Graduate Research Hub

  • Preparing my thesis
  • Incorporating your published work in your thesis
  • Examples of thesis and chapter formats when including publications

The following examples are acceptable ways of formatting your thesis and chapters when including one or more publications.

Essential requirements

All theses with publications must have the following:

  • Declaration
  • Preface – noting collaborations, and contributions to authorship
  • Acknowledgements
  • Table of contents
  • List of tables, figures & illustrations
  • Main text/chapters
  • Bibliography or list of references

Main text examples

  • Chapter 1: Introduction
  • Chapter 2: Literature review
  • Chapter 3: Methods
  • Chapter 4: Paper 1 & general discussion
  • Chapter 5: Paper 2
  • Chapter 6: Regular thesis chapter – results
  • Chapter 7 : Regular thesis chapter/general discussion tying in published and unpublished work
  • Chapter 8: Conclusion
  • Appendices - May include CD, DVD or other material, also reviews & methods papers
  • Chapter 2: Methods
  • Chapter 3: Paper 1
  • Chapter 4: Regular thesis chapter
  • Chapter 6: Regular thesis chapter, final preliminary study
  • Chapter 7: General discussion
  • Chapter 5: Regular thesis chapter
  • Chapter 6: Regular thesis chapter
  • Chapter 7: Regular thesis chapter, final preliminary study
  • Chapter 8: General discussion
  • Chapter 4: Paper 2 - e.g. data paper, including meta analyses
  • Chapter 5: Paper 3
  • Chapter 6: Paper 4
  • Chapter 7: Paper 5
  • Chapter 3: Major paper
  • Chapter 4: Normal thesis chapter, final preliminary study
  • Chapter 5: General discussion

Chapter examples

  • Introduction – including specific aims and hypotheses
  • Introduction – including specific aims, hypotheses
  • Methods – results (including validation, preliminary) not included in the paper
  • Results (including validation, preliminary) not included in paper
  • Discussion – expansion of paper discussion, further method development
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Prepare your thesis

Throughout your research candidature you will work toward producing your final thesis. There are some key points to keep in mind when you start this process.

Your thesis must be a coherent and cohesive whole. You can submit a thesis including publications but we don't accept thesis by publication. Refer to the relevant Thesis and Examination policy (pdf, 392KB) and discuss this with your supervisor.

There are also certain formatting and referencing requirements that are outlined below.

You can also find more general information on research skills, planning and writing your thesis in the research skills for HDR students page. This includes literature reviews, writing up results and theses including publications.

Proofreading and editing

You can use an editor to prepare your thesis for submission. Make sure you discuss your plans with your supervisor and provide your editor with a copy of the University’s Thesis Submission and Examination Procedures (pdf, 180KB) .

When you use an editor:

  • include the editor’s name and a brief description of the service provided in your list of acknowledgements at the front of your thesis. For creative work, make sure this information is included when it's presented for examination.
  • you need to state the editor’s current or former area of academic specialisation if this is similar to your own.

Composition

You will find information on word limits in the below policies and procedures, or in your faculty or school handbook.

Word limits include footnotes and all material in the main body of the thesis. Bibliographies and appendices are not included in the overall word count.

  • University of Sydney (Higher Degree by Research) Rule (pdf, 877KB)
  • Thesis and Examination of Higher Degrees by Research Policy (pdf, 194KB)
  • Thesis and Examination of Higher Degrees by Research Procedures (pdf, 180KB)

If you have questions about formatting, you can speak to your supervisor or postgraduate coordinator.

Thesis frontispiece sections

The frontispiece includes the parts of your thesis before the main content.

Thesis title and abstract

The following upper limits apply to your title and abstract content submitted on RECS for the final lodgement:

  • thesis title: maximum 250 characters including spaces, in title case not uppercase.
  • thesis abstract: maximum 2000 characters including spaces.

Login to Sydney Student (go to ‘My studies’, then 'Research details') to update and maintain your thesis title and thesis abstract.

Note that there are no characters limits for the title and abstract in the actual pdf of the thesis. 

Your thesis title page should state:

  • title of the thesis
  • faculty name
  • the University’s full name – The University of Sydney
  • for theses only: A thesis submitted to fulfil requirements for the degree of Doctor/Master of Philosophy (or other higher degree by research)
  • for theses with a creative component: A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of requirements for the degree of Doctor/Master of Philosophy (or other higher degree by research).
  • a statement if you have been in receipt of a Research Training Program scholarship: "This research reported in this thesis was supported by the award of a Research Training Program scholarship to the PhD Candidate."

Statement of originality

You need to include a statement of originality, usually placed after the title page, for example:

This is to certify that to the best of my knowledge, the content of this thesis is my own work. This thesis has not been submitted for any degree or other purposes.

I certify that the intellectual content of this thesis is the product of my own work and that all the assistance received in preparing this thesis and sources have been acknowledged.

Signature* Name

*you should only include the signature in the copy you submit for examination, not the library copy.

Authorship attribution statement

If your thesis contains material you have previously published, you need to discuss an authorship attribution statement with your supervisor and submit this statement as part of your final thesis submission. It should indicate the name and publication details of the published work, as well as specify your contribution.

Such a statement typically appears in the frontispiece of your thesis.

If the publication in which your work has previously appeared has a convention about author order, then you need to include this information after each relevant attribution statement (for example,  Journal of XXXX  requires that the lead author must be corresponding author).

This only applies where you have made a substantial contribution to the paper. You cannot present minor contributions to published works in the main body of your thesis – these can only be included as appendices.

Example: Chapters published as papers/edited book chapters

Chapter x of this thesis is published as [citation]. I designed the study, analysed the data and wrote the drafts of the MS.

Chapter y of this thesis is published as [citation]. I designed the study, extracted the data and wrote the drafts of the MS.

Chapter z of this thesis is published as [citation]. I co-designed the study with the co-authors, interpreted the analysis done by A.N. Other and wrote the drafts of the MS.

Example: Published material distributed through the thesis

This thesis contains material published in [citation]. This is section x.y; figure s.t, and pages p-q of section y.z. I did... [describe your role].

Attesting your authorship attribution statement

You and your supervisor need to attest to an authorship attribution statement under the  Thesis and Examination Policy and Procedures (pdf, 185KB) . The following are suggested:

In addition to the statements above, in cases where I am not the corresponding author of a published item, permission to include the published material has been granted by the corresponding author.

Student Name, Signature, Date

As supervisor for the candidature upon which this thesis is based, I can confirm that the authorship attribution statements above are correct.

Supervisor Name, Signature, Date

You should refer to the Thesis and Examination of Higher Degrees by Research Procedures (pdf, 180KB) for information about the inclusion of published material you wrote, or contributed to as an author. This includes use of citations and quotations.

If your thesis contains material you have previously published, an authorship attribution statement, outlined above, may be included.

More information can be found in the Thesis and Examination of Higher Degrees by Research Policy (pdf, 194KB) and the University of Sydney (Higher Degree by Research) Rule (pdf, 877KB) .

The responsibilities of all researchers, academic staff and students are outlined in our Research Code of Conduct (pdf, 484KB) . This defines research misconduct and breaches of the Code related to plagiarism.

File type for submission

You need to submit your thesis as a pdf file. This is the required format for us to submit your thesis into Turnitin for similarity detection. If we receive a file in another format, then the conversion to pdf will not be controlled by you and may result in unacceptable or undesirable formatting changes. Be aware, once a thesis file is submitted for examination, it is not possible to withdraw it for revisions unless under the provisions of the Thesis and Examination of Higher Degree by Research Students Policy .

