13.5 Research Process: Making Notes, Synthesizing Information, and Keeping a Research Log

Learning outcomes.

By the end of this section, you will be able to:

  • Employ the methods and technologies commonly used for research and communication within various fields.
  • Practice and apply strategies such as interpretation, synthesis, response, and critique to compose texts that integrate the writer’s ideas with those from appropriate sources.
  • Analyze and make informed decisions about intellectual property based on the concepts that motivate them.
  • Apply citation conventions systematically.

As you conduct research, you will work with a range of “texts” in various forms, including sources and documents from online databases as well as images, audio, and video files from the Internet. You may also work with archival materials and with transcribed and analyzed primary data. Additionally, you will be taking notes and recording quotations from secondary sources as you find materials that shape your understanding of your topic and, at the same time, provide you with facts and perspectives. You also may download articles as PDFs that you then annotate. Like many other students, you may find it challenging to keep so much material organized, accessible, and easy to work with while you write a major research paper. As it does for many of those students, a research log for your ideas and sources will help you keep track of the scope, purpose, and possibilities of any research project.

A research log is essentially a journal in which you collect information, ask questions, and monitor the results. Even if you are completing the annotated bibliography for Writing Process: Informing and Analyzing , keeping a research log is an effective organizational tool. Like Lily Tran’s research log entry, most entries have three parts: a part for notes on secondary sources, a part for connections to the thesis or main points, and a part for your own notes or questions. Record source notes by date, and allow room to add cross-references to other entries.

Summary of Assignment: Research Log

Your assignment is to create a research log similar to the student model. You will use it for the argumentative research project assigned in Writing Process: Integrating Research to record all secondary source information: your notes, complete publication data, relation to thesis, and other information as indicated in the right-hand column of the sample entry.

Another Lens. A somewhat different approach to maintaining a research log is to customize it to your needs or preferences. You can apply shading or color coding to headers, rows, and/or columns in the three-column format (for colors and shading). Or you can add columns to accommodate more information, analysis, synthesis, or commentary, formatting them as you wish. Consider adding a column for questions only or one for connections to other sources. Finally, consider a different visual format , such as one without columns. Another possibility is to record some of your comments and questions so that you have an aural rather than a written record of these.

Writing Center

At this point, or at any other point during the research and writing process, you may find that your school’s writing center can provide extensive assistance. If you are unfamiliar with the writing center, now is a good time to pay your first visit. Writing centers provide free peer tutoring for all types and phases of writing. Discussing your research with a trained writing center tutor can help you clarify, analyze, and connect ideas as well as provide feedback on works in progress.

Quick Launch: Beginning Questions

You may begin your research log with some open pages in which you freewrite, exploring answers to the following questions. Although you generally would do this at the beginning, it is a process to which you likely will return as you find more information about your topic and as your focus changes, as it may during the course of your research.

  • What information have I found so far?
  • What do I still need to find?
  • Where am I most likely to find it?

These are beginning questions. Like Lily Tran, however, you will come across general questions or issues that a quick note or freewrite may help you resolve. The key to this section is to revisit it regularly. Written answers to these and other self-generated questions in your log clarify your tasks as you go along, helping you articulate ideas and examine supporting evidence critically. As you move further into the process, consider answering the following questions in your freewrite:

  • What evidence looks as though it best supports my thesis?
  • What evidence challenges my working thesis?
  • How is my thesis changing from where it started?

Creating the Research Log

As you gather source material for your argumentative research paper, keep in mind that the research is intended to support original thinking. That is, you are not writing an informational report in which you simply supply facts to readers. Instead, you are writing to support a thesis that shows original thinking, and you are collecting and incorporating research into your paper to support that thinking. Therefore, a research log, whether digital or handwritten, is a great way to keep track of your thinking as well as your notes and bibliographic information.

In the model below, Lily Tran records the correct MLA bibliographic citation for the source. Then, she records a note and includes the in-text citation here to avoid having to retrieve this information later. Perhaps most important, Tran records why she noted this information—how it supports her thesis: The human race must turn to sustainable food systems that provide healthy diets with minimal environmental impact, starting now . Finally, she makes a note to herself about an additional visual to include in the final paper to reinforce the point regarding the current pressure on food systems. And she connects the information to other information she finds, thus cross-referencing and establishing a possible synthesis. Use a format similar to that in Table 13.4 to begin your own research log.

6/06/2021

It has been estimated, for example, that by 2050, milk production will increase 58 percent and meat production 73 percent (Chai).

 

Shows the pressure being put on food systems that will cause the need for more sustainable systems

Maybe include a graph showing the rising pressure on food systems.

Connects to similar predictions about produce and vegan diets. See Lynch et al.

Chai, Bingil Clark, et al. “Which Diet Has the Least Environmental Impact on Our Planet? A Systematic Review of Vegan, Vegetarian and Omnivorous Diets.” , vol. 11, no. 15, 2019, . Accessed 6 Dec. 2020.

Types of Research Notes

Taking good notes will make the research process easier by enabling you to locate and remember sources and use them effectively. While some research projects requiring only a few sources may seem easily tracked, research projects requiring more than a few sources are more effectively managed when you take good bibliographic and informational notes. As you gather evidence for your argumentative research paper, follow the descriptions and the electronic model to record your notes. You can combine these with your research log, or you can use the research log for secondary sources and your own note-taking system for primary sources if a division of this kind is helpful. Either way, be sure to include all necessary information.

Bibliographic Notes

These identify the source you are using. When you locate a useful source, record the information necessary to find that source again. It is important to do this as you find each source, even before taking notes from it. If you create bibliographic notes as you go along, then you can easily arrange them in alphabetical order later to prepare the reference list required at the end of formal academic papers. If your instructor requires you to use MLA formatting for your essay, be sure to record the following information:

  • Title of source
  • Title of container (larger work in which source is included)
  • Other contributors
  • Publication date

When using MLA style with online sources, also record the following information:

  • Date of original publication
  • Date of access
  • DOI (A DOI, or digital object identifier, is a series of digits and letters that leads to the location of an online source. Articles in journals are often assigned DOIs to ensure that the source can be located, even if the URL changes. If your source is listed with a DOI, use that instead of a URL.)

It is important to understand which documentation style your instructor will require you to use. Check the Handbook for MLA Documentation and Format and APA Documentation and Format styles . In addition, you can check the style guide information provided by the Purdue Online Writing Lab .

Informational Notes

These notes record the relevant information found in your sources. When writing your essay, you will work from these notes, so be sure they contain all the information you need from every source you intend to use. Also try to focus your notes on your research question so that their relevance is clear when you read them later. To avoid confusion, work with separate entries for each piece of information recorded. At the top of each entry, identify the source through brief bibliographic identification (author and title), and note the page numbers on which the information appears. Also helpful is to add personal notes, including ideas for possible use of the information or cross-references to other information. As noted in Writing Process: Integrating Research , you will be using a variety of formats when borrowing from sources. Below is a quick review of these formats in terms of note-taking processes. By clarifying whether you are quoting directly, paraphrasing, or summarizing during these stages, you can record information accurately and thus take steps to avoid plagiarism.

Direct Quotations, Paraphrases, and Summaries

A direct quotation is an exact duplication of the author’s words as they appear in the original source. In your notes, put quotation marks around direct quotations so that you remember these words are the author’s, not yours. One advantage of copying exact quotations is that it allows you to decide later whether to include a quotation, paraphrase, or summary. ln general, though, use direct quotations only when the author’s words are particularly lively or persuasive.

A paraphrase is a restatement of the author’s words in your own words. Paraphrase to simplify or clarify the original author’s point. In your notes, use paraphrases when you need to record details but not exact words.

A summary is a brief condensation or distillation of the main point and most important details of the original source. Write a summary in your own words, with facts and ideas accurately represented. A summary is useful when specific details in the source are unimportant or irrelevant to your research question. You may find you can summarize several paragraphs or even an entire article or chapter in just a few sentences without losing useful information. It is a good idea to note when your entry contains a summary to remind you later that it omits detailed information. See Writing Process Integrating Research for more detailed information and examples of quotations, paraphrases, and summaries and when to use them.

Other Systems for Organizing Research Logs and Digital Note-Taking

Students often become frustrated and at times overwhelmed by the quantity of materials to be managed in the research process. If this is your first time working with both primary and secondary sources, finding ways to keep all of the information in one place and well organized is essential.

