the music to her friends is not because it deprives the copyright owner of income.)
  • Allow time for follow-up discussion. Include in the discussion when and how to seek permission to use a copyrighted work (see the U.S. Copyright Office answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Copyright ).
  • Have the students complete the "learned" column of the fair use section of the Research Skills KWL handout.

Session Three

  • Begin with a review of the previous sessions.
  • Discuss students' responses for the "know" and "want to know" columns of the paraphrasing section of the Research Skills KWL handout.
  • Create a class definition of paraphrasing, using the information on students KWL chart. Be sure that the class definition includes the idea of restating another person's ideas in your own words or format.
  • Ask students to give examples of some of the ways they paraphrase information. Make sure the discussion includes summarizing, rewording, and using direct quotes.
  • Make sure that students understand that summarizing is putting the main ideas of a piece of writing in a shortened form that uses their own words. This process can be completed by reading an entire text (paragraph, page, section, etc.) and then writing down what they remember accurately.
  • In collaboration with another content area teacher, assign an unfamiliar passage from the students' textbook for students to read and summarize.
  • For additional practice, introduce students to the ReadWriteThink Notetaker . Allow time for them to become familiar with the tool, perhaps having them practice together using the passage assigned in the previous step.
  • Assign a new passage from the unfamiliar section, and ask the students to use the ReadWriteThink Notetaker to summarize the information.
  • Make sure students understand that rewording is restating the material in their own words. Explain to students that their teachers expect them to write as students would write, not as textbooks or encyclopedias sound. Then show them how to take a statement and rewrite it using words they know and would use.
  • Do one or two of the examples in the Paraphrasing Practice Powerpoint Presentation together, deciding which words should be changed and which can stay.
  • Complete the remainder one at a time using Think-Pair-Share or some other small group strategy.
  • Go over the students' suggestions aloud after each example, and offer comments on the results.
  • An important person's words lend credibility to the writing.
  • The reader will think you are very strategic to seek out an authority's idea to include in the report.
  • The words and phrases in the quote simply express the idea too powerfully not to use the original.
  • Ask students to consider why it is important that a paper is not one long quote or a series of quotes from a book even if credit is given.
  • Provide instruction on footnotes, endnotes, or bibliography compilation if appropriate at this time, using the class textbook.
  • Have students complete the "learned" portion of the Research Skills KWL handout for paraphrasing.
  • Have volunteers share what they learned over the entire lesson.

Student Assessment / Reflections

  • The classroom teacher and school media specialist should assess students’ learning through observation and anecdotal notetaking on participation and class discussions.
  • Test students’ understanding by choosing a three-paragraph passage from the class textbook, and asking each student to demonstrate the following skills: summarize paragraph one; paraphrase paragraph two; and choose a significant quotation from paragraph three, citing it correctly.
  • Calendar Activities
  • Professional Library
  • Student Interactives
  • Lesson Plans

This document is a code of best practices that helps educators using media literacy concepts and techniques to interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use.

Useful for a wide variety of reading and writing activities, this outlining tool allows students to organize up to five levels of information.

This tool allows students to create an online K-W-L chart. Saving capability makes it easy for them to start the chart before reading and then return to it to reflect on what they learned.

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An Innovative Way to Deal With Plagiarism

Creating a short blended learning course is a good way to help students learn how to quote and paraphrase sources and use proper citations.

Student taking notes in class.

As a high school English teacher, I have to spend a significant amount of time teaching my students about academic integrity and how to avoid plagiarism.

This school year, teaching these skills became all the more important because my students learned to rely heavily on the internet while they were on distance learning. Because of this, I spent a big chunk of time at the beginning of the year teaching them things like how to cite sources, how to paraphrase, and how to understand programs like Turnitin , an online tool designed to detect plagiarism.

Still, I found myself facing an onslaught of papers that were copied from the internet, were from former students, or paraphrased websites. To address this issue, I emailed home, issued detentions, and changed classroom policies. But it seemed like the more I lectured about academic integrity, the more my students tuned me out. Despite these problems, I found that most students simply misunderstood how to cite sources and/or how to properly paraphrase something they had read.

A New Approach

It was then that I realized that I was simply fighting with students and parents, and I wasn’t addressing the problem, and I decided to change my approach by creating an online course about plagiarism. This course was designed to remind students of the ideas and concepts they learned about in class.

I enroll my students in the 45-minute course if they are caught with any academic integrity violations. I do not grade any classroom assignments until the assignments in this class are completed—a major incentive for the student to get the assignments done.

To get ideas for the course, it was important for me to have a frank and honest conversation with my students. I told them about my frustrations and how I needed their help in understanding why plagiarism was such an issue in my class.

After I set the tone for the conversation, I asked them questions designed to get to the bottom of what confused them most about academic honesty. One of my main goals was to see if they understood why plagiarism was such a big problem. I also wanted to find out what led them to make mistakes in this area. Were they just looking for a shortcut, or were they simply confused about how to properly cite sources?

Designing the Course

Based on the answers to these questions, I structured the course and tailored the assignments to fit the needs of my students. Assignments focused on defining academic integrity, how to avoid plagiarism, and the problems with paraphrasing websites. The course also covered how to rebuild trust with me and how to move forward.

