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Anthony’s research question is “What environmental policies have been adopted to protect southern blue whales near the coast of Antarctica?” He is having trouble finding sources that answer this exact question. How should he revise his research question?

He should make his research question more complex.

He should make his research question more concise.

He should broaden his research question.

He should narrow his research question to focus his topic.

Which research question would lead to the most information about methods public schools can use to strengthen literacy at all grade levels?

What can school districts do to support teachers in improving their own literacy skills?

What are the most effective tests to assess the literacy levels of graduating students?

How do literacy programs in other countries compare to those in the United States?

Which literacy improvement techniques have proven most effective with students?

Bella’s research question is “What habitats do blue whales thrive in, and which locations are not ideal for the various behaviors they tend to exhibit?” She is having trouble writing a short presentation about what she has found. How should she revise her research question?

She should make her research question more complex.

She should make her research question more concise.

She should broaden her research question.

She should narrow her research question to focus her topic.

Jack has set out to research the question “Why are blue whales important?” He is having trouble going through the dozens of different books he found on this subject at the library. How should he revise his research question?

Colette’s research question is “Do blue whales live in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence?” She is having trouble putting together a long enough presentation on her findings. How should she revise her research question?

Anna has just read a text about New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern and is conducting a research project based on the text. Which research question would be most effective for her topic?

How did Jacinda Ardern come to be the prime minister of New Zealand?

What are politics like in New Zealand?

At what age was Jacinda Ardern first elected to public office in New Zealand?

Is Jacinda Ardern originally from New Zealand?

Which of the topics listed would you most likely be able to research using the library or Internet? ( Select all that apply )

The American Revolution

Your best friend's favorite childhood memory

The number of shoes you own

The process of photosynthesis

Audrey is researching chameleon habitats. Her current research question is “Where do chameleons live?” but she is having trouble.

Audrey's research question is ____________

The most effective revision would be...

"What species of insects do panther chameleons typically eat in the rainforest?"

"What kinds of chameleons are there?"

"What height of trees are best for veiled chameleons to line in?"

"What conditions are typically needed for chameleons to thrive?"

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  • 10 Research Question Examples to Guide Your Research Project

10 Research Question Examples to Guide your Research Project

Published on October 30, 2022 by Shona McCombes . Revised on October 19, 2023.

The research question is one of the most important parts of your research paper , thesis or dissertation . It’s important to spend some time assessing and refining your question before you get started.

The exact form of your question will depend on a few things, such as the length of your project, the type of research you’re conducting, the topic , and the research problem . However, all research questions should be focused, specific, and relevant to a timely social or scholarly issue.

Once you’ve read our guide on how to write a research question , you can use these examples to craft your own.

Research question Explanation
The first question is not enough. The second question is more , using .
Starting with “why” often means that your question is not enough: there are too many possible answers. By targeting just one aspect of the problem, the second question offers a clear path for research.
The first question is too broad and subjective: there’s no clear criteria for what counts as “better.” The second question is much more . It uses clearly defined terms and narrows its focus to a specific population.
It is generally not for academic research to answer broad normative questions. The second question is more specific, aiming to gain an understanding of possible solutions in order to make informed recommendations.
The first question is too simple: it can be answered with a simple yes or no. The second question is , requiring in-depth investigation and the development of an original argument.
The first question is too broad and not very . The second question identifies an underexplored aspect of the topic that requires investigation of various  to answer.
The first question is not enough: it tries to address two different (the quality of sexual health services and LGBT support services). Even though the two issues are related, it’s not clear how the research will bring them together. The second integrates the two problems into one focused, specific question.
The first question is too simple, asking for a straightforward fact that can be easily found online. The second is a more question that requires and detailed discussion to answer.
? dealt with the theme of racism through casting, staging, and allusion to contemporary events? The first question is not  — it would be very difficult to contribute anything new. The second question takes a specific angle to make an original argument, and has more relevance to current social concerns and debates.
The first question asks for a ready-made solution, and is not . The second question is a clearer comparative question, but note that it may not be practically . For a smaller research project or thesis, it could be narrowed down further to focus on the effectiveness of drunk driving laws in just one or two countries.