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In Australia the thesis is an extended written piece which reports on the results of a three to four year programme of research (in other countries the writing component is called a 'dissertation'). The thesis should incorporate a summary of the research undertaken during the program.

At ANU we do not usually require an oral defence or 'viva'. Your thesis will be sent to at least two examiners for evaluation . For more information about how examiners make a judgement on a thesis, read this paper by Mullins and Kiley called " It's a PhD, not a Nobel Prize ".

Types of thesis

There are three common types of thesis documents allowed in the ANU research award rules: a standard thesis of up to 100,000 words in length for a PhD (or 60,000 words for an M.Phil); a thesis by compilation (sometimes called a thesis by publication) and a thesis by creative works.

A thesis by compilation may include works that are solo or joint authored and accepted for publication. The compilation can include works which have been explicitly prepared for publication but not yet accepted, however these should not make up the majority of the text. It is expected that a thesis by compilation has linking text and a foreword to each chapter.

A thesis by creative works can include a multimedia or digital work, a film, an exhibition, a performance, a musical composition, a novel, a play, a series of poems, creative art work or other works as agreed by the candidate and the university. This work can be accompanied by an exegesis (commentary and interpretation of the work) or a dissertation (on a topic related to the work). Any written work accompanying a thesis by creative works must be substantial; between 30,000 and 60,000 words for a PhD and between 15,000 and 30,000 for an M.Phil. The final presentation of the work will be a public presentation; an exhibition, recital, lecture or some other form as agreed with the supervisor and the university.

Preparing the thesis

The Research Training team run a variety of workshops, seminars and courses aimed at helping you prepare your thesis as well as guidance on working with your supervisor to achieve a successful submission.

Writing the thesis

The Academic Skills and Learning Centre offer individual appointments to discuss thesis drafts and other issues such as managing your project. Their site also has a range of resources about writing a thesis to support you during your programme.

Reviewing the thesis

Writing about the impact of covid-19 in your thesis.

COVID-19 has changed the course of many research projects in ways that would not have been predicted at the outset you your PhD program. Research can always take unexpected turns and being able to take advantage of opportunities that arise, and be able to switch directions when necessary are useful skills to demonstrate. It is up to you to decide if you want to write about how your research has changed due to COVID-19. You are encouraged to talk with your supervisory panel to seek advice about what might be appropriate for your thesis.

The types of impact you might like to discuss include

  • changes to research sites or populations due to travel or access restrictions,
  • changes to research scope due to inability to access archival material,
  • changes in access to labs, or experimental equipment,
  • including theoretical instead of experimental content,

There is no right place to mention impacts, it will depend on the type of thesis and the type of research. It will also depend on how large the impact has been. For many the impact can be explained in a few sentences. For some projects a whole section of the thesis may be required. Some suggestions include

  • in the introduction when setting the scene for the research that follows
  • in the methodology section if changes to method was made part way through the research.
  • where discussing limitations of the research
  • where discussing ideas for future research

You should not include statements in your thesis that outline the impact of remote working, your physical or mental health or that of your family. While it is acknowledged that we have all been impacted in some way, these are not appropriate statements in your examined thesis and would not be assessed by an examiner.

Submitting the thesis and the examination process

It's good to know the regulations, processes and requirements around thesis submission and examination. Check out the information on finishing your degree for some inspiration!

ANU Thesis library

A great way to get your head around the expectations of a thesis is to read some! Check out the ANU Digital Thesis Library and find past successful theses in your discipline. 

Advisory information

  • Submitting a thesis
  • Policy: Glossary - student policies and procedures
  • 135 ANU (135 268)

University of Adelaide home page

Adelaide Graduate Research School

Including Publications In Your Thesis

All students are encouraged to publish their research during candidature.

Publications both give you an advantage for future employment, and show your examiners that your research has been accepted through a peer review process already. It is very important that you read the  guidelines for including publications   and the associated  FAQs   to ensure that you are including a publication appropriately and consult with your supervisor regarding the structure of your thesis. You will also need the  Statement of Authorship   form for all publications you include. You can view an  example statement of authorship  .

Of course you are not required to include publications in your thesis, you can choose to submit a conventional thesis, a combination thesis with some publications and work written specifically for the thesis, or a thesis with a major work. Descriptions of the different thesis types are in the 'Thesis' section of the  Research Student Handbook .

How do I format my thesis when including publications?

In the Specifications for Thesis you will find the essential components of a thesis in clause 3.3.  It is always important that those parts are included.  How to structure ‘the main body of work’ will depend on your publications, how many you are including and what additional information you need to include to ensure your reader (examiner) has a comprehensive understanding of your research.

The main challenges of including publications in a thesis are:

  • Maintaining flow of the thesis
  • Adding information to your thesis that was not possible in the publication due to style or word limits for so the research presented is complete

Note that thesis is no specific requirement for the number of publications that should be included in a thesis.  This will depend on factors such as discipline norms, depth/length of publications, student contribution to publications etc.

Example thesis formats

Please use these as a guide only as suggested ways a thesis could be formatted, other formats will be accepted as long as they meet the Specifications for Thesis requirements.

Example 1 - Thesis by publication

Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: Literature Review

Chapter 3: Materials and Methods

Chapter 4: Statement of Authorship and Publication 1

Chapter 5: Statement of Authorship and Publication 2

Chapter 6: Statement of Authorship and Publication 3

Chapter 7: Statement of Authorship and Publication 4

Chapter 8: Statement of Authorship and Publication 5

Chapter 9: Discussion and Conclusions

Example 2 - Combination Thesis

Chapter 2: Materials and Methods

Chapter 3: Statement of Authorship and Publication 1 (Literature Review)

Chapter 4: Regular thesis chapter

Chapter 6: Regular thesis chapter

Chapter 7: Statement of Authorship and Publication 3

Chapter 8: General Discussion

Example 3 - Combination Thesis

Chapter 5: Regular thesis chapter

Chapter 7: Regular thesis chapter

Example 4 - Combination Thesis

Chapter 1: Introduction including literature review

Chapter 4: Statement of Authorship and Publication – large

Publication chapter formats

When you have additional information that should be included in addition to your publication.

Example 1 - Publication with introduction

  • Statement of Authorship
  • Introduction – including specific aims and hypotheses
  • Publication 1

Example 2 - Publication with additional information

  • Introduction – including specific aims, hypotheses
  • Methods – results (including validation, preliminary) not included in the paper
  • Results (including validation, preliminary) not included in paper
  • Publication
  • Discussion – expansion of paper discussion

Example University of Adelaide theses including publications

The following theses have incorporated publications well.  As you will see there, other than ensuring that you have met the requirements of the Specifications for Thesis, is no set format or style that must be used.

Law, Cheryl Suwen (2019) Advanced Engineering of Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Photonic Crystals for Optical Sensing Applications   http://hdl.handle.net/2440/119957

Feenstra, John Erik (2018)  Modelling the population and catchability of the southern rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii) in South Australia and Victoria using commercial fisheries catch rate data http://hdl.handle.net/2440/118088

Health and Medical Sciences

Amare, Azmeraw Tayelgn (2018) Genetic predictors of response to pharmacotherapy in patients with mood disorders: steps on the path to personalised psychiatry http://hdl.handle.net/2440/118191

Giezenaar, Caroline Gerda Thea (2018) Gastrointestinal mechanisms in the ‘anorexia of ageing’ – effects of dietary protein http://hdl.handle.net/2440/123238

Professions

Edjigu, Habtamu Tesfaye (2019) Essays on international trade and firm performance http://hdl.handle.net/2440/119402

Haque, Qazi G M Ziaul (2018)  Bayesian estimation of monetary DSGE models and testing for indeterminacy    http://hdl.handle.net/2440/114258

Aubert, Matthew Kevern (2018) Molecular and genetic characterisation of early aleurone development in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) http://hdl.handle.net/2440/120200

Badger, Skye Michelle (2019) Quality of evidence used for the management of antimicrobial resistance in Australian animals http://hdl.handle.net/2440/122582

Other examples are available in the University Library: https://digital.library.adelaide.edu.au/  

Select Theses and do a key word search.