Because gathering primary evidence may be a relatively new practice, this section is designed to help you navigate the process. As mentioned earlier, information gathered in fieldwork is not cataloged, organized, indexed, or shelved for your convenience. Obtaining it requires diligence, energy, and planning. Online resources can assist you with keeping a research log. Your college library may have subscriptions to tools such as Todoist or EndNote. Consult with a librarian to find out whether you have access to any of these. If not, use something like the template shown in Figure 13.8 , or another like it, as a template for creating your own research notes and organizational tool. You will need to have a record of all field research data as well as the research log for all secondary sources.

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  • Staff Resources
  • Research Process
  • Note-Taking
  • Note-Taking Templates
  • Note-Taking Checklist

Reference Template

Use these templates to take notes from different kinds of sources. These templates will help you to understand:

  • what kind of information to gather from each kind of source
  • how to keep track of what data you got from each source
  • what further information you need to gather

Each template is available in Google Doc format, for your convenience. Some WRDSB high schools have versions of these templates which have been customized to suit that school’s specific requirements. Check your school library website for further information.

Reference Source Templates

  • Use for finding facts and figures
  • Note information that needs to be verified by checking other sources
  • Jot down potential sub-topics suggested by information from each source
  • Record source information (title, date, etc.)

Online Doc/Printable Downloads

  • MLA Reference Encyclopedia G-Doc
  • APA Reference Encyclopedia G-Doc
  • MLA Specialized Print Encyclopedia G-Doc

Book Source Templates

Book Template

  • Record main ideas in point form
  • Take note of your own responses to these ideas, or questions that you have about them
  • Record any great quotes that you find that support your main ideas: be sure to copy the quote exactly and note the page number for your citation
  • Record source information
  • MLA Book G-Doc
  • APA Book G-Doc
  • CMS Book G-Doc
  • APA Book Chapter G-Doc
  • MLA Anthology G-Doc
  • CMS Anthology G-Doc

Journal Source Templates

Journal Template

  • Use for print or online journals, and for journal articles accessed through an online database from the Virtual Library
  • Take note of your own responses and ideas
  • Record quotes that support your ideas: be sure to copy the quote exactly
  • MLA Journal Magazine G-Doc
  • CMS Journal Magazine G-Doc
  • APA Academic Journal with DOI G-Doc
  • APA Periodicals without DOI (magazines, popular journals, news articles) G-Doc

Website Source Templates

Website Template

  • Note main ideas in point form
  • Record your own responses to these ideas
  • Note information that needs to be verified from another source
  • Identify the steps you took to validate this source: when researching from the web, you are particularly responsible for making sure that your source is reliable
  • APA Website G-Doc
  • MLA Page from Website G-Doc
  • APA Page from Website G-Doc
  • CMS Page from Website G-Doc
  • CMS Online Image G-Doc
  • APA Online Multimedia G-Doc
  • MLA Online Multimedia G-Doc
  • CMS Online Multimedia G-Doc

This information expires once printed. Please always refer to the online version for the most current information.

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Notetaking Templates

How to take useful notes.

  • Taking Lecture Notes 
  • Taking Notes on Readings

Taking Notes for Research

Template for lecture notes.

Download accessible version (Word doc) or this notetaking template to support your notetaking for lectures.

Video: Effective Lecture Notes

Template for Taking Notes on Readings

Guided reading chart.

This notetaking template is a helpful active reading tool to help identify questions you can ask of the reading as you move through it. Adapt the questions as needed. Download the Guided Reading Chart template (Word doc) .

Taking Notes on Articles/Books in the Humanities and Social Sciences

This notetaking template encourages organized notetaking and uses questions to elicit analytical responses to a text. Available to download accessible version (Word doc) .

Taking Notes on Scientific Papers

This notetaking template encourages organized notetaking and uses questions to elicit analytical responses to a scientific article. Available to download accessible version (Word doc) .

Excel is another useful platform for notetaking; this template allows you to capture key ideas from a source and encourages you to think about how you will use the source. 

  • Academic Success

Note-Taking Template for Journal Articles

Use this worksheet to help you take notes and learn important content in journal articles.

Title of Article: ______________________________ Publication: __________________

Author(s) __________________________________ Date: __________________


                                                                                                         




Download Note-Taking Template for Journal Articles Word Document

Download Note-Taking Template for Journal Articles PDF File

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How to take Research Notes

How to take research notes.

Your research notebook is an important piece of information useful for future projects and presentations. Maintaining organized and legible notes allows your research notebook to be a valuable resource to you and your research group. It allows others and yourself to replicate experiments, and it also serves as a useful troubleshooting tool. Besides it being an important part of the research process, taking detailed notes of your research will help you stay organized and allow you to easily review your work.

Here are some common reasons to maintain organized notes:

  • Keeps a record of your goals and thoughts during your research experiments.
  • Keeps a record of what worked and what didn't in your research experiments.
  • Enables others to use your notes as a guide for similar procedures and techniques.
  • A helpful tool to reference when writing a paper, submitting a proposal, or giving a presentation.
  • Assists you in answering experimental questions.
  • Useful to efficiently share experimental approaches, data, and results with others.

Before taking notes:

  • Ask your research professor what note-taking method they recommend or prefer.
  • Consider what type of media you'll be using to take notes.
  • Once you have decided on how you'll be taking notes, be sure to keep all of your notes in one place to remain organized.
  • Plan on taking notes regularly (meetings, important dates, procedures, journal/manuscript revisions, etc.).
  • This is useful when applying to programs or internships that ask about your research experience.

Note Taking Tips:

Taking notes by hand:.

  • Research notebooks don’t belong to you so make sure your notes are legible for others.
  • Use post-it notes or tabs to flag important sections.
  • Start sorting your notes early so that you don't become backed up and disorganized.
  • Only write with a pen as pencils aren’t permanent & sharpies can bleed through.
  • Make it a habit to write in your notebook and not directly on sticky notes or paper towels. Rewriting notes can waste time and sometimes lead to inaccurate data or results.

Taking Notes Electronically

  • Make sure your device is charged and backed up to store data.
  • Invest in note-taking apps or E-Ink tablets
  • Create shortcuts to your folders so you have easier access
  • Create outlines.
  • Keep your notes short and legible.

Note Taking Tips Continued:

Things to avoid.

  • Avoid using pencils or markers that may bleed through.
  • Avoid erasing entries. Instead, draw a straight line through any mistakes and write the date next to the crossed-out information.
  • Avoid writing in cursive.
  • Avoid delaying your entries so you don’t fall behind and forget information.

Formatting Tips

  • Use bullet points to condense your notes to make them simpler to access or color-code them.
  • Tracking your failures and mistakes can improve your work in the future.
  • If possible, take notes as you’re experimenting or make time at the end of each workday to get it done.
  • Record the date at the start of every day, including all dates spent on research.

Types of media to use when taking notes:

Traditional paper notebook.

  • Pros: Able to take quick notes, convenient access to notes, cheaper option
  • Cons: Requires a table of contents or tabs as it is not easily searchable, can get damaged easily, needs to be scanned if making a digital copy

Electronic notebook  

  • Apple Notes  
  • Pros: Easily searchable, note-taking apps available, easy to edit & customize
  • Cons: Can be difficult to find notes if they are unorganized, not as easy to take quick notes, can be a more expensive option

Combination of both

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Study Skills

Research skills.

  • Searching the literature
  • Note making for dissertations
  • Research Data Management
  • Copyright and licenses
  • Publishing in journals
  • Publishing academic books
  • Depositing your thesis
  • Research metrics
  • Build your online profile
  • Finding support

Note making for dissertations: First steps into writing

research note taking template

Note making (as opposed to note taking) is an active practice of recording relevant parts of reading for your research as well as your reflections and critiques of those studies. Note making, therefore, is a pre-writing exercise that helps you to organise your thoughts prior to writing. In this module, we will cover:

  • The difference between note taking and note making
  • Seven tips for good note making
  • Strategies for structuring your notes and asking critical questions
  • Different styles of note making

To complete this section, you will need:

research note taking template

  • Approximately 20-30 minutes.
  • Access to the internet. All the resources used here are available freely.
  • Some equipment for jotting down your thoughts, a pen and paper will do, or your phone or another electronic device.

Note taking v note making

When you think about note taking, what comes to mind? Perhaps trying to record everything said in a lecture? Perhaps trying to write down everything included in readings required for a course?

