us representation

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List of current members of the u.s. congress.

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The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the United States of America's federal government. It consists of two houses, the Senate and the House of Representatives , with members chosen through direct election .

Congress has 535 voting members. The Senate has 100 voting officials, and the House has 435 voting officials, along with five delegates and one resident commissioner.

As of June 25, 2024, there were three vacancies in the U.S. House of Representatives .

Click here to find your representatives with Ballotpedia's "Who represents me?" tool.

  • 1.1 Leadership and partisan balance
  • 1.2 List of current U.S. Senate members
  • 2.1 Leadership and partisan balance
  • 2.2 List of current U.S. House members
  • 3 Congressional delegations by state

U.S. Senate

Leadership and partisan balance.

U.S. Senate leadership
Position Representative Party
President of the Senate
Senate Majority Leadership
President pro tempore
Senate Majority Leader
Senate Majority Whip
Senate Minority Leadership
Senate Minority Leader
Senate Minority Whip
Democratic 47
Republican 49
Independent 4
Vacancies 0

List of current U.S. Senate members

Office Name Party
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U.S. House leadership
Position Representative Party
Speaker of the House
House Majority Leadership
House Majority Leader
House Majority Whip
House Minority Leadership
House Minority Leader
House Minority Whip
Democratic 213
Republican 219
Vacancies 3

List of current U.S. House members

Office Name Party
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Congressional delegations by state

Click on the map below to see congressional delegations by state.

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  • ↑ Three independents caucus with the Democratic Party. Another independent, Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, counts toward the Democratic majority for committee purposes.
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us representation

Find Your U.S. Senators and Representatives by Zip Code or State: A Quick Guide

Vote Seeker

How to Find Your Elected Officials on Vote Seeker

1. using your zip code.

Finding your U.S. Senators and Representatives by zip code is quick and straightforward. Simply enter your zip code into the search input. In seconds, you will receive a list of your elected officials, complete with their contact information and links to their official websites. Whether you are looking for your Senators or your Representative, our user-friendly tool makes it easy to get the information you need.

2. Searching by State

If you prefer to search by state rather than zip code, we have got you covered. Just select your state from the dropdown menu, click Search, and you will be presented with a comprehensive list of your Senators and Representatives. With one click, you can access their profiles, learn more about their positions on key issues, and find out how to get in touch with them.

Why It Matters

Today we live in an interconnected world. Staying informed about your elected officials is more important than ever. Whether you are passionate about a particular issue or simply want to exercise your civic duty, knowing who represents you in Congress empowers you to make your voice heard on the issues that matter most to you. But with so much information out there, finding your U.S. Senators and Representatives should not feel like searching for a needle in a haystack. That is why we are here to make it easy for you.

Your U.S. Senators and Representatives play a crucial role in shaping national policy and representing your interests in Washington, D.C. From healthcare and education to the economy and the environment, the decisions they make impact every aspect of your life. By knowing who represents you, you can stay informed about the issues that affect you and advocate for the changes you want to see.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is my representative.

Your Representative, also known as a Congressman or Congresswoman, represents your congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives. To find out who your Representative is, simply enter your zip code or state into our search tool, and we will provide you with all the information you need.

Who are my Senators?

Each state is represented by two Senators in the U.S. Senate. To find out who your Senators are, enter your zip code or state into our search tool, and we will give you the names and contact information for both of your Senators.

  • Politics & Government
  • National Politics

'My high school sweetheart': U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie shares news of his wife's death

Yesterday my high school sweetheart, the love of my life for over 35 years, the loving mother of our 4 children, the smartest kindest woman I ever knew, my beautiful and wise queen forever, Rhonda went to Heaven. Thank you for your prayers for our family in this difficult time. pic.twitter.com/tTSWXeLCG0 — Thomas Massie (@RepThomasMassie) June 28, 2024

Republican U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie's wife died Thursday, according to a post shared by the congressman on social media.

Thomas Massie posted the news on X, formerly known as Twitter, Friday morning, calling his wife, Rhonda Massie, his "high school sweetheart ... the smartest kindest woman I ever knew, my beautiful and wise queen forever."

The Massies were married for over 30 years.

Thomas Massie, who represents Kentucky's 4th Congressional District, also highlighted Rhonda Massie's achievements, including being named valedictorian in high school and earning a mechanical engineering degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

U.S. Rep. Andy Barr, who represents Kentucky's 6th Congressional District, said on social media he was saddened to hear about Rhonda Massie's passing, and he would keep Thomas Massie and his family "in his thoughts and prayers."

