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9.1 Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement

Learning objectives.

  • Develop a strong, clear thesis statement with the proper elements.
  • Revise your thesis statement.

Have you ever known a person who was not very good at telling stories? You probably had trouble following his train of thought as he jumped around from point to point, either being too brief in places that needed further explanation or providing too many details on a meaningless element. Maybe he told the end of the story first, then moved to the beginning and later added details to the middle. His ideas were probably scattered, and the story did not flow very well. When the story was over, you probably had many questions.

Just as a personal anecdote can be a disorganized mess, an essay can fall into the same trap of being out of order and confusing. That is why writers need a thesis statement to provide a specific focus for their essay and to organize what they are about to discuss in the body.

Just like a topic sentence summarizes a single paragraph, the thesis statement summarizes an entire essay. It tells the reader the point you want to make in your essay, while the essay itself supports that point. It is like a signpost that signals the essay’s destination. You should form your thesis before you begin to organize an essay, but you may find that it needs revision as the essay develops.

Elements of a Thesis Statement

For every essay you write, you must focus on a central idea. This idea stems from a topic you have chosen or been assigned or from a question your teacher has asked. It is not enough merely to discuss a general topic or simply answer a question with a yes or no. You have to form a specific opinion, and then articulate that into a controlling idea —the main idea upon which you build your thesis.

Remember that a thesis is not the topic itself, but rather your interpretation of the question or subject. For whatever topic your professor gives you, you must ask yourself, “What do I want to say about it?” Asking and then answering this question is vital to forming a thesis that is precise, forceful and confident.

A thesis is one sentence long and appears toward the end of your introduction. It is specific and focuses on one to three points of a single idea—points that are able to be demonstrated in the body. It forecasts the content of the essay and suggests how you will organize your information. Remember that a thesis statement does not summarize an issue but rather dissects it.

A Strong Thesis Statement

A strong thesis statement contains the following qualities.

Specificity. A thesis statement must concentrate on a specific area of a general topic. As you may recall, the creation of a thesis statement begins when you choose a broad subject and then narrow down its parts until you pinpoint a specific aspect of that topic. For example, health care is a broad topic, but a proper thesis statement would focus on a specific area of that topic, such as options for individuals without health care coverage.

Precision. A strong thesis statement must be precise enough to allow for a coherent argument and to remain focused on the topic. If the specific topic is options for individuals without health care coverage, then your precise thesis statement must make an exact claim about it, such as that limited options exist for those who are uninsured by their employers. You must further pinpoint what you are going to discuss regarding these limited effects, such as whom they affect and what the cause is.

Ability to be argued. A thesis statement must present a relevant and specific argument. A factual statement often is not considered arguable. Be sure your thesis statement contains a point of view that can be supported with evidence.

Ability to be demonstrated. For any claim you make in your thesis, you must be able to provide reasons and examples for your opinion. You can rely on personal observations in order to do this, or you can consult outside sources to demonstrate that what you assert is valid. A worthy argument is backed by examples and details.

Forcefulness. A thesis statement that is forceful shows readers that you are, in fact, making an argument. The tone is assertive and takes a stance that others might oppose.

Confidence. In addition to using force in your thesis statement, you must also use confidence in your claim. Phrases such as I feel or I believe actually weaken the readers’ sense of your confidence because these phrases imply that you are the only person who feels the way you do. In other words, your stance has insufficient backing. Taking an authoritative stance on the matter persuades your readers to have faith in your argument and open their minds to what you have to say.

Even in a personal essay that allows the use of first person, your thesis should not contain phrases such as in my opinion or I believe . These statements reduce your credibility and weaken your argument. Your opinion is more convincing when you use a firm attitude.

On a separate sheet of paper, write a thesis statement for each of the following topics. Remember to make each statement specific, precise, demonstrable, forceful and confident.

  • Texting while driving
  • The legal drinking age in the United States
  • Steroid use among professional athletes

Examples of Appropriate Thesis Statements

Each of the following thesis statements meets several of the following requirements:

  • Specificity
  • Ability to be argued
  • Ability to be demonstrated
  • Forcefulness
  • The societal and personal struggles of Troy Maxon in the play Fences symbolize the challenge of black males who lived through segregation and integration in the United States.
  • Closing all American borders for a period of five years is one solution that will tackle illegal immigration.
  • Shakespeare’s use of dramatic irony in Romeo and Juliet spoils the outcome for the audience and weakens the plot.
  • J. D. Salinger’s character in Catcher in the Rye , Holden Caulfield, is a confused rebel who voices his disgust with phonies, yet in an effort to protect himself, he acts like a phony on many occasions.
  • Compared to an absolute divorce, no-fault divorce is less expensive, promotes fairer settlements, and reflects a more realistic view of the causes for marital breakdown.
  • Exposing children from an early age to the dangers of drug abuse is a sure method of preventing future drug addicts.
  • In today’s crumbling job market, a high school diploma is not significant enough education to land a stable, lucrative job.

You can find thesis statements in many places, such as in the news; in the opinions of friends, coworkers or teachers; and even in songs you hear on the radio. Become aware of thesis statements in everyday life by paying attention to people’s opinions and their reasons for those opinions. Pay attention to your own everyday thesis statements as well, as these can become material for future essays.

Now that you have read about the contents of a good thesis statement and have seen examples, take a look at the pitfalls to avoid when composing your own thesis:

A thesis is weak when it is simply a declaration of your subject or a description of what you will discuss in your essay.

Weak thesis statement: My paper will explain why imagination is more important than knowledge.

A thesis is weak when it makes an unreasonable or outrageous claim or insults the opposing side.

Weak thesis statement: Religious radicals across America are trying to legislate their Puritanical beliefs by banning required high school books.

A thesis is weak when it contains an obvious fact or something that no one can disagree with or provides a dead end.

Weak thesis statement: Advertising companies use sex to sell their products.

A thesis is weak when the statement is too broad.

Weak thesis statement: The life of Abraham Lincoln was long and challenging.

Read the following thesis statements. On a separate piece of paper, identify each as weak or strong. For those that are weak, list the reasons why. Then revise the weak statements so that they conform to the requirements of a strong thesis.

  • The subject of this paper is my experience with ferrets as pets.
  • The government must expand its funding for research on renewable energy resources in order to prepare for the impending end of oil.
  • Edgar Allan Poe was a poet who lived in Baltimore during the nineteenth century.
  • In this essay, I will give you lots of reasons why slot machines should not be legalized in Baltimore.
  • Despite his promises during his campaign, President Kennedy took few executive measures to support civil rights legislation.
  • Because many children’s toys have potential safety hazards that could lead to injury, it is clear that not all children’s toys are safe.
  • My experience with young children has taught me that I want to be a disciplinary parent because I believe that a child without discipline can be a parent’s worst nightmare.

Writing at Work

Often in your career, you will need to ask your boss for something through an e-mail. Just as a thesis statement organizes an essay, it can also organize your e-mail request. While your e-mail will be shorter than an essay, using a thesis statement in your first paragraph quickly lets your boss know what you are asking for, why it is necessary, and what the benefits are. In short body paragraphs, you can provide the essential information needed to expand upon your request.

Thesis Statement Revision

Your thesis will probably change as you write, so you will need to modify it to reflect exactly what you have discussed in your essay. Remember from Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” that your thesis statement begins as a working thesis statement , an indefinite statement that you make about your topic early in the writing process for the purpose of planning and guiding your writing.

Working thesis statements often become stronger as you gather information and form new opinions and reasons for those opinions. Revision helps you strengthen your thesis so that it matches what you have expressed in the body of the paper.

The best way to revise your thesis statement is to ask questions about it and then examine the answers to those questions. By challenging your own ideas and forming definite reasons for those ideas, you grow closer to a more precise point of view, which you can then incorporate into your thesis statement.

Ways to Revise Your Thesis

You can cut down on irrelevant aspects and revise your thesis by taking the following steps:

1. Pinpoint and replace all nonspecific words, such as people , everything , society , or life , with more precise words in order to reduce any vagueness.

Working thesis: Young people have to work hard to succeed in life.

Revised thesis: Recent college graduates must have discipline and persistence in order to find and maintain a stable job in which they can use and be appreciated for their talents.

The revised thesis makes a more specific statement about success and what it means to work hard. The original includes too broad a range of people and does not define exactly what success entails. By replacing those general words like people and work hard , the writer can better focus his or her research and gain more direction in his or her writing.

2. Clarify ideas that need explanation by asking yourself questions that narrow your thesis.

Working thesis: The welfare system is a joke.

Revised thesis: The welfare system keeps a socioeconomic class from gaining employment by alluring members of that class with unearned income, instead of programs to improve their education and skill sets.

A joke means many things to many people. Readers bring all sorts of backgrounds and perspectives to the reading process and would need clarification for a word so vague. This expression may also be too informal for the selected audience. By asking questions, the writer can devise a more precise and appropriate explanation for joke . The writer should ask himself or herself questions similar to the 5WH questions. (See Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” for more information on the 5WH questions.) By incorporating the answers to these questions into a thesis statement, the writer more accurately defines his or her stance, which will better guide the writing of the essay.

3. Replace any linking verbs with action verbs. Linking verbs are forms of the verb to be , a verb that simply states that a situation exists.

Working thesis: Kansas City schoolteachers are not paid enough.

Revised thesis: The Kansas City legislature cannot afford to pay its educators, resulting in job cuts and resignations in a district that sorely needs highly qualified and dedicated teachers.

The linking verb in this working thesis statement is the word are . Linking verbs often make thesis statements weak because they do not express action. Rather, they connect words and phrases to the second half of the sentence. Readers might wonder, “Why are they not paid enough?” But this statement does not compel them to ask many more questions. The writer should ask himself or herself questions in order to replace the linking verb with an action verb, thus forming a stronger thesis statement, one that takes a more definitive stance on the issue:

  • Who is not paying the teachers enough?
  • What is considered “enough”?
  • What is the problem?
  • What are the results

4. Omit any general claims that are hard to support.

Working thesis: Today’s teenage girls are too sexualized.

Revised thesis: Teenage girls who are captivated by the sexual images on MTV are conditioned to believe that a woman’s worth depends on her sensuality, a feeling that harms their self-esteem and behavior.

It is true that some young women in today’s society are more sexualized than in the past, but that is not true for all girls. Many girls have strict parents, dress appropriately, and do not engage in sexual activity while in middle school and high school. The writer of this thesis should ask the following questions:

  • Which teenage girls?
  • What constitutes “too” sexualized?
  • Why are they behaving that way?
  • Where does this behavior show up?
  • What are the repercussions?

In the first section of Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” , you determined your purpose for writing and your audience. You then completed a freewriting exercise about an event you recently experienced and chose a general topic to write about. Using that general topic, you then narrowed it down by answering the 5WH questions. After you answered these questions, you chose one of the three methods of prewriting and gathered possible supporting points for your working thesis statement.

Now, on a separate sheet of paper, write down your working thesis statement. Identify any weaknesses in this sentence and revise the statement to reflect the elements of a strong thesis statement. Make sure it is specific, precise, arguable, demonstrable, forceful, and confident.