Finding theses

University of sydney theses, higher degree by research theses.

We hold theses written by the University’s Higher Degree by Research (PhD or Masters by Research) students in our collections.

You can find a University of Sydney thesis by searching the  Library catalogue . Select the “Advanced search” and then select “USYD Theses” from the “Material type” dropdown menu.

You can also find digital theses by searching directly in the Sydney eScholarship repository .

Access a digital or digitised thesis

Many of the University’s digital and digitised theses are openly available for download through the Sydney eScholarship repository .

Theses marked “University of Sydney Access” are only available to current University staff and students. Libraries and private researchers can request to purchase a copy of a University of Sydney Access only thesis for AUD$18.50 (incl. GST, within Australia) or AUD$40.00 (international requests).

To purchase a digital thesis, you need to complete one of the relevant request forms below and submit it to [email protected] :

  • Individuals requesting a thesis, or library requesting on behalf of an individual
  • Libraries requesting a copy to be included in their collection

All requests for copies of material held at the University of Sydney Library must comply with the  Copyright Act of 1968 .

Access a hard copy thesis

Theses that are only available in printed format can be viewed in the Rare Books and Special Collections Library , Level 1, Fisher Library.

We are currently running a project to digitise hardcopy theses. You can request an update to find out where a particular thesis is in our digitisation queue by emailing [email protected] .

We don’t digitise theses on request.

Honours or postgraduate coursework theses

Search for an honours or postgraduate coursework thesis in the repository , then use the filters on the left side of the results page to narrow by “Type”.

You can also search the Honours and Postgraduate Coursework theses collection for a faculty, school or discipline (if available).

There are limited numbers of honours theses in the Sydney eScholarship repository as we have strict requirements for submission of honours theses . If you can't find the thesis you're looking for, we suggest contacting the relevant faculty office.

Theses from other Australian and New Zealand universities

Find a thesis from other Australian or New Zealand universities by searching:

  • Australian theses via Trove
  • Libraries Australia for Higher Degree theses awarded from 1989 onwards
  • Education Research Theses for citations and abstracts from theses submitted from 1919 onwards.

If you’re interested in a thesis that isn't available online, you can request the item through our Resource Sharing Service .

International theses

For theses written and submitted at universities outside of Australia, try the following resources:

  • Open Access Theses and Dissertations
  • DART-Europe E-theses Portal
  • British Library Electronic Digital Thesis Online Service (EThOS)
  • EBSCO open dissertations
  • French Thesis-On-Line Repository
  • History Online – postgraduate theses in History submitted in the UK since 1995
  • Index to Theses – listing of theses with abstracts accepted for higher degrees by universities in Great Britain and Ireland since 1716
  • Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations – North American theses
  • ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Related information

For more help finding and accessing theses, speak to our friendly library staff.

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Finding UNSW theses

UNSW PhD or Masters by Research theses can be located via  UNSWorks . For honours theses, contact the UNSW faculty, school or the author directly.

For more information on rights of use and removing material in UNSWorks see  Copyright - UNSWorks .

Finding Australian and international theses

Australian theses.

To find Australian theses, search via:

Library collection To find UNSW Library’s collection of Australian and international theses in print, search  Library collection  for a title or keywords. Refine your results by selecting  Refine my results > Resource types > Dissertations  in the column on the left.

Trove - Australian print and digital theses Trove includes theses at all levels, including PhD, masters and honours. To limit your search to Australian theses only, use  Trove - Research & Reports  search. Tick the  Australian content  box. Next to  Format - select  Thesis  from the drop-down list.

International theses

To find international theses, search via:

BASE BASE academic search engine provides access to the repositories of 8,000 institutions. 60% of the full-text documents are open access.

CORE CORE aggregates open access research outputs from repositories and journals worldwide.

DART-Europe e-theses portal DART-Europe is a partnership of research libraries and library consortia working to improve global access to European research theses.

EBSCO open dissertations Includes the content from American Doctoral Dissertations in addition to theses and dissertations from around the world. Coverage from 1955.

Open access theses and dissertations OATD provides access to open access graduate theses from over 1100 colleges, universities, and research institutions.

Theses Canada Theses and dissertations in the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) collection.

Web of Science The Web of Science ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Citation Index provides the citation information of theses from around the world. To search for thesis citations, change the search from Web of Science Core Collection to ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Citation Index .

Non-UNSW theses

To obtain a thesis that is not available via the resources listed above, contact the library of the holding/publishing institution directly. Conditions of access to a thesis are determined by the author and holding library, and is outside the control of UNSW Library.

Depositing your thesis

How to  deposit  your UNSW thesis.

Thesis preparation, submission and examination

Rules and procedures for your thesis.

It is important that you understand your responsibilities and the relevant procedures you need to follow during the thesis submission process.

Nomination of examiners

The University requires nomination and selection of graduate research thesis examiners to be based on the principle that students receive an impartial examination by high-quality examiners in the relevant field of research.

The examiners must not have had any involvement in the preparation of the thesis, as a member of the supervisory panel or as an academic advisor for the student. The University expects all supervisors, faculties and examiners to report all actual or potential conflicts of interest.

The University applies the Conflict of Interest Guidelines [PDF 28MB] of the Australian Council of Graduate Research.

PhD/MPhil students

You should discuss possible examiners with your Principal Supervisor and other supervisors at least three months in advance of your thesis submission date. Your supervisor will contact the possible examiners to ascertain their availability to examine your thesis.

Once confirmed, your supervisor will submit an electronic examiner nomination via the HDR Thesis Examination portal to the Thesis Examination Subcommittee for review and approval. This normally includes a list of:

  • Five examiners for a doctoral degree
  • Four for a Master of Philosophy degree

You will have to electronically confirm the selection of the nominated examiners.

For further information on the nomination of examiners, see Schedule 2 in the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy.

Master of Research (MRes) students

You should discuss with your Principal Supervisor the names of any persons that you do not wish to examine your thesis at least two months before your expected thesis submission date.

Your supervisor will contact possible examiners to ascertain their availability to examine your thesis. Once confirmed, your supervisor will submit an electronic examiner nomination via the HDR Thesis Examination portal to the Thesis Examination Subcommittee for review and approval.

For further information on the nomination of examiners, see the Master of Research - Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Procedures and Schedule 2 in the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy .

Thesis preparation

Before you submit your thesis, it is important to ensure you are following all content, presentation, formatting, and length requirements. These may vary depending on your faculty, department or examiner’s needs. While your supervisor can guide you, it is ultimately your responsibility to ensure you follow University standards.

Your thesis must showcase the results of your original research during your candidature, with Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) theses requiring a distinct contribution to knowledge.

Unless agreed under a formal Joint or Cotutelle enrolment contract, a student may not submit as the main content of the thesis any work or material which has been previously submitted for any degree successfully completed at Macquarie University or elsewhere. However, they may incorporate that work or material in the thesis if the student specifies the work or material which has been so incorporated. At least half of the work done towards the thesis must be undertaken while formally enrolled as a graduate research student at Macquarie University.