I am deeply saddened by the passing of Rhonda Massie, the beloved wife of my friend and colleague, Thomas Massie. Rhonda's warmth, kindness, and dedication to her family and community touched everyone who had the privilege of knowing her. During this heartbreaking time, my… — Rep. Andy Barr (@RepAndyBarr) June 28, 2024

Republican U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie, who represents Kentucky's 2nd Congressional District, called Rhonda Massie an "incredible woman" and said in a post he will stand with Thomas Massie and his family "during this difficult time."

My thoughts and prayers are with @RepThomasMassie and the entire Massie family following this terrible loss. Rhonda was an incredible woman. Beth and I stand with you and your family during this difficult time. https://t.co/0Lb5Ly5lwd — Rep. Brett Guthrie (@RepGuthrie) June 28, 2024

Republican U.S. Rep. James Comer, who represents Kentucky's 1st Congressional District, said he and his wife were "deeply saddened by the news" and called Rhonda Massie "a beautiful person on the inside and out."

TJ and I are deeply saddened by the news of Rhonda Massie’s passing. Rhonda was a beautiful person both inside and out. Our hearts go out to my colleague and dear friend Thomas Massie and his entire family. https://t.co/XAlEiZaWzc — Rep. James Comer (@RepJamesComer) June 28, 2024

Former Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said Massie and his family would be in his thoughts and prayers.

Makenze and I are asking all Kentuckians to join us in praying for @RepThomasMassie and his family. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Massie family, their friends, and all who loved Rhonda during this difficult time. — Daniel Cameron (@DanielCameronKY) June 28, 2024

U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell said he and his wife were devastated to hear about Rhonda Massie's death and that Kentucky supports Massie and his family during this time.

Elaine and I are devastated to learn of the passing of Congressman Thomas Massie’s beloved wife, Rhonda. The entire Commonwealth stands behind the Massie family and holds in our prayers Thomas, their four children, and all those grieving her loss. — Leader McConnell (@LeaderMcConnell) June 28, 2024

The Kentucky State Senate Majority Caucus also posted their support on X and said their thoughts and prayers are with Massie and his family.

Our sincerest prayers for comfort and peace are with @RepThomasMassie and family upon the passing of Rhonda Massie. All of Kentucky joins in mourning the loss of a wonderful person. — KY Senate Majority (@KYSenateGOP) June 28, 2024

Some state senators also released individual statements on Rhonda Massie's death, including Sen. Chris McDaniel, R-Ryland Heights, who said Rhonda Massie was a "woman of charitable spirit, grace (and) strength."

"Rhonda's legacy of kindness and dedication will live on in the hearts of those who had the blessing of knowing her," McDaniel said in the statement. "We stand in solidarity with the Massie family, offering our support and heartfelt sympathies."

Sen. John Schickel, R-Union, said he was shocked and devastated to hear the news.

"Rhonda was a fantastic human being, and her loving marriage with Congressman Massie was among the most beautiful you could imagine," Schickel said in the statement.

Gov. Andy Beshear expressed he would keep Massie and his family in "his thoughts and prayers" and encouraged others to do the same.

Britainy and I are deeply saddened for U.S. Congressman Thomas Massie and his family at the tragic news of the passing of his wife, Rhonda. Please join us in sending prayers of peace and comfort. ^AB — Governor Andy Beshear (@GovAndyBeshear) June 28, 2024

Thomas and Rhonda Massie had four children together and lived on a cattle farm in Kentucky.

Information has not been released about Rhonda Massie's cause of death.

Reach reporter Hannah Pinski at @[email protected] or follow her on X, formerly known as Twitter, at @hannahpinski.  

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U.S. House of Representatives seats by state

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United States House of Representatives Seats by State

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us representation

The U.S. Congress consists of two houses, the House of Representatives and the Senate . Each state elects two senators, while seats in the House of Representatives are apportioned by state according to population, with each state receiving a minimum of one representative. After each decennial census, the House of Representatives used to increase in size, but in the 1910s overall membership was capped at 435 (it expanded temporarily to 437 after Alaska and Hawaii were admitted as states in 1959). Now, after each census, legislative seats are reapportioned, with some states increasing their number of representatives while other states may lose seats. After the 2020 census, six states gained seats in the House: Colorado, Florida, Montana, North Carolina, and Oregon each gained one, and Texas gained two. California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia each lost one seat.