  • Note taking is a passive process. When you take notes, you are often trying to record everything that you are reading or listening to. However, you may have noticed that this takes a lot of effort and often results in too many notes to be useful.  
  • Note making , on the other hand, is an active practice, based on the needs and priorities of your project. Note making is an opportunity for you to ask critical questions of your readings and to synthesise ideas as they pertain to your research questions. Making notes is a pre-writing exercise that develops your academic voice and makes writing significantly easier.

Seven tips for effective note making

Note making is an active process based on the needs of your research. This video contains seven tips to help you make brilliant notes from articles and books to make the most of the time you spend reading and writing.

  • Transcript of Seven Tips for Effective Notemaking

Question prompts for strategic note making

You might consider structuring your notes to answer the following questions. Remember that note making is based on your needs, so not all of these questions will apply in all cases. You might try answering these questions using the note making styles discussed in the next section.

  • Question prompts for strategic note making
  • Background question prompts
  • Critical question prompts
  • Synthesis question prompts

Answer these six questions to frame your reading and provide context.

  • What is the context in which the text was written? What came before it? Are there competing ideas?
  • Who is the intended audience?
  • What is the author’s purpose?
  • How is the writing organised?
  • What are the author’s methods?
  • What is the author’s key argument and conclusions?

Answer these six questions to determine your critical perspectivess and develop your academic voice.

  • What are the most interesting/compelling ideas (to you) in this study?
  • Why do you find them interesting? How do they relate to your study?
  • What questions do you have about the study?
  • What could it cover better? How could it have defended its research better?
  • What are the implications of the study? (Look not just to the conclusions but also to definitions and models)
  • Are there any gaps in the study? (Look not just at conclusions but definitions, literature review, methodology)

Answer these five questions to compare aspects of various studies (such as for a literature review. 

  • What are the similarities and differences in the literature?
  • Critically analyse the strengths, limitations, debates and themes that emerg from the literature.
  • What would you suggest for future research or practice?
  • Where are the gaps in the literature? What is missing? Why?
  • What new questions should be asked in this area of study?

Styles of note making

photo of a mind map on a wall

  • Linear notes . Great for recording thoughts about your readings. [video]
  • Mind mapping : Great for thinking through complex topics. [video]

Further sites that discuss techniques for note making:

  • Note-taking techniques
  • Common note-taking methods
  • Strategies for effective note making  

Did you know?

research note taking template

How did you find this Research Skills module

research note taking template

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  • Last Updated: Apr 11, 2024 9:35 AM
  • URL: https://libguides.cam.ac.uk/research-skills

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How to Do Research: A Step-By-Step Guide: 4a. Take Notes

  • Get Started
  • 1a. Select a Topic
  • 1b. Develop Research Questions
  • 1c. Identify Keywords
  • 1d. Find Background Information
  • 1e. Refine a Topic
  • 2a. Search Strategies
  • 2d. Articles
  • 2e. Videos & Images
  • 2f. Databases
  • 2g. Websites
  • 2h. Grey Literature
  • 2i. Open Access Materials
  • 3a. Evaluate Sources
  • 3b. Primary vs. Secondary
  • 3c. Types of Periodicals
  • 4a. Take Notes
  • 4b. Outline the Paper
  • 4c. Incorporate Source Material
  • 5a. Avoid Plagiarism
  • 5b. Zotero & MyBib
  • 5c. MLA Formatting
  • 5d. MLA Citation Examples
  • 5e. APA Formatting
  • 5f. APA Citation Examples
  • 5g. Annotated Bibliographies

Note Taking in Bibliographic Management Tools

We encourage students to use bibliographic citation management tools (such as Zotero, EasyBib and RefWorks) to keep track of their research citations. Each service includes a note-taking function. Find more information about citation management tools here . Whether or not you're using one of these, the tips below will help you.

Tips for Taking Notes Electronically

  • Try using a bibliographic citation management tool to keep track of your sources and to take notes.
  • As you add sources, put them in the format you're using (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.).
  • Group sources by publication type (i.e., book, article, website).
  • Number each source within the publication type group.
  • For websites, include the URL information and the date you accessed each site.
  • Next to each idea, include the source number from the Works Cited file and the page number from the source. See the examples below. Note that #A5 and #B2 refer to article source 5 and book source 2 from the Works Cited file.

#A5 p.35: 76.69% of the hyperlinks selected from homepage are for articles and the catalog #B2 p.76: online library guides evolved from the paper pathfinders of the 1960s

  • When done taking notes, assign keywords or sub-topic headings to each idea, quote or summary.
  • Use the copy and paste feature to group keywords or sub-topic ideas together.
  • Back up your master list and note files frequently!

Tips for Taking Notes by Hand

  • Use index cards to keep notes and track sources used in your paper.
  • Include the citation (i.e., author, title, publisher, date, page numbers, etc.) in the format you're using. It will be easier to organize the sources alphabetically when creating the Works Cited page.
  • Number the source cards.
  • Use only one side to record a single idea, fact or quote from one source. It will be easier to rearrange them later when it comes time to organize your paper.
  • Include a heading or key words at the top of the card. 
  • Include the Work Cited source card number.
  • Include the page number where you found the information.
  • Use abbreviations, acronyms, or incomplete sentences to record information to speed up the notetaking process.
  • Write down only the information that answers your research questions.
  • Use symbols, diagrams, charts or drawings to simplify and visualize ideas.

Forms of Notetaking

Use one of these notetaking forms to capture information:

  • Summarize : Capture the main ideas of the source succinctly by restating them in your own words.
  • Paraphrase : Restate the author's ideas in your own words.
  • Quote : Copy the quotation exactly as it appears in the original source. Put quotation marks around the text and note the name of the person you are quoting.

Example of a Work Cited Card

Example notecard.

  • << Previous: Step 4: Write
  • Next: 4b. Outline the Paper >>
  • Last Updated: May 29, 2024 1:53 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.elmira.edu/research

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Graphic Organizer: Research Note-Taking Made Easy

  • Arts & Humanities --Language Arts
  • Educational Technology
  • Science --Life Sciences ----Animals Note: This activity can be easily adapted for use across the curriculum.

Brief Description

A graphic organizer helps students gather research notes for writing.

Students will

  • select a topic for research.
  • develop focus questions for their research.
  • use a graphic organizer to collect and organize information.
  • use their collected notes to write a research essay/paper.

research, bats, graphic organizer, notes, note taking, study skills

  • Note-Taking Graphic Organizer *
  • library and/or Internet resources related to the topic of research

* NOTE: This graphic organizer is editable. That means students can simply copy the graphic organizer to a disk and use a Word processing program to fill in the spaces. See additional graphic organizers on Education World's Teacher Tools and Templates Page . (Of course, it you choose to, you can simply print the template and students can write on the form with pen or pencil.)

Lesson Plan

In this lesson, students use an editable graphic organizer template and a word processing program to fill out the template. (Or you can print the template for students to write on.) This note-taking template helps students collect and organize information related to a research topic.

Note: For the purpose of this lesson, we chose the topic "Bats." You can use that topic; connect the activity to any topic in your curriculum; or have students choose a topic of special interest to them.

Introduce students to a new research topic. (For this sample lesson, we are using the topic of bats. ) You might start the lesson by creating a KWL chart, such as the one on Education World's Teacher Tools and Templates Page . Have students brainstorm information they Know about bats and write it in the K column. Brainstorm a list of questions students Want to know about bats and write them in the W column. Save the KWL chart for use at the end of the lesson.

The students' list of questions might include some of the following: How many different kinds of bats are there? In what countries can bats be found? How big are the biggest bats? How do bats fly? How do bats see? Where can bat habitats be found? What do bats eat? How long do bats live? Which bats are endangered? Why? Why is it a good idea to protect bats? What can be done to protect bats?

Students can select from their brainstormed list the three questions they are most interested in learning about, or you might assign one question to each student (so at least one student is researching each of the brainstormed questions) and let students choose the other two questions. The student then use a word processing program to type the three questions into the "Research Question" field on the Note-Taking Graphic Organizer .

Next, students use library and or Internet resources (see Internet Resource List below) to search for the information to answer the three questions on their charts. They identify three "Research Sources" and write the answers they find in those sources in the appropriate columns in the Note-Taking Graphic Organizer.

