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How to write a great cover letter in 2024: tips and structure

young-woman-checking-her-cover-lette

A cover letter is a personalized letter that introduces you to a potential employer, highlights your qualifications, and explains why you're a strong fit for a specific job.

Hate or love them, these brief documents allow job seekers to make an impression and stand out from the pile of other applications. Penning a thoughtful cover letter shows the hiring team you care about earning the position.

Here’s everything you need to know about how to write a cover letter — and a great one, at that.

What is a cover letter and why does it matter?

A professional cover letter is a one-page document you submit alongside your CV or resume as part of a job application. Typically, they’re about half a page or around 150–300 words.

An effective cover letter doesn’t just rehash your CV; it’s your chance to highlight your proudest moments, explain why you want the job, and state plainly what you bring to the table.

Show the reviewer you’re likable, talented, and will add to the company’s culture . You can refer to previous jobs and other information from your CV, but only if it helps tell a story about you and your career choices .

What 3 things should you include in a cover letter?

A well-crafted cover letter can help you stand out to potential employers. To make your cover letter shine, here are three key elements to include:

1. Personalization

Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role.

2. Highlight relevant achievements and skills

Emphasize your most relevant skills , experiences, and accomplishments that directly relate to the job you're applying for. Provide specific examples of how your skills have benefited previous employers and how they can contribute to the prospective employer's success. Use quantifiable achievements , such as improved efficiency, cost savings, or project success, to demonstrate your impact.

3. Show enthusiasm and fit

Express your enthusiasm for the company and the position you're applying for. Explain why you are interested in this role and believe you are a good fit for the organization. Mention how your values, goals, and skills align with the company's mission and culture. Demonstrating that you've done your research can make a significant impression.

What do hiring managers look for in a cover letter?

Employers look for several key elements in a cover letter. These include:

Employers want to see that your cover letter is specifically tailored to the position you are applying for. It should demonstrate how your skills, experiences, and qualifications align with the job requirements.

Clear and concise writing

A well-written cover letter is concise, easy to read, and error-free. Employers appreciate clear and effective communication skills , so make sure your cover letter showcases your ability to express yourself effectively.

Demonstrated knowledge of the company

Employers want to see that you are genuinely interested in their organization. Mention specific details about the company, such as recent achievements or projects, to show that you are enthusiastic about joining their team.

Achievements and accomplishments

Highlight your relevant achievements and accomplishments that demonstrate your qualifications for the position. Use specific examples to showcase your skills and show how they can benefit the employer.

Enthusiasm and motivation

Employers want to hire candidates who are excited about the opportunity and motivated to contribute to the company's success. Express your enthusiasm and passion for the role and explain why you are interested in working for the company.

Professionalism

A cover letter should be professional in tone and presentation. Use formal language, address the hiring manager appropriately, and follow standard business letter formatting.

excited-woman-in-her-office-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

How do you structure a cover letter?

A well-structured cover letter follows a specific format that makes it easy for the reader to understand your qualifications and enthusiasm for the position. Here's a typical structure for a cover letter:

Contact information

Include your name, address, phone number, and email address at the top of the letter. Place your contact information at the beginning so that it's easy for the employer to reach you.

Employer's contact information

Opening paragraph, middle paragraph(s), closing paragraph, complimentary close, additional contact information.

Repeat your contact information (name, phone number, and email) at the end of the letter, just in case the employer needs it for quick reference.

Remember to keep your cover letter concise and focused. It should typically be no more than one page in length. Proofread your letter carefully to ensure it is free from spelling and grammatical errors. Tailor each cover letter to the specific job application to make it as relevant and impactful as possible.

How to write a good cover letter (with examples)

The best letters are unique, tailored to the job description, and written in your voice — but that doesn’t mean you can’t use a job cover letter template.

Great cover letters contain the same basic elements and flow a certain way. Take a look at this cover letter structure for ref erence while you construct your own.

1. Add a header and contact information

While reading your cover letter, the recruiter shouldn’t have to look far to find who wrote it. Your document should include a basic heading with the following information:

  • Pronouns (optional)
  • Location (optional)
  • Email address
  • Phone number (optional)
  • Relevant links, such as your LinkedIn profile , portfolio, or personal website (optional)

You can pull this information directly from your CV. Put it together, and it will look something like this:

Christopher Pike

San Francisco, California

[email protected]

Alternatively, if the posting asks you to submit your cover letter in the body of an email, you can include this information in your signature. For example:

Warm regards,

Catherine Janeway

Bloomington, Indiana

[email protected]

(555) 999 - 2222

man-using-his-laptop-while-smiling-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

2. Include a personal greeting

Always begin your cover letter by addressing the hiring manager — preferably by name. You can use the person’s first and last name. Make sure to include a relevant title, like Dr., Mr., or Ms. For example, “Dear Mr. John Doe.”