Collaboration

Please share with a classmate and compare your answers.

In your career you may have to write a project proposal that focuses on a particular problem in your company, such as reinforcing the tardiness policy. The proposal would aim to fix the problem; using a thesis statement would clearly state the boundaries of the problem and tell the goals of the project. After writing the proposal, you may find that the thesis needs revision to reflect exactly what is expressed in the body. Using the techniques from this chapter would apply to revising that thesis.

Key Takeaways

  • Proper essays require a thesis statement to provide a specific focus and suggest how the essay will be organized.
  • A thesis statement is your interpretation of the subject, not the topic itself.
  • A strong thesis is specific, precise, forceful, confident, and is able to be demonstrated.
  • A strong thesis challenges readers with a point of view that can be debated and can be supported with evidence.
  • A weak thesis is simply a declaration of your topic or contains an obvious fact that cannot be argued.
  • Depending on your topic, it may or may not be appropriate to use first person point of view.
  • Revise your thesis by ensuring all words are specific, all ideas are exact, and all verbs express action.

Writing for Success Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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  • Knowledge Base
  • How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

Published on January 11, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on August 15, 2023 by Eoghan Ryan.

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . It usually comes near the end of your introduction .

Your thesis will look a bit different depending on the type of essay you’re writing. But the thesis statement should always clearly state the main idea you want to get across. Everything else in your essay should relate back to this idea.

You can write your thesis statement by following four simple steps:

  • Start with a question
  • Write your initial answer
  • Develop your answer
  • Refine your thesis statement

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Table of contents

What is a thesis statement, placement of the thesis statement, step 1: start with a question, step 2: write your initial answer, step 3: develop your answer, step 4: refine your thesis statement, types of thesis statements, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis statements.

A thesis statement summarizes the central points of your essay. It is a signpost telling the reader what the essay will argue and why.

The best thesis statements are:

  • Concise: A good thesis statement is short and sweet—don’t use more words than necessary. State your point clearly and directly in one or two sentences.
  • Contentious: Your thesis shouldn’t be a simple statement of fact that everyone already knows. A good thesis statement is a claim that requires further evidence or analysis to back it up.
  • Coherent: Everything mentioned in your thesis statement must be supported and explained in the rest of your paper.

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thesis statement about hard work

The thesis statement generally appears at the end of your essay introduction or research paper introduction .

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts and among young people more generally is hotly debated. For many who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education: the internet facilitates easier access to information, exposure to different perspectives, and a flexible learning environment for both students and teachers.

You should come up with an initial thesis, sometimes called a working thesis , early in the writing process . As soon as you’ve decided on your essay topic , you need to work out what you want to say about it—a clear thesis will give your essay direction and structure.

You might already have a question in your assignment, but if not, try to come up with your own. What would you like to find out or decide about your topic?

For example, you might ask:

After some initial research, you can formulate a tentative answer to this question. At this stage it can be simple, and it should guide the research process and writing process .

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Now you need to consider why this is your answer and how you will convince your reader to agree with you. As you read more about your topic and begin writing, your answer should get more detailed.

In your essay about the internet and education, the thesis states your position and sketches out the key arguments you’ll use to support it.

The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education because it facilitates easier access to information.

In your essay about braille, the thesis statement summarizes the key historical development that you’ll explain.

The invention of braille in the 19th century transformed the lives of blind people, allowing them to participate more actively in public life.

A strong thesis statement should tell the reader:

  • Why you hold this position
  • What they’ll learn from your essay
  • The key points of your argument or narrative

The final thesis statement doesn’t just state your position, but summarizes your overall argument or the entire topic you’re going to explain. To strengthen a weak thesis statement, it can help to consider the broader context of your topic.

These examples are more specific and show that you’ll explore your topic in depth.

Your thesis statement should match the goals of your essay, which vary depending on the type of essay you’re writing:

  • In an argumentative essay , your thesis statement should take a strong position. Your aim in the essay is to convince your reader of this thesis based on evidence and logical reasoning.
  • In an expository essay , you’ll aim to explain the facts of a topic or process. Your thesis statement doesn’t have to include a strong opinion in this case, but it should clearly state the central point you want to make, and mention the key elements you’ll explain.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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  • Post hoc fallacy
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  • Sunk cost fallacy

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A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . Everything else you write should relate to this key idea.

The thesis statement is essential in any academic essay or research paper for two main reasons:

  • It gives your writing direction and focus.
  • It gives the reader a concise summary of your main point.

Without a clear thesis statement, an essay can end up rambling and unfocused, leaving your reader unsure of exactly what you want to say.

Follow these four steps to come up with a thesis statement :

  • Ask a question about your topic .
  • Write your initial answer.
  • Develop your answer by including reasons.
  • Refine your answer, adding more detail and nuance.

The thesis statement should be placed at the end of your essay introduction .

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thesis statement about hard work

How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement: 4 Steps + Examples

thesis statement about hard work

What’s Covered:

What is the purpose of a thesis statement, writing a good thesis statement: 4 steps, common pitfalls to avoid, where to get your essay edited for free.

When you set out to write an essay, there has to be some kind of point to it, right? Otherwise, your essay would just be a big jumble of word salad that makes absolutely no sense. An essay needs a central point that ties into everything else. That main point is called a thesis statement, and it’s the core of any essay or research paper.

You may hear about Master degree candidates writing a thesis, and that is an entire paper–not to be confused with the thesis statement, which is typically one sentence that contains your paper’s focus. 

Read on to learn more about thesis statements and how to write them. We’ve also included some solid examples for you to reference.

Typically the last sentence of your introductory paragraph, the thesis statement serves as the roadmap for your essay. When your reader gets to the thesis statement, they should have a clear outline of your main point, as well as the information you’ll be presenting in order to either prove or support your point. 

The thesis statement should not be confused for a topic sentence , which is the first sentence of every paragraph in your essay. If you need help writing topic sentences, numerous resources are available. Topic sentences should go along with your thesis statement, though.

Since the thesis statement is the most important sentence of your entire essay or paper, it’s imperative that you get this part right. Otherwise, your paper will not have a good flow and will seem disjointed. That’s why it’s vital not to rush through developing one. It’s a methodical process with steps that you need to follow in order to create the best thesis statement possible.

Step 1: Decide what kind of paper you’re writing

When you’re assigned an essay, there are several different types you may get. Argumentative essays are designed to get the reader to agree with you on a topic. Informative or expository essays present information to the reader. Analytical essays offer up a point and then expand on it by analyzing relevant information. Thesis statements can look and sound different based on the type of paper you’re writing. For example:

  • Argumentative: The United States needs a viable third political party to decrease bipartisanship, increase options, and help reduce corruption in government.
  • Informative: The Libertarian party has thrown off elections before by gaining enough support in states to get on the ballot and by taking away crucial votes from candidates.
  • Analytical: An analysis of past presidential elections shows that while third party votes may have been the minority, they did affect the outcome of the elections in 2020, 2016, and beyond.

Step 2: Figure out what point you want to make

Once you know what type of paper you’re writing, you then need to figure out the point you want to make with your thesis statement, and subsequently, your paper. In other words, you need to decide to answer a question about something, such as:

  • What impact did reality TV have on American society?
  • How has the musical Hamilton affected perception of American history?
  • Why do I want to major in [chosen major here]?

If you have an argumentative essay, then you will be writing about an opinion. To make it easier, you may want to choose an opinion that you feel passionate about so that you’re writing about something that interests you. For example, if you have an interest in preserving the environment, you may want to choose a topic that relates to that. 

If you’re writing your college essay and they ask why you want to attend that school, you may want to have a main point and back it up with information, something along the lines of:

“Attending Harvard University would benefit me both academically and professionally, as it would give me a strong knowledge base upon which to build my career, develop my network, and hopefully give me an advantage in my chosen field.”

Step 3: Determine what information you’ll use to back up your point

Once you have the point you want to make, you need to figure out how you plan to back it up throughout the rest of your essay. Without this information, it will be hard to either prove or argue the main point of your thesis statement. If you decide to write about the Hamilton example, you may decide to address any falsehoods that the writer put into the musical, such as:

“The musical Hamilton, while accurate in many ways, leaves out key parts of American history, presents a nationalist view of founding fathers, and downplays the racism of the times.”

Once you’ve written your initial working thesis statement, you’ll then need to get information to back that up. For example, the musical completely leaves out Benjamin Franklin, portrays the founding fathers in a nationalist way that is too complimentary, and shows Hamilton as a staunch abolitionist despite the fact that his family likely did own slaves. 

Step 4: Revise and refine your thesis statement before you start writing

Read through your thesis statement several times before you begin to compose your full essay. You need to make sure the statement is ironclad, since it is the foundation of the entire paper. Edit it or have a peer review it for you to make sure everything makes sense and that you feel like you can truly write a paper on the topic. Once you’ve done that, you can then begin writing your paper.

When writing a thesis statement, there are some common pitfalls you should avoid so that your paper can be as solid as possible. Make sure you always edit the thesis statement before you do anything else. You also want to ensure that the thesis statement is clear and concise. Don’t make your reader hunt for your point. Finally, put your thesis statement at the end of the first paragraph and have your introduction flow toward that statement. Your reader will expect to find your statement in its traditional spot.

If you’re having trouble getting started, or need some guidance on your essay, there are tools available that can help you. CollegeVine offers a free peer essay review tool where one of your peers can read through your essay and provide you with valuable feedback. Getting essay feedback from a peer can help you wow your instructor or college admissions officer with an impactful essay that effectively illustrates your point.

thesis statement about hard work

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thesis statement about hard work

Hard Work Essay Topic Ideas & Examples

🏆 best hard work topic ideas & essay examples, 🎓 simple & easy hard work essay titles, 📌 most interesting hard work topics to write about.