The number of representatives in the U.S. House of Representatives by state is provided in the table.

U.S. congressional apportionment
state representatives
Alabama 7
Alaska 1
Arizona 9
Arkansas 4
California 52
Colorado 8
Connecticut 5
Delaware 1
Florida 28
Georgia 14
Hawaii 2
Idaho 2
Illinois 17
Indiana 9
Iowa 4
Kansas 4
Kentucky 6
Louisiana 6
Maine 2
Maryland 8
Massachusetts 9
Michigan 13
Minnesota 8
Mississippi 4
Missouri 8
Montana 2
Nebraska 3
Nevada 4
New Hampshire 2
New Jersey 12
New Mexico 3
New York 26
North Carolina 14
North Dakota 1
Ohio 15
Oklahoma 5
Oregon 6
Pennsylvania 17
Rhode Island 2
South Carolina 7
South Dakota 1
Tennessee 9
Texas 38
Utah 4
Vermont 1
Virginia 11
Washington 10
West Virginia 2
Wisconsin 8
Wyoming 1
Total 435

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U.S. population keeps growing, but House of Representatives is same size as in Taft era

The U.S. House of Representatives has one voting member for every 747,000 or so Americans. That’s by far the highest population-to-representative ratio among a peer group of industrialized democracies, and the highest it’s been in U.S. history. And with the size of the House capped by law and the country’s population continually growing , the representation ratio likely will only get bigger.

In the century-plus since the number of House seats first reached its current total of 435 (excluding nonvoting delegates), the representation ratio has more than tripled – from one representative for every 209,447 people in 1910 to one for every 747,184 as of last year.

us representation

That ratio, mind you, is for the nation as a whole. The ratios for individual states vary considerably, mainly because of the House’s fixed size and the Constitution’s requirement that each state, no matter its population, have at least one representative. Currently, Montana’s 1,050,493 people have just one House member; Rhode Island has slightly more people (1,059,639), but that’s enough to give it two representatives – one for every 529,820 Rhode Islanders.

The U.S. findings in this post are based on Pew Research Center analyses of House membership changes since 1789 and historical population data (actual when available, estimated when not). They exclude territories, the District of Columbia and other U.S. possessions that don’t have voting representation in the House. The analysis was complicated somewhat by the fact that new states often were admitted after a decennial census but before the apportionment law based on that census took effect (usually about three years afterward). In such cases, the new states were analyzed as if they had been states at the time of the census.

How the House reached 435

The first Congress (1789-91) had 65 House members, the number provided for in the Constitution until the first census could be held. Based on an estimated population for the 13 states of 3.7 million, there was one representative for every 57,169 people. (At the time, Kentucky was part of Virginia, Maine was part of Massachusetts, and Tennessee was part of North Carolina. Vermont governed itself as an independent republic, despite territorial claims by New York.)

By the time the first apportionment bill took effect in March 1793, Vermont and Kentucky already had joined the Union; the 15 states had a total population of 3.89 million. Since the apportionment law provided for 105 House members, there was one representative for every 37,081 people. (According to the Constitution at the time, only three-fifths of the nation’s 694,280 slaves were counted for apportionment purposes; using that method, the ratio was approximately one representative for every 34,436.)

For more than a century thereafter, as the U.S. population grew and new states were admitted, the House’s membership grew too (except for two short-lived contractions in the mid-1800s). The expansion generally was managed in such a way that, even as the representation ratio steadily rose, states seldom lost seats from one apportionment to the next.

us representation

That process ran aground in the 1920s. The 1920 census revealed a “major and continuing shift” of the U.S. population from rural to urban areas; when the time came to reapportion the House, as a Census Bureau summary puts it, rural representatives “worked to derail the process, fearful of losing political power to the cities.” In fact, the House wasn’t reapportioned until after the 1930 census; the 1929 law authorizing that census also capped the size of the House at 435. And there it has remained, except for a brief period from 1959 to 1963 when the chamber temporarily added two members to represent the newly admitted states of Alaska and Hawaii.

There have been occasional  proposals to  add more seats to the House to reflect population growth. One is the so-called “Wyoming Rule,” which would make the population of the smallest state (currently Wyoming) the basis for the representation ratio. Depending on which variant of that rule were adopted, the House would have had 545 to 547 members following the 2010 census.