The spaces on the graphic organizer are particularly small. That fact should encourage students to write notes (using key phrases and words) rather than entire sentences; that way, when they use their notes to write their reports they will have plenty of content and be more likely to write in their own words.

When students complete their graphic organizers, they write a report that includes a summary paragraph or two about each of the questions they researched.

Save time for students to share the results of their research. Then fill in the L column on your KWL chart with the information students Learned about bats.

Internet Resource List: Bats

  • The Story of Echo the Bat
  • Incredible Bats
  • Basic Facts About Bats
  • KidZone Bats
  • Fact Monster: Spotlight on Bats
  • KidzCave: All About Bats

Students will complete their charts accurately. They will use correct grammar and punctuation in their essays/reports.

Lesson Plan Source

Education World

Submitted By

Gary Hopkins

National Standards

LANGUAGE ARTS: English GRADES K - 12 NL-ENG.K-12.1 Reading for Perspective NL-ENG.K-12.2 Reading for Understanding NL-ENG.K-12.3 Evaluation Strategies NL-ENG.K-12.4 Communication Skills NL-ENG.K-12.5 Communication Strategies NL-ENG.K-12.6 Applying Knowledge NL-ENG.K-12.8 Developing Research Skills NL-ENG.K-12.12 Applying Language Skills

TECHNOLOGY GRADES K - 12 NT.K-12.1 Basic Operations and Concepts NT.K-12.3 Technology Productivity Tools NT.K-12.5 Technology Research Tools

Return to the Note Taking lesson plan page.

Find more ideas for teaching study skills in an Education World article Teaching Study Skills: Ideas That Work! .

Links updated on 04/20/17

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User Research Center

User research note taking guide, by meg mcmahon.

Taking notes is a vital part of the User Research process. It helps all of the researchers gain a shared understanding of the interviews during the analysis phase of the project.

As a note taker, you need to decide what is important to include to inform the tasks or questions asked in the interview and what information could help answer the research questions or further the goals of the study. Note taking is not creating a transcript (if you need a transcript, we can use dictation software).

Before Taking Notes

  • Become familiar with the following documents and aspects of the project: the project plan, script, and any important background information on the project.
  • Use a shared notes grid with a column for each participant and rows for each task or question.
  • Use a notes doc template; each participant has their own document that includes the participant details and the questions.
  • Use Dovetail , a web-based note taking tool or a different web-based tool.
  • Check the moderator notes field for context for this specific interview. (This is found at the bottom of a shared notes grid, at the top of a participant notes doc, or at the top of a Dovetail participant area.)

Note Taking

It is the note takers job to note anything that actually happened in the meeting. This may include things that were said as well as sounds or body language that may indicate feelings. In capturing notes pay attention to the following:

  • Frustrations
  • “Wow” or positive moments
  • Gaps in knowledge, moments when a participant doesn’t have the necessary knowledge in relation to the task or question.

Do’s and Don’ts of Notetaking

Use the word “participant”.

At the URC we refer to all the individuals who participate in our studies as “participant” not user, interviewee, or by their name.

DO DON'T
7:53] Participant notes they are not aware of what kind of file to attach under “attach file” on the form. [7:53] User notes they are not aware of what kind of file to attach under “attach file” on the form.

Add timestamp of the insight

Timestamps are helpful to have for reference, especially if video clips are needed for the report.

DO DON'T
[3:45] Participant says, “I am frustrated with the specificity of the search.” Participant says, “I am frustrated with the specificity of the search.”

Don’t make assumptions in the notes, stay true to the facts

When taking notes, state what happens opposed to assuming behavior of the participant or making generalizations about the system.

DO DON'T
[4:45] Participant doesn’t notice the search icon on the page. [4:45] The search icon is not noticeable.

Keep a consistent format

Be sure to stay in the chosen format for the notes.

DO DON'T
[23:25] Participant says she doesn't get many questions after filling it out and she believes the form makes sense. Participant doesn’t get many questions after filling it out She believes the form makes sense

Use quotations when it makes an impact

If a participant says something that is directly related to a theme you find during analysis, it is helpful to record the quote as a record of that theme within the research.

DO DON'T
Theme: participants collaboratively search with a collection specialist as a part of the search process. This was noted to build researchers' special collections research skills.

[9:23] Participant says, “[Working with a Collection Specialist] is having a translator that understands the collection, and is willing to look at it through my eyes or my research questions.”

Theme: participants collaboratively search with a collection specialist as a part of the search process. This was noted to build researchers' special collections research skills.

[9:23] Participant says, “I’m confused on where to click first, oh Ask A Librarian.”

Paraphrase when appropriate

If a participant’s quote is long and includes pieces of information that are not directly related to the key finding with the phrase, shorten the phrase.

DO DON'T
[8:12] Participant says she doesn't know what she is supposed to fill in, "All the fields are mixed in together, and every time I fill out the form I wonder did I do everything I need to?" [8:12] Participant says she doesn't know what she is supposed to fill in, "these things are left empty until something else happens or someone else needs to go in. It's just all mixed in together, and so that always makes me every time I'm like, okay, wait, Did I? Still, and everything I need to?"

Look for unspoken body language or emotions

Add notes about what body language a participant is using when speaking or trying to accomplish a task.

DO DON'T
[32:39] Participant slumps back in their chair, “It’s frustrating, I’ve gotten used to it, though it’s not intuitive for new people.” [32:39] “It’s frustrating, I’ve gotten used to it, though it’s not intuitive for new people.”

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42 Timeless Tips On How To Effectively Take Research Notes

Improve your note-taking skills with timeless tips on effectively taking research notes. Enhance your study sessions and research projects today.

Mar 11, 2024

laptop and notebook for creation of Research Notes

Discover the significance of meticulous note-taking in the realm of academia and research with a deep dive into the world of research notes. Understanding the distinction between primary vs secondary sources is crucial for scholarly pursuits. Uncover how researchers leverage these notes to capture critical insights, citations, and observations, providing a roadmap for future investigations. Gain valuable insights into the meticulous process of documenting, organizing, and analyzing research data for enhanced academic endeavors.

Table of Contents

What are research notes, complete guide on how to effectively take research notes, supercharge your researching ability with otio — try otio for free today.

person writing over Research Notes

Research notes are essential tools used by knowledge workers, researchers, and students to document and organize their findings, thoughts, and insights during the research process . These notes serve as a repository of information gathered from various sources such as articles, books, websites, and interviews. They help individuals track their progress, remember important details, and structure their ideas effectively.

How Can Otio Transform Your Research Workflow?

Knowledge workers, researchers, and students today struggle with content overload and the complexities of using multiple tools for their research tasks. Otio offers a solution by providing an AI-native workspace tailored for researchers. It simplifies the research process by enabling users to collect data from diverse sources, extract key takeaways using AI-generated notes, and create draft outputs seamlessly.  With features like AI-generated notes on various content types and AI-assisted writing, Otio streamlines the research process and helps individuals create high-quality research papers and essays efficiently.

Why Otio Stands Out as Your AI Research and Writing Partner

Otio stands out as an invaluable AI research and writing partner due to its ability to streamline the research process from data collection to content creation. By offering features such as AI-generated notes on all content types, interactive chat capabilities similar to ChatGPT, and AI-assisted writing, Otio empowers researchers to enhance their productivity and produce quality outputs faster. Embrace Otio as your AI research and writing partner today and experience a seamless and efficient research journey.

Otio - Your AI Research and Writing Partner

Knowledge workers, researchers, and students today suffer from content overload and are left to deal with it using fragmented, complex, and manual tooling. Too many of them settle for stitching together complicated bookmarking, read-it-later, and note-taking apps to get through their workflows. Now that anyone can create content with the click of a button - this problem is only going to get worse. Otio solves this problem by providing one AI-native workspace for researchers. It helps them: 

A wide range of data sources, from bookmarks, tweets, and extensive books to YouTube videos.

2. Extract key takeaways

With detailed AI-generated notes and source-grounded Q&A chat.

Draft outputs using the sources you’ve collected. Otio helps you to go from reading list to first draft faster. Along with this, Otio also helps you write research papers/essays faster. Here are our top features that are loved by researchers: AI-generated notes on all bookmarks (Youtube videos, PDFs, articles, etc.), Otio enables you to chat with individual links or entire knowledge bases, just like you chat with ChatGPT, as well as AI assisted writing. Let Otio be your AI research and writing partner — try Otio for free today!