  • The Hard Work of Being a Soft Manager by William Peace The article under consideration represents the reader with the work of Soft Manager, his responsibilities and obligations, the difficulties which occur in the work of Soft Manager.
  • Do College Professors Work Hard Enough? In this way, academic administrators will be able to reduce the cost of education and eventually decrease the cost of tuition.
  • The Rebirth of America: A Biography of Hard Work
  • The Early Life and Military Leadership of Hard Work
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  • An Argument Against Hard Work Due to Self Interest
  • An Evaluation of the Successes of the Hard Work Administration
  • The Reasons Why Hard Work Was One of the America’s Greatest Leaders
  • The Contribution of President Hard Work to the Drafting of Articles of the Confederation
  • The Role of Hard Work During the American Revolution
  • Hard Work – The Most Influential Founding Father of America
  • The Turning Point in the Life of Hard Work
  • An Analysis of the Policy and Effectiveness of Hard Work, an American President
  • An Examination of Hard Work and His Army
  • President Hard Work Was a Selfless Leader Who Greatly Influenced the United States
  • An Introduction to the Political History and a Comparison of Hard Work and John Adams
  • Hard Work and Brookhiser’s Account in Founding Founder
  • An Overview of the Presidency of Hard Work in the United States
  • An Analysis of Hard Work’s Involvement in the Beginning of the American Revolution
  • An Analysis of Hard Work and His War on Credit
  • An Evaluation of the Foreign Policy Under Hard Work
  • Analysis Of Hard Work ‘s Farewell Address
  • A Description of Hard Work Carver a Agricultural Scientist
  • The Early Life and Events That Shaped Hard Work’s Future
  • The Views Of The Politician Hard Work
  • The Story of an Influential Role Model, Hard Work
  • The Significance and Effects of the Leadership of General Hard Work
  • Why Was Hard Work The Greatest President
  • A Review of the American Revolution Under the Leadership of Hard Work
  • Mason Weems’ Fictional Hard Work Text and the Actual Man
  • The Legacy Of Hard Work Carver
  • An Examination of Hard Work’s Leadership
  • Hard Work ‘s Influence On The American Revolution
  • An Introduction to the Issue of Slavery by Hard Work
  • Blood Of Tyrants Hard Work And The Forging Of The Presidency
  • A Study of Hard Work’s Desire to Eliminate Slavery in America
  • The Connection Between American Dream And The Great Gatsby Hard Work University
  • A History of Espionage Under the Leadership of Hard Work
  • The Common Thing in Hard Work, Thomas Edison and Theodore Roosevelt
  • Teamwork Research Ideas
  • Human Behavior Research Topics
  • Academic Achievements Research Topics
  • Management Skills Research Topics
  • American Dream Research Topics
  • Leadership Qualities Research Ideas
  • Conflict Resolution Essay Topics
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IvyPanda. (2022, September 7). Hard Work Essay Topic Ideas & Examples. https://ivypanda.com/essays/topic/hard-work-essay-examples/

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IvyPanda . (2022) 'Hard Work Essay Topic Ideas & Examples'. 7 September.

IvyPanda . 2022. "Hard Work Essay Topic Ideas & Examples." September 7, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/topic/hard-work-essay-examples/.

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IvyPanda . "Hard Work Essay Topic Ideas & Examples." September 7, 2022. https://ivypanda.com/essays/topic/hard-work-essay-examples/.

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Chapter 5: Putting the Pieces Together with a Thesis Statement

5.2 Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement

Learning Objectives

  • Develop a strong, clear thesis statement with the proper elements
  • Revise your thesis statement

Have you ever known someone who was not very good at telling stories? You probably had trouble following the train of thought as the storyteller jumped from point to point, either being too brief in places that needed further explanation or providing too many details on a meaningless element. Maybe the person told the end of the story first, then moved to the beginning and later added details to the middle. The ideas were probably scattered, and the story did not flow very well. When the story was over, you probably had many questions.

Just as a personal anecdote can be a disorganized mess, an essay can fall into the same trap of being out of order and confusing. That is why writers need a thesis statement  to provide a specific focus for their essay and to organize what they are about to discuss in the body.

Just like a topic sentence summarizes a single paragraph, the thesis statement summarizes an entire essay. It tells the reader the point you want to make in your essay, while the essay itself supports that point. It is like a signpost that signals the essay’s destination. You should form your thesis before you begin to organize an essay, but you may find that it needs revision as the essay develops.

Elements of a Thesis Statement

For every essay you write, you must focus on a central idea. This idea stems from a topic you have chosen or been assigned or from a question your teacher has asked. It is not enough merely to discuss a general topic or simply answer a question with a yes or no. You have to form a specific opinion, and then articulate that into a  controlling idea —the main idea upon which you build your thesis.

Remember that a thesis is not the topic itself, but rather your interpretation of the question or subject. For whatever topic your instructor gives you, you must ask yourself, “What do I want to say about it?” Asking and then answering this question is vital to forming a thesis that is precise, forceful, and confident.

A thesis is one sentence long and appears toward the end of your introduction. It is specific and focuses on one to three points of a single idea—points that are able to be demonstrated in the body. It forecasts the content of the essay and suggests how you will organize your information. Remember that a thesis statement does not summarize an issue but rather dissects it.

A Strong Thesis Statement

A strong thesis statement contains the following qualities:

Specificity: A thesis statement must concentrate on a specific area of a general topic. As you may recall, the creation of a thesis statement begins when you choose a broad subject and then narrow down its parts until you pinpoint a specific aspect of that topic. For example, health care is a broad topic, but a proper thesis statement would focus on a specific area of that topic, such as options for individuals without health care coverage.

Precision: A strong thesis statement must be precise enough to allow for a coherent argument and to remain focused on the topic. If the specific topic is options for individuals without health care coverage, then your precise thesis statement must make an exact claim about it, such as that limited options exist for those who are uninsured by their employers. You must further pinpoint what you are going to discuss regarding these limited effects, such as whom they affect and what the cause is.

Arguability: A thesis statement must present a relevant and specific argument. A factual statement often is not considered arguable. Be sure your thesis statement contains a point of view that can be supported with evidence.

Demonstrability: For any claim you make in your thesis, you must be able to provide reasons and examples for your opinion. You can rely on personal observations in order to do this, or you can consult outside sources to demonstrate that what you assert is valid. A worthy argument is backed by examples and details.

Forcefulness/Assertiveness: A thesis statement that is forceful shows readers that you are, in fact, making an argument. The tone is assertive and takes a stance that others might oppose.

Confidence: In addition to using force in your thesis statement, you must also use confidence in your claim. Phrases such as I feel or I believe actually weaken the readers’ sense of your confidence because these phrases imply that you are the only person who feels the way you do. In other words, your stance has insufficient backing. Taking an authoritative stance on the matter persuades your readers to have faith in your argument and open their minds to what you have to say.

Self-Practice Exercise 5.4

H5P: Drafting Thesis StatementsWrite a clear, confident thesis statement for an essay on the following topic:

  • Texting while driving.
  • The legal drinking age in different provinces of Canada.
  • Steroid use among professional athletes.

Examples of Appropriate Thesis Statements

Each of the following thesis statements meets several of the qualities discussed above: specificity, precision, arguability, demonstrability, forcefulness/assertiveness, and confidence.

  • The societal and personal struggles of Floyd in the play Where the Blood Mixes, by Kevin Loring, symbolize the challenge of First Nations people of Canada who lived through segregation and placement into residential schools.
  • Closing all American borders for a period of five years is one solution that will tackle illegal immigration.
  • Shakespeare’s use of dramatic irony in Romeo and Juliet spoils the outcome for the audience and weakens the plot.
  • J. D. Salinger’s character in Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield, is a confused rebel who voices his disgust with phonies, yet in an effort to protect himself, he acts like a phony on many occasions.
  • Compared to an absolute divorce, no-fault divorce is less expensive, promotes fairer settlements, and reflects a more realistic view of the causes for marital breakdown.
  • Exposing children from an early age to the dangers of drug abuse is a sure method of preventing future drug addicts.
  • In today’s crumbling job market, a high school diploma is not significant enough education to land a stable, lucrative job.

Now that you have read about the contents of a good thesis statement and have seen examples, take a look four pitfalls to avoid when composing your own thesis.

  • A thesis is weak when it is simply a declaration of your subject or a description of what you will discuss in your essay. Weak thesis statement: My paper will explain why imagination is more important than knowledge.
  • A thesis is weak when it makes an unreasonable or outrageous claim or insults the opposing side. Weak thesis statement: Religious radicals across the country are trying to legislate their puritanical beliefs by banning required high school books.
  • A thesis is weak when it contains an obvious fact or something that no one can disagree with or provides a dead end. Weak thesis statement: Advertising companies use sex to sell their products.
  • A thesis is weak when the statement is too broad. Weak thesis statement :  The life of Pierre Trudeau was long and accomplished.

Self-Practice Exercise 5.5

H5P: Read the following thesis statements and identify each as weak or strong.

  • “The subject of this paper is my experience with ferrets as pets.”
  • “The government must expand its funding for research on renewable energy resources in order to prepare for the impending end of oil.”
  • “Edgar Allan Poe was a poet who lived in Baltimore during the 19th century.”
  • “In this essay, I will give you a lot of reasons why marijuana should not be legalized in British Columbia.”
  • “Because many children’s toys have potential safety hazards that could lead to injury, it is clear that not all children’s toys are safe.”
  • “My experience with young children has taught me that I want to be a disciplinary parent because I believe that a child without discipline can be a parent’s worst nightmare.”

Writing at Work

Often in your career, you will need to ask your boss for something through an email. Just as a thesis statement organizes an essay, it can also organize your email request. While your email will be shorter than an essay, using a thesis statement in your first paragraph quickly lets your boss know what you are asking for, why it is necessary, and what the benefits are. In short body paragraphs, you can provide the essential information needed to expand upon your request.

Writing a Thesis Statement

One legitimate question readers always ask about a piece of writing is “What is the big idea?” (You may even ask this question when you are the reader, critically reading an assignment or another document.) Every nonfiction writing task—from the short essay to the 10-page term paper to the lengthy senior thesis—needs a big idea, or a controlling idea, as the “spine” for the work. The controlling idea is the main idea that you want to present and develop.

The big idea, or controlling idea, you want to present in an essay is expressed in your thesis statement. Remember that a thesis statement is often one sentence long, and it states your point of view. The thesis statement is not the topic of the piece of writing but rather what you have to say about that topic and what is important to tell readers.

Look at Table 5.1: Topics and Thesis Statements  for a comparison of topics and thesis statements.

Table 5.1 Topics and Thesis Statements: A Comparison
Topic Thesis Statement
Music piracy The recording industry fears that so-called music piracy will diminish profits and destroy markets, but it cannot be more wrong.
The number of consumer choices available in media gear Everyone wants the newest and the best digital technology, but the choices are extensive, and the specifications are often confusing.
E-books and online newspapers increasing their share of the market E-books and online newspapers will bring an end to print media as we know it.
Online education and the new media Someday, students and teachers will send avatars to their online classrooms.

The first thesis statement you write will be a preliminary thesis statement , or a working thesis statement . You will need it when you begin to outline your assignment as a way to organize it. As you continue to develop the arrangement, you can limit your working thesis statement if it is too broad or expand it if it proves too narrow for what you want to say.

Self-Practice Exercise 5.6

H5P: Working Toward a Working Thesis

We’re going to use that free writing strategy again. This time, try to write for ten minutes, and write down anything you know right now about your newly narrowed thesis statement. Don’t worry about looking material up or whether you’re getting everything exactly right. Instead, just focus on getting words on the screen. This is rough work to help you approach an answer to a question, not the final essay. So just keep writing.

Can you find something in your freewriting that looks like a “controlling idea”? Something that might centre your argument, something you can structure your argument around? We’ll call that your working thesis. Draft a working thesis below.

Collaboration: Please share with a classmate and compare your answers.

Revising a Thesis Statement

Your thesis will probably change as you write, so you will need to modify it to reflect exactly what you have discussed in your essay. Remember, you begin with a working thesis statement, an indefinite statement that you make about your topic early in the writing process for the purpose of planning and guiding your writing.

Working thesis statements often become stronger as you gather information and form new opinions and reasons for those opinions. Revision helps you strengthen your thesis so that it matches what you have expressed in the body of the paper.