However, a recent Pew Research Center survey found limited public support for adding new House seats. Only 28% of Americans said the House should be expanded, versus 51% who said it should remain at 435 members. When historical context was added to the question, support for expansion rose a bit, to 34%, with the additional support coming mainly from Democrats.

How the U.S. compares globally

The House’s hefty representation ratio makes the United States an outlier among its peers. Our research finds that the U.S. ratio is the highest among the 35 nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, most of them highly developed, democratic states.

us representation

We took the most recent population estimate for each OECD nation and divided it by the current number of seats in the lower chamber of each national legislature (or, in the case of unicameral bodies, the single chamber). After the U.S., the two countries with the highest representation ratios are Japan (one lawmaker for every 272,108 Japanese) and Mexico (one for every 247,965 Mexicans). Iceland had the lowest ratio: one member of the Althing for every 5,500 or so Icelanders.

While much of the cross-national disparity in representation ratios can be explained by the big population of the U.S. (with more than 325 million people it’s the largest country in the OECD), that’s not the only reason. Eight OECD countries have larger lower chambers than the U.S. House, with Germany’s Bundestag topping the league table with 709 members. The British House of Commons has 650 MPs (Members of Parliament); Italy’s Chamber of Deputies has 630 lawmakers.

Even if Congress decided to expand the size of the House, the large U.S. population puts some practical limits on how much the representation ratio could be lowered. If the House were to grow as large as the Bundestag, for instance, the ratio would fall only to one representative per 458,428 people. In order to reduce the ratio to where it was after the 1930 census, the House would need to have 1,156 members. (That would still be smaller than China’s National People’s Congress , the largest national legislature in the world with  2,980 members .)

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Drew DeSilver is a senior writer at Pew Research Center .

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The House Explained

Constitution of the United States

We the People of the United States…

As per the Constitution, the U.S. House of Representatives makes and passes federal laws. The House is one of Congress’s two chambers (the other is the U.S. Senate), and part of the federal government’s legislative branch. The number of voting representatives in the House is fixed by law at no more than 435, proportionally representing the population of the 50 states.

Learn About:

What is a representative.

Also referred to as a congressman or congresswoman, each representative is elected to a two-year term serving the people of a specific congressional district. Among other duties, representatives introduce bills and resolutions, offer amendments and serve on committees. The number of representatives with full voting rights is 435, a number set by Public Law 62-5 on August 8, 1911, and in effect since 1913. The number of representatives per state is proportionate to population.

Article 1, Section 2 of the Constitution provides for both the minimum and maximum sizes for the House of Representatives. Currently, there are five delegates representing the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. A resident commissioner represents Puerto Rico. The delegates and resident commissioner possess the same powers as other members of the House, except that they may not vote when the House is meeting as the House of Representatives.

To be elected, a representative must be at least 25 years old, a United States citizen for at least seven years and an inhabitant of the state he or she represents.

Go to the Clerk’s site for more information about representatives.

View the list of House members.

Find Your Representative

Enter your ZIP code in the banner of this page to find the representative for your congressional district.

Did You Know?

After extensive debate, the framers of the Constitution agreed to create the House with representation based on population and the Senate with equal representation. This agreement was part of what is referred to as The Great Compromise .

House leadership includes the speaker, majority and minority leaders, assistant leaders, whips and a party caucus or conference. The speaker acts as leader of the House and combines several institutional and administrative roles. Majority and minority leaders represent their respective parties on the House floor. Whips assist leadership in managing their party's legislative program on the House floor. A party caucus or conference is the name given to a meeting of or organization of all party members in the House. During these meetings, party members discuss matters of concern.

The majority party members and the minority party members meet in separate caucuses to select their leader. Third parties rarely have had enough members to elect their own leadership, and independents will generally join one of the larger party organizations to receive committee assignments.

Learn more about the history of the majority and minority leaders from the Office of the Clerk .

Leadership List

View the list of leadership offices and links to the websites.

Past Leadership

Curious about who else has been Speaker of the House or Majority Leader?  Read more about  past house leadership .

Do You Know?

How many people have served as Speaker of the House? Has the Speaker ever become President? Find out more about the history of the Speakership!

The House’s standing committees have different legislative jurisdictions. Each considers bills and issues and recommends measures for consideration by the House. Committees also have oversight responsibilities to monitor agencies, programs, and activities within their jurisdictions, and in some cases in areas that cut across committee jurisdictions.