Avoid generic openings like “To whom it may concern,” “Dear sir or madam,” or “Dear hiring manager.” These introductions sound impersonal — like you’re copy-pasting cover letters — and can work against you in the hiring process.

Be careful, though. When using someone’s name, you don’t want to use the wrong title or accidentally misgender someone. If in doubt, using only their name is enough. You could also opt for a gender-neutral title, like Mx.

Make sure you’re addressing the right person in your letter — ideally, the person who’s making the final hiring decision. This isn’t always specified in the job posting, so you may have to do some research to learn the name of the hiring manager.

3. Draw them in with an opening story

The opening paragraph of your cover letter should hook the reader. You want it to be memorable, conversational, and extremely relevant to the job you’re pursuing. 

There’s no need for a personal introduction — you’ve already included your name in the heading. But you should make reference to the job you’re applying for. A simple “Thank you for considering my application for the role of [job title] at [company],” will suffice.

Then you can get into the “Why” of your job application. Drive home what makes this specific job and this company so appealing to you. Perhaps you’re a fan of their products, you’re passionate about their mission, or you love their brand voice. Whatever the case, this section is where you share your enthusiasm for the role.

Here’s an example opening paragraph. In this scenario, you’re applying for a digital marketing role at a bicycle company:

“Dear Mr. John Doe,

Thank you for considering my application for the role of Marketing Coordinator at Bits n’ Bikes.

My parents bought my first bike at one of your stores. I’ll never forget the freedom I felt when I learned to ride it. My father removed my training wheels, and my mom sent me barrelling down the street. You provide joy to families across the country — and I want to be part of that.”

4. Emphasize why you’re best for the job

Your next paragraphs should be focused on the role you’re applying to. Highlight your skill set and why you’re a good fit for the needs and expectations associated with the position. Hiring managers want to know what you’ll bring to the job, not just any role.

Start by studying the job description for hints. What problem are they trying to solve with this hire? What skills and qualifications do they mention first or more than once? These are indicators of what’s important to the hiring manager.

Search for details that match your experience and interests. For example, if you’re excited about a fast-paced job in public relations, you might look for these elements in a posting:

  • They want someone who can write social media posts and blog content on tight deadlines
  • They value collaboration and input from every team member
  • They need a planner who can come up with strong PR strategies

Highlight how you fulfill these requirements:

“I’ve always been a strong writer. From blog posts to social media, my content pulls in readers and drives traffic to product pages. For example, when I worked at Bits n’ Bikes, I developed a strategic blog series about bike maintenance that increased our sales of spare parts and tools by 50% — we could see it in our web metrics.

Thanks to the input of all of our team members, including our bike mechanics, my content delivered results.”

5. End with a strong closing paragraph and sign off gracefully

Your closing paragraph is your final chance to hammer home your enthusiasm about the role and your unique ability to fill it. Reiterate the main points you explained in the body paragraphs and remind the reader of what you bring to the table.

You can also use the end of your letter to relay other important details, like whether you’re willing to relocate for the job.

When choosing a sign-off, opt for a phrase that sounds professional and genuine. Reliable options include “Sincerely” and “Kind regards.”

Here’s a strong closing statement for you to consider:

“I believe my enthusiasm, skills, and work experience as a PR professional will serve Bits n’ Bikes very well. I would love to meet to further discuss my value-add as your next Director of Public Relations. Thank you for your consideration. I hope we speak soon.

man-reading-carefully-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

Tips to write a great cover letter that compliments your resume

When writing your own letter, try not to copy the example excerpts word-for-word. Instead, use this cover letter structure as a baseline to organize your ideas. Then, as you’re writing, use these extra cover letter tips to add your personal touch:

  • Keep your cover letter different from your resume : Your cover letter should not duplicate the information on your resume. Instead, it should provide context and explanations for key points in your resume, emphasizing how your qualifications match the specific job you're applying for.
  • Customize your cover letter . Tailor your cover letter for each job application. Address the specific needs of the company and the job posting, demonstrating that you've done your homework and understand their requirements.
  • Show enthusiasm and fit . Express your enthusiasm for the company and position in the cover letter. Explain why you are interested in working for this company and how your values, goals, and skills align with their mission and culture.
  • Use keywords . Incorporate keywords from the job description and industry terms in your cover letter. This can help your application pass through applicant tracking systems (ATS) and demonstrate that you're well-versed in the field.
  • Keep it concise . Your cover letter should be succinct and to the point, typically no more than one page. Focus on the most compelling qualifications and experiences that directly support your application.
  • Be professional . Maintain a professional tone and structure in your cover letter. Proofread it carefully to ensure there are no errors.
  • Address any gaps or concerns . If there are gaps or concerns in your resume, such as employment gaps or a change in career direction, briefly address them in your cover letter. Explain any relevant circumstances and how they have shaped your qualifications and determination.
  • Provide a call to action . Conclude your cover letter with a call to action, inviting the employer to contact you for further discussion. Mention that you've attached your resume for their reference.
  • Follow the correct format . Use a standard cover letter format like the one above, including your contact information, a formal salutation, introductory and closing paragraphs, and your signature. Ensure that it complements your resume without redundancy.
  • Pick the right voice and tone . Try to write like yourself, but adapt to the tone and voice of the company. Look at the job listing, company website, and social media posts. Do they sound fun and quirky, stoic and professional, or somewhere in-between? This guides your writing style.
  • Tell your story . You’re an individual with unique expertise, motivators, and years of experience. Tie the pieces together with a great story. Introduce how you arrived at this point in your career, where you hope to go , and how this prospective company fits in your journey. You can also explain any career changes in your resume.
  • Show, don’t tell . Anyone can say they’re a problem solver. Why should a recruiter take their word for it if they don’t back it up with examples? Instead of naming your skills, show them in action. Describe situations where you rose to the task, and quantify your success when you can.
  • Be honest . Avoid highlighting skills you don’t have. This will backfire if they ask you about them in an interview. Instead, shift focus to the ways in which you stand out.
  • Avoid clichés and bullet points . These are signs of lazy writing. Do your best to be original from the first paragraph to the final one. This highlights your individuality and demonstrates the care you put into the letter.
  • Proofread . Always spellcheck your cover letter. Look for typos, grammatical errors, and proper flow. We suggest reading it out loud. If it sounds natural rolling off the tongue, it will read naturally as well.

woman-writing-on-her-notebook-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

Common cover letter writing FAQs

How long should a cover letter be.

A cover letter should generally be concise and to the point. It is recommended to keep it to one page or less, focusing on the most relevant information that highlights your qualifications and fits the job requirements.

Should I include personal information in a cover letter?

While it's important to introduce yourself and provide your contact information, avoid including personal details such as your age, marital status, or unrelated hobbies. Instead, focus on presenting your professional qualifications and aligning them with the job requirements.

Can I use the same cover letter for multiple job applications?

While it may be tempting to reuse a cover letter, it is best to tailor each cover letter to the specific job you are applying for. This allows you to highlight why you are a good fit for that particular role and show genuine interest in the company.

Do I need to address my cover letter to a specific person?

Whenever possible, it is advisable to address your cover letter to a specific person, such as the hiring manager or recruiter. If the job posting does not provide this information, try to research and find the appropriate contact. If all else fails, you can use a generic salutation such as "Dear Hiring Manager."

Should I include references in my cover letter?

It is generally not necessary to include references in your cover letter. Save this information for when the employer explicitly requests it. Instead, focus on showcasing your qualifications and achievements that make you a strong candidate for the position.

It’s time to start writing your stand-out cover letter

The hardest part of writing is getting started. 

Hopefully, our tips gave you some jumping-off points and confidence . But if you’re really stuck, looking at cover letter examples and resume templates will help you decide where to get started. 

There are numerous sample cover letters available online. Just remember that you’re a unique, well-rounded person, and your cover letter should reflect that. Using our structure, you can tell your story while highlighting your passion for the role. 

Doing your research, including strong examples of your skills, and being courteous is how to write a strong cover letter. Take a breath , flex your fingers, and get typing. Before you know it, your job search will lead to a job interview.

If you want more personalized guidance, a specialized career coach can help review, edit, and guide you through creating a great cover letter that sticks.

Ace your job search

Explore effective job search techniques, interview strategies, and ways to overcome job-related challenges. Our coaches specialize in helping you land your dream job.