The assignments can be adapted or modified to fit the needs of an individual student and class. The assignments I created asked for the following:

  • Students will take Cornell notes on videos and articles that teach about specific academic integrity violations.
  • Students will go to a popular paraphrasing website and put in a sample paragraph. Students are then instructed to compare and contrast the original paragraph with the paraphrased one. They are asked to examine things like grammar, spelling, content, and sentence structure.
  • Students will turn in a piece of writing to the Turnitin website. Once their score is generated, students are then taught through pictures and videos how to interpret the website’s findings.
  • Students will go to OWL Purdue and learn how to properly cite sources. Students then have to practice this skill using a set of resources given to them.
  • Students will learn how to write a professional email and then practice writing one to their teacher asking the teacher for help on a particular subject or skill.
  • Students will read a variety of well-known plagiarism cases and answer questions at the end of the article.
  • Students will take a deep dive into the school’s academic integrity policies and answer questions at the end to check for understanding.
  • Students will read and sign an academic pledge. Moving forward, this pledge will act as a sort of contract between the student and the teacher.

While students don’t like having to do extra work, this course helps them to finally understand that there are genuine consequences to their actions. When the course first launched, I overheard one of my students remarking to his group of friends that because he had more work to complete, cheating “isn’t worth it anymore.”

Another benefit to going through the class is that excuses like “I didn’t know” or “I was too scared to ask” are no longer valid. Students are given the opportunity to relearn the material and clear up any misconceptions that they may have. They are also taught what to do if they are too intimidated to go up to the teacher and directly ask for help.

While I am constantly making improvements to my class, I have not had any academic integrity issues with any of the students who have gone through the course. In fact, I have had an influx of students coming up to me and directly asking for help. While they are primarily asking me for feedback on their writing, they are also asking me questions related to the plagiarism course.

I have learned through this process that most students have genuine misunderstandings about academic integrity, and this course is a perfect opportunity to address them. While consequences like a zero are sometimes necessary, I have learned that by giving students the benefit of the doubt, I am allowing them to be successful and hopefully avoid a bigger problem in the future.

Home / Teaching / Educating Against Plagiarism in High School

plagiarism presentation for high school

Educating Against Plagiarism in High School

Posted 17 April 2018

Under Teaching

Life keeps teaching you the same lessons until you learn them. Next year, I will have finally learned my lesson about teaching plagiarism in high school: do it early. 

At the beginning of the year I’m always so excited to meet my new students and learn about their literary interests and writing skills that I forget to refresh their memories about plagiarism. I assume it’s been covered in middle school and that the rules are obvious. Yet year after year, my students teach me that this assumption is false. There are always questions about specific cases, clarifications about obscure details and shocked faces when self-plagiarism comes up. Not to mention the same inevitable confrontation with a student who didn’t realize rewording a Wikipedia article or copying and pasting “just the introduction” counts.

This year, my plagiarism unit came first thing after winter break. I had closed the previous semester with an unfortunate case of plagiarism in high school and was determined to make sure it wouldn’t happen again. My favorite way to introduce the topic is through music. There are several compilation videos on YouTube with hit songs and their original samples. Before I even say the word “plagiarism,” I tell my students we’re going to listen to some old songs and that their job is to guess which modern song sampled the oldie. They get really into the game and the music buffs are able to show off their knowledge. (It’s also a great way to get to know the musical tastes of the class.) After a few minutes of this, I switch videos to the final round: a song that has gotten an artist in legal trouble for violating copyright laws.

I chose a top ten pop hit from 2014 compared to an 80s classic rock song with a similar melody for this year’s final round. I told the students that the final round is more difficult because only one aspect of the song was allegedly copied. Many students were stumped, as they didn’t think the songs were that similar. This led right into a discussion about music plagiarism, a subject of interest to many students, that touched on many points that directly relate to plagiarism in high school. For example, one student asked, “If they have permission from the original artist, isn’t sampling allowed?” Another added, “They have to put their name in the credits.”

Finally, after this long introduction, the students are ready to discuss plagiarism. If you don’t hook them in the beginning, they will shut down as soon as you say the “p-word.” I present statistics about copying and plagiarism so students feel more comfortable talking openly, knowing that it’s a widespread issue. I emphasize the fact that being proactive and informed are the best ways to avoid the dreaded “zero with no possibility of make-up,” the typical minimum consequence for plagiarism in high school. I also stress that among the types of plagiarism (direct, self, and mosaic), there is also accidental plagiarism. Students must understand that even if accidental, these cases carry all the same consequences as intentional plagiarism.

The most important skills to teach for avoiding accidental plagiarism are proper quoting, summarizing, and paraphrasing with parenthetical or in text citations . A common misconception is that it’s not necessary to cite if you paraphrase or summarize. Many students believe rewording someone else’s article still counts as original work. This connects back to the music discussion, since taking someone else’s idea for a melody can be considered a copyright violation. We spend several days practicing quoting, summarizing and paraphrasing example paragraphs. This may seem juvenile for high school, but these skills need to be constantly reinforced in every grade level with increasing difficulty. During these exercises, students make a habit of consistently citing sources.

I teach my students to use EasyBib correctly to make accurate citations. It’s always amusing to me that some students complain about citing sources when it is made so easy for them. Back in my day, we had to create citations from scratch by finding all the information ourselves. Now, with one click, you can switch between MLA style , APA style or even Chicago style format .

The only reason I need to go over these sites with my classes (instead of just telling the kids to use them) is that they need to be reminded not to just click through the steps without looking at the information being pulled. When the algorithms can’t see a piece of information that is available, it’s the student’s job to fill that in. When a full citation looks particularly sparse, I usually review the site myself to make sure the student did the same. If an author or publication date is missing from the citation, I use it as a “teachable moment” to show the student why they need to use their own brain in addition to the online tool.

Having the plagiarism talk early and clearing up misconceptions is often the best way to make sure your students are producing high-quality, original work they can be proud of. Plagiarism in high school is one thing I am very serious about because if I’m not, I know it will cost them much more in their future education or career.