The Committee of the Whole House is a committee of the House on which all representatives serve and which meets in the House Chamber for the consideration of measures from the Union calendar.

Before members are assigned to committees, each committee’s size and the proportion of Republicans to Democrats must be decided by the party leaders. The total number of committee slots allotted to each party is approximately the same as the ratio between majority party and minority party members in the full chamber.

Get answers to frequently asked questions about committees from the Clerk of the House.

Committee Websites

All committees have websites where they post information about the legislation they are drafting.

What's a Select Committee?

The House will sometimes form a special or select committee for a short time period and specific purpose, frequently an investigation.

Each committee has a chair and a ranking member. The chair heads the full committee. The ranking member leads the minority members of the committee.

Congress has created a wide variety of temporary and permanent commissions to serve as advisory bodies for investigative or policy-related issues, or to carry out administrative, interparliamentary, or commemorative tasks. Such commissions are typically created by either law or House resolution, and may be composed of House members, private citizens, or a mix of both. In some cases, the commissions are entities of the House or Congress itself; in other cases, they are crafted as independent entities within the legislative branch.

Examples of commissions

  • Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission: a temporary, independent investigative body created by law and made up of private citizens.
  • Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (also known as the Helsinki Commission): an independent U.S. government agency composed of nine members of the United States Senate, nine from the House of Representatives, and one member each from the Departments of State, Defense and Commerce.
  • House Page Board: a permanent, Congressional advisory group created by law and made up of House members, Officers, and private citizens.

House Commissions

  • Congressional Executive Commission on China
  • Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (Helsinki Commission)
  • House Democracy Partnership Commission
  • Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission
  • U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission

Whether working on Capitol Hill or in his / her congressional district, a representative’s schedule is extremely busy. Often beginning early in the morning with topical briefings, most representatives move quickly among caucus and committee meetings and hearings. They vote on bills, speak with constituents and other groups, and review constituent mail, press clips and various reports. Work can continue into the evening with receptions or fundraising events.

Key Concept

Representatives carry out a broad scope of work in order to best represent their constituents.

Contact Your Representative

Share your thoughts with your representative. Use the Find Your Representative box in the banner of this site to identify your representative, then use the contact form to share your thoughts.

Representatives’ schedules are sometimes planned out in increments as short as five minutes.

House Rules

The Rules of the House of Representatives for the 118th Congress were established by the House with the adoption of H. Res. 5 (PDF) on January 9, 2023. A section by section analysis is also available.

Rules of Conduct

The Committee on Ethics has jurisdiction over the rules and statutes governing the conduct of members, officers and employees while performing their official duties.

The Rules Committee controls what bills go to the House Floor and the terms of debate.

Majority Rules

The makeup of the Rules Committee has traditionally been weighted in favor of the majority party, and has been in its current configuration of 9 majority and 4 minority members since the late 1970s.

The Rules Committee has an online Parliamentary Bootcamp that gives an overview of House Floor procedures, process and precedents.

As outlined in the Constitution , the House represents citizens based on district populations, while the Senate represents citizens on an equal state basis. This agreement was part of what is called The Great Compromise which, in turn, led to the Permanent Seat of Government Act establishing the nation’s federal capital in Washington, DC. In 1789, the House assembled for the first time in New York. It moved to Philadelphia in 1790 and then to Washington, DC, in 1800.

Each member of the House represents a set number of constituents.

More House History

Learn more about the History of the House from the Clerk’s website.

The House of Representatives moved into the House wing on the south side of the Capitol in 1807, four years before the wing was fully completed.

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Bowman Falls to Latimer in a Loss for Progressive Democrats

Representative Jamaal Bowman of New York, a member of the House’s left-wing “squad,” was defeated by George Latimer in a race that exposed Democratic fissures.

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Representative Jamaal Bowman, wearing a red Bowman T-shirt, makes a fist as he speaks to a crowd.

By Nicholas Fandos

  • June 25, 2024

Representative Jamaal Bowman of New York, one of Congress’s most outspoken progressives, suffered a stinging primary defeat on Tuesday, according to The Associated Press, unable to overcome a record-shattering campaign from pro-Israel groups and a slate of self-inflicted blunders.

Mr. Bowman was defeated by George Latimer, the Westchester County executive, in a race that became the year’s ugliest intraparty brawl and the most expensive House primary in history.