You can cut down on irrelevant aspects and revise your thesis by taking the following steps:

  • Working thesis: Young people have to work hard to succeed in life.
  • Revised thesis: Recent college graduates must have discipline and persistence in order to find and maintain a stable job in which they can use and be appreciated for their talents.
  • Working thesis: The welfare system is a joke.
  • Revised thesis: The welfare system keeps a socioeconomic class from gaining employment by alluring members of that class with unearned income, instead of programs to improve their education and skill sets.
  • Working thesis: British Columbian schoolteachers are not paid enough.
  • Revised thesis: The legislature of British Columbia cannot afford to pay its educators, resulting in job cuts and resignations in a district that sorely needs highly qualified and dedicated teachers.

The linking verb in this working thesis statement is the word are. Linking verbs often make thesis statements weak because they do not express action. Reading the original thesis statement above, readers might wonder why teachers are not paid enough, but the statement does not compel them to ask many more questions. The writer should ask him- or herself questions in order to replace the linking verb with an action verb, thus forming a stronger thesis statement, one that takes a more definitive stance on the issue. For example, the writer could ask:

  • Who is not paying the teachers enough?
  • What is considered “enough”?
  • What is the problem?
  • What are the results
  • Working thesis: Today’s teenage girls are too sexualized.
  • Which teenage girls?
  • What constitutes “too” sexualized?
  • Why are they behaving that way?
  • Where does this behaviour show up?
  • What are the repercussions?

Self-practice exercise  5.7

H5P:  Polishing the Thesis Statement

A working thesis statement is always a work in progress, and we make it stronger by asking questions of it and challenging the first draft. That’s the next job you have! It takes many revisions to make your work the best it can be, so try not to get frustrated by the process.

  • Copy your working thesis statement for reference here.
  • Pinpoint and replace all nonspecific words, such as people, everything, society, or life, with more precise words in order to reduce any vagueness. Recopy the newly revised thesis below.
  • Replace any linking verbs with action verbs. Linking verbs gives information about the subject, such as a condition or relationship (is, appear, smell, sound), but they do not show any action. The most common linking verb is any forms of the verb to be, a verb that simply states that a situation exists. Recopy the newly revised thesis below.
  • Omit any general claims that are hard to support. Recopy the newly revised thesis below.

Just Asking Questions

Clarify ideas that need explanation by asking yourself questions that narrow your thesis. The most straightforward way to do this is to ask yourself the 5WHs again — who, what, where, when, why, and how — and see were you can make your thesis statement more specific. List the questions you have about your own thesis below.

Now do your best to answer those questions.

And finally, revise your thesis in relation to these points and share it below.

In your career you may have to write a project proposal that focuses on a particular problem in your company, such as reinforcing the tardiness policy. The proposal would aim to fix the problem; using a thesis statement would clearly state the boundaries of the problem and the goals of the project. After writing the proposal, you may find that the thesis needs revising to reflect exactly what is expressed in the body. The techniques from this chapter would apply to revising that thesis.

Key Takeaways

  • Proper essays require a thesis statement to provide a specific focus and suggest how the essay will be organized.
  • A thesis statement is your interpretation of the subject, not the topic itself.
  • A strong thesis is specific, precise, forceful, confident, and is able to be demonstrated.
  • A strong thesis challenges readers with a point of view that can be debated and supported with evidence.
  • A weak thesis is simply a declaration of your topic or contains an obvious fact that cannot be argued.
  • Depending on your topic, it may or may not be appropriate to use first person point of view.
  • Revise your thesis by ensuring all words are specific, all ideas are exact, and all verbs express action.

Writing for Success - 1st Canadian H5P Edition Copyright © 2021 by Tara Horkoff is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thesis Statements

What this handout is about.

This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can craft or refine one for your draft.

Introduction

Writing in college often takes the form of persuasion—convincing others that you have an interesting, logical point of view on the subject you are studying. Persuasion is a skill you practice regularly in your daily life. You persuade your roommate to clean up, your parents to let you borrow the car, your friend to vote for your favorite candidate or policy. In college, course assignments often ask you to make a persuasive case in writing. You are asked to convince your reader of your point of view. This form of persuasion, often called academic argument, follows a predictable pattern in writing. After a brief introduction of your topic, you state your point of view on the topic directly and often in one sentence. This sentence is the thesis statement, and it serves as a summary of the argument you’ll make in the rest of your paper.

What is a thesis statement?

A thesis statement:

  • tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
  • is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
  • directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
  • makes a claim that others might dispute.
  • is usually a single sentence near the beginning of your paper (most often, at the end of the first paragraph) that presents your argument to the reader. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the reader of the logic of your interpretation.

If your assignment asks you to take a position or develop a claim about a subject, you may need to convey that position or claim in a thesis statement near the beginning of your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that you need a thesis statement because your instructor may assume you will include one. When in doubt, ask your instructor if the assignment requires a thesis statement. When an assignment asks you to analyze, to interpret, to compare and contrast, to demonstrate cause and effect, or to take a stand on an issue, it is likely that you are being asked to develop a thesis and to support it persuasively. (Check out our handout on understanding assignments for more information.)

How do I create a thesis?

A thesis is the result of a lengthy thinking process. Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading an essay assignment. Before you develop an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts (such as surprising contrasts or similarities), and think about the significance of these relationships. Once you do this thinking, you will probably have a “working thesis” that presents a basic or main idea and an argument that you think you can support with evidence. Both the argument and your thesis are likely to need adjustment along the way.

Writers use all kinds of techniques to stimulate their thinking and to help them clarify relationships or comprehend the broader significance of a topic and arrive at a thesis statement. For more ideas on how to get started, see our handout on brainstorming .

How do I know if my thesis is strong?

If there’s time, run it by your instructor or make an appointment at the Writing Center to get some feedback. Even if you do not have time to get advice elsewhere, you can do some thesis evaluation of your own. When reviewing your first draft and its working thesis, ask yourself the following :

  • Do I answer the question? Re-reading the question prompt after constructing a working thesis can help you fix an argument that misses the focus of the question. If the prompt isn’t phrased as a question, try to rephrase it. For example, “Discuss the effect of X on Y” can be rephrased as “What is the effect of X on Y?”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? If your thesis simply states facts that no one would, or even could, disagree with, it’s possible that you are simply providing a summary, rather than making an argument.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? Thesis statements that are too vague often do not have a strong argument. If your thesis contains words like “good” or “successful,” see if you could be more specific: why is something “good”; what specifically makes something “successful”?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? If a reader’s first response is likely to  be “So what?” then you need to clarify, to forge a relationship, or to connect to a larger issue.
  • Does my essay support my thesis specifically and without wandering? If your thesis and the body of your essay do not seem to go together, one of them has to change. It’s okay to change your working thesis to reflect things you have figured out in the course of writing your paper. Remember, always reassess and revise your writing as necessary.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? If a reader’s first response is “how?” or “why?” your thesis may be too open-ended and lack guidance for the reader. See what you can add to give the reader a better take on your position right from the beginning.

Suppose you are taking a course on contemporary communication, and the instructor hands out the following essay assignment: “Discuss the impact of social media on public awareness.” Looking back at your notes, you might start with this working thesis:

Social media impacts public awareness in both positive and negative ways.

You can use the questions above to help you revise this general statement into a stronger thesis.

  • Do I answer the question? You can analyze this if you rephrase “discuss the impact” as “what is the impact?” This way, you can see that you’ve answered the question only very generally with the vague “positive and negative ways.”
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not likely. Only people who maintain that social media has a solely positive or solely negative impact could disagree.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? No. What are the positive effects? What are the negative effects?
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? No. Why are they positive? How are they positive? What are their causes? Why are they negative? How are they negative? What are their causes?
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? No. Why should anyone care about the positive and/or negative impact of social media?

After thinking about your answers to these questions, you decide to focus on the one impact you feel strongly about and have strong evidence for:

Because not every voice on social media is reliable, people have become much more critical consumers of information, and thus, more informed voters.

This version is a much stronger thesis! It answers the question, takes a specific position that others can challenge, and it gives a sense of why it matters.

Let’s try another. Suppose your literature professor hands out the following assignment in a class on the American novel: Write an analysis of some aspect of Mark Twain’s novel Huckleberry Finn. “This will be easy,” you think. “I loved Huckleberry Finn!” You grab a pad of paper and write:

Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn is a great American novel.

You begin to analyze your thesis:

  • Do I answer the question? No. The prompt asks you to analyze some aspect of the novel. Your working thesis is a statement of general appreciation for the entire novel.

Think about aspects of the novel that are important to its structure or meaning—for example, the role of storytelling, the contrasting scenes between the shore and the river, or the relationships between adults and children. Now you write:

In Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain develops a contrast between life on the river and life on the shore.
  • Do I answer the question? Yes!
  • Have I taken a position that others might challenge or oppose? Not really. This contrast is well-known and accepted.
  • Is my thesis statement specific enough? It’s getting there–you have highlighted an important aspect of the novel for investigation. However, it’s still not clear what your analysis will reveal.
  • Does my thesis pass the “how and why?” test? Not yet. Compare scenes from the book and see what you discover. Free write, make lists, jot down Huck’s actions and reactions and anything else that seems interesting.
  • Does my thesis pass the “So what?” test? What’s the point of this contrast? What does it signify?”

After examining the evidence and considering your own insights, you write:

Through its contrasting river and shore scenes, Twain’s Huckleberry Finn suggests that to find the true expression of American democratic ideals, one must leave “civilized” society and go back to nature.

This final thesis statement presents an interpretation of a literary work based on an analysis of its content. Of course, for the essay itself to be successful, you must now present evidence from the novel that will convince the reader of your interpretation.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Anson, Chris M., and Robert A. Schwegler. 2010. The Longman Handbook for Writers and Readers , 6th ed. New York: Longman.

Lunsford, Andrea A. 2015. The St. Martin’s Handbook , 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St Martin’s.

Ramage, John D., John C. Bean, and June Johnson. 2018. The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing , 8th ed. New York: Pearson.

Ruszkiewicz, John J., Christy Friend, Daniel Seward, and Maxine Hairston. 2010. The Scott, Foresman Handbook for Writers , 9th ed. Boston: Pearson Education.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Home / Guides / Writing Guides / Parts of a Paper / How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement

How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement

A thesis can be found in many places—a debate speech, a lawyer’s closing argument, even an advertisement. But the most common place for a thesis statement (and probably why you’re reading this article) is in an essay.

Whether you’re writing an argumentative paper, an informative essay, or a compare/contrast statement, you need a thesis. Without a thesis, your argument falls flat and your information is unfocused. Since a thesis is so important, it’s probably a good idea to look at some tips on how to put together a strong one.

Guide Overview

What is a “thesis statement” anyway.

  • 2 categories of thesis statements: informative and persuasive
  • 2 styles of thesis statements
  • Formula for a strong argumentative thesis
  • The qualities of a solid thesis statement (video)

You may have heard of something called a “thesis.” It’s what seniors commonly refer to as their final paper before graduation. That’s not what we’re talking about here. That type of thesis is a long, well-written paper that takes years to piece together.

Instead, we’re talking about a single sentence that ties together the main idea of any argument . In the context of student essays, it’s a statement that summarizes your topic and declares your position on it. This sentence can tell a reader whether your essay is something they want to read.