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plagiarism presentation for high school

About the Author

Jamie breitner.

Jamie is a high school English teacher at a charter school near Denver, Colorado. She has taught Language Arts and Creative Writing in the United States and overseas, including middle school Language Arts and three different IB and AP English courses. Jamie loves teaching and constantly strives to improve her pedagogical methodology to better serve her students.

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Avoiding Plagiarism: Teaching Tips and Lesson Plans

Avoiding plagiarism can be a tricky topic to teach. It’s important for teachers to make students aware of the consequences and to empower them with the digital literacy tools they need to cite research correctly, but it’s also important that educators don’t come across as punitive, rule-enforcing instructors who have no compassion for the learning process.

In high school, students are developing an awareness and an understanding of ethical research writing. In junior high, many students are still trying to grasp the concept of an internal citation. Obviously, maturity should be considered when addressing plagiarism.

The following instructional practices are the ones I’ve found most beneficial during essay units. They help my students understand what plagiarism is, why it’s important to give proper credit to sources, and how to cite research correctly.

AVOIDING PLAGIARISM: TEACHING APPROACHES

1.  broaden students’ understanding..

Make sure students are aware of various types of plagiarism. Plagiarism is more than copy and paste, which students often misunderstand. I begin the year with a  plagiarism mini unit . During this week, we study real-world plagiarism examples, talk about how students can avoid plagiarism, and explore the concept through differentiated learning opportunities. Students need to hear the information verbally, to see examples, to practice with exercises and games, and to correct common mistakes.

2.  DIFFERENTIATE PRACTICE.

Use different kinds of practice exercises. I always teach students how to paraphrase, summarize and directly quote research before asking them to write a research paragraph or essay. I’ve used many different practice exercises with success. For example:

  • Ask students to color code different elements of a sentence from research (the signal phrase, the quotation, the in-text citation, the punctuation, etc.).
  • Give students a scenario (Ex. –  You are writing an argumentative research paper about ______. While researching, you come across the following interesting fact, which contains technical jargon. You feel you cannot change the wording, so you decide to directly quote it. ). Then, give students the information they need to cite the source (the title of the article, the source information, the page numbers, and etcetera). Guide them through some examples, let them work in partners, and then have them try it on their own.
  • Provide students with an already-written paragraph, and ask them to read an article and plug in paraphrased and directly quoted information to strengthen the content.

3. USE MODELS. 

Use samples to bring awareness. You probably already provide students with examples of the type of essay you are asking them to write. Make sure one of your examples is missing important citations, quotation marks, or a Works Cited page. After they read this example, ask students, “What grade do you think this paper is worth?” or “Is this student proficient with the standard?” If the example is well-written with the exception of the missing citations, students will probably suggest the student has earned an A or a Proficient in a standards grading system. When you tell them the individual would actually not earn credit for omitting citations or a Works Cited page, they will begin to realize the implications for inattention.

Teach students to avoid plagiarism and create a culture of responsible source citing before research units #highschoolela #plagiarism

4. GIVE FEEDBACK ON THE SPOT.

Avoiding plagiarism is hard work. Give feedback constantly in different formats. While students are in the midst of writing an essay, constantly circulate the room, look over shoulders, conference with them, or stalk their documents on Google Drive. While it’s time-consuming in the moment, this diligence saves time in the long run by reducing the number of plagiarism instances you have to address on the final draft and parents or administrators you need to contact. Get your hover game on point.

5. BE PROACTIVE.

Require your students to complete their Works Cited page during pre-writing and drafting as they find each source so they don’t forget where they found it. Keep the tab open like a brain dump! It’s easier to delete a source students didn’t cite than to later try to find one they forgot to record. This will also help them to see continuity between Works Cited entries and internal citations.

6. HOLD STUDENTS ACCOUNTABLE.

Ask students to be responsible for correcting their own citation errors through revision activities. Before collecting a rough or final draft of an essay that you plan to grade, allow students to complete   stoplight  plagiarism stations . If we teach students about plagiarism and provide ample practice opportunities and reminders throughout the unit, we can fully expect them to demonstrate mastery at the end of the essay. Station activities put students in the driver’s seat. If they care, they will ask questions, revise, and edit their work so that it is better as a result of the activities.

These tips will help with any student…but struggling writers? They need more.

plagiarism presentation for high school

PLAGIARISM AND STRUGGLING WRITERS: 4 MORE TIPS

Avoiding plagiarism feels different for some of my students. Struggling writers do not need any additional stress added to their plates. When teaching them how to incorporate research into an essay, their brains are on overload. It’s all they can do to process how they should be writing a coherent sentence. Asking them to analyze that research and also cite it correctly is a huge obstacle. Here are some tips for helping scaffold research writing for struggling students:

1. BE SPECIFIC.

When teaching struggling writers about avoiding plagiarism,   b e specific about how much research students should include . I tell my freshmen they need three citations per paragraph. Two should be paraphrased facts, and one should be a direct quote. These particular guidelines might seem rigid, but anxious writers appreciate the structure, and eliminating the guessing game puts them at ease.

2. GIVE FREQUENT FEEDBACK.

As students develop the shell of their essays,  require them to seek feedback on individual sections of their prewriting   in the form of an outline or a graphic organizer. This takes time, but it’s less frustrating for students to get feedback on their topic sentence promptly than it is for them to write out the ideas for an entire paragraph – which might take them an hour – only to find out they need to change most of it. Start with the thesis. Next, tackle the topic sentence and three main points from research for the first body paragraph. Before students move on to the next step, they need to confirm their ideas are cohesive and that the research is cited properly.