While the presentation of research may vary, it generally includes a written component. Non-written thesis formats and media must be approved by your Faculty Executive Dean.

Your thesis must be written in English and be of satisfactory literary presentation. Theses written in full or in part in another language require approval by the Thesis Examination Subcommittee, which must be sought as soon as possible by your supervisor. If you are on a joint enrolment contract, you will not require separate approval for submission in a language other than English.

Note: The use of Generative AI to wholly generate a research output for examination is prohibited. Text-based Generative AI tools such as ChatGPT fall within the broad definition of contract cheating services according to the TEQSA Act 2011 (Cth), s5. Refer to the ' Using Generative Artificial Intelligence in Research' Guidance Note for further information.

Thesis by publication

A thesis by publication may include relevant papers, such as conference presentations, which have been published, accepted, submitted or prepared for publication for which at least half of the research has been undertaken during your enrolment. The papers must form a coherent and integrated body of work, which focusses on a single thesis project or set of related questions or propositions. The papers are one part of the thesis, rather than a separate component or appendix.

As a general rule, you will need to have enough papers to support the important findings from the research, presented in a logical and coherent way. Most theses by publication have between 2 and 8 papers in combinations of sole and co-authored papers.

You must complete (and submit with your thesis for examination) an  Authorship Contribution Statement  to document the contribution of all authors to each of the proposed or published research papers. This requirement is in accordance with the  Macquarie University Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research and the  Authorship Standard . If there are multiple authors (5+) on the Authorship Statement, the contribution of each author must be noted but the form can be signed only by the student and supervisor (and corresponding author, if not supervisor). You may also choose to include the details of the contribution of all authors in the footnotes/endnotes or cover page for each experimental chapter.

In addition, section 1.6.55 of the Research Training Program (RTP) Guidelines sets out the requirement that the Commonwealth's contribution is acknowledged in research publications by RTP students where related to a research project.

The acknowledgement must include mention of the student's support through an 'Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship'.

An example acknowledgement statement would be:"This research is supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP) Scholarship."

For further information on thesis by publication, see Schedule 1 in the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy and the Examiner Guidelines [PDF 202KB].

Creative component

If you are including a creative component, you must specify its size in relation to the critical component. Creative components must be submitted in a form which enables further examination/re-examination and allows for Library deposit.

Students may also choose to merge their creative and critical components, as in ficto-critical writing or essay films. In this case, you still have to include an explicit critical analysis in written form. Its length is based on Faculty expectations but is often 25,000 words for an MPhil thesis and 50,000 words for a PhD thesis.

For further information on theses with creative components, see Schedule 5 in the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy and the Examiner Guidelines [PDF 202KB].

Relationship between Master of Research (MRes) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

The research project undertaken in the MRes is intended as a gateway to your PhD or MPhil project. However, the MRes thesis does not form part of your MPhil or PhD directly but works to help you better understand your research area and demonstrate your research ability.

If your topic for your PhD or MPhil thesis is related to your MRes, you must include a clear statement outlining what work was done for the MRes. If you must include any text or data from your MRes thesis in your PhD or MPhil thesis, you must identify this as such, as it is non-examinable. Failure to do so is a breach of Academic Integrity.

Presentation and formatting

The written component of your thesis should be presented:

  • in A4 pdf format
  • double or 1.5 spacing
  • margins no less than 3cm on the left border, 1.5cm on the right border and 1.5cm on the top and bottom
  • pages numbered consecutively

If one of your examiners requests a hard copy of your thesis for examination, you will have to submit a copy with a temporary binding of a stitched and glued soft cover or in hardback form (spiral binding or a loose-leaf binder of the spring-type or screw-type is not acceptable). During binding, the edges should be trimmed.

Preliminary pages

A thesis should incorporate the following pages in order:

  • the thesis title
  • your names and degrees
  • your university department
  • date of submission/re-submission.
  • If applicable, the name of the organisation, institute or laboratory where the research was conducted
  • a table of contents
  • a summary of approximately 200-300 words for MRes/MPhil and 300-500 for PhD
  • a signed statement [DOCX 16KB] indicating that:
  • the work has not been submitted for a higher degree before
  • you have referenced all sources and the extent to which you used them
  • your Ethics Committee approval and protocol number (if applicable).

Cotutelle students should submit a statement [PDF 115KB] indicating that the thesis is being submitted in accordance with their Cotutelle agreement. If you have completed a thesis by publication , you must also specify your specific contribution to the conception, data collection, analysis and writing of each paper. The contribution of others to the preparation of the thesis or to individual parts of the thesis should also be specified in the thesis.

  • Impact of COVID-19 changes on the thesis (if applicable). If you have had to make changes to your research due to the impact of COVID-19, you may want to include a statement [DOCX 28KB] about the impact of COVID-19 in your thesis. Note that this form should be used only to explain changes to the expected experiments or thesis direction. As the standard for thesis award remains the same, this form should not be used to justify the submission of poor quality work.
  • Acknowledgements (if applicable).
  • The written component of the thesis.

Diagrams, figures and tables

These may vary depending on your department.

These are general suggestions for normal practice:

  • Diagrams and figures should be inserted in the appropriate place in the text.
  • All figures should include a legend either at the bottom or next to the figures.
  • Small tables should be inserted in the text. Lengthy or bulky tables should appear as an appendix.

Thesis length

Note: the maximum thesis length does not include footnotes or references.

The editing process for research students is governed by the ‘ Guidelines for Editing Research Theses ’ as set out by the Institute of Professional Editors Limited (IPEd). As per the Guidelines, professional editing services can assist research students with copyediting (including language and illustrations) and proofreading to ensure that all thesis components are complete, consistent and correctly placed.

Whether you engage a professional editor or ask someone you know who is a good writer to check your manuscript, they will need to abide by these Guidelines and should be acknowledged in your thesis.

For more information about getting your thesis edited, check out our ‘ How do I get my thesis professionally edited ’ guide.

Thesis submission

Before you submit your thesis, it is important to ensure you prepare any additional required documents required.

Required documents

In addition to your thesis, you may also be required to submit other documents with your submission. You should prepare these documents before you commence the submission process.

Australian Higher Education Graduation Statement

The Australian Higher Education Graduation Statement (AHEGS) is provided by Australian higher education institutions to graduating students on completion of the requirements for a particular higher education award. It provides a description of the nature, level, context and status of studies that were pursued by the individual named. Its purpose is to:

  • assist in both national and international recognition of Australian qualifications
  • promote international mobility and professional recognition of graduates.

For the Statement to be issued, you have to provide a thesis abstract of strictly no more than 100 words.

You must upload the abstract as part of your thesis submission in the HDR Thesis Examination Portal .

Ethics approval

If you were required to obtain Ethics approval for your research, you will need to provide a copy of the Macquarie University Ethics Committee letter with your thesis.

You must upload the approval letter with your thesis submission in the HDR Thesis Examination Portal . You should also have this information on hand to complete the required fields in the portal.

Unofficial academic transcript - PhD/MPhil students only

If you had to complete coursework units ( HDRT units ) during your candidature, you will need to upload an unofficial copy of your academic transcript with your thesis submission. You can download a copy of your transcript from eStudent .

Six Digit Field of Research (FOR) codes

You will have to provide at least one Field of Research (FOR) code on your thesis submission form. You can review the FOR codes on the Australian Bureau of Statistics website . If you are unsure which code to list, contact your supervisor for advice prior to commencing your thesis submission.