It began last fall when Mr. Bowman stepped forward as one of the leading critics of how Israelis were carrying out their war with Hamas. But the contest grew into a broader proxy fight around the future of the Democratic Party, exposing painful fractures over race, class and ideology in a diverse district that includes parts of Westchester County and the Bronx.

Mr. Bowman, the district’s first Black congressman and a committed democratic socialist, never wavered from his calls for a cease-fire in Gaza or left-wing economic priorities. Down in the polls, he repeatedly accused his white opponent of racism and used expletives in denouncing the pro-Israel groups as a “Zionist regime” trying to buy the election.

His positions on the war and economic issues electrified the national progressives, who undertook an 11th-hour rescue mission led by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York. But they ultimately did little to win over skeptical voters and only emboldened his adversaries.

A super PAC affiliated with the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, a pro-Israel lobby, dumped $15 million into defeating him , more than any outside group has ever spent on a House race.

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United States Trade Representative

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  • Remarks by Ambassador Katherine Tai at the National Legislative-Political Conference of the Communications Workers of America

USTR Releases 2024 Biennial Report on Implementation of the African Growth and Opportunity Act

  • Readout of United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai’s Meeting with Japan’s Minister of Economy, Trade, and Industry Ken Saitō
  • Readout of United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai’s Meeting with Bahrain’s Minister of Industry and Commerce Abdulla bin Adel Fakhro
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  • USTR Concludes Robust Public Engagement to Advance Supply Chain Resilience in Trade Policy Initiatives
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  • Statement by Ambassador Katherine Tai on the Beginning of Pride Month
  • Statement by Ambassador Katherine Tai on the Start of National Caribbean American Heritage Month
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June 28, 2024

WASHINGTON – The Office of the United States Trade Representative today released its 2024 Biennial Report on the Implementation of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) Report.    “AGOA has helped to grow Africa’s extraordinary economic potential and has made a difference for many Africans, but we have an opportunity to make it even better,” said Ambassador Katherine Tai .  “A lot has changed on the continent and in the global economy over the last two decades.  This Report provides a starting point for the Administration, Congress, our African partners, and stakeholders to examine how we can improve utilization rates for smaller economies and make the program more effective and relevant to today’s challenges—like growing inequality, supply chain fragility, and the climate crisis.”   Since it was signed into law in May 2000, AGOA has played a critical role in the United States’ trade relationship with sub-Saharan Africa, including by fostering economic growth and development on the continent and encouraging African-led solutions to economic and political reforms.  The Biden-Harris Administration is committed to partnering with Africa to amplify the continent’s vibrancy and potential, and to shape a forward-looking vision for the U.S.-Africa trade and investment relationship.   In 2023, U.S. imports under AGOA (including the Generalized System of Preferences program, which remains available for AGOA beneficiaries) totaled $9.7 billion.  This consisted of approximately $4.2 billion in crude oil and $5.5 billion in other products, including $1.1 billion in apparel and more than $900 million in agricultural products.  Last year, African countries eligible for AGOA leveraged the program’s preferences to export nearly $10 billion in goods to the United States.     BACKGROUND   The AGOA Report is a biennial report required under Section 110 of the Trade Preferences Extension ACT (TPEA) of 2015, which states that the President shall submit a report to Congress on the implementation of the African Growth and Opportunity Act no later than one year after the enactment of the statute, and biennially thereafter.  The United States Trade Representative, on behalf of the President, last submitted this report in June 2022.  The 2024 AGOA Report covers the period since then, from July 2022 to June 2024.   The 2024 AGOA Report provides a description of the status of trade and investment between the United States and sub-Saharan Africa, changes in country eligibility for AGOA benefits, an analysis of country compliance with the AGOA eligibility criteria, an overview of regional integration efforts in sub-Saharan Africa, and a summary of U.S. trade capacity building efforts. 

  

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Texas has two senators in the United States Senate and 38 representatives in the United States House of Representatives. Texas is a state in the United States.

Follow GovTrack on social media for more updates:

Visit us on Mastodon

Representatives

Map of congressional districts.

Each state in the United States elects two senators, regardless of the state’s population. Senators serve six-year terms with staggered elections. Americans in the United States’s six territories do not have senators.