Related Reading

• How To Read A Research Paper • Sources For Research Paper • How Many Sources Should A Research Paper Have • How To Read Scientific Papers • How To Find Sources For A Research Paper • Google Scholar Search Tips • Literature Synthesis

notebook with laptop for Research Notes

1. Use a Consistent Format

Create a clear structure for your notes to easily find and review information later.

2. Summarize Key Points

Condense information into concise summaries to grasp the main ideas quickly.

3. Organize by Topic

Categorize your notes by subject to maintain a logical flow of information.

4. Use Keywords

Highlight essential terms to quickly identify important concepts when revisiting your notes.

5. Include Citations

Record sources alongside your notes to ensure proper referencing in your research.

6. Use Abbreviations

Develop a list of abbreviations for common terms to streamline note-taking.

7. Visual Aids

Incorporate diagrams, charts, or tables to enhance understanding and retention.

8. Incorporate Quotations

Capture direct quotes accurately to support your arguments and findings.

9. Review Regularly

Schedule time to review and update your notes to reinforce retention.

10. Utilize Color Coding

Assign colors to different categories for a visual organization method.

11. Mind Mapping

Create visual representations of ideas to establish relationships between different concepts.

12. Include Page Numbers

Note the page numbers of your sources to locate information easily when needed.

13. Group Information

Group related details together for a comprehensive overview of specific topics.

14. Limit Bullet Points

Use bullet points sparingly to avoid overwhelming your notes with fragmented information.

15. Record Questions

Pose questions based on your notes to guide further research or critical thinking.

16. Define Acronyms

Define acronyms or abbreviations to ensure clarity in your notes.

17. Active Listening

Engage actively during lectures or interviews to capture essential points accurately.

18. Paraphrase

Rewrite information in your own words to deepen understanding and promote retention.

19. Avoid Plagiarism

Attribute ideas correctly and refrain from copying verbatim text without citation.

20. Separate Personal Insights

Distinguish your thoughts from the original content to maintain clarity.

21. Utilize Software Tools

Explore note-taking apps or software for digital organization and accessibility.

22. Create Templates

Establish templates for different types of research to streamline the note-taking process .

23. Prioritize Information

Focus on recording critical details over minor or tangential points.

24. Use Symbols

Employ symbols or icons to denote importance levels or key concepts in your notes.

25. Establish Timelines

Note dates or timelines within your research to track the progression of ideas or events.

26. Develop an Index

Create an index or table of contents for quick reference to specific topics within your notes.

27. Collaborate with Peers

Share notes with colleagues to gain diverse perspectives and enrich your research.

28. Track Sources

Keep a detailed record of all sources consulted to facilitate accurate referencing.

29. Embrace Digitalization

Digitize handwritten notes for easy access and searchability across platforms.

30. Prioritize Clarity

Ensure your notes are clear and concise to facilitate comprehension during review sessions.

31. Use Cross-References

Link related notes or concepts to establish connections within your research.

32. Emphasize Key Terms

Highlight crucial terms or concepts to draw attention to pivotal ideas.

33. Review and Edit

Regularly review and edit your notes for accuracy, relevance, and coherence.

34. Remove Redundancy

Eliminate redundant information to streamline your notes and enhance clarity.

35. Stay Updated

Continuously update your notes with new insights or discoveries to maintain relevance.

36. Engage with Multimedia

Incorporate multimedia elements like images or videos to enrich your notes.

37. Leverage Text Formatting

Utilize bold, italics, or underline for emphasis and hierarchy in your notes.

38. Seek Feedback

Share your notes with mentors or peers for constructive feedback and improvement.

39. Practice Active Reading

Engage critically with sources to extract essential information effectively.

40. Utilize Templates

Utilize note-taking templates for structured and efficient information organization.

41. Be Selective

Focus on capturing information that directly contributes to your research objectives.

42. Stay Consistent

Maintain a regular note-taking routine to cultivate a habit and enhance productivity.

AI research and writing partner

Knowledge workers, researchers, and students today suffer from content overload and are left to deal with it using fragmented, complex, and manual tooling. Too many of them settle for stitching together complicated bookmarking, read-it-later, and note-taking apps to get through their workflows. Now that anyone can create content with the click of a button - this problem is only going to get worse. Otio solves this problem by providing one AI-native workspace for researchers. It helps them:

Draft outputs using the sources you’ve collected. Otio helps you go from reading list to first draft faster. Along with this, Otio also helps you write research papers/essays faster. Here are our top features that are loved by researchers: AI-generated notes on all bookmarks (Youtube videos, PDFs, articles, etc.), Otio enables you to chat with individual links or entire knowledge bases, just like you chat with ChatGPT, as well as AI-assisted writing.  Let Otio be your AI research and writing partner — try Otio for free today!

• How To Tell If An Article Is Peer Reviewed • Reliable Sources For Research • Literature Search • How To Summarize A Research Article • Best Databases For Research • Using Ai For Research • Summarize Research Paper Ai • How To Use Chat Gpt For Research • How To Search For Research Articles

group study plan for making good Research Notes

Research notes are a crucial aspect of any researcher's workflow, serving as the foundation for organizing, synthesizing, and retaining information gathered during the research process. These notes provide a roadmap for the researcher, aiding in the development of ideas, analysis, and ultimately, the creation of insightful and well-supported research papers or projects.

Setting Up Your Note-Taking System

1. choose the right tools.

Select a note-taking tool that aligns with your preferences and needs. Whether it's digital tools like Otio or traditional pen and paper, ensure it complements your research style.

2. Create a Structure

Establish a consistent and intuitive organizational system for your notes. Use headings, subheadings, bullet points, or numbering to categorize information effectively.

3. Utilize Templates

Develop templates for different types of research notes, such as literature reviews, interview summaries, or data analysis. Templates can streamline your note-taking process and maintain consistency.

Effective Note-Taking Strategies

1. active reading.

Engage with the material actively by highlighting key points, jotting down questions, and summarizing main ideas. This helps in digesting and internalizing the content.

2. Summarize and Paraphrase

Rather than copying verbatim, condense information into your own words. This aids in comprehension and prevents plagiarism when incorporating sources into your work.

3. Cite Sources Properly

Always record the sources of your information alongside your notes. Include bibliographic details or hyperlinks to ensure proper referencing and easy retrieval when needed.

Organizing and Reviewing Your Notes

1. create a tagging system.

Employ tags or labels to categorize and link related notes. This enables quick retrieval of information based on topics, themes, or keywords.

2. Regular Review

Schedule periodic reviews of your notes to reinforce learning, identify connections between ideas, and clarify any ambiguities. This practice enhances retention and aids in synthesizing information.

3. Revision and Refinement

Continuously refine and update your notes as your research progresses. Add new insights, revisit older notes for relevance, and connect disparate pieces of information to enhance the coherence of your work.

Transforming Research Efficiency with Otio's AI-Powered Workspace

Knowledge workers, researchers, and students can revolutionize their research processes with Otio , an AI-native workspace designed to streamline data collection, extraction of key insights, and creation of draft outputs. By integrating AI-generated notes, source-grounded Q&A chat features, and AI-assisted writing capabilities, Otio empowers users to navigate the complexities of research effectively.  Embrace a seamless research experience with Otio - your ultimate AI research and writing partner .

Otio addresses the content overload challenge faced by knowledge workers, researchers, and students by offering an all-in-one AI-native workspace. By allowing users to seamlessly collect data from various sources such as bookmarks, tweets, articles, and videos, Otio simplifies the initial stage of the research process. This aggregation feature not only saves time but also ensures that users have a comprehensive set of resources at their disposal.

AI-Generated Notes and Source-Grounded Q&A Chat

One of Otio 's standout features is its ability to extract key takeaways from collected sources by providing detailed AI-generated notes. These notes offer a condensed version of the content, making it easier for researchers to grasp essential information quickly. The source-grounded Q&A chat function enables users to engage with their collected material in a conversational manner, facilitating a deeper understanding of the content.

Efficient Drafting with Otio

Transitioning from reading materials to drafting outputs is often a time-consuming process for researchers. Otio streamlines this transition by assisting users in creating draft outputs directly from the sources they have collected. This feature not only accelerates the writing process but also ensures that the drafted content remains closely tied to the original sources, enhancing the overall quality of the output.