Submitting your thesis

When your thesis is complete and appropriately formatted, you must submit your thesis via the HDR Thesis Examination Portal . For more information view the instructions for submitting your thesis via the HDR Thesis Examination Portal [PDF 684KB].

Note for Master of Research (MRes) students: If your thesis is submitted late, you will be penalised one percentage point from your final MRes thesis grade per calendar day until your thesis is submitted. Submission will be taken as the date your thesis is submitted electronically via the portal.

If your supervisor is unable or unwilling to approve your thesis submission, the matter should be referred to the Faculty’s Associate Dean, Research Training and Partnerships for resolution.

Once your thesis is submitted, your candidature is considered to be 'Under Examination' (UX).

For information about the examination process, see the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy .

Cotutelle and Joint Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) students

If you are enrolled in a Cotutelle or Joint PhD program, refer to your agreement for additional information relating to your examiners and thesis examination. Joint PhD students with a lead university that is not Macquarie University must provide the following information to [email protected] to ensure your enrolment is not ceased:

  • evidence of your thesis submission
  • 100 words abstract for your Australian Higher Education Graduation Statement
  • a point of contact at the partner university

Celebrating your thesis submission

thesis by publication australia

Then it’s time to promote yourself!  Join the Graduate Research Academy Network LinkedIn group and share a short statement of the most interesting, unusual or exciting thing about your research (no more than 25 words). Don’t forget to upload your selfie too!

Professional Portrait

To better equip you during your future job searches and improve your online profile, the GRA is also offering you the opportunity to have your professional portrait taken for free . Having a great-quality professional headshot is a fantastic way of showing confidence in your professional capabilities. You can use the images on your social media profiles, your resume, your website or blog, your business cards and even marketing collateral.

The next photo session dates will be advised soon. Keep an eye out here.

If you have any questions about this service, please contact  [email protected] .

Examination and completion

After your thesis is submitted and your examiners finalised, your thesis will be sent for examination. Each examiner is sent your thesis together with examination instructions guidelines. Your examiners are required to complete their examination and provide their report within four weeks for MRes theses and five weeks for PhD and MPhil theses. Students and supervisors should not contact examiners during the examination process.

For detailed information about the examination process, see the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy .

Examination outcomes

  • Award: The thesis meets all required standards in terms of the nature and quality of work undertaken, and the degree can be awarded without any further work by the student, other than the correction of typographical errors and small lapses of expression and presentation in the final copy.
  • Award (after Corrections): The thesis meets all required standards in terms of the nature and quality of work undertaken, and the degree can be awarded without further examination once the student has made a number of corrections and clarifications in the thesis. The corrections are to be completed to the satisfaction of the Thesis Examination Subcommittee and are required to be completed within one month for MRes students and two months for MPhil/PhD students.
  • Revision and re-examination: The thesis does not yet meet all required standards for the award of the degree and the student should complete a further period of research and writing. Normally, under this category, a student would re-enrol for a period of up to one-year full-time (or equivalent). The thesis will then be submitted for re-examination.
  • Not award: The thesis does not meet the required standards for the award of the degree, and does not warrant a further period of research and writing.

MRes students will also be awarded a percentage score for their thesis. The maximum mark a thesis can receive after re-examination is 64%.

For further information about examination criteria and outcomes, see the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy.

Revise and resubmit

In some cases, you may be advised to revise and resubmit your thesis for re-examination. During re-examination, examiners are requested to determine whether or not the revised thesis now meets the requirements of the degree as specified.

Re-submission must occur within one year from the date of the decision for revision for PhD and MPhil students and three months from the date of the decision for revision for MRes students.

For re-submission, you will need to submit your thesis in accordance with the relevant submission requirements. You must also include documentation that addresses the matters raised in your initial examination. This documentation must not be examiner-specific.

  • Initial examiners will receive an invitation to re-examine your thesis. Re-examiners are allowed access to your unrevised thesis, along with all reports from the University and initial examiners (subject to privacy requirements).
  • If your initial examiners are unavailable, there may be new examiners appointed. You should make no direct contact with your examiners – any contact you wish to make must be approved by the Research and Research Training Committee.
  • If you do not complete your re-submission in the determined time-frame, you will be deemed to have failed the requirements for the award of your degree.
  • If you fail to meet the requirements of the degree on re-examination, you cannot apply for further re-examination.

Note that revision of your thesis requires you to re-enrol and pay any required fees.

For further information about the resubmission process, see the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy .

Final thesis submission

All graduate research students, including PhD, MPhil and MRes students must submit a final digital copy of their thesis for inclusion in the in Macquarie University Theses which is Macquarie University’s open access digital collection. Access to graduate research theses is facilitated through the University Library.

Macquarie University Theses is designed to promote globally, preserve locally and provide open access to the research theses of Macquarie University's students. Records from Macquarie University Theses are also accessible from sources such as Trove Australia, Google and Google Scholar. The Macquarie University’s open access digital  theses collection gives your research greater potential readership, ensures your research is protected from destruction and provides security through adherence to metadata standards and access rights. The Library and the GRA work together to implement, manage and oversee the submission of digital theses for inclusion in Macquarie University Theses.

Further information and FAQs can be found Theses @ Macquarie University .

Once the thesis has been examined and passed by the Research and Research Training Committee, you have to submit  a ‘HDR Thesis Submission to Library Request’ eForm accompanied by the final digital copy of the thesis.

To submit, you must:

  • Log in to  eStudent
  • Click in the Forms tile
  • Search for the ‘HDR Thesis Submission to Library Request’
  • Complete the form

After submission of the eForm, your request will go to the Graduate Research Academy. You will receive an email notification confirming that your request has been completed.

The Library will accept your digital thesis in PDF, Word and RTF format. The final display format on Macquarie University Theses is PDF and the Library will convert your thesis into this format as required. If you intend to submit your thesis in PDF format, security protection or password access should not be applied.

Parts of your thesis may be subject to copyright. If you are concerned about copyright issues related to your thesis, check Macquarie's  information on copyright , talk to Macquarie University's  Copyright Coordinator or speak to your Research Librarian.

The University recognises that in particular cases commercial and confidentiality issues may necessitate a moratorium on the digital version of a thesis. This needs to be addressed at the earliest point during the candidacy. Approval from the Research and Research Training Committee (RRTC), with support from the Head of Department, is required for such access restrictions to be imposed on a thesis. For further information, please email [email protected] .

If your thesis contains material you have written and have published or is in the process of being published, you can request an embargo on your thesis. For further information about embargos, please contact the Library by emailing [email protected].

A thesis may include supplementary files, e.g. creative component or data files, that you wish to restrict from full open access. If this is the case, please email the Library at [email protected] to discuss options for managing restrictions to supplementary files.

Hardbound guidelines

If your faculty requests a hardbound copy of your thesis, you should prepare the thesis in accordance with the following requirements:

  • The spine should state the title of the thesis (abbreviated if necessary), your family name, and the date of submission or re-submission.
  • The words should be in gold lettering of suitable size.
  • When published papers are submitted as additional evidence, they should be bound in the back of the thesis as an appendix. When they form part of the thesis body, they should be bound into the thesis itself.

International students

If you are an international student Visa holder, your visa date will be checked by the University when your thesis examination outcome has been finalised. If your visa is found to have more than 4 weeks’ validity, the Graduate Research Academy will report the thesis submission to the Department of Home Affairs (DIHA) . You are responsible for contacting DIHA regarding your change of visa status. If you wish to stay in Australia to wait for examination results, DIHA will need to be consulted. Contact DIHA directly for advice.