3. CONFERENCE IMMEDIATELY.  

We live in a primarily digital world, but if possible, ask students to print out their sources. Printing sources allows students to slow down and process what they are taking and including in their essay. It’s just so easy to copy and past from one tab to another.

If printing isn’t possible, at least make sure students can open the sources up while you talk. While their writing thought process is still fresh in their minds, guide them through important revisions. Many struggling writers forget in-text citations, omit signal phrases for attribution, and leave out punctuation for direct quotes. Some of them use the synonym replacement approach to paraphrasing. Conferencing with students as frequently as possible allows you to intervene before students write an entire essay in this manner, further reinforcing their lack of understanding.

4. PROVIDE CLASS WORK TIME.

Don’t expect students to write the essay at home.  I only ask my struggling writers to write during our class period. They need help, and asking them to work independently is too frustrating for them. Giving them class time provides a safe and productive environment in which I can spend time working with each student.

Ultimately, it’s important to remember that students are learning. If a student doesn’t use class time wisely, procrastinates on writing the rough and final draft, or doesn’t ask me any questions or take my feedback throughout the writing process, that’s lack of effort. In those instances, the student earns a failing or incomplete grade, especially if parents have been contacted and support has been provided throughout the process. Yet, most students will make concerted efforts to cite their sources correctly after they realize the magnitude of the issue. In our twenty-first century society where intellectual theft and piracy have become the norm, convincing students that plagiarism is unethical is the first step toward solving the problem. 

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Plagiarism lesson for middle and high school ELA #PlagiarismLesson #MiddleSchoolELA #HighSchoolELA

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Plagiarism Lesson Plan: Digital Literacy

*Click to open and customize your own copy of the Plagiarism Lesson Plan .

This lesson accompanies the BrainPOP topic Plagiarism , and supports the standard of integrating information from various sources while avoiding plagiarism. Students demonstrate understanding through a variety of projects.

Step 1: ACTIVATE PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

Ask students:

  • Why might someone be tempted to plagiarize someone else’s work? 
  • Why shouldn’t you plagiarize?  

Step 2: BUILD KNOWLEDGE

  • Read the description on the Plagiarism topic page .
  • Play the Movie , pausing to check for understanding.
  • Assign Related Reading . Have students read one of the following articles: “Real Life” or “Did You Know?” Partner them with someone who read a different article to share what they learned with each other.

Step 3: APPLY and ASSESS

Assign the Plagiarism Quiz , prompting students to apply essential literacy skills while demonstrating what they learned about this topic.  

Step 4: DEEPEN and EXTEND Students synthesize their ideas and express them through one or more of the following creative projects. They can work individually or collaborate.  

  • Make-a-Movie : Create a tutorial that explains how to check your work for plagiarism. 
  • Make-a-Map : Make a concept map that identifies different ways to use a quote from an article in a research paper. 
  • Creative Coding : Code a meme about the perils of plagiarism. 
  • Primary Source Activity : Examine images and read a letter, then cite details to answer the accompanying questions.

More to Explore

Related BrainPOP Topics : Deepen understanding of digital literacy with these topics: Citing Sources , Copyright , and Research . 

Teacher Support Resources:

  • Pause Point Overview : Video tutorial showing how Pause Points actively engage students to stop, think, and express ideas.  
  • Learning Activities Modifications : Strategies to meet ELL and other instructional and student needs.
  • Learning Activities Support : Resources for best practices using BrainPOP.

Lesson Plan Common Core State Standards Alignments

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Addressing Plagiarism in Student Presentations

Summer Dittmer

Summer Dittmer Student Activities Coordinator, Mercy High School, Burlingame, CA

Jason Chu

Jason Chu Contributing Editor

With so much emphasis being placed on student projects and the use of presentations to showcase that work–particularly when that work is multi-media based–how are teachers addressing the inappropriate use of original content or source material? What are some best practices for using student presentation assignments to help build their media and digital literacy skills?

In this webcast, we share strategies for working to enhance student understanding of proper citation and attribution when using media in presentations and projects.

Summer Dittmer has taught high school Drama, Online Expository Writing, English and Honors English for 13 years. She teaches 12th grade Literature and is the Student Activities Coordinator at Mercy High School in Burlingame, CA. She has trained teachers in developing online curriculum, along with assisting in implementing effective one-to-one iPad programs. Summer also creates professional development webinars for Turnitin, emphasizing how instructors can effectively integrate technology into their curriculum.

Jason Chu is Education Director for Turnitin. His focus is on working to build resources for educators, and his personal passion is to find better ways to enhance student achievement. He will be moderating this webcast.

Related Resources

Assessing art & design and visual projects.

How to use Turnitin to evaluate visual student work and how to leave effective feedback on it.

Methods for Successful Plagiarism Discussions

How to introduce plagiarism at the beginning of an undergraduate course so incoming freshmen understand it.

How Instructors Respond to Plagiarism

Survey results on how instructors respond to plagiarism when they encounter it.

Plagiarism PowerPoint

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Description

I used this PowerPoint presentation to teach my middle- and high-school students about plagiarism. This presentation covers the legal consequences of plagiarizing, how to use sources correctly, and how to tell if you are plagiarizing.

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30-minute Webcast

Teaching High School Students How To Avoid Plagiarism

November 2, 2015 in  Pedagogy

Teaching High School Students How To Avoid Plagiarism

My very first year of teaching high school, I asked my sophomore students to write a 1,000 word paper. It’s been so long ago, I don’t remember the topic. What I do remember is that I caught three students plagiarizing.

I also remember being perplexed by this discovery, because we had just that week taken notes on what copyright and plagiarism is, and had completed several exercises on identifying and avoiding taking other people’s words and ideas and claiming them as our own.