AI-Assisted Writing for Research Papers/Essays

In addition to its data collection and note-taking capabilities, Otio offers AI-assisted writing functionality to help users compose research papers and essays more efficiently. By leveraging AI technology, Otio provides users with writing suggestions, grammar corrections , and structural guidance, empowering them to produce high-quality written work in less time.

Embracing Otio as Your AI Research and Writing Partner

Otio's comprehensive suite of features, including AI-generated notes, source-grounded Q&A chat, efficient drafting tools, and AI-assisted writing, make it a valuable asset for knowledge workers, researchers, and students looking to streamline their research workflows. By integrating Otio into their processes, users can enhance their productivity, improve the quality of their work, and ultimately, achieve greater success in their research endeavors.

• Best Reference Manager • Chatpdf Alternative • Ai Research Tools • Elicit AI • Consensus Ai • Sematic Scholar • Research Paper Writing App • Research Paper Reader • How Does Chatpdf Work • Scholarcy Alternative

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Researching the Literature Review

  • 1. Get Started
  • 2. Find Articles

Tracking Your Searches

Mind mapping, note taking tables, reading tips, writing as a conversation, writing center resources, how do you take notes.

  • 4. Keep Current
  • 5. Manage References
  • 6. Done Yet?
  • 7. Get Help

One way to begin taking notes is to keep track of what you are searching for.  Many databases help you do this by allowing you to save searches and set up email alerts .  Saving searches allows you to watch the development of your search over time and to make sure you are not simply repeating the same search over and over.  Copy and paste or print out the search page to help think of ways your search could or should change over time.  This example is from the EbscoHost version of Medline, but many databases have a similar option.

Viewing the search history and saving searches

research note taking template

Mind mapping is a popular way to brainstorm about your topic or to take notes about an article or presentation.  Start with the main topic in the center and then think of a variety of related subtopics that you want to explore.  Mind maps allow you to be flexible and to see alternative ideas you may not initially have considered.

You can either use paper and pencil or you can use a variety of free or commercial products to create mind maps.  See some suggested options below.  (This mind map was made with the free version of XMind.)

  • Wikipedia's List of Mind Mapping Software
  • Note Taking Table Template

Some of us think in a more linear way and find it useful to enter notes in tables rather than in mind or concept maps.  This table is one illustration of what types of information you can gather from the articles or books that you read.  If this table is helpful, you can download the handout version linked above.

Learning how to read academic literature, both articles and books, takes practices.  Here are some tips to help you become a more focused reader:

(usually your thesis or research question) " about the significance of the article as it relates to your research question.  Then it is easy to transition from these notes to your literature review draft. in mind, not because you forgot the contents of the article.  

One way to think about writing a literature review is as a dialogue between authors who have previously written about various aspects of your topic.  You will create this dialog by discussing the agreements and disagreements between those authors, and you will illustrate what they have not yet talked about or researched. 

Use this illustration not as an exact recipe for how to write, but as a guide for how to incorporate some of these writing strategies.

  • OSU Graduate Writing Center

Need more writing help? Try the OSU Writing Center.  In addition to providing free help, particularly with brainstorming and organization, they also have writing assistants who are specifically trained to work with graduate students.  Plan ahead as it can often take several sessions to work through something as major as a thesis writing project.

Which of these tools do you most commonly use to take notes?

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Note Taking

10 free note taking templates in google docs, word, & clickup.

Praburam Srinivasan

Growth Marketing Manager

February 21, 2024

It’s been rightly said that “The palest ink is better than the best memory.”

Whether you’re studying, working, or planning a grocery run, noting things down helps avoid missing essential details.  

Note-taking is an indispensable skill. Note taking templates help make this process more structured and efficient. These templates are pre-designed frameworks for taking notes, helping you record and categorize information systematically, and ensuring that the most critical points don’t slip through the cracks. 

This article discusses ten downloadable note taking templates to make your life at work and home more organized. Write your key ideas, add bullet points, agenda items, essential questions, and even meeting minutes to stay on top of everything that needs your attention.

What are Note Taking Templates? 

What makes a good note taking template , 1. clickup meeting notes template, 2. clickup daily notes template, 3. clickup project note template, 4. clickup meeting note style template, 5. clickup class notes template, 6. clickup cornell note template, 7. google docs simple notes for studying template by goodocs, 8. google docs simple meeting note template by goodocs, 9. microsoft word lecture notes template by template.net, 10. microsoft word guest speaker note-taking template by template.net.

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Note taking templates are structured frameworks designed to capture and organize information during various activities such as meetings, lectures, or daily chores. 

A pre-built notetaking template offers a systematic layout to record and categorize important details efficiently throughout the day.

One key advantage of note templates is their versatility. They cater to diverse needs, from personal task management to project planning. 

Unlike the traditional pen-and-paper way of taking notes, note-taking templates can be accessed across any device, from desktops to mobile apps and tablets. They allow you to add the key reading notes and fetch the information whenever needed.

Whether you’re a student aiming to capture lecture notes, a professional looking to improve your work habits , or an individual organizing personal thoughts, note-taking templates offer a practical solution to organize your thoughts. They keep track of critical tasks and help you. Write down your ideas whenever inspiration strikes you. 

  • Customizable: A note-taking template is more than just a space for jotting down thoughts. It is the perfect blend of an intuitive interface with an adaptable structure, enabling you to quickly capture and categorize project notes without feeling overwhelmed
  • Pre-defined sections: Choose a note-taking template with predefined sections for crucial details and leave room for individual preferences. Headings, key points, and numbering help create a visual hierarchy, making it easier to follow the flow of key ideas. The template includes features like tags, categories, and color-coding to classify and archive information
  • Accommodate various types of text: Your note-taking template should accommodate multiple types of content, such as text, images, tables, and diagrams. Through prompts, questions, or designated spaces for reflections, the template should encourage users to interact with the content actively to help you capture your thoughts and mark details for future reference
  • Accessibility and compatibility: Lastly, whether in digital or printable form, ensure the template is accessible and compatible with various devices and note-taking applications . Seamlessly integrate your notes into your project workflow, whether you prefer working on a laptop, tablet, or smartphone

10 Note Taking Templates to Use in 2024

research note taking template

Properly documenting meeting details is essential, whether for your daily team schedule, detailed weekly team meeting, or quick connection. Meeting notes templates can give you a headstart.

Never miss a beat of any meeting, and stay on top of all your important team discussions. With the editable Meeting Notes Template by ClickUp , you can capture agendas, notes, action items , and work plans for all your meetings. 

Once the meeting ends, ClickUp Brain lets you summarize your meeting notes to share with all the attendees as a follow-up action. This way, everybody can focus on the discussion instead of worrying about remembering everything. 

ClickUp’s AI Brain boosts your team’s ability to complete more work quickly. Here are some simple ways it can help you in your work: 

  • Product development: Summarize lengthy requirement documents and extract key decisions 
  • Marketing campaigns: Pull insights from campaign planning email threads to get collaborators up to speed 
  • Research projects: Distill key points from lengthy results to create executive summaries 
  • Consulting projects: Create a snapshot of deliverables and meeting minutes to keep your clients updated on high-level progress  

Organize your thoughts and store ideas in one handy place with the Daily Notes Template from ClickUp

Effective note-taking separates successful people from the crowd. Having a central place to journal your thoughts and knowledge can help you get the most out of your day and also help you understand what you could have done better. 

However, effective note-taking isn’t about scribbling stuff down. Use daily notes to structure your thoughts. 

With the Daily Notes Templates by ClickUp , organize your thoughts, write quick notes, and track progress on action items in real time. Team managers can use the Daily Notes template to keep their team members focused on their professional goals by tracking daily tasks. 

Within the template, use ClickUp Custom Statuses to create tasks with custom statuses such as ‘Complete,’ ‘Reviewed,’ and ‘To Do’ to keep track of progress made on each note. Further, use ClickUp tags and dependency warnings and instantly be alerted about any blockers to completing the project. 

The  ClickUp Project Note Template is an efficient way to document important project-related information

Staying organized throughout the project’s lifecycle is crucial to manage a project effectively. The Project Notes Template by ClickUp provides project managers with a ready-to-use document to share supplementary information with team members and stakeholders so they can understand the project better. 

This template provides a consistent format for all team members to record all project details and ensures that no essential information is missed during project implementation. 

The project note template also comes in handy when onboarding cross-functional team members on a new project, providing them with the full context and overview of the project goals. All teams can access and record project details consistently, stay on top of tasks, and track progress. 