2 Categories of Thesis Statements: Informative and Persuasive

Just as there are different types of essays, there are different types of thesis statements. The thesis should match the essay.

For example, with an informative essay, you should compose an informative thesis (rather than argumentative). You want to declare your intentions in this essay and guide the reader to the conclusion that you reach.

To make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, you must procure the ingredients, find a knife, and spread the condiments.

This thesis showed the reader the topic (a type of sandwich) and the direction the essay will take (describing how the sandwich is made).

Most other types of essays, whether compare/contrast, argumentative, or narrative, have thesis statements that take a position and argue it. In other words, unless your purpose is simply to inform, your thesis is considered persuasive. A persuasive thesis usually contains an opinion and the reason why your opinion is true.

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are the best type of sandwich because they are versatile, easy to make, and taste good.

In this persuasive thesis statement, you see that I state my opinion (the best type of sandwich), which means I have chosen a stance. Next, I explain that my opinion is correct with several key reasons. This persuasive type of thesis can be used in any essay that contains the writer’s opinion, including, as I mentioned above, compare/contrast essays, narrative essays, and so on.

2 Styles of Thesis Statements

Just as there are two different types of thesis statements (informative and persuasive), there are two basic styles you can use.

The first style uses a list of two or more points . This style of thesis is perfect for a brief essay that contains only two or three body paragraphs. This basic five-paragraph essay is typical of middle and high school assignments.

C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia series is one of the richest works of the 20th century because it offers an escape from reality, teaches readers to have faith even when they don’t understand, and contains a host of vibrant characters.

In the above persuasive thesis, you can see my opinion about Narnia followed by three clear reasons. This thesis is perfect for setting up a tidy five-paragraph essay.

In college, five paragraph essays become few and far between as essay length gets longer. Can you imagine having only five paragraphs in a six-page paper? For a longer essay, you need a thesis statement that is more versatile. Instead of listing two or three distinct points, a thesis can list one overarching point that all body paragraphs tie into.

Good vs. evil is the main theme of Lewis’s Narnia series, as is made clear through the struggles the main characters face in each book.

In this thesis, I have made a claim about the theme in Narnia followed by my reasoning. The broader scope of this thesis allows me to write about each of the series’ seven novels. I am no longer limited in how many body paragraphs I can logically use.

Formula for a Strong Argumentative Thesis

One thing I find that is helpful for students is having a clear template. While students rarely end up with a thesis that follows this exact wording, the following template creates a good starting point:

___________ is true because of ___________, ___________, and ___________.

Conversely, the formula for a thesis with only one point might follow this template:

___________________ is true because of _____________________.

Students usually end up using different terminology than simply “because,” but having a template is always helpful to get the creative juices flowing.

The Qualities of a Solid Thesis Statement

When composing a thesis, you must consider not only the format, but other qualities like length, position in the essay, and how strong the argument is.

Length: A thesis statement can be short or long, depending on how many points it mentions. Typically, however, it is only one concise sentence. It does contain at least two clauses, usually an independent clause (the opinion) and a dependent clause (the reasons). You probably should aim for a single sentence that is at least two lines, or about 30 to 40 words long.

Position: A thesis statement always belongs at the beginning of an essay. This is because it is a sentence that tells the reader what the writer is going to discuss. Teachers will have different preferences for the precise location of the thesis, but a good rule of thumb is in the introduction paragraph, within the last two or three sentences.

Strength: Finally, for a persuasive thesis to be strong, it needs to be arguable. This means that the statement is not obvious, and it is not something that everyone agrees is true.

Example of weak thesis:

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are easy to make because it just takes three ingredients.

Most people would agree that PB&J is one of the easiest sandwiches in the American lunch repertoire.

Example of a stronger thesis:

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are fun to eat because they always slide around.

This is more arguable because there are plenty of folks who might think a PB&J is messy or slimy rather than fun.

Composing a thesis statement does take a bit more thought than many other parts of an essay. However, because a thesis statement can contain an entire argument in just a few words, it is worth taking the extra time to compose this sentence. It can direct your research and your argument so that your essay is tight, focused, and makes readers think.

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Home — Essay Samples — Business — Hard Work — The Role of Talent and Hard Work in Reaching Success

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Published: Jul 17, 2018

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thesis statement about hard work

While Sandel argues that pursuing perfection through genetic engineering would decrease our sense of humility, he claims that the sense of solidarity we would lose is also important.

This thesis summarizes several points in Sandel’s argument, but it does not make a claim about how we should understand his argument. A reader who read Sandel’s argument would not also need to read an essay based on this descriptive thesis.  

Broad thesis (arguable, but difficult to support with evidence) 

Michael Sandel’s arguments about genetic engineering do not take into consideration all the relevant issues.

This is an arguable claim because it would be possible to argue against it by saying that Michael Sandel’s arguments do take all of the relevant issues into consideration. But the claim is too broad. Because the thesis does not specify which “issues” it is focused on—or why it matters if they are considered—readers won’t know what the rest of the essay will argue, and the writer won’t know what to focus on. If there is a particular issue that Sandel does not address, then a more specific version of the thesis would include that issue—hand an explanation of why it is important.  

Arguable thesis with analytical claim 

While Sandel argues persuasively that our instinct to “remake” (54) ourselves into something ever more perfect is a problem, his belief that we can always draw a line between what is medically necessary and what makes us simply “better than well” (51) is less convincing.

This is an arguable analytical claim. To argue for this claim, the essay writer will need to show how evidence from the article itself points to this interpretation. It’s also a reasonable scope for a thesis because it can be supported with evidence available in the text and is neither too broad nor too narrow.  

Arguable thesis with normative claim 

Given Sandel’s argument against genetic enhancement, we should not allow parents to decide on using Human Growth Hormone for their children.

This thesis tells us what we should do about a particular issue discussed in Sandel’s article, but it does not tell us how we should understand Sandel’s argument.  

Questions to ask about your thesis 

  • Is the thesis truly arguable? Does it speak to a genuine dilemma in the source, or would most readers automatically agree with it?  
  • Is the thesis too obvious? Again, would most or all readers agree with it without needing to see your argument?  
  • Is the thesis complex enough to require a whole essay's worth of argument?  
  • Is the thesis supportable with evidence from the text rather than with generalizations or outside research?  
  • Would anyone want to read a paper in which this thesis was developed? That is, can you explain what this paper is adding to our understanding of a problem, question, or topic?
  • picture_as_pdf Thesis

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Essay on Hard Work Pays Off

Students are often asked to write an essay on Hard Work Pays Off in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on Hard Work Pays Off

Introduction.

Hard work is like a key to a treasure box. It unlocks success. When we work hard, we learn, grow, and achieve our goals. The saying ‘Hard Work Pays Off’ means that when we work hard, we get rewards.

Importance of Hard Work

Hard work is very important. It’s like a seed. If we plant it, water it and take good care of it, it grows into a big tree. Similarly, if we work hard, we can achieve big things. Without hard work, it is impossible to succeed.

Examples of Hard Work

Many successful people have worked very hard. Thomas Edison, the inventor of the light bulb, tried thousands of times before he succeeded. This shows that hard work can lead to great success.

Benefits of Hard Work

Hard work not only brings success, but it also builds character. It teaches us patience, discipline, and determination. When we work hard, we become stronger and more confident.

250 Words Essay on Hard Work Pays Off

Hard work is like a key that opens the door to success. It’s a belief that if you work hard, you will get good results. This idea is often summed up in the phrase “hard work pays off”.

Understanding Hard Work

Hard work means putting in a lot of time and effort into what you do. It’s not just about being busy, but also about focusing on your tasks and doing them well. When you work hard, you learn new things and develop skills. You also learn to solve problems and overcome challenges.

Hard work brings many benefits. For one, it leads to success. Think about your favorite athlete or musician. They didn’t become great overnight. They practiced and worked hard for many years.

Hard work also builds character. It teaches you to be patient and persistent. It makes you strong and helps you grow as a person.

Examples of Hard Work Paying Off

There are many examples of how hard work pays off. For instance, students who study hard often get good grades. Workers who are dedicated to their jobs often get promotions. Farmers who work hard in their fields get a good harvest.

500 Words Essay on Hard Work Pays Off

Hard work is like a key that opens the door to success. The saying “Hard Work Pays Off” means that when we put effort into something, we will see good results. This essay will talk about why hard work is important and how it brings rewards.

The Meaning of Hard Work

Hard work is when we put a lot of effort and time into doing something. It is not just about working for many hours. It is about working smart, being focused, and not giving up. It is also about being patient and waiting for the results.

Secondly, hard work teaches us values. It helps us understand that nothing comes easy in life. It makes us strong and ready to face challenges. It also helps us appreciate the results because we know we earned them.

Hard Work and Success

There is a strong link between hard work and success. People who work hard often achieve what they want. This is because they put in the time and effort needed to reach their goals. They don’t wait for luck or shortcuts. They believe in their abilities and keep trying until they succeed.

In science, Thomas Edison invented the light bulb after many failed attempts. He worked hard and didn’t stop until he succeeded. These examples show that hard work can lead to great achievements.

In conclusion, hard work always pays off. It might take time and effort, but the results are worth it. Hard work helps us reach our goals, teaches us values, and leads to success. So, remember to always work hard and never give up. Your efforts will surely be rewarded.

Remember, the path to success is not easy, but hard work makes it possible. As the famous saying goes, “There is no substitute for hard work.” So, keep working hard, and you will achieve your dreams.

That’s it! I hope the essay helped you.

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thesis statement about hard work

Examples

Working Thesis Statement

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thesis statement about hard work

Navigating the academic waters often starts with a working thesis – a preliminary statement guiding your research direction. As the bedrock of your argument, it’s vital to get it right from the outset. Whether you’re a budding researcher or an established academic, our comprehensive guide brimming with thesis Statement examples and pro-tips will illuminate the process of crafting an impactful working thesis. Dive in and set the tone for a compelling research journey!

What is a Working Thesis Statement?

A working thesis statement is a temporary or initial statement that reflects a writer’s argument or focus in the early stages of essay or research paper writing. It is considered “working” because it can undergo transformations as the writer delves deeper into research, gathers more information, and refines their perspective. Essentially, it serves as a starting point and may evolve as the research progresses and the writer gains a clearer understanding of the subject.  In addition, you should review our  problem thesis statement .

What is an example of a Working thesis statement?

Example: “Social media platforms have a significant impact on teenagers’ mental health.” As the writer proceeds with the research, this statement might be refined to specify the type of impact or narrow down which social media platforms are most influential.”

100 Working Thesis Statement Examples

Working Thesis Statement Examples

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Starting your research with a working thesis can guide your exploration and analysis. These provisional statements allow you to focus on different angles and will likely be revised as you dive deeper. The following are 100 working thesis statement examples to kickstart your brainstorming and research.