Last year, I wrote a lengthy article detailing “ What is plagiarism, And Why Does It Matter? ” and used it to help my students define the word and learn how to avoid mistakes.

This year, I am working again to head students off at the pass. Not only are we going to take a different route to learning about plagiarism, I’m also looking to find instances of it in their first rough drafts, and showing them how to fix their mistakes before the final draft gets handed in.

Today, is the day we’ll formally learn about plagiarism, beginning with the following videos, which were recommended by Larry Ferlazzo . While his site is specifically geared towards ESL students, I’ve found his resources beneficial to all students.

Instead of me lecturing in front of a boring Powerpoint and the students writing notes — or not — I recommend the following activities.

First, I begin the day with a bellringer prompt: What is plagiarism?

Students must write a paragraph in response to the prompt, and they can use the dictionary to help them understand the word if they’ve never heard of it before.

The first video, from Easy Bib, defines plagiarism and gives tips on how to quote directly or paraphrase information.

https://youtu.be/k3Lwlfy5FHM

(You can watch Plagiarism by Easy Bib on View Pure to avoid advertising.)

The following video from Imagine Easy Solutions gives step-by-step instructions on how to avoid plagiarism:

Paraphrasing from Imagine Easy Solutions on Vimeo .

After watching the videos above, read  Skills and Strategies | Understanding Plagiarism in a Digital Age from The Learning Network by The New York Times. This article not only shows students why plagiarism and copyright concerns are still relevant today — especially to their musical idols — but also gives more video options, and includes an activity at the end.

If you have time, use this article recommend by The New York Times to show how Sen. John Walsh, D-Montana, plagiarized his Master’s Degree thesis . Read “ Plagiarism Costs Degree For Senator John Walsh ” to learn what can happen to those who steal others ideas and words, even for those with money and power.

The following activities can help you and your students learn more about and practice avoiding plagiarism.

  • Write Check Plagiarism Quiz can help your students show their understanding of what plagiarism is and how to avoid it.
  • Recognizing and Avoiding Plagiarism by Cornell University
  • Avoiding Plagiarism Exercises by Cardiff University
  • Plagiarism Review quiz on Kahoot!

Possible plagiarism assignments

The key to an easy and authentic plagiarism assignment is to tap into a recent lesson and/or writing assignment. Here is what I’m asking my students to do today:

  • Write an opinion about the opening of a short story we have read recently. Do not quote or paraphrase, but state your own opinion.
  • Paraphrase and cite the paragraph describing the main character.
  • Quote 2 sentences describing the setting.

Related topics: Plagiarism , Teaching Writing

Author Image

About the author 

Michelle Boyd Waters, M.Ed.

I am a secondary English Language Arts teacher, a University of Oklahoma student working on my doctorate in Instructional Leadership and Academic Curriculum with an concentration in English Education and co-Editor of the Oklahoma English Journal. I am constantly seeking ways to amplify students' voices and choices.

Dear Mrs. Waters, May I use ideas from your page? This looks interesting.

Thank you so much for sharing your educational knowledge and experience. I based our homeschool plagiarism unit study on the information and resources you provided. You not only addressed the long-established perspectives on plagiarism, but also brought into question what “plagiarism” means to the current technologically- and ethically-complex generation. My deepest appreciation…

Comments are closed.

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Safe Practices: An Exercise

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Read over each of the following passages, and respond on your own or as a class as to whether or not each passage uses citations accurately. If it doesn't, what would you do to improve the passage so it's properly cited?

1. Last summer, my family and I traveled to Chicago, which was quite different from the rural area I grew up in. We saw the dinosaur Sue at the Field Museum and ate pizza at Gino's East.

2. Americans want to create a more perfect union; they also want to establish justice, ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty for everybody.

3. I find it ridiculous that 57% of high school students think their teachers assign too much homework.

Passages 4, 5, and 6 all refer to the following passage from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from the Birmingham Jail":

You deplore the demonstrations taking place in Birmingham. But your statement, I am sorry to say, fails to express a similar concern for the conditions that brought about the demonstrations. I am sure that none of you would want to rest content with the superficial kind of social analysis that deals merely with effects and does not grapple with underlying causes. It is unfortunate that demonstrations are taking place in Birmingham, but it is even more unfortunate that the city's white power structure left the Negro community with no alternative.

4. Dr. King was certain that nobody would want to be contented with a feigning type of social analysis that concerns itself only with effects and doesn't deal with root causes.

5. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote that the city of Birmingham's "white power structure" left African-Americans there with "no alternative" but to demonstrate ("Letter from the Birmingham Jail" para. 5).

6. In "Letter from the Birmingham Jail," King writes to fellow clergy saying that although they "deplore the demonstrations taking place in Birmingham, your statement fails to express a similar concern for the conditions that brought about the demonstrations."

7. My friend Kara told me that she loves living so close to the ocean.

8. Americans are guaranteed the right to freely gather for peaceful meetings.

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Plagiarism Differences in High School and College Students

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A report released today by the plagiarism-detection tool TurnItIn confirms what a lot of teachers already know: that students are copying content from online sources. According to the report, for both high school and college students, Wikipedia and Yahoo Answers were the top two most popular sources of lifted copy.

But another interesting fact emerged from the report about the difference between high school and college students. While 31% of content matches for high school students came from social and "content-sharing" sites (like Facebook or Yahoo Answers), just 26% of the matches for college students originated there.