Note that the design of your research question can depend on what method you are pursuing. Here are a few options for qualitative, quantitative, and statistical research questions.

Type of research Example question
Qualitative research question
Quantitative research question
Statistical research question

Other interesting articles

If you want to know more about the research process , methodology , research bias , or statistics , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

Methodology

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Research bias

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planning and presenting research projects mastery test has 5 questions

Researching and Presenting

This pathways project isn’t a drab homework assignment. have fun with it..

By Kate McClare, DTM

“Toastmasters

Giving an entertaining or inspirational speech that reaches the audience on an emotional level is one of the pleasures of Toastmasters. So where does that leave the research presentation?

A necessary but mundane assignment? Something to endure so you can get to one of those fun storytelling electives? Think again.

“Research” doesn’t have to mean dry science experiments or political analysis. Your research could focus on all sorts of topics: health issues, model trains, the funniest jokes ever told. As with any other speech, your aim is to engage your audience.

“Researching and Presenting” is currently a Level 1 project in each of the 11 paths in the Toastmasters Pathways learning experience . The project is being updated and repurposed as a Level 3 elective. That elective will launch sometime within the next few months, available only in paths selected after the launch. As you advance in your career, you may be called on to give work presentations on complex subjects. When that happens, you won’t want to turn your presentation time into nap time for your boss and coworkers.

Giving such a speech in your Toastmasters club will help—it’s like a practice run, says Pierre Andriani, a member of the Heart of England Club in Solihull, England. The Pathways project stretches your skills and awareness, he notes. “You are specifically asked to research a topic you are not familiar with. Therefore, you are placed outside of your comfort zone on purpose. By design, you will learn something new, and this is where personal growth thrives.”

What Makes a Good One?

As long as you’re gathering facts and the opinions of expert sources, it’s a legitimate research presentation. You may have to work a little harder and get a little more creative to make factual content sound intriguing, but it can be done.

Toastmaster Cate Arnold shares her experience with the Presentation Mastery path, and how she learned to incorporate storytelling at work and turning complicated topics into memorable ones.

For Eddie Landron, a member of Out-of-the-Box Toastmasters in Miami, Florida, it’s a matter of “breaking down the subject matter so it can be easy to understand. Making it relatable to everyday life lets your audience absorb the information.”

Like any other presentation, a research project’s main goal should be: to inform and engage the audience.

Andriani agrees. “It must be clear, relevant, and accessible. Even if it was a topic people might not have been interested in at first, you want them to leave thinking, I did not know that. Glad I heard that speech .”

In other words, just like any other presentation. Here are some ways to keep things lively and still informative.

Get Personal

For a presentation on income tax, Landron says, “I opened up with a true story about my first job, and I answered questions that I asked myself.” Then, he reviewed the history of the U.S. income tax system, starting with its creation by President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War.

The personal touch also worked well for Andriani when he presented a research paper to his peers. “I referenced examples from the people attending,” he recalls. “I also mentioned the previous speeches given that day. Finally, I acknowledged the people in the audience who helped me. It worked out well.”

Keep It Focused

The Pathways project calls for a 5- to 7-minute speech. You can’t cover everything about your subject in such a short time, and even if you could, you’d probably lose your audience. If you’re giving a presentation on tourist sites in a particular city, try narrowing it down to the top three places to visit, or getting even more specific, with the top three historic sites or family activities.

Make It Engaging

For some, “research presentation” suggests the need to use presentation software like PowerPoint . But tread carefully.

“I stay away from slides when possible,” Landron says. “I enjoy doing speeches live and with humor.” When he explained how a battery worked, he didn’t use a PowerPoint slide but gave a live demonstration in which he made a battery with two nails and a lemon.

Keep It Real

Using appropriate sources is an essential element of research presentations. You can present your own opinions, but you must show the facts they are based on. Furthermore, they must come from reputable, generally accepted sources. As the Pathways assignment points out, a scientific study in a recognized journal is acceptable, but a comment from a personal blog is not.

The Bottom Line

Like any other presentation, a research project’s main goal should be: to inform and engage the audience. Every point you make should serve that purpose.