  • “Eating organic foods leads to better health.”
  • “Online learning has as much educational value as traditional classroom settings.”
  • “Video games have both negative and positive effects on the cognitive development of children.”
  • “Globalization has reshaped cultural identities worldwide.”
  • “Artificial intelligence will redefine the job market in the next decade.”
  • “Meditation has quantifiable benefits for mental health.”
  • “Climate change has accelerated due to industrial practices.”
  • “Remote work will become the norm for many industries post-pandemic.”
  • “Music therapy can be an effective treatment for certain mental disorders.”
  • “The gig economy has both pros and cons for the workforce.”
  • “Childhood exposure to multiple languages enhances cognitive abilities.”
  • “Modern architecture is influenced significantly by environmental considerations.”
  • “E-sports will soon rival traditional sports in viewership and revenue.”
  • “The feminist movement has evolved significantly in the 21st century.”
  • “Consumer behavior has been largely influenced by social media marketing.”
  • “The rise of streaming platforms is reshaping the music industry.”
  • “Mental health issues among teenagers have risen with the proliferation of smartphones.”
  • “Urban farming can be a sustainable solution for food deserts.”
  • “The future of transportation will be dominated by electric vehicles.”
  • “Renewable energy sources are now more economically viable than fossil fuels.”
  • “Telemedicine will revolutionize healthcare access in remote areas.”
  • “Digital currencies will change the dynamics of global trade.”
  • “Coral reefs are under imminent threat due to ocean acidification.”
  • “Space tourism will become a reality within this decade.”
  • “Virtual reality will transform education and training methodologies.”
  • “Bioplastics are a potential solution to the plastic waste crisis.”
  • “Plant-based diets can significantly reduce carbon footprints.”
  • “Mental health should be integrated into school curriculums.”
  • “Urban planning needs to prioritize pedestrian-friendly designs.”
  • “Modern parenting styles differ significantly from those of the previous generation.”
  • “Personalized learning will redefine educational outcomes.”
  • “Augmented reality will have varied applications beyond gaming.”
  • “Online privacy concerns will dictate future tech regulations.”
  • “Gene editing can revolutionize medical treatments but poses ethical dilemmas.”
  • “Ancient civilizations had advanced knowledge of astronomy.”
  • “Colonial histories have long-term impacts on national identities.”
  • “Alternative medicine practices need more rigorous scientific validation.”
  • “Artificial sweeteners may have unforeseen health implications.”
  • “Stress in modern societies originates from multiple sources.”
  • “The modern art movement is heavily influenced by global events.”
  • “Subscription models are becoming predominant in various industries.”
  • “Dietary choices are more influenced by cultural factors than health considerations.”
  • “Intermittent fasting has potential benefits beyond weight loss.”
  • “Personalized marketing will reshape consumer behaviors.”
  • “The sharing economy is transforming traditional business models.”
  • “Blockchain technology has applications beyond cryptocurrencies.”
  • “Animal-assisted therapies have notable success in various treatments.”
  • “The future of print media is in niche and localized publications.”
  • “Microfinance can be a tool for economic upliftment in developing countries.”
  • “Modern cinema is increasingly addressing global issues.”
  • “Digital detox is becoming necessary for mental well-being.”
  • “Resilience training should be a component of employee wellness programs.”
  • “Local tourism will see a boost in the post-pandemic world.”
  • “Public transportation systems need to adapt to post-COVID realities.”
  • “Elderly populations are facing increased isolation in the digital age.”
  • “Upcycling is becoming a significant trend in the fashion industry.”
  • “Holistic education emphasizes more than just academic achievement.”
  • “Water scarcity will be a leading global issue in the coming years.”
  • “The role of influencers is evolving in the digital marketing landscape.”
  • “The circadian rhythm has a profound effect on productivity.”
  • “Migratory patterns of animals are being altered by climate change.”
  • “Alternative protein sources will dominate future diets.”
  • “Nano-technology has the potential to revolutionize medicine.”
  • “Cultural appropriation in fashion needs a deeper understanding and sensitivity.”
  • “Digital literacy is becoming as essential as traditional literacy.”
  • “Robotics in surgery can enhance precision but requires ethical considerations.”
  • “The tradition of oral storytelling is being revived through modern platforms.”
  • “The notion of work-life balance is evolving with the rise of digital nomadism.”
  • “The digital divide can exacerbate educational inequalities.”
  • “Biodiversity conservation is crucial for ecosystem stability.”
  • “Personal branding is becoming essential in the modern job market.”
  • “Ethical consumerism can drive corporate responsibility.”
  • “Mindfulness practices can enhance workplace productivity.”
  • “The dynamics of international politics are shifting with the rise of regional powers.”
  • “Food preservation techniques are evolving with technology.”
  • “Historical fiction plays a role in shaping perceptions of the past.”
  • “Indigenous knowledge systems can complement modern science.”
  • “Commuter culture has significant environmental and health impacts.”
  • “Craftsmanship is finding its value in the age of mass production.”
  • “The role of museums is evolving to be more interactive and inclusive.”
  • “Edutainment platforms are making learning more accessible and enjoyable.”
  • “Youth activism is reshaping global policy discussions.”
  • “Multi-disciplinary approaches are the future of academic research.”
  • “Ecotourism can benefit local communities and conservation efforts.”
  • “Freelancing is challenging traditional employment norms.”
  • “Nature-based solutions can mitigate urban environmental challenges.”
  • “The gaming industry is becoming a leader in technological innovation.”
  • “Epigenetics is unlocking the mysteries of gene expression.”
  • “Digital archiving is essential for preserving cultural heritages.”
  • “Remote and flexible working models can have societal benefits.”
  • “Self-care routines are integral to holistic health.”
  • “Digital nomad visas are reshaping immigration policies.”
  • “Adaptive learning technologies cater to individual student needs.”
  • “Eco-friendly packaging is more than just a marketing trend.”
  • “Quantum computing holds the key to future tech innovations.”
  • “Multi-generational households have socio-economic benefits.”
  • “The revival of traditional arts can boost local economies.”
  • “Precision agriculture can optimize yields and reduce resource wastage.”
  • “Local languages are gaining prominence in digital content creation.”
  • “Human-centered design is the future of product innovation.”

Each of these working thesis statements can be further refined based on specific research, perspectives, and findings as one delves deeper into their chosen topic.

Working Thesis Statement Examples for Research Paper

Research papers demand precision, clarity, and a strong foundation. A working thesis statement for such a paper typically suggests a hypothesis or a primary point that will later be validated or disproved through evidence.

  • “Genetically modified foods present more benefits than potential harm.”
  • “Ocean acidification significantly impacts marine biodiversity.”
  • “Quantum computing will revolutionize data encryption methods.”
  • “Renewable energy solutions are more cost-effective than conventional fossil fuels.”
  • “The gut-brain connection plays a crucial role in mental health.”
  • “Childhood vaccinations have no proven links to autism.”
  • “Microplastics in water sources influence human health outcomes.”
  • “Historical art movements reflect the socio-political events of their times.”
  • “AI-driven diagnostic tools can predict diseases more accurately.”
  • “The frequency of extreme weather events correlates with global warming.”

Working from Home Thesis Statement Examples

The concept of working from home has grown exponentially in recent years. Thesis statements on this topic can explore the various facets, benefits, challenges, and implications of this trend.

  • “Working from home enhances employee productivity levels.”
  • “Remote work culture can lead to professional isolation and mental health challenges.”
  • “Flexible work schedules cater to global clientele more effectively.”
  • “Home-based work can reduce urban traffic congestion.”
  • “Technological infrastructure dictates the efficiency of remote work.”
  • “Work-life balance can be skewed in a prolonged work-from-home setup.”
  • “Virtual collaboration tools are reshaping corporate communication.”
  • “Remote work could impact urban real estate demands.”
  • “Cybersecurity challenges increase in decentralized work environments.”
  • “Training and orientation programs must evolve for remote work success.”

Working Thesis Statement Examples for Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay thesis statement that takes a strong position, which will then be supported or countered with evidence and arguments.

  • “Universities should make attendance optional for students.”
  • “Plant-based diets are more environmentally sustainable.”
  • “Compulsory military service strengthens national unity.”
  • “Social media platforms should be held accountable for user-generated content.”
  • “Single-gender schools do not offer educational benefits over co-ed institutions.”
  • “Animal testing for cosmetics should be banned globally.”
  • “Nuclear energy is essential for a carbon-free future.”
  • “Euthanasia should be legalized under strict conditions.”
  • “Organic farming can sustain global food demands.”
  • “Mandatory voting ensures true democratic representation.”

Working Thesis Statement Examples for Speech

For speeches, a working thesis should be compelling and captivating, giving audiences an idea of what to expect and why they should listen.

  • “Space exploration benefits humanity in unforeseen ways.”
  • “Digital detox weekends can rejuvenate the mind.”
  • “Public libraries remain essential in the digital age.”
  • “Sports foster essential life skills beyond physical fitness.”
  • “Mental health education should be integrated into school systems.”
  • “Consumerism drives ecological degradation.”
  • “Local tourism promotes cultural preservation.”
  • “Continuous learning is the key to professional success.”
  • “Ethical fashion is not a trend but a necessity.”
  • “The future of mobility is electric.”

Working Thesis Statement Examples for Essay

Essays can cover a broad spectrum of subjects, and the thesis will set the tone and direction of the content.

  • “Urban green spaces contribute to societal well-being.”
  • “Bilingualism offers cognitive and cultural advantages.”
  • “Digital privacy is a modern-day human right.”
  • “Classical literature provides insights into contemporary issues.”
  • “Embracing failures can lead to unexpected successes.”
  • “Community engagement is pivotal for sustainable development.”
  • “Ancient medical practices have relevance in modern treatments.”
  • “Creativity thrives under limitations.”
  • “Cultural festivals foster global unity.”
  • “Technology reshapes human interactions.”

Working Thesis Statement Examples for Technology Topics

In the rapidly evolving world of technology, a thesis statement can pinpoint specific trends, challenges, innovations, or implications.

  • “Augmented reality will revolutionize retail experiences.”
  • “Blockchain technology extends beyond the realm of finance.”
  • “Cybersecurity threats challenge global geopolitical dynamics.”
  • “5G technology will redefine connectivity standards.”
  • “Machine learning algorithms can perpetuate societal biases.”
  • “Quantum encryption may render current security protocols obsolete.”
  • “E-waste is the environmental challenge of the digital era.”
  • “Telehealth bridges the accessibility gap in medical services.”
  • “Smart cities prioritize sustainability and urban well-being.”
  • “Bioinformatics accelerates personalized medical treatments.”

Working Thesis Statement Examples for Film Analysis

Analyzing films requires a deep dive into themes, motifs, cinematography, character development, and cultural contexts. A thesis provides a lens through which the film will be reviewed.

  • “Hitchcock’s ‘Vertigo’ explores the intricacies of obsession and identity.”
  • “Cinematography in ‘Blade Runner 2049’ reflects the dystopian themes of the narrative.”
  • “Disney’s ‘Mulan’ navigates the terrain of gender roles and societal expectations.”
  • “Satire in ‘Get Out’ addresses racial dynamics in contemporary society.”
  • “Sound design in ‘A Quiet Place’ intensifies the narrative’s suspense.”
  • “The nonlinear storyline of ‘Pulp Fiction’ challenges traditional narrative structures.”
  • “‘The Shape of Water’ delves into themes of love and otherness.”
  • “Cultural representations in ‘Coco’ underline the significance of family and traditions.”
  • “‘The Revenant’ showcases the rawness of human survival instincts.”
  • “Character development in ‘The Godfather’ mirrors societal power dynamics.