College students were more likely to use content from cheat sites and paper mills, the report finds: 19.6% of content matches in college students' papers came from those sites, whereas just 14.1% of matches to high school students' papers. College students were also more likely to turn to news sites -- 16.6% versus 12.3% of college students. And even though Wikipedia was the most popular source for copied content, encyclopedias in general constituted roughly 11-12% of content for both populations.

The data from this report comes from TurnItIn's own business: some 128 million content matches from 33 million student papers (24 million from higher education and nine million from high school) over a one-year period. That is, when students' papers were submitted to TurnItIn, its system found passages from those papers matched content available on the open Web.

The report doesn't indicate whether or not students cited these sources (it's likely that many did). And TurnItIn doesn't always catch plagiarized material from behind paywalls -- sites that require subscriptions, for example, like many academic journals may not be included in what TurnItIn indexes.

TurnItIn's report backs up a recent Pew Research Center survey, which showed that more than half of college presidents said that they believe plagiarism has increased among their students over the course of the last decade. None of this is surprising, of course. The "copy-and-paste" functionality  and the massive amount of online material available makes it a lot easier to take whole sections of a Web site and plop it into one's assignment. As long as the source is cited, of course, it's not necessarily considered plagiarism.

To help combat plagiarism, TurnItIn makes a number of suggestions for educators: make your assignments plagiarism-proof, the company suggests. Help students better understand citations. And -- of course -- the company recommends schools use a service like TurnItIn.

Recently we looked at some of the factors that may be behind our " culture of academic dishonesty ." Is it simply that students are taking advantage of easier copy-and-paste technology and online resources, or are there other issues at play? For example, what are the pressures on college students that make them far more likely to turn to cheating sites than high school students? What are the reasons why high schoolers turn more to social sites? How can we take advantage of their interest in working with their peers while helping them learn not to simply copy from them?

How can we address these factors, while creating better assignments -- ones that reward creative thinking -- and offering better instruction about citation?

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PLAGIARISM - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

plagiarism presentation for high school

PLAGIARISM What it is & how to avoid it Simply put, plagiarism is cheating. It is using someone else s work without giving them credit. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

  • how to avoid it
  • Not enough time to do the work
  • Pressure to get good grades, to get into college, to please parents teachers
  • Illusion that they wont get caught
  • And sometimes, plagiarism is unintentional
  • Plagiarism is generally considered a problem seen at the high school and college level.
  • Schools often develop Honor Codes or Academic Honesty Policies that spell out the consequences of plagiarism.
  • Consequences vary from school to school, but some include
  • Zero on the plagiarized paper
  • Failing the course
  • Suspension for the semester
  • Expulsion from the school
  • Copying or sharing another students work (homework, paper, exam or in class work)
  • Cutting pasting from the internet (with no sources cited)
  • Failure to produce works cited list for sources (including images, media or sounds)
  • Submitting another students assignment/work as your own
  • Purchasing term papers
  • Using another persons ideas without citing them as a source
  • Using online translators to complete foreign language work/homework
  • Altering student records
  • Taking exam materials from teachers desks
  • While we often think of plagiarism occurring in schools, there are cases of plagiarism in the real world as well
  • Plagiarism Controversy Doris Kearns Goodwin And The Credibility Gap by Mark Lewis
  • Well known historian acknowledged multiple instances of plagiarism in one of her books about the Kennedys
  • The Plagiarist Why Stephen Ambrose is a vampire.
  • Chronicles the number of times the popular historian plagiarized from other sources for his books
  • Cite sources
  • If you copy anything directly from a source, put it in quotation marks.
  • Example Your detention will take place at eleven oclock tonight. Meet Mr. Filch in the entrance hall. (Rowling 247)
  • Read and reread the information until you fully understand it.
  • Put the source away and write your own understanding of the information.
  • Compare your version with the original.
  • If you use any unique phrase or word from the original, put it in quotation marks.
  • Be sure to write your source on a note card so you can give credit to the source.
  • (Paraphrase Write it in Your Own Words)
  • When you use a direct quote
  • When you paraphrase information from a source! Even if you have written a passage of text in your own words, you still must acknowledge the source of those ideas.
  • When in doubt cite!!!
  • Words and information are not the only things which must be cited from the Internet
  • You always must cite the source of graphics, sounds recordings or any other media that you use in your paper or presentation.

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Premier says sex education group will be banned from giving school presentations

Organization disputes suggestion that material delivered was outside curriculum.

plagiarism presentation for high school

Social Sharing

Premier Blaine Higgs says he will ban a Quebec-based sex education group from presenting at schools in New Brunswick after a presentation he believes was "clearly inappropriate." 

The premier took to X, formerly Twitter, to express his displeasure with a presentation given at several New Brunswick high schools. 

"To say I am furious would be a gross understatement," he said. "This presentation was not part of the New Brunswick curriculum and the content was not flagged for parents in advance.

"The fact that this was shared shows either improper vetting was done, the group misrepresented the content they would share ... or both."

Higgs said the Department of Education told his office the presentation was supposed to be about the sexually transmitted infection human papillomavirus – but it went beyond that. 

A pink and purple presentation slide with four text bubbles.

He shared and criticized a presentation slide that includes questions like "do girls masturbate" and "is it good or bad to do anal?"

Teresa Norris, who delivered the presentation to several New Brunswick schools last week, denied that schools were misled about what the presentation would cover. 

The president and founder of the charity HPV Global Action, which also operates a youth sexual education resource called Thirsty for the Talk, said she was surprised and disappointed at Higgs's reaction.

She said the slide Higgs shared was the presentation's cover slide. She said it reflects actual questions her group receives from students. 

"That excerpt that was taken is an extraction of something that's very grossly misrepresenting what this presentation is about," Norris said.