“Remember,” Andriani says, “people are in the audience because they really are interested in what you have to say. Make sure you give them your best.”

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Highlights From the Pathways Project

  • Purpose: To learn or review basic research methods and present a well-organized, well-researched speech (5-7 minutes) on any topic.
  • Choosing a topic: Be sure it’s narrow enough to fit the speech time. If you are knowledgeable about the subject, present an aspect that interests you most.
  • Start with what you know: List these areas; determine what to research by generating questions you want to be answered.
  • Find reliable sources: They should be authorities on the subject and recognized by others in their field. Give proper credit for both statements and images.
  • Use structure appropriate to the subject: A scientific paper might need a chronological structure. A speech about a geographic area could use a spatial approach, taking each region one by one. You might use the problem/solution format when discussing a local social issue.

Presentation Pointers

Top Tips for Research Presentations

Eddie Landron, Out-of-the-Box Toastmasters in Miami, Florida

  • Think about what question you might ask if you were in the audience.
  • Be animated with your gestures. People will remember your body language even more than your words.

Pierre Andriani, Heart of England Club in Solihull, England

  • Use self-deprecation to get the audience on your side and help them relate to you. For example, “I had this problem, and my solution was terrible. Don’t you hate it when you have this problem?” Then you tell them, “Here’s how I found a solution.” Now they are rooting for you on a subliminal level.
  • Be willing to share your research. The goal is to get more people interested in that field, not to hog the data.

The Right Way to Use PowerPoint

Pierre Andriani

  • Never, ever read entire paragraphs from the slides. Instead, think of slides as cue cards. They just guide you through your presentation.
  • Make your points appear only when you are ready to discuss each of them. Start with a blank slide. Click and Point 1 appears; click and Point 2 appears; and so on. That way, you are in control. The audience cannot see or read ahead of where you want them to be.
  • Bring in your points with a slow fade instead of an abrupt reveal. The gradual movement adds visual interest.
  • Use a fade transition between slides to advance your story seamlessly.

Making Presentations Work at Work

Eddie Landron

  • Never assume the audience knows what you know. Explain simply and clearly.
  • Provide context. Everyone in your audience has their own reference points in their head. Give them a common ground for understanding.

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Planning Your Research

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Noxt ⊖quad Planning and Presenting Research Projects: Mastery Test Research Plan source text: Requrements for Planot Classification" summary: The author of this text annoyingly insists that celestial objects must have cleared their local area of ether objects in ord planet, even though Pluto has been a planet for a very long time. research question: What are the arguments for and against classifying Pluto as a planet? research text list: Dwarf Planets A Gude (book) Why Pluto Should be a Planet' (online article) "Declassilyng Pluto" (journal article) presentation plan: t witt create a poster that graphically represents the arguments for and against ciassifying Pluto as a planet wi oxplanations ifif then go through the arguments in more detail with viewers who stop to look at my poster 3 Select the correct answer from each drop-down menu. Review Lana's research plan. Then choose the correct way to complete the sentences. Lanas research text list vv needs to be improved She can improve it by Reset making her presentation more delailed making her research text fist more relevant to the top making her summary more objeclive making her research question more concise

Noxt ⊖quad Planning and Presenting Research Projects: Mastery Test Research Plan source text: Requrements for Planot Classification" summary: The author of this text annoyingly insists that celestial objects must have cleared their local area of ether objects in ord planet, even though Pluto has been a planet for a very long time. research question: What are the arguments for and against classifying Pluto as a planet? research text list: Dwarf Planets A Gude (book) Why Pluto Should be a Planet' (online article) "Declassilyng Pluto" (journal article) presentation plan: t witt create a poster that graphically represents the arguments for and against ciassifying Pluto as a planet wi oxplanations ifif then go through the arguments in more detail with viewers who stop to look at my poster 3 Select the correct answer from each drop-down menu. Review Lana's research plan. Then choose the correct way to complete the sentences. Lanas research text list vv needs to be improved She can improve it by Reset making her presentation more delailed making her research text fist more relevant to the top making her summary more objeclive making her research question more concise

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