Texas’s senators are:

John Cornyn

John Cornyn

Ted Cruz

The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. Representatives are also called congressmen/congresswomen. Americans in the United States’s six territories are represented in the House of Representatives by an additional six non-voting delegates.

Texas’s 38 representatives are:

Nathaniel Moran

Nathaniel Moran

Dan Crenshaw

Dan Crenshaw

Keith Self

Patrick “Pat” Fallon

Lance Gooden

Lance Gooden

Jake Ellzey

Jake Ellzey

Lizzie Fletcher

Lizzie Fletcher

Morgan Luttrell

Morgan Luttrell

Al Green

Michael McCaul

August Pfluger

August Pfluger

Kay Granger

Kay Granger

Ronny Jackson

Ronny Jackson

Randy Weber

Randy Weber

Mónica De La Cruz

Mónica De La Cruz

Veronica Escobar

Veronica Escobar

Pete Sessions

Pete Sessions

Sheila Jackson Lee

Sheila Jackson Lee

Jodey Arrington

Jodey Arrington

Joaquin Castro

Joaquin Castro

Chip Roy

Ernest “Tony” Gonzales

Beth Van Duyne

Beth Van Duyne

Roger Williams

Roger Williams

Michael Burgess

Michael Burgess

Michael Cloud

Michael Cloud

Henry Cuellar

Henry Cuellar

Sylvia Garcia

Sylvia Garcia

Jasmine Crockett

Jasmine Crockett

John R. Carter

John R. Carter

Colin Allred

Colin Allred

Marc Veasey

Marc Veasey

Vicente Gonzalez

Vicente Gonzalez

Gregorio Casar

Gregorio Casar

Brian Babin

Brian Babin

Lloyd Doggett

Lloyd Doggett

Wesley Hunt

Wesley Hunt

All representatives serve until the end of the current Congress on Jan 3, 2025.

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IMAGES

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  2. Hypothetical US proportional representation based...

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  3. Potential Shifts in Political Power after the 2020 Census

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  4. A simplified explanation of the Electoral College

    us representation

  5. Congressional Representation

    us representation

  6. The US ranks 75th in women's representation in government

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COMMENTS

  1. Find Your Representative

    Find Your Representative. Not sure of your congressional district or who your member is? This service will assist you by matching your ZIP code to your congressional district, with links to your member's website and contact page. Please review the frequently asked questions if you have problems using this service. Enter your ZIP code:

  2. Representatives

    Also referred to as a congressman or congresswoman, each representative is elected to a two-year term serving the people of a specific congressional district. The number of voting representatives in the House is fixed by law at no more than 435, proportionally representing the population of the 50 states.

  3. List of current members of the United States House of Representatives

    This is a list of individuals serving in the United States House of Representatives (as of June 3, 2024, the 118th Congress ). [1] The membership of the House comprises 435 seats for representatives from the 50 states, apportioned by population, as well as six seats for non-voting delegates from U.S. territories and the District of Columbia.

  4. United States House of Representatives

    The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, with the Senate being the upper chamber. Together, they comprise the national bicameral legislature of the United States. [1] [2] The House is charged with the passage of federal legislation, known as bills; those that are also passed by the Senate ...

  5. Find Your Members in the U.S. Congress

    Find Your Members. Find your member by address: Use current location. Already know your member? Find your member on a list to view their contact information. Representatives. Senators. Find your members of Congress by typing in your address on Congress.gov.

  6. Homepage

    Select Committee on the Strategic Competition Between the United States and the Chinese Communist Party : 10:00 am ... Information about any legal expenses incurred by a candidate or current representative. Statement of Disbursements. Information about all receipts and expenditures of representatives, committees, leadership, and officers of the ...

  7. U.S. House of Representatives

    Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States. Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Locked padlock icon) ... Contact your Representative; Phone number. 1-202-224-3121. TTY. 1-202-225-1904. Main address U.S. House of Representatives Washington, DC 20515. SHARE THIS PAGE:

  8. Members of Congress & Congressional District Maps

    Congressional Districts Map. Find your representative (a.k.a. congressman or congresswoman) by entering your address or clicking a district in the map: Find My District. I'm at home, use my phone/computer's location. Some states have changed or are changing their congressional districts for the 2024 election. Although this map based on 2022 ...

  9. Members of the U.S. Congress

    Sort View Congress Chamber Party Members by US State or Territory . Sort View Congress Chamber Party Members by US State or Territory . Congress. Check all; 118 ... Abercrombie, Neil - Representative. State: Hawaii District: 1 Party: Democratic Served: House: 1985-1987, 1991-2011; MEMBER. 3. Abourezk, James - Senator.