This template is accessible on your mobile phone using the ClickUp app, one of the best note-taking apps , to make information accessible and easily editable on the go.

Document all event meeting notes, key takeaways, and action items with the Meeting Note Style Template created by ClickUp

As a manager handling multiple projects, you’re expected to stay on top and review the progress and status of hundreds of tasks. When a stakeholder requests an update, the last thing you want to do is scramble through all your sticky notes to find the information. 

There are better and more efficient ways of capturing critical information and updates than taking meeting notes using online sticky notes or handwritten notes. 

During meetings, stay organized and on top of your project tasks and synthesize information from previous meetings with the Meeting Note Style Template by ClickUp . This template lets you quickly capture key moments and keep track of conversations from different meetings in an easy-to-use format. 

In addition to capturing information and organizing tasks and decisions into one central, searchable repository, with ClickUp’s note-taking template, use ClickUp’s Whiteboard to work closely with team members to brainstorm ideas and add visuals to your meeting notes.  

The Class Notes Template by ClickUp allows you to take lecture notes and keep them organized

If you are a student struggling with a big pile of hand-written lecture notes on your desk, which do little to help you remember what’s discussed in class, this template is for you. 

Use the Class Notes Template by ClickUp to compile all your notes in one place, including notes from lectures, links to helpful resources, and homework. This note-taking template can also be useful in school for planning, documenting, and following up on lectures. 

Format your notes and embed links or tables to make them more detailed using the editable ClickUp Docs . Create tasks with email alerts within the doc so you never miss another assignment deadline.

Organize your notes better with ClickUp's Cornell Notes Template

The Cornell method of note-taking formulated by Cornell University Professor Walter Pauk is one of the most popular note-taking strategies . 

Cornell Notes

The note-taking system involves the following steps:

  • All notes from the lecture go into the note-taking column 
  • Use the smaller column on the left for keywords and questions (record hints and prompts about the topic) 
  • Add a brief summary of the content at the bottom of the page 

The Cornell note-taking method is a productive way to stay focused and organized when taking notes, whether preparing for an exam or even a meeting at work. 

The Cornell Note-Taking Template by ClickUp provides a digital, creative, and user-friendly way to use this note-taking method. The template can help you track tasks and visualize progress. 

The Cornell Note Template is invaluable in helping students learn, review, and synthesize large amounts of information.

You can also use ClickUp’s Notepad to quickly jot down notes and transform those into trackable tasks that are accessible from anywhere. Share the notes and information with your peers and colleagues for cross-functional collaboration. 

Google Docs Simple Notes For Studying Template

We all know what exam jitters feel like. If you’re a student, exam days likely mean last-minute revisions of important questions and poring over numerous textbooks. But who has time to review a few hundred pages of text the night before an exam? The most successful students know the power of making and reviewing notes.

This is where studying note templates comes in handy. The Google Docs Simple Notes for Studying Template helps students compile question-and-answer sets in a clean, editable Google Docs format. 

The template uses standard Google Docs font and is print-ready for students who prefer having the comfort of a physical sheet of paper when reviewing and revising from study notes. All you need to do is log into your Google account and edit the unique template. 

Google Docs Simple Meeting Notes

Use the Google Docs Simple Meeting Note Template to maximize your productivity and keep your team deliverables on track 

The Google Docs Simple Meeting Note Template is made for working professionals who want to maximize the outcomes of any meeting by making notes and keeping the team on track.

Every meeting is only as productive as the accountable actions that follow it. While there are various AI tools for meeting notes, this Google Docs meeting note template helps professionals get a structured template to capture the key highlights from any meeting and craft an actionable plan that details the next steps and task ownership.

The template is customizable—you can even add your company logo. If you prefer handwritten notes over digital notes, you can print the template and carry your digital notes to meetings.

Lecture Note Taking Template

The Lecture Notes Taking Template will organize the note-taking experience for students

The Lecture Note Template by Template.net is ideal for students and researchers and evolves with their note-taking needs. The template is fully customizable and simplifies the note-taking process, smoothing the academic journey.

The uniform note-taking structure will help you take organized notes during classes and guest lectures. This template is available in Word, Google Docs, and PDF formats for online and offline note-taking.  

Guest Speaker Note Taking Template

Capture all the learnings, insights, and quotes highlighted by guest speakers using the Guest Speaker Note-taking Template 

Handwritten notes during professional events and conferences are a thing of the past. 

Use the Guest Speaker Note-taking Template by Template.net to capture key insights, personal reflections, and actionable strategies shared by guest speakers at the event. It is helpful for event attendees who want to maximize their learning during an event. 

The template is available in Word, Google Docs, and Apple Pages formats.  

Optimize Productivity with Note-Taking Templates

Streamlining the note-taking process with pre-built templates can save time and maximize outcomes. Various templates designed to accomplish a specific task are available, and using the relevant template can help you document your thoughts.

Whether managing daily tasks, organizing project details, or preparing for exams, a suitable template helps you stay on top of the key agenda items, prioritize your actions, and track your progress in real time. 

Capture your notes on ClickUp and quickly retrieve information across different devices. 

In addition to note-taking templates, ClickUp helps you be productive with its project management capabilities. Create ClickUp Tasks directly from your notes, and use ClickUp Automations to mark action items as complete once done.

Sign up for free on ClickUp to optimize your note-taking efforts.

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Note-taking template

There is no one perfect method for taking notes but it can be made more effective through the use of templates. It is important to find a method that works for you, both during a lecture or reading session, and for when you need to retrieve the information at a later date. Be prepared to try different techniques and adapt as needed.

Cornell note-taking method

The Cornell Method divides a single piece of paper into three different sections. 

The note section is for noting down key ideas from lecture. These are your annotations where you write done the main theories and theorists, concepts, key terms etc.

  • What is the author's aims?
  • What is the their research question?
  • What is the author arguing?
  • What is their answer to the question?
  • What points support their argument?
  • What are their main reasons?
  • What evidence have they used to support their argument? 

The cue column is for you to write down your own questions, thoughts, terms you are unsure of, connections between ideas etc. In short, this is where you critically engage with the lecture material. These may also form "cues" to aid your memory.

  • What do I already know?
  • Strengths and weaknesses?
  • How valid are the research methods?
  • How strong is the evidence?
  • How logical is the argument?
  • How does this fit in to other research in the field?
  • What do I need to find out next?

Summarise  at various points within the lecture or reading or if you prefer, sometime after the lecture or when you've finished reading. The summaries are crucial as they help you to reflect and develop your understanding of the course content, and practice articulating the main ideas. 

In the example, the cue column is on the left and notes on the right, but you should adapt the template to suit your needs. Note that this method can also be used in note-taking software.

Note: Based on the Cornell Note Taking system, adapted from: Walter Pauk and Ross Owens , How to Study in College (Boston: Cengage, 2011), 205 - 279.

Note-taking

Mind mapping

Note-taking system

Reference Documents

  • Note-taking template (DOCX, 61.28 KB)

Use contact details to request an alternative file format.

  • ANU Library Academic Skills
  • +61 2 6125 2972

Research Graphic Organizer: Note-Taking

When writing an informational essay, start with gathering information! Students will use this graphic organizer template in the first step of their research process, honing note-taking skills as they document their sources, pick out relevant information from resources, and concisely record important details. After students gather information, they will be prompted to reflect and draw conclusions about their research. Geared toward students in sixth, seventh, and eighth grade, this worksheet is a a helpful way to get learners in the habit of citing sources and preparing for the next steps in the writing process.

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CRediT author statement

CRediT (Contributor Roles Taxonomy) was introduced with the intention of recognizing individual author contributions, reducing authorship disputes and facilitating collaboration. The idea came about following a 2012 collaborative workshop led by Harvard University and the Wellcome Trust, with input from researchers, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) and publishers, including Elsevier, represented by Cell Press.

CRediT offers authors the opportunity to share an accurate and detailed description of their diverse contributions to the published work.

The corresponding author is responsible for ensuring that the descriptions are accurate and agreed by all authors

The role(s) of all authors should be listed, using the relevant above categories

Authors may have contributed in multiple roles

CRediT in no way changes the journal’s criteria to qualify for authorship

CRediT statements should be provided during the submission process and will appear above the acknowledgment section of the published paper as shown further below.