For further information about thesis preparation, submission and examination, see the HDR Thesis Preparation, Submission and Examination Policy .

Celebrate your achievement!

thesis by publication australia

Then it's time to promote yourself again by sharing your success and selfie photo on the  Graduate Research Academy Network LinkedIn group!

  • Graduate Research Academy
  • Level 2, 16 Wally's Walk
  • Macquarie University NSW 2109
  • T: +61 (2) 9850 4741
  • E: [email protected]

Submit your thesis

Ensure that your thesis is appropriately formatted.

Related links

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All Australian National University theses are in digital form. You can search for them online through the  theses collection in ANU Open Research , and are also searchable via the  Library Catalogue .

The majority of ANU theses are openly accessible but a small number are restricted due to cultural sensitivities, copyright controls or other restrictions.

Digital theses

Digital theses can be searched online through the  theses collection in ANU Open Research .

The Australian National University Library’s theses collection holds the research output of the University’s academic community over the last 60 years. The first ANU thesis was awarded in 1953.

By digitising its print theses collection, ANU Library delivers the University’s unique and original research in a freely available, open access online collection. Digital delivery expands engagement with the Library’s collections, provides visibility to the university’s scholarship, and supports the careers of its academic community.

Restrictions

The majority of theses are openly accessible; however, some may not be available under open access conditions due to author or copyright restrictions.

If an author wishes to restrict access to their thesis (or part of it), they can elect to do so as part of the online submission process. If after 12 months an extension to that restriction is required, a new application must be completed.

In the case of a Higher Degree by Research thesis, approval is required from the Dean, Higher Degree Research and can be sought by filling out an  Extension of Thesis Restriction of Access Request Form  or emailing  [email protected] . If approved, the Open Research team will be notified and restrict access to the online version of your thesis in line with the decision made.

Read our  Restriction Infosheet  for more information about applying for restrictions on theses.

Hard copy theses

Hard copy theses can be requested  for reading within the Library, but cannot be borrowed.

The majority of theses are available for research or study, however some may not be available due to author or copyright restrictions.

To check whether access restrictions apply to a particular thesis, ask at the  Menzies Library  Information Desk or email the  ANU Library .

Non-ANU readers are advised to check in advance whether they will be granted access to a particular thesis.

Location of hard copy theses

  • ANU Doctoral and Masters’ theses (1953-2018) –  Menzies Library
  • Master of Law and International Law theses (pre-October 1987) –  Law Library
  • ANU Honours theses – held by the  ANU Colleges
  • ANU Law Honours theses (selected) – Law Library or online through  ANU Open Research
  • Non-ANU theses (without access restrictions) are on the open shelves.
  • Hard copy theses requests

Related links

  • Finding theses
  • Ask a librarian
  •   Theses   +61 2 6125 2005   Send email
  • Find theses for your research

Find UQ theses

Online uq theses via uq espace, print copies of uq theses, uq schools' theses, ordering copies of uq theses (for non-uq clients).

  • Australian theses
  • International theses
  • Further help

UQ Library holds Higher Degree by Research theses and some Honours and Coursework master's theses. 

Print or online UQ theses

  • Go to the Advanced search of Library Search
  • Enter your search keywords in the search box
  • Use the drop-down option to choose UQ School, Centre or Institute  and add the name of the School
  • Under Content type select Theses
  • Click Search to see the results
  • Under Refine my results you can sort the results further by relevance or date.

thesis by publication australia

UQ eSpace is the institutional repository for UQ research publications, including UQ Higher Degree by Research theses

Find online versions of UQ theses :

  • Go to  UQ eSpace
  • Enter your search keywords or title
  • At Work type choose Thesis
  • Scroll down to click Search

A UQ staff or student log in may be required to view the full text of online theses. Some theses may be unavailable due to embargoes.

To request access to a print copy of a UQ thesis:

UQ students and staff and Alumni Library members: 

  • Make sure you have logged in 
  • Click on the  Available at link in the result in Library Search

 Illustrative screenshot of the Request Options Place a request link

  • Complete the form details. 

Illustrative screenshot of the Fyer Library request form

  • Click on the  Place a Request  button

Many theses are kept within collections in University of Queensland schools.

This is often the only way to obtain honours theses and coursework master's theses.

Please contact the appropriate school .

If you are NOT a UQ student, UQ staff member or Alumni member of the UQ Library you can:

  • order copies of UQ Theses
  • place requests through your own educational institution or local library.
  • order copies online via the National Library of Australia's  Copies Direct service.
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  • Last Updated: May 30, 2024 3:19 PM
  • URL: https://guides.library.uq.edu.au/how-to-find/theses
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Charles Sturt University

PhD by Prior Publication – Information for Prospective Applicants

What is a PhD by Prior Publication?

The PhD by Prior Publication is suitable for established researchers with a significant historical record of refereed publications who wish to gain a formal qualification to recognise their standing within a field. During the program, the candidate must develop a thesis for examination comprising of the prior publications and a significant integrating essay that demonstrates both a capacity for independent research and a significant, original and scholarly contribution to knowledge or understanding.

This is not a short-cut to a PhD. Admission to the program is subject to external assessment and requires the demonstration of a significant body of quality academic publication that will be drawn together, with minimal additional research, as a doctoral thesis. It is important also to differentiate this program from a Doctor of Philosophy whereby the research is undertaken during the course of the degree and a series of publications may be generated.

More about this process as follows:

Applicants must meet the entry requirements for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy program as outlined in the Charles Sturt University Admissions Procedure . Candidates must provide the following evidence to demonstrate that they are an experienced researcher with a significant historical record of refereed publications of doctoral standard:

  • the publications (which may include books and non-print materials) that will be included in the submission presented for examination;
  • any information on the quality and citations of the publications to be included in the submission;
  • a statement making clear the applicant's contribution to all jointly-authored publications;
  • a statement from the co-authors of any jointly-authored publications confirming the extent of the applicant's contribution to these publications;
  • indicates the way in which the work has developed;
  • demonstrates the contemporary relevance of each publication;
  • makes clear the way in which the publications make an original scholarly contribution to knowledge;
  • provides a thematic overview which serves to link the individual publications into an integrated whole;
  • confirms the papers have not previously been submitted as part of a degree;
  • includes a statement indicating whether or not additional research activity may be required in order to convert the publications to an integrated whole, and if so, an outline of the necessary work.

The application for the Doctor of Philosophy by Publication will be subject to external assessment.

The identified field of research needs to be one in which Charles Sturt has supervisory expertise and capacity. This is determined by the Faculty.

An applicant who has already been awarded a PhD will not be admitted to the degree.

The Dean of Graduate Studies will review all of the documentation provided at the admission application stage and consider the recommendation of the external assessor. This input is utilised as advice about suitability for admission only; it is not part of the examination process.

Enrolment would be for six to twelve months full-time-equivalent. In this period under the guidance of a Principal Supervisor, the candidate will prepare a thesis that incorporates their previously published research and a substantial integrating essay, which may involve additional introductory and concluding chapters. While some minor research element may be permitted in this period, the primary focus of the candidature is preparation of the thesis for examination.

The Higher Degree by Research Policy states that where candidates undertake the thesis by by prior publication, they must:

  • demonstrate the originality and significance of the body of research published or submitted for publication; and
  • present these publications and supplementary chapters or essay that integrates the work and places the publications into the context of the research question, in the thesis.