  10. List of Representatives and Senators

    This page lists the currently serving representatives in the House of Representatives and the senators in the U.S. Senate, collectively called the Members of Congress. You can also see a map and search by address or the historical list of Members of Congress.

  11. Members of the United States Congress

    The United States is also divided into 435 congressional districts with a population of about 760,000 each. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term. As in the Senate, the day-to-day activities of the House are controlled by the "majority party." Here is a count of representatives by party:

  12. Find and contact elected officials

    Federal elected officials. Contact President Joe Biden online, or call the White House switchboard at 202-456-1414 or the comments line at 202-456-1111 during business hours. Get contact information for U.S. senators. Find website and contact information for U.S. representatives.

  13. United States House of Representatives

    The United States House of Representatives, commonly referred to as the House, is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; ... Each state receives representation in the House in proportion to the size of its population but is entitled to at least one representative. There are currently 435 representatives, a number fixed by law ...

  14. List of current members of the U.S. Congress

    The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the United States of America's federal government. It consists of two houses, the Senate and the House of Representatives, with members chosen through direct election.. Congress has 535 voting members. The Senate has 100 voting officials, and the House has 435 voting officials, along with five delegates and one resident commissioner.

  15. United States Congress

    The United States Congress is the legislature of the federal government of the United States. It is bicameral, composed of a lower body, the House of Representatives, and an upper body, the Senate. It meets in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Senators and representatives are chosen through direct election, though vacancies in the Senate may ...

  16. | house.gov

    Representatives. Leadership. Committees. Legislative Activity. The House Explained. 118th Congress, 2nd Session · The House is not in session.

  17. Find Your U.S. Senators and Representatives by Zip Code or State

    1. Using Your Zip Code. Finding your U.S. Senators and Representatives by zip code is quick and straightforward. Simply enter your zip code into the search input. In seconds, you will receive a list of your elected officials, complete with their contact information and links to their official websites. Whether you are looking for your Senators ...

  18. U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie's wife Rhonda Massie dies

    Republican U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie's wife died Thursday, according to a post shared by the congressman on social media. Thomas Massie posted the news on X, formerly known as Twitter, Friday ...

  19. House of Representatives

    United States House of Representatives, 118th Congress 1Party totals: Republicans (R) 217; Democrats (D) 213. state. district and representative (party) service began. 1 When total does not equal 435, it is because of vacancies. 2 Kevin McCarthy resigned in December 2023.

  20. United States House of Representatives Seats by State

    After the 2020 census, six states gained seats in the House: Colorado, Florida, Montana, North Carolina, and Oregon each gained one, and Texas gained two. California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia each lost one seat. The number of representatives in the U.S. House of Representatives by state is provided in ...

  21. US population is growing, but House of Representatives is stuck at 435

    The House's hefty representation ratio makes the United States an outlier among its peers. Our research finds that the U.S. ratio is the highest among the 35 nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, most of them highly developed, democratic states. ... While much of the cross-national disparity in representation ...

  22. The House Explained

    As per the Constitution, the U.S. House of Representatives makes and passes federal laws. The House is one of Congress's two chambers (the other is the U.S. Senate), and part of the federal government's legislative branch. The number of voting representatives in the House is fixed by law at no more than 435, proportionally representing the ...

  23. Bowman Falls to Latimer in House Primary in New York

    Representative Jamaal Bowman of New York, a member of the House's left-wing "squad," was defeated by George Latimer in a race that exposed Democratic fissures.

  24. California Senators, Representatives, and Congressional ...

    The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term.

  25. USTR Releases 2024 Biennial Report on Implementation of the African

    WASHINGTON - The Office of the United States Trade Representative today released its 2024 Biennial Report on the Implementation of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) Report. "AGOA has helped to grow Africa's extraordinary economic potential and has made a difference for many Africans, but we have an opportunity to make it even better," said Ambassador Katherine Tai.

  26. Texas Senators, Representatives, and Congressional ...

    Representatives. The United States is divided into 435 congressional districts, each with a population of about 710,000 individuals. Each district elects a representative to the House of Representatives for a two-year term.

  27. FISCAL YEAR 2025 OFFICIAL REPRESENTATION FUNDS > United States Marine

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