Term

Definition

Conceptualization

Ideas; formulation or evolution of overarching research goals and aims

Methodology

Development or design of methodology; creation of models

Software

Programming, software development; designing computer programs; implementation of the computer code and supporting algorithms; testing of existing code components

Validation

Verification, whether as a part of the activity or separate, of the overall replication/ reproducibility of results/experiments and other research outputs

Formal analysis

Application of statistical, mathematical, computational, or other formal techniques to analyze or synthesize study data

Investigation

Conducting a research and investigation process, specifically performing the experiments, or data/evidence collection

Resources

Provision of study materials, reagents, materials, patients, laboratory samples, animals, instrumentation, computing resources, or other analysis tools

Data Curation

Management activities to annotate (produce metadata), scrub data and maintain research data (including software code, where it is necessary for interpreting the data itself) for initial use and later reuse

Writing - Original Draft

Preparation, creation and/or presentation of the published work, specifically writing the initial draft (including substantive translation)

Writing - Review & Editing

Preparation, creation and/or presentation of the published work by those from the original research group, specifically critical review, commentary or revision – including pre-or postpublication stages

Visualization

Preparation, creation and/or presentation of the published work, specifically visualization/ data presentation

Supervision

Oversight and leadership responsibility for the research activity planning and execution, including mentorship external to the core team

Project administration

Management and coordination responsibility for the research activity planning and execution

Funding acquisition

Acquisition of the financial support for the project leading to this publication

*Reproduced from Brand et al. (2015), Learned Publishing 28(2), with permission of the authors.

Sample CRediT author statement

Zhang San:  Conceptualization, Methodology, Software  Priya Singh. : Data curation, Writing- Original draft preparation.  Wang Wu : Visualization, Investigation.  Jan Jansen :  Supervision. : Ajay Kumar : Software, Validation.:  Sun Qi:  Writing- Reviewing and Editing,

Read more about CRediT  here opens in new tab/window  or check out this  article from  Authors' Updat e:  CRediT where credit's due .

COMMENTS

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    Download the PDF: Note Taking Template for Journal Articles PDF. Use this worksheet to help you take notes and learn important content in journal articles. REMEMBER: The UNC Learning Center is a great resource! Both Peer Tutoring and Academic Coaching can help you create a balanced approach to succeeding at Carolina.

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    Note-Taking Templates. Use these templates to take notes from different kinds of sources. These templates will help you to understand: Each template is available in Google Doc format, for your convenience. Some WRDSB high schools have versions of these templates which have been customized to suit that school's specific requirements.

  5. PDF Note-Taking Template for Journal Articles

    Note-Taking Template for Journal Articles Title of Article: Publication: Author(s): Date: Background What was the context for this research? What has been studied or determined already? Methods & Nature of this Study What was the objective? How did the author(s) collect data? When and where did the research take place? ...

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    Template for Taking Notes on Readings Guided Reading Chart. This notetaking template is a helpful active reading tool to help identify questions you can ask of the reading as you move through it. Adapt the questions as needed. Download the Guided Reading Chart template (Word doc). Taking Notes on Articles/Books in the Humanities and Social Sciences

  7. Note-Taking Template for Journal Articles

    Download Note-Taking Template for Journal Articles Word Document Download Note-Taking Template for Journal Articles PDF File Developed and shared by The Learning Center , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  8. PDF Taking and Organizing Notes for Research Papers

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  9. How to take Research Notes

    Taking Notes By Hand: Research notebooks don't belong to you so make sure your notes are legible for others. Use post-it notes or tabs to flag important sections. Start sorting your notes early so that you don't become backed up and disorganized. Only write with a pen as pencils aren't permanent & sharpies can bleed through.

  10. Note making for dissertations

    Note making (as opposed to note taking) is an active practice of recording relevant parts of reading for your research as well as your reflections and critiques of those studies. Note making, therefore, is a pre-writing exercise that helps you to organise your thoughts prior to writing. ... Note taking is a passive process. When you take notes, ...

  11. How to Do Research: A Step-By-Step Guide: 4a. Take Notes

    On each note card: Use only one side to record a single idea, fact or quote from one source. It will be easier to rearrange them later when it comes time to organize your paper. Include a heading or key words at the top of the card. Include the Work Cited source card number. Include the page number where you found the information. Taking notes:

  12. Graphic Organizer: Research Note Taking Made Easy

    In this lesson, students use an editable graphic organizer template and a word processing program to fill out the template. (Or you can print the template for students to write on.) This note-taking template helps students collect and organize information related to a research topic. Note: For the purpose of this lesson, we chose the topic "Bats."

  13. Notetaking for UX Research: Templates & Methods

    📝 17 UX research note-taking templates Note-taking sounds simple enough, but it can be tough to keep up during research sessions—especially if you're the sole moderator of the session. Using a ready-made template, or adapting an example to fit your needs, makes things so much easier. We scoured the internet to put together this ...

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    By Meg McMahon Taking notes is a vital part of the User Research process. It helps all of the researchers gain a shared understanding of the interviews during the analysis phase of the project. As a note taker, you need to decide what is important to include to inform the tasks or questions asked in the interview and what information could help answer the research questions or further the ...

  15. 42 Timeless Tips On How To Effectively Take Research Notes

    40. Utilize Templates. Utilize note-taking templates for structured and efficient information organization. 41. Be Selective. Focus on capturing information that directly contributes to your research objectives. 42. Stay Consistent. Maintain a regular note-taking routine to cultivate a habit and enhance productivity. AI research and writing partner

  16. LibGuides: Researching the Literature Review: 3. Read & Take Notes

    Here are some tips to help you become a more focused reader: Read with your question in mind (usually your thesis or research question) Write a short " take home message " about the significance of the article as it relates to your research question. Then it is easy to transition from these notes to your literature review draft.

  17. PDF Taking Purposeful Research Notes

    How Notes Sheets eliminate possible note-taking problems: Problem #1: Students write too much information on a card Notes Sheet Solution: Each space on the sheet is only big enough for one fact or quote. Problem #2: Students fill out cards just to meet teacher requirements (i.e. "you must have 50 note cards for your paper") without thinking about the usefulness of the information or its ...

  18. A step-by-step guide to user research note taking

    Introduction. User research note taking is the process of recording information while conducting user research studies such as customer interviews, usability tests, stakeholder interviews, ethnographic studies, contextual inquiries, etc. It's important to take notes during user research sessions because it allows you to keep track of what you ...

  19. 10 Free Note Taking Templates in Google Docs, Word, & ClickUp

    This template is available in Word, Google Docs, and PDF formats for online and offline note-taking. 10. Microsoft Word Guest Speaker Note-taking Template by Template.net. via Template.net. Capture all the learnings, insights, and quotes highlighted by guest speakers using the Guest Speaker Note-taking Template.

  20. Note-taking template

    Note-taking template. There is no one perfect method for taking notes but it can be made more effective through the use of templates. It is important to find a method that works for you, both during a lecture or reading session, and for when you need to retrieve the information at a later date. Be prepared to try different techniques and adapt ...

  21. PDF Notes on Note-Taking: Review of Research and Insights for Students and

    This literature overview is designed as a resource for both students and instructors. to gain insight into what education research reveals about note-taking. Specifically, this. review discusses the cognitive mechanisms behind note-taking, how to assess the quality. of notes, and optimal practices.

  22. 10 Best Notes Templates for Effective Digital Note-Taking

    Source: The Organized Notebook, 2024. The SQ3R Note is a systematic approach to note-taking that promotes active engagement with the material. The acronym SQ3R stands for Survey, Question, Read, Recall, and Review. Survey: Get a general idea of the material by quickly scanning headings, subheadings, and other standout features. Question: Before you start reading, turn each heading into a question.

  23. Research Graphic Organizer: Note-Taking

    Students will use this graphic organizer template in the first step of their research process, honing note-taking skills as they document their sources, pick out relevant information from resources, and concisely record important details. After students gather information, they will be prompted to reflect and draw conclusions about their research.

  24. Results for research note taking template

    This is a Research Book Template for a Rock Unit of Study. It supports all stages of the research / writing process. This was designed with Google Classroom in mind. The resource includes a Gallery of Rocks to explore, brainstorming opportunities, note-taking space (gathering), source tracking, graphic organizers (planning), and the ...

  25. CRediT author statement

    Conducting a research and investigation process, specifically performing the experiments, or data/evidence collection. Resources. Provision of study materials, reagents, materials, patients, laboratory samples, animals, instrumentation, computing resources, or other analysis tools.