A presentation slide that reads "4 out of 5 have had HPV at some point in their life," with cartoon people shaded in red and green.

"All of the topics that we cover are supporting the learning areas. This is something that your province has decided ... We're not creating something that the province hasn't already put in place."

Norris said she has been giving presentations at New Brunswick schools for several years. All schools receive an outline of the topics to be covered and the school must give its consent prior to the presentation, she said.

The presentation is called Healthy Relationships 101. Norris said it is an "A to Z" about relationships and sexuality.

"We are not promoting any of these sexual behaviours ... we talk about abstinence in the presentation, we empower students to help them make decisions about their relationships," she said.

A presentation slide about healthy relationships.

"We teach them to understand when they are not comfortable, or that they don't feel ready, and to pay attention so that they have those boundaries. Our goal is always to destigmatize conversations about sexual health." 

Objectives in the province's high school sex education curriculum include having students define sexuality, discuss safe sex practices that include abstinence, masturbation, condom use and birth control options, and how to handle sexual feelings and sexual pressure.

Andrea Anderson-Mason, MLA for Fundy-the Isles-Saint John West, said she has heard about the presentation from teachers and constituents with family members who attend Fundy Middle-High School.

The Anglophone South School District has not responded to a request for comment.

Anderson-Mason said she has a daughter in Grade 12 at the school, but the presentation was only delivered to Grade 9 to Grade 11 students.

The MLA said reaction has been mixed and she is hoping to see a balanced conversation on the issue.

A person speaking to reporters.

"When I was in high school, I had a male teacher teach me about breast self-examination, and at 47 years old I am still grateful for that information and use it," she said. "There is a time and a place and an appropriateness to talk about our bodies."

For Norris, the ultimate goal is to help students stay informed and avoid getting into relationship situations they are not ready for.

Despite Higgs's statement, she has not been given any formal message from the province banning the presentation. 

Requests to the premier's office for comment have not been answered.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

plagiarism presentation for high school

Savannah Awde is a reporter with CBC New Brunswick. You can contact her with story ideas at [email protected].

Related Stories

  • Premier defends banning sex ed group despite not seeing presentation
  • N.B. schools told not to book sex education group, minister says
  • Mother 'disgusted' by Winnipeg school's handling of sexually explicit email to 9-year-old daughter
  • Education minister says francophone schools are following Policy 713
  • High school students in Moncton say cellphone restrictions help concentration in class

Boyertown Area School District cancels last 2 days of classes due to network server issues

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PENNSYLVANIA (WPVI) -- A school district in Berks and Montgomery counties announced that its last two days of school will be canceled this week.

Officials with the Boyertown Area School District say due to a network server issue impacting the heating and cooling systems, as well as the phone and intercom systems, the district will be closed on Thursday and Friday.

Those last two days bring the school year to an end.

"This action is not taken lightly and is done out of an abundance of caution for the health and safety of our students and staff," the district's statement wrote in part.

All district buildings will be closed on both days, the statement added.

To help resolve the server issues, district officials are asking all students to log out of any district devices they have at home and perform a hard shutdown on the device.

Devices are asked to be kept off and unused until further notice.

Graduation is set to be held as planned, on Thursday at 6 p.m. at Santander Arena. Students and families attending should follow the schedules provided by Boyertown Area Senior High (BASH), officials say.

The Graduation Walks planned for Thursday morning at the elementary and middle school buildings are canceled, however.

World Language finals and eighth-grade project presentations have also been canceled, officials say.

Berks Career & Technology Center (BCTC) students are set to be transported to and from BASH at their normal times, according to the district, but they will need to provide their own transportation to BASH.

Report cards for all grades will also be delayed until further notice.

Lastly, the district stated that it will make arrangements for students to collect any remaining items from the schools in the coming days. Residents are asked not to visit the buildings until they've been notified of district plans.

"This is not the way any of us planned to end the school year, and we offer our sincerest apologies for the last-minute changes," the statement said in part. "We look forward to celebrating the Class of 2024 as planned, and we wish all of you the best of summers!"

Related Topics

  • BERKS COUNTY
  • MONTGOMERY COUNTY
  • PENNSYLVANIA
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COMMENTS

  1. Plagiarism

    This lesson presentation facilitates a discussion between students and educators about what plagiarism is, the many different types of plagiarism, and ways that students can actively work to avoid it in their work. Pair this lesson presentation with the Plagiarism lesson guided notes to actively engage students in the content of this lesson ...

  2. Exploring Plagiarism, Copyright, and Paraphrasing

    Share examples from the Identifying Plagiarism PowerPoint Presentation or Identifying Plagiarism Sheet, and ask students to determine whether the passages are plagiarized. Add examples from class texts to expand this practice at identifying plagiarism. ... DeSena offers a practical guide on how high school and college teachers can structure ...

  3. Plagiarism Slide Show Lesson

    an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the representation of that author's work as one's own, as by not crediting the original author: It is said that he plagiarized Thoreau's plagiarism of a line written by Montaigne. Synonyms: appropriation, infringement, piracy ...

  4. Plagiarism Resources for Educators

    Plagiarism articles and guides. The Scribbr Knowledge Base is an open-source collection of free resources to help students succeed in academic research, writing, and citation skills. We regularly publish helpful content to make challenging topics more accessible to students. The following resources can help students cite with confidence and avoid plagiarism.

  5. An Innovative Way to Deal With Plagiarism in High School

    An Innovative Way to Deal With Plagiarism. Creating a short blended learning course is a good way to help students learn how to quote and paraphrase sources and use proper citations. As a high school English teacher, I have to spend a significant amount of time teaching my students about academic integrity and how to avoid plagiarism.