The Higher Degree by Research Procedure states that the thesis must:

  • published or otherwise made accessible to the public following peer review or a similar level of peer scrutiny;
  • approved for submission for the thesis at the time of the candidate’s admission; and
  • sets out how the works make a significant original contribution to knowledge in the discipline or field;
  • contains a substantial theoretical component relevant to the discipline or field; and
  • may involve additional introductory and concluding chapters.

The maximum length for the integrating essay and any other text in support of the publications is 20,000 words

Examination of the thesis is undertaken by three examiners, all of whom are external to the University. Examiners are nominated by the Principal Supervisor, endorsed by the Faculty and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies. The examination criteria are outline in the Higher Degree by Research Policy .

Please refer to the Higher Degree by Research courses page for information about programs, admission requirements, contacts and how to apply.

Alternatively, you are welcome to contact the appropriate Faculty Sub-Dean Graduate Studies to discuss your options in more detail.

Charles Sturt University also offers a free-call contact number for course information – phone 1800 334 733.

How do I find Australian theses?

Students in desks and browsing library shelves in Monash University Library

Sievers, Wolfgang (1963),  Monash University: Main Library, students at desks  1963 nla.obj-143591614

Theses completed for higher research degrees (PhD, Masters or Honours) form an important body of original research.

There are a number of places you can search for Australian theses, we have outlined the three main sources for you below.

National Library collection

While the Library holds a selection of theses presented to Australian universities, we do not have a comprehensive collection. 

To search the Library's collection for a thesis on a particular subject:

  • Go to our  online catalogue  
  • Type in your subject keywords, and add the keywords  dissertation or thesis, for example:  "global warming" AND thesis  ;  alpine AND thesis

We also hold a number of useful reference books on finding Australian theses, including:

  • Guide to Microform Research Collections in the National Library of Australia .  1992. See pages 148-149 for an outline of the Australian and overseas theses held on microform at the National Library. This title is available on open access in the Newspapers and Family History zone .
  • Union List of Higher Degree Theses in Australian University Libraries . 1959+ A list of theses submitted for a higher degree at Australian universities. The list is arranged by author, subject and keyword indexes. Supplements covering the period  1961-1976  and  1976-1991  can also be accessed via the catalogue.

Other Australian collections

Use the Library's discovery service  Trove to search for Australian and overseas theses in over one thousand Australian collecting institutions.

For a basic thesis search:

  • Go to the homepage of Trove, type in your search terms and hit search
  • Select the Books & Libraries category
  • Select the 'Thesis' facet under 'Format' on the right-hand side.

If you'd like to use more advanced options in your search, on the results page you can click on advanced search (underneath the magnifying glass icon) to see the options available. 

Hint: to find thesis that are freely available online, narrow your search results to 'Freely available' under 'Online'.

You can find more search tips and strategies on Trove's  Australian theses blog .

University libraries

In most cases, a copy of a thesis is deposited in the library of the relevant university.

You can access the online catalogues of Australian university libraries through the  Australian Libraries Gateway . Links to many university libraries are also available through the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) .

The National Library of Australia acknowledges Australia’s First Nations Peoples – the First Australians – as the Traditional Owners and Custodians of this land and gives respect to the Elders – past and present – and through them to all Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Cultural Notification

Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website contains a range of material which may be considered culturally sensitive including the records of people who have passed away.

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Thesis by Publication

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PDF version of Thesis by Publication

Definition overview

1 definition, 2 references, 3 definition information.

A Thesis where some chapters are in the form of research papers published in, or submitted to, peer-reviewed journals.

UniSQ Defined.

Complying with the law and observing Policy and Procedure is a condition of working and/or studying at the University.

* This file is available in Portable Document Format (PDF) which requires the use of Adobe Acrobat Reader. A free copy of Acrobat Reader may be obtained from Adobe. Users who are unable to access information in PDF should email [email protected] to obtain this information in an alternative format.

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ESG Strategy and B Corp Certification with YourLand

The partnership between YourLand and Anthesis has significantly focused their sustainability efforts, rapidly advancing them towards B Corp Certification

29th May 2024

aerial of suburb_yourland esg b corp anthesis

Our partnership with Anthesis marks a significant milestone in YourLand’s journey towards B Corp Certification. This comprehensive approach not only aligns with best practice but also ensures that we focus our efforts where they matter most – driving impactful change and securing long-term viability for our communities and the environment. This commitment underscores our dedication to creating resilient, thriving communities that our residents love to call home. Dean Gold, Chief Operating Officer YourLand Developments

YourLand Developments ( YourLand ) is one of Victoria’s leading private property developers, committed to delivering high-quality communities that residents love to call home.

For over 15 years, YourLand has been committed to social and environmental sustainability, creating resilient communities and uplifting environmental health through thoughtful product choices and sustainability initiatives.

To ground this vision in best practice, YourLand set out to understand its most material Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) issues and begin its journey towards B Corp Certification .

YourLand engaged Anthesis to lead them through an ESG materiality assessment and to develop their first formal sustainability strategy. The goal was to identify and prioritise YourLand’s sustainability issues, align those outcomes to B Corp’s five-pillar ESG framework, and then build out an ESG strategy that served jointly as a B Corp improvement plan. The alignment between ESG and B Corp has presented challenges resolved by Anthesis’ specialist consultants, including B Consultants.

The materiality assessment was strengthened through stakeholder engagement, including a workshop undertaken by a broad group of YourLand staff, leadership, and key investors to further understand and prioritise material topics.

Once the material topics were identified, Anthesis identified, prioritised, and finalised indicators, targets, and an ESG action plan for YourLand to follow for the near-term (Year 1 – Year 3) and long-term (2030). All actions were mapped to corresponding B Corp questions, GRI disclosure codes, and UN SDGs and targets.

This project has tethered YourLand’s strategy to best practice, simplifying any future reporting needs. The YourLand and Anthesis’ partnership has enabled YourLand to focus their sustainability efforts where it matters most, rapidly progressing them toward B Corp Certification.

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Australian Government, Department of Industry Science and Resources

National Battery Strategy

Leading the charge towards a competitive and diverse Australian battery industry

Download or share

The National Battery Strategy is a key part of the government's Future Made in Australia agenda.

The strategy outlines how the Australian Government will support our domestic battery industry as it grows. It sets out how we will create a diverse and competitive Australian battery industry. 

Through the strategy we will: 

  • improve Australia's energy security 
  • ensure our place in global battery supply chains 
  • drive economic growth
  • create positive social, economic and resilience outcomes for all Australians. 

Explore the digital publication

Acknowledgement of country, minister's foreword, the strategy at a glance.

The National Battery Strategy is a key part of the government’s Future Made in Australia agenda. The strategy will improve Australia’s resilience and security and drive economic growth by expanding Australia’s battery manufacturing capabilities and building skills. This will help us meet our target of 82% renewable energy and secure our place in global battery supply chains.

Our vision is that by 2035, Australia is a globally competitive producer of batteries and battery materials, providing secure and resilient battery supply chains, delivering affordable and secure energy for Australians, boosting productivity, and creating wealth and opportunity while being part of the global energy transition.

Read the strategy

Introduction to the national battery strategy, high value opportunities for australia, summary of the strategy's actions, our priorities.

We will create a fully charged Australian battery industry by focusing on 5 key priorities: 

Priority 1: Manufacturing

Priority 2: knowledge and skills, priority 3: global supply chains, priority 4: sustainability, esg and circular economy, priority 5: government coordination, download the strategy, more information.

COMMENTS

  1. Theses including publications

    Under the Thesis and examinations higher degrees by research policy (pdf, 199KB), a research thesis is a coherent and cohesive narrative describing a body of scholarly activity that adds to knowledge.. At the University a collection of published papers is not a thesis, neither is a publication on its own sufficient to warrant the award of a research degree.