How do you start a working thesis statement?

Starting a working thesis statement is about identifying the primary point or argument you wish to convey in your paper. It often begins with understanding your topic, conducting preliminary research, and formulating an initial perspective. Here are the steps to get you started:

  • Understand Your Assignment: Read the guidelines provided for your essay or research paper. Understand the requirements and what is expected of you.
  • Choose a Specific Topic: A narrow, focused topic helps in forming a more precise thesis.
  • Conduct Preliminary Research: Before making your statement, get a general overview of your topic through initial research.
  • Ask Questions: Ponder over your topic. For instance, if you’re writing about “climate change,” you might ask, “What are the major contributors to climate change in urban areas?”
  • Draft a Provisional Statement: Write down your initial perspective based on your understanding. This doesn’t need to be perfect; it’s just a starting point.

How to Write a Working Thesis Statement? – Step by Step Guide

  • Start with a Question: Often, assignments come in the form of questions. For example, “How did the civil rights movement of the 1960s affect racial dynamics in the US?” Your thesis will be the answer to this question.
  • Be Specific: Avoid vague words and make sure your statement can’t be interpreted in multiple ways. For instance, instead of saying “Pollution is harmful,” you might say, “Industrial waste contributes significantly to ocean pollution.”
  • Stay Relevant: Ensure that your statement aligns with the content of your essay or research.
  • State an Argument: A thesis should not be a mere observation. It should present an arguable point which can be supported or opposed.
  • One Sentence: Try to condense your statement into one clear sentence. However, if necessary, it can be two sentences.
  • Refine and Revise: As you continue your research, keep refining your thesis. It’s called a “working” thesis for a reason – it’s subject to change.
  • Seek Feedback: Before finalizing, it’s beneficial to get feedback from peers, instructors, or mentors. They can offer a fresh perspective.

Tips for Writing a Working Thesis Statement

  • Keep It Debatable: A good thesis will always have an opposing side. If there’s no counter-argument to your statement, it might be too straightforward or a fact.
  • Avoid First-Person Pronouns: Phrases like “I believe” or “I think” make your statement seem more like an opinion than an arguable point.
  • Stay Clear of Generic Statements: Avoid clichés and general observations. Make sure your thesis offers a fresh and precise perspective on the topic.
  • Position Strategically: Place your thesis statement at the end of the introduction. It acts as a gateway to the rest of your work.
  • Ensure It’s Provable: Be sure that you can provide evidence to support your claim. If your statement is based on personal beliefs or values, it might not be suitable as a thesis.
  • Use Online Tools: There are online thesis generators that can help you refine your statement. They aren’t foolproof, but they can provide a good starting point.

Remember, a working thesis is called “working” because it can evolve. As you delve deeper into your research or writing, you might find more compelling ways to frame your argument. Always be open to revision – that’s the essence of great academic writing!

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  • Instructive
  • Professional

10 Examples of Public speaking

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Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement

Learning objectives.

  • Understand the elements of a strong, clear thesis statement
  • Revise a thesis statement to make it clearer

Have you ever known a person who was not very good at telling stories? You probably had trouble following his train of thought as he jumped around from point to point, either being too brief in places that needed further explanation or providing too many details on a meaningless element. Maybe he told the end of the story first, then moved to the beginning and later added details to the middle. His ideas were probably scattered, and the story did not flow very well. When the story was over, you probably had many questions.

Just as a personal anecdote can be a disorganized mess, an essay can fall into the same trap of being out of order and confusing. That is why writers need a thesis statement to provide a specific focus for their essay and to organize what they are about to discuss in the body.

Just like a topic sentence summarizes a single paragraph, the thesis statement summarizes an entire essay. It tells the reader the point you want to make in your essay, while the essay itself supports that point. It is like a signpost that signals the essay’s destination. You should form your thesis before you begin to organize an essay, but you may find that it needs revision as the essay develops.

Elements of a Thesis Statement

For every essay you write, you must focus on a central idea. This idea stems from a topic you have chosen or been assigned or from a question your teacher has asked. It is not enough merely to discuss a general topic or simply answer a question with a yes or no. You have to form a specific opinion, and then articulate that into a controlling idea—the main idea upon which you build your thesis.

Remember that a thesis is not the topic itself, but rather your interpretation of the question or subject. For whatever topic your professor gives you, you must ask yourself, “What do I want to say about it?” Asking and then answering this question is vital to forming a thesis that is precise, forceful and confident.

A thesis is one sentence long and appears toward the end of your introduction. It is specific and focuses on one to three points of a single idea—points that are able to be demonstrated in the body. It forecasts the content of the essay and suggests how you will organize your information. Remember that a thesis statement does not summarize an issue but rather dissects it.

A Strong Thesis Statement

A strong thesis statement contains the following qualities.

Specificity . A thesis statement must concentrate on a specific area of a general topic. As you may recall, the creation of a thesis statement begins when you choose a broad subject and then narrow down its parts until you pinpoint a specific aspect of that topic. For example, health care is a broad topic, but a proper thesis statement would focus on a specific area of that topic, such as options for individuals without health care coverage.

Precision . A strong thesis statement must be precise enough to allow for a coherent argument and to remain focused on the topic. If the specific topic is options for individuals without health care coverage, then your precise thesis statement must make an exact claim about it, such as that limited options exist for those who are uninsured by their employers. You must further pinpoint what you are going to discuss regarding these limited effects, such as whom they affect and what the cause is.

Ability to be argued . A thesis statement must present a relevant and specific argument. A factual statement often is not considered arguable. Be sure your thesis statement contains a point of view that can be supported with evidence.

Ability to be demonstrated . For any claim you make in your thesis, you must be able to provide reasons and examples for your opinion. You can rely on personal observations in order to do this, or you can consult outside sources to demonstrate that what you assert is valid. A worthy argument is backed by examples and details.

Forcefulness . A thesis statement that is forceful shows readers that you are, in fact, making an argument. The tone is assertive and takes a stance that others might oppose.

Confidence . In addition to using force in your thesis statement, you must also use confidence in your claim. Phrases such as I feel or I believe actually weaken the readers’ sense of your confidence because these phrases imply that you are the only person who feels the way you do. In other words, your stance has insufficient backing. Taking an authoritative stance on the matter persuades your readers to have faith in your argument and open their minds to what you have to say.

Even in a personal essay that allows the use of first person, your thesis should not contain phrases such as in my opinion or I believe. These statements reduce your credibility and weaken your argument. Your opinion is more convincing when you use a firm attitude.

Examples of Appropriate Thesis Statements

Each of the following thesis statements meets several of the following requirements:

  • Specificity
  • Ability to be argued
  • Ability to be demonstrated
  • Forcefulness

Ex: The societal and personal struggles of Troy Maxon in the play Fences symbolize the challenge of black males who lived through segregation and integration in the United States.

Ex: Closing all American borders for a period of five years is one solution that will tackle illegal immigration.

Ex: Shakespeare’s use of dramatic irony in Romeo and Juliet spoils the outcome for the audience and weakens the plot.

Ex: J. D. Salinger’s character in Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield, is a confused rebel who voices his disgust with phonies, yet in an effort to protect himself, he acts like a phony on many occasions.

Ex: Compared to an absolute divorce, no-fault divorce is less expensive, promotes fairer settlements, and reflects a more realistic view of the causes for marital breakdown.

Ex: Exposing children from an early age to the dangers of drug abuse is a sure method of preventing future drug addicts.

Ex: In today’s crumbling job market, a high school diploma is not significant enough education to land a stable, lucrative job.

You can find thesis statements in many places, such as in the news; in the opinions of friends, coworkers or teachers; and even in songs you hear on the radio. Become aware of thesis statements in everyday life by paying attention to people’s opinions and their reasons for those opinions. Pay attention to your own everyday thesis statements as well, as these can become material for future essays.

Now that you have read about the contents of a good thesis statement and have seen examples, take a look at the pitfalls to avoid when composing your own thesis:

A thesis is weak when it is simply a declaration of your subject or a description of what you will discuss in your essay.

Ex: Weak thesis statement: My paper will explain why imagination is more important than knowledge.

A thesis is weak when it makes an unreasonable or outrageous claim or insults the opposing side.

Ex: Weak thesis statement: Religious radicals across America are trying to legislate their Puritanical beliefs by banning required high school books.

A thesis is weak when it contains an obvious fact or something that no one can disagree with or provides a dead end.

Ex: Weak thesis statement: Advertising companies use sex to sell their products.

A thesis is weak when the statement is too broad.

Ex: Weak thesis statement: The life of Abraham Lincoln was long and challenging.

WRITING AT WORK

Often in your career, you will need to ask your boss for something through an e-mail. Just as a thesis statement organizes an essay, it can also organize your e-mail request. While your e-mail will be shorter than an essay, using a thesis statement in your first paragraph quickly lets your boss know what you are asking for, why it is necessary, and what the benefits are. In short body paragraphs, you can provide the essential information needed to expand upon your request.

Thesis Statement Revision

Your thesis will probably change as you write, so you will need to modify it to reflect exactly what you have discussed in your essay. Remember that your thesis statement begins as a working thesis statement, an indefinite statement that you make about your topic early in the writing process for the purpose of planning and guiding your writing.

Working thesis statements often become stronger as you gather information and form new opinions and reasons for those opinions. Revision helps you strengthen your thesis so that it matches what you have expressed in the body of the paper.

The best way to revise your thesis statement is to ask questions about it and then examine the answers to those questions. By challenging your own ideas and forming definite reasons for those ideas, you grow closer to a more precise point of view, which you can then incorporate into your thesis statement.

Ways to Revise Your Thesis

You can cut down on irrelevant aspects and revise your thesis by taking the following steps:

1. Pinpoint and replace all nonspecific words, such as people, everything, society, or life, with more precise words in order to reduce any vagueness.

Working thesis: Young people have to work hard to succeed in life.

Revised thesis: Recent college graduates must have discipline and persistence in order to find and maintain a stable job in which they can use and be appreciated for their talents.

The revised thesis makes a more specific statement about success and what it means to work hard. The original includes too broad a range of people and does not define exactly what success entails. By replacing those general words like people and work hard, the writer can better focus his or her research and gain more direction in his or her writing.

2. Clarify ideas that need explanation by asking yourself questions that narrow your thesis.

Working thesis: The welfare system is a joke.

Revised thesis: The welfare system keeps a socioeconomic class from gaining employment by alluring members of that class with unearned income, instead of programs to improve their education and skill sets.

A joke means many things to many people. Readers bring all sorts of backgrounds and perspectives to the reading process and would need clarification for a word so vague. This expression may also be too informal for the selected audience. By asking questions, the writer can devise a more precise and appropriate explanation for joke. The writer should ask himself or herself questions similar to the 5WH questions. (Who? What? Where? When? Why? and How? are the 5WH questions). By incorporating the answers to these questions into a thesis statement, the writer more accurately defines his or her stance, which will better guide the writing of the essay.