  6. How to Teach Plagiarism in High School

    Students must understand that even if accidental, these cases carry all the same consequences as intentional plagiarism. The most important skills to teach for avoiding accidental plagiarism are proper quoting, summarizing, and paraphrasing with parenthetical or in text citations. A common misconception is that it's not necessary to cite if ...

  7. Avoiding Plagiarism: Teaching Tips and Lesson Plans

    Here are some tips for helping scaffold research writing for struggling students: 1. BE SPECIFIC. When teaching struggling writers about avoiding plagiarism, be specific about how much research students should include. I tell my freshmen they need three citations per paragraph.

  8. What Is Plagiarism

    This presentation defines the term plagiarism. It shows the different ways a person could commit plagiarism and provides advice on how to avoid it. ... This slide show created by Joyce Valenza Media Specialist Springfield Township High School Modified by C. Tomlinson 4-2-05 WITCC Adjunct ;

  9. Plagiarism Lesson Plan: Digital Literacy

    Step 3: APPLY and ASSESS. Assign the Plagiarism Quiz, prompting students to apply essential literacy skills while demonstrating what they learned about this topic. Step 4: DEEPEN and EXTEND. Students synthesize their ideas and express them through one or more of the following creative projects. They can work individually or collaborate.

  10. Addressing Plagiarism in Student Presentations

    In this webcast, we share strategies for working to enhance student understanding of proper citation and attribution when using media in presentations and projects. Presenters. Summer Dittmer has taught high school Drama, Online Expository Writing, English and Honors English for 13 years. She teaches 12th grade Literature and is the Student ...

  11. Plagiarism PowerPoint by Natasha Williams

    I used this PowerPoint presentation to teach my middle- and high-school students about plagiarism. This presentation covers the legal consequences of plagiarizing, how to use sources correctly, and how to tell if you are plagiarizing.

  12. PDF Plagiarism …and how to avoid it

    Plagiarism can happen when your citation (or lack of it) Tells your reader one thing, but you meant something else. Example: you paraphrase an author's words but you do not cite the author. You just told your reader that it is YOUR idea. But in reality, it is the AUTHOR's idea. Maybe you forgot or misunderstood the convention, but still ...

  13. Getting to the (Power)Point: Addressing Plagiarism in Student Presentations

    Summer Dittmer has taught high school Drama, Online Expository Writing, English and Honors English for 13 years. She teaches 12th grade Literature and is the Student Activities Coordinator at Mercy High School in Burlingame, CA. She has trained teachers in developing online curriculum, along with assisting in implementing effective one-to-one ...

  14. Teaching High School Students How To Avoid Plagiarism

    Possible plagiarism assignments. The key to an easy and authentic plagiarism assignment is to tap into a recent lesson and/or writing assignment. Here is what I'm asking my students to do today: Write an opinion about the opening of a short story we have read recently. Do not quote or paraphrase, but state your own opinion.

  15. PPT Plagiarism

    Plagiarism is theft of intellectual property. Plagiarism is cheating. Plagiarism may result in receiving a failing grade or zero for the assignment. Plagiarism could result in a disciplinary referral. Students caught plagiarizing may be denied admittance to or removal from the National Honor Society.

  16. What Is Plagiarism? (for Kids)

    Plagiarism is when you use someone else's words or ideas and pass them off as your own. It's not allowed in school, college, or beyond, so it's a good idea to learn the proper way to use resources, such as websites, books, and magazines. Plagiarism is a form of cheating, but it's a little complicated so a kid might do it without understanding ...

  17. Consequences of Mild, Moderate & Severe Plagiarism

    Failing grade on course. Severe. Patchwork of different texts passed off as original. Paper written by someone else. Academic probation or expulsion. Plagiarism can also have serious consequences in high school and during the college application process.

  18. Plagiarism Exercise

    2. Americans want to create a more perfect union; they also want to establish justice, ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty for everybody. 3. I find it ridiculous that 57% of high school students think their teachers assign too much homework.

  19. The 5 Types of Plagiarism

    Table of contents. Global plagiarism: Plagiarizing an entire text. Verbatim plagiarism: Copying words directly. Paraphrasing plagiarism: Rephrasing ideas. Patchwork plagiarism: Stitching together sources. Self-plagiarism: Plagiarizing your own work. Frequently asked questions about plagiarism.

  20. Plagiarism ppt

    Education. 1 of 23. Download now. Download to read offline. Plagiarism ppt - Download as a PDF or view online for free.

  21. Plagiarism Differences in High School and College Students

    College students were more likely to use content from cheat sites and paper mills, the report finds: 19.6% of content matches in college students' papers came from those sites, whereas just 14.1% of matches to high school students' papers. College students were also more likely to turn to news sites -- 16.6% versus 12.3% of college students.

  22. PPT

    4. Academic Plagiarism. Plagiarism is generally considered a problem seen. at the high school and college level. Schools often develop Honor Codes or Academic. Honesty Policies that spell out the consequences. of plagiarism. 5. Academic Consequences.

  23. The Research Repository @ WVU

    Learn how to avoid plagiarism and cite sources properly in your academic papers from this WVU dissertation on copying and pasting stuff from the internet.

  24. Premier says sex education group will be banned from giving school

    Anderson-Mason said she has a daughter in Grade 12 at the school, but the presentation was only delivered to Grade 9 to Grade 11 students. ... "When I was in high school, I had a male teacher ...

  25. Boyertown Area School District cancels last 2 days of classes due to

    A school district in Berks and Montgomery counties announced that its last two days of school will be canceled this week. Graduation is set to be held as planned, on Thursday at 6 p.m. at ...