  2. Incorporating your published work in your thesis

    When submitting your thesis, you will be required to confirm that: (a) the work in the incorporated publications is your own, and. (b) that any co-authors give permission for the article to be included in the thesis. To do this, you must complete the Declaration for publication incorporated in a thesis form.

  3. Thesis including Published Works

    The Thesis Including Published Works is not a different degree, rather, it is a thesis format that includes papers that have been accepted or published during the student's enrolment in the relevant graduate research degree at Monash. A thesis in this format must reflect a sustained and cohesive theme related to a defined research project.

  4. Thesis by compilation

    A thesis by compilation (otherwise known as a thesis by publication) is a thesis which includes some of your journal article manuscripts which have been or are in the process of being published. If you are writing a thesis by compilation, its structure may be slightly different to that of a traditional thesis. However, a thesis by compilation still requires you to have a central argument.

  5. Examples of thesis and chapter formats when including publications

    Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 Example 4 Example 5. Chapter 1: Introduction. Chapter 2: Literature review. Chapter 3: Methods. Chapter 4: Paper 1 & general discussion. Chapter 5: Paper 2. Chapter 6: Regular thesis chapter - results. Chapter 7: Regular thesis chapter/general discussion tying in published and unpublished work.

  6. Prepare your thesis

    Prepare your thesis. Throughout your research candidature you will work toward producing your final thesis. There are some key points to keep in mind when you start this process. Your thesis must be a coherent and cohesive whole. You can submit a thesis including publications but we don't accept thesis by publication.

  7. The thesis

    The thesis. In Australia the thesis is an extended written piece which reports on the results of a three to four year programme of research (in other countries the writing component is called a 'dissertation'). The thesis should incorporate a summary of the research undertaken during the program. At ANU we do not usually require an oral defence ...

  8. Including Publications In Your Thesis

    Of course you are not required to include publications in your thesis, you can choose to submit a conventional thesis, a combination thesis with some publications and work written specifically for the thesis, or a thesis with a major work. ... AUSTRALIA. Contact. T: +61 8 8313 5882 [email protected]. Opening hours: Mon-Fri: 9 ...

  9. Finding theses

    If you can't find the thesis you're looking for, we suggest contacting the relevant faculty office. Theses from other Australian and New Zealand universities. Find a thesis from other Australian or New Zealand universities by searching: Australian theses via Trove; Libraries Australia for Higher Degree theses awarded from 1989 onwards

  10. Theses

    Next to Format- select Thesis from the drop-down list. International theses. To find international theses, search via: ... UNSW Sydney NSW 2052 Australia Telephone: +61 2 9065 9444. UNSW CRICOS Provider Code: 00098G TEQSA Provider ID: PRV12055 ABN: 57 195 873 179. Connect with us

  11. PDF Thesis by Publication Information Sheet

    Rule 39.2. For a thesis by publication: the separate papers provided under sub-clause 39.1(i) must be published, in press. or submitted to scholarly media only, i.e. refereed publications classified by current. national standards and refereed conference papers, however at least 50% of these. papers must have been published.

  12. Theses

    Use 'Advanced Search' and for 'Document Type' select 'Thesis'. Trove - Australian content from libraries, museums, archives and other research organisations. Use 'Advanced Search', and limit by the format 'thesis'. Proquest Dissertations and Theses Global - more than 2.7 million entries with over 1.2 million records in full text.

  13. PDF Guidelines for thesis by published papers

    The thesis may be comprised of published papers, manuscripts accepted for publication, manuscripts submitted for publication or under review. The minimum number of papers and/or manuscripts is stated above. However, in some disciplines a larger number of papers are required to meet the expectations of scope and quality commensurate with HDR ...

  14. Thesis Preparation and Submission

    A thesis by publication may include relevant papers, such as conference presentations, which have been published, accepted, submitted or prepared for publication for which at least half of the research has been undertaken during your enrolment. ... If you wish to stay in Australia to wait for examination results, DIHA will need to be consulted ...

  15. PDF Guidelines for Examiners of Thesis with Publication

    1. Introduction. These guidelines are designed to assist examiners in understanding the University's requirements for a thesis presented in the Thesis with Publication format. Whilst they have been specifically developed for the Doctor of Philosophy degree they may be used to inform policy and practice within other research degrees, such as ...

  16. PDF Guideline: Thesis by Publication

    1.1 The purpose of the Guideline: Thesis by Publication ('Guideline') is to provide broad guidance on the preparation of a Higher Degree by Research (HDR) Student's Thesis by Publication at the University of Notre Dame Australia ('University'). Thesis by Publication is an option available to students enrolled in any Research Degree.

  17. Theses

    The Australian National University Library's theses collection holds the research output of the University's academic community over the last 60 years. The first ANU thesis was awarded in 1953. By digitising its print theses collection, ANU Library delivers the University's unique and original research in a freely available, open access ...

  18. Library Guides: Theses: UQ theses

    To request access to a print copy of a UQ thesis: UQ students and staff and Alumni Library members: Make sure you have logged in. Click on the Available at link in the result in Library Search. Click on Place a Request. Complete the form details. Click on the Place a Request button.

  19. PhD by Prior Publication

    The PhD by Prior Publication is suitable for established researchers with a significant historical record of refereed publications who wish to gain a formal qualification to recognise their standing within a field. During the program, the candidate must develop a thesis for examination comprising of the prior publications and a significant ...

  20. Theses

    Thesis collection. The Library provides access to theses submitted at Monash University, and also to theses from other universities in Australia and internationally. We acknowledge and pay respects to the Elders and Traditional Owners of the land on which our Australian campuses stand. Information for Indigenous Australians.

  21. How do I find Australian theses?

    Add the country of publication if known; for example: Dissertations Academic Australia; Hit browse. We also hold a number of useful reference books on finding Australian theses, including: Guide to Microform Research Collections in the National Library of Australia. 1992. See pages 148-149 for an outline of the Australian and overseas theses ...

  22. Full article: The PhD by publication in the humanities and social

    The PhD by publication is variously called a thesis by publication (Nygaard and Solli Citation 2021), a thesis with publications (Mason Citation 2018), ... There are, then, various types of PhDs by publication in Australia. That is, they may be sandwich-style theses or two-part theses, especially if it is a PhD by published work. ...

  23. Thesis by Publication

    Thesis by Publication. Search All Policy and Procedure A-Z Policy and Procedure Categories Enterprise Agreement Current Activity ... A Thesis where some chapters are in the form of research papers published in, or submitted to, peer-reviewed journals. 2 References. UniSQ Defined.

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    ESG Strategy and B Corp Certification with YourLand. The partnership between YourLand and Anthesis has significantly focused their sustainability efforts, rapidly advancing them towards B Corp Certification. 29th May 2024. Our partnership with Anthesis marks a significant milestone in YourLand's journey towards B Corp Certification.

  25. National Battery Strategy

    The strategy at a glance. The National Battery Strategy is a key part of the government's Future Made in Australia agenda. The strategy will improve Australia's resilience and security and drive economic growth by expanding Australia's battery manufacturing capabilities and building skills. This will help us meet our target of 82% ...

  26. Class of '24 Spotlight on Terrance Phillips

    From Houston to Savannah to, now, Los Angeles, Terrance Phillips graduated with a Master of Architecture with a Certificate in Real Estate Development. During his time at USC, Terrance was involved in the Graduate Architecture Student Association (GASA), the National Organization of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS), and SPACE, a student-run publication within USC Architecture.