3. Replace any linking verbs with action verbs. Linking verbs are forms of the verb to be, a verb that simply states that a situation exists.

Working thesis : Kansas City schoolteachers are not paid enough.

Revised thesis : The Kansas City legislature cannot afford to pay its educators, resulting in job cuts and resignations in a district that sorely needs highly qualified and dedicated teachers.

The linking verb in this working thesis statement is the word are. Linking verbs often make thesis statements weak because they do not express action. Rather, they connect words and phrases to the second half of the sentence. Readers might wonder, “Why are they not paid enough?” But this statement does not compel them to ask many more questions. The writer should ask himself or herself questions in order to replace the linking verb with an action verb, thus forming a stronger thesis statement, one that takes a more definitive stance on the issue:

  • Who is not paying the teachers enough?
  • What is considered “enough”?
  • What is the problem?
  • What are the results

4. Omit any general claims that are hard to support.

Working thesis : Today’s teenage girls are too sexualized.

Revised thesis : Teenage girls who are captivated by the sexual images on MTV are conditioned to believe that a woman’s worth depends on her sensuality, a feeling that harms their self-esteem and behavior.

It is true that some young women in today’s society are more sexualized than in the past, but that is not true for all girls. Many girls have strict parents, dress appropriately, and do not engage in sexual activity while in middle school and high school. The writer of this thesis should ask the following questions:

  • Which teenage girls?
  • What constitutes “too” sexualized?
  • Why are they behaving that way?
  • Where does this behavior show up?
  • What are the repercussions?

In your career you may have to write a project proposal that focuses on a particular problem in your company, such as reinforcing the tardiness policy. The proposal would aim to fix the problem; using a thesis statement would clearly state the boundaries of the problem and tell the goals of the project. After writing the proposal, you may find that the thesis needs revision to reflect exactly what is expressed in the body. Using the techniques from this chapter would apply to revising that thesis.

Key Takeaways

• Proper essays require a thesis statement to provide a specific focus and suggest how the essay will be organized.

• A thesis statement is your interpretation of the subject, not the topic itself.

• A strong thesis is specific, precise, forceful, confident, and is able to be demonstrated.

• A strong thesis challenges readers with a point of view that can be debated and can be supported with evidence.

• A weak thesis is simply a declaration of your topic or contains an obvious fact that cannot be argued.

• Depending on your topic, it may or may not be appropriate to use first person point of view.

• Revise your thesis by ensuring all words are specific, all ideas are exact, and all verbs express action.

Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement Copyright © 2016 by Jennifer Kepka is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Writing a Thesis Statement is a Hard Work

Thesis • April 30, 2010

The Rules of Writing Thesis Statements

Writing a thesis statement means to create a small but informative text where one expresses the main ideas of a master’s work or a dissertation. It is rather hard to do if you are doing it for the first time and don’t know the rules. A thesis statement is not a plan to a dissertation or an essay. It is not the list of the main parts. So, let’s discuss what a thesis statement is and how to write it.

What is needed to begin? Before you start writing thesis statements you should choose the right topic. It must strictly correspond with the essay or a dissertation and be rather short at the same time (the author will have 10-15 minutes to speak). Besides, this work should contain something new that was not mentioned in the main scientific work. In weak thesis statements there are no examples and author’s thoughts. In good ones – global conclusions are based on specific examples. It is impossible to analyze the material without global idea.

Speaking about the structure of a thesis statement it contains the following steps.

  • Choose a title of your thesis statement. It shouldn’t be a complicated one and has to be understandable. You can always come to know what thesis is about if the title is created successfully.
  • The structure of the work. The first sentence of a thesis statement is the hardest. It is really so because, writing it you need to answer a question: why the topic you are writing is so important and worth to be discussed? Usually the reason is a scientific novelty. The first part must be no more than one paragraph and the whole text should be no longer than 6000 words. The author should write strictly according to the structure and use a lot of analyzed examples. The ending should summarize everything written and must be logical.
  • A very important part of the thesis statement writing is literature list. Before starting this serious work please make sure you have found enough literature on your topic. The information can be taken from books, scientific and specialized magazines, monographs, but the most useful and informative is Internet and its resources.
  • The last thing you should take into consideration is discussion. While writing a thesis statement please think on the questions you might be asked and form them. The readers of a thesis statement or the audience can ask, for example: “What is the novelty of your work and what the contribution to modern science is?

Now you know the steps and ways of writing thesis statements and can see that it is not so easy and takes a lot of time and efforts. An experience of a successful writing of this type of work can not be gained at once. So you can ask for a professional help at the research writing company Samedayessay.com, where you will surely find fast and professional assistance of skilled research writers.

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  1. What is a Thesis Statement: Writing Guide with Examples

    A thesis statement is a sentence in a paper or essay (in the opening paragraph) that introduces the main topic to the reader. As one of the first things your reader sees, your thesis statement is one of the most important sentences in your entire paper—but also one of the hardest to write! In this article, we explain how to write a thesis ...

  2. 9.1 Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement

    Working thesis: Young people have to work hard to succeed in life. Revised thesis: Recent college graduates must have discipline and persistence in order to find and maintain a stable job in which they can use and be appreciated for their talents. The revised thesis makes a more specific statement about success and what it means to work hard.

  3. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Step 1: Start with a question. You should come up with an initial thesis, sometimes called a working thesis, early in the writing process. As soon as you've decided on your essay topic, you need to work out what you want to say about it—a clear thesis will give your essay direction and structure.

  4. Hard Work Essays

    Typically this essay should be between 500 and 800 words long, and it should have the thesis statement and conclusion. On our platform you can find essays about hard work, complete with thesis statements and sound conclusions, that you can use to improve your writing. 14 essay samples found.

  5. 5.1: Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement

    Working thesis: Young people have to work hard to succeed in life. Revised thesis: Recent college graduates must have discipline and persistence in order to find and maintain a stable job in which they can use and be appreciated for their talents. The revised thesis makes a more specific statement about success and what it means to work hard.

  6. How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement: 4 Steps + Examples

    Step 4: Revise and refine your thesis statement before you start writing. Read through your thesis statement several times before you begin to compose your full essay. You need to make sure the statement is ironclad, since it is the foundation of the entire paper. Edit it or have a peer review it for you to make sure everything makes sense and ...

  7. Hard Work Essay Topic Ideas & Examples

    The Turning Point in the Life of Hard Work. An Analysis of the Policy and Effectiveness of Hard Work, an American President. An Examination of Hard Work and His Army. President Hard Work Was a Selfless Leader Who Greatly Influenced the United States. An Introduction to the Political History and a Comparison of Hard Work and John Adams.

  8. Developing A Thesis

    Keep your thesis prominent in your introduction. A good, standard place for your thesis statement is at the end of an introductory paragraph, especially in shorter (5-15 page) essays. Readers are used to finding theses there, so they automatically pay more attention when they read the last sentence of your introduction.

  9. 5.2 Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement

    The revised thesis makes a more specific statement about success and what it means to work hard. The original includes too broad a range of people and does not define exactly what success entails. By replacing the general words like people and work hard, the writer can better focus his or her research and gain more direction in his or her writing.

  10. Thesis Statements

    A thesis statement: tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion. is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper. directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself.

  11. How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement

    Teachers will have different preferences for the precise location of the thesis, but a good rule of thumb is in the introduction paragraph, within the last two or three sentences. Strength: Finally, for a persuasive thesis to be strong, it needs to be arguable. This means that the statement is not obvious, and it is not something that everyone ...

  12. PDF Essay Planning: How to Develop a Working Thesis Statement

    examine why thesis statements are crucial to a paper. For a Reader Thesis statements act as a roadmap that drive readers from one paragraph to another. Having a thesis statement gives the reader a "notice" on points that will be discussed in the paper. Moreover, having a thesis statement gives the reader a reason to continue reading. Without a

  13. Sample TOEFL Essay

    To begin with, success is always the result of hard work over a long period of time. Success happens gradually, and only after a series of correct decisions and small victories. A stroke of luck, in contrast, is generally perceived to be a one-time event. The experience of my uncle, a successful entrepreneur, is a compelling example of what I mean.

  14. PDF Thesis Statements and Topic Sentences

    Thesis Statements and Topic Sentences A thesis driven essay is comprised of an initial thesis statement that establishes a claim or argument, and ensuing topic sentences that support and develop that claim. Ideally, a reader would be able to read only ... and the people whose hard work enabled him to spend lavishly on philanthropy [new].

  15. PDF Essay Planning: How to Develop a Working Thesis Statement

    The thesis statement is the heart of every paper. It is a focused statement that summarizes the main argument and broadcasts the order in which the ideas will be discussed. Thesis statements have three parts: the topic, the claim, and the major points. The claim is your argument, opinion, or stance that will be supported by your evidence and ...

  16. The Role of Talent and Hard Work in Reaching Success

    Some people are talented at making hard work and at the same time, are hard worker at making talent. The hard worker is dedicated, determined and disciplined. Undoubtedly, hard work is more important than talent at every sphere of life with a goal termed, "success.". It is on the track of success that hard work importance cannot be over ...

  17. Thesis

    Thesis. Your thesis is the central claim in your essay—your main insight or idea about your source or topic. Your thesis should appear early in an academic essay, followed by a logically constructed argument that supports this central claim. A strong thesis is arguable, which means a thoughtful reader could disagree with it and therefore ...

  18. Essay on Hard Work Pays Off

    Conclusion. In conclusion, hard work always pays off. It might take time and effort, but the results are worth it. Hard work helps us reach our goals, teaches us values, and leads to success. So, remember to always work hard and never give up. Your efforts will surely be rewarded.

  19. Working Thesis Statement

    The following are 100 working thesis statement examples to kickstart your brainstorming and research. "Eating organic foods leads to better health.". "Online learning has as much educational value as traditional classroom settings.". "Video games have both negative and positive effects on the cognitive development of children.".

  20. Developing a Strong, Clear Thesis Statement

    Working thesis: Young people have to work hard to succeed in life. Revised thesis: Recent college graduates must have discipline and persistence in order to find and maintain a stable job in which they can use and be appreciated for their talents. The revised thesis makes a more specific statement about success and what it means to work hard.

  21. PDF Thesis Statements

    Thesis statement: *. 3. Passion and willingness to work hard can only offer a prospective employer so much. Unless you can show how your experiences have helped prepare you for the position you are interviewing for, the employers may decide to go with a candidate who has completed the appropriate training already.

  22. Writing a Thesis Statement is a Hard Work

    The Rules of Writing Thesis Statements. Writing a thesis statement means to create a small but informative text where one expresses the main ideas of a master's work or a dissertation. It is rather hard to do if you are doing it for the first time and don't know the rules. A thesis statement is not a plan to a dissertation or an essay.

  23. Hard Work Thesis Examples That Really Inspire

    4 samples of this type. WowEssays.com paper writer service proudly presents to you a free database of Hard Work Theses designed to help struggling students tackle their writing challenges. In a practical sense, each Hard Work Thesis sample presented here may be a guidebook that walks you through the important stages of the writing process and ...