Elizabeth Perry, ACC

Elizabeth Perry is a Coach Community Manager at BetterUp. She uses strategic engagement strategies to cultivate a learning community across a global network of Coaches through in-person and virtual experiences, technology-enabled platforms, and strategic coaching industry partnerships. With over 3 years of coaching experience and a certification in transformative leadership and life coaching from Sofia University, Elizabeth leverages transpersonal psychology expertise to help coaches and clients gain awareness of their behavioral and thought patterns, discover their purpose and passions, and elevate their potential. She is a lifelong student of psychology, personal growth, and human potential as well as an ICF-certified ACC transpersonal life and leadership Coach.

3 cover letter examples to help you catch a hiring manager’s attention

Chatgpt cover letters: how to use this tool the right way, write thank you letters after interviews to stand out as job applicant, use professional reference templates to make hiring smoother, send a thank you email after an internship to boost your career, character references: 4 tips for a successful recommendation letter, how to ask for a letter of recommendation (with examples), how to write an impactful cover letter for a career change, how to write a follow-up email 2 weeks after an interview, cv versus resume demystify the differences once and for all, how to create a resume with chatgpt, how and when to write a functional resume (with examples), what are professional references and how to ask for one (examples), how to politely decline a job offer (with examples), resume best practices: how far back should a resume go, 4 tips to respond to a job rejection email plus examples, how to put babysitting on a resume: 6 skills to highlight, a quick guide on how to list references on a resume, stay connected with betterup, get our newsletter, event invites, plus product insights and research..

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How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

Background Image

After weeks of heavy job searching, you’re almost there!

You’ve perfected your resume.

You’ve short-listed the coolest jobs you want to apply for.

You’ve even had a friend train you for every single interview question out there.

But then, before you can send in your application and call it a day, you remember that you need to write a cover letter too.

So now, you’re stuck staring at a blank page, wondering where to start...

Don’t panic! We’ve got you covered. Writing a cover letter is a lot simpler than you might think. 

In this guide, we’re going to teach you how to write a cover letter that gets you the job you deserve.

We're going to cover:

What Is a Cover Letter?

  • How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter, Step by Step
  • 15+ Job-Winning Cover Letter Examples

Let’s get started.

A cover letter is a document that you submit as part of your job application, alongside your resume or CV.

The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce you and briefly summarize your professional background. On average, it should be around 250 to 400 words long .

A good cover letter is supposed to impress the hiring manager and convince them you’re worth interviewing as a candidate.

So, how can your cover letter achieve this?

First of all, it should complement your resume, not copy it. Your cover letter is your chance to elaborate on important achievements, skills, or anything else that your resume doesn’t give you the space to cover. 

For example, if you have an employment gap on your resume, the cover letter is a great place to explain why it happened and how it helped you grow as a person. 

If this is your first time writing a cover letter, writing about yourself might seem complicated. But don’t worry—you don’t need to be super creative or even a good writer .

All you have to do is follow this tried and tested cover letter structure:

structure of a cover letter

  • Header. Add all the necessary contact information at the top of your cover letter.
  • Formal greeting. Choose an appropriate way to greet your target audience.
  • Introduction. Introduce yourself in the opening paragraph and explain your interest in the role.
  • Body. Elaborate on why you’re the best candidate for the job and a good match for the company. Focus on “selling” your skills, achievements, and relevant professional experiences.
  • Conclusion. Summarize your key points and wrap it up professionally.

Now, let’s take a look at an example of a cover letter that follows our structure perfectly:

How to Write a Cover Letter

New to cover letter writing? Give our cover letter video a watch before diving into the article!

When Should You Write a Cover Letter?

You should always include a cover letter in your job application, even if the hiring manager never reads it. Submitting a cover letter is as important as submitting a resume if you want to look like a serious candidate.

If the employer requests a cover letter as part of the screening process, not sending one is a huge red flag and will probably get your application tossed into the “no” pile immediately.

On the other hand, if the job advertisement doesn’t require a cover letter from the candidates, adding one shows you went the extra mile.

Putting in the effort to write a cover letter can set you apart from other candidates with similar professional experience and skills, and it could even sway the hiring manager to call you for an interview if you do it right.

Need to write a letter to help get you into a good school or volunteer program? Check out our guide to learn how to write a motivation letter !

How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter

Now that you know what a cover letter is, it’s time to learn how to write one!

We’ll go through the process in detail, step by step.

#1. Choose the Right Cover Letter Template

A good cover letter is all about leaving the right first impression.

So, what’s a better way to leave a good impression than a well-formatted, stylish template?

cover letter templates for 2024

Just choose one of our hand-picked cover letter templates , and you’ll be all set in no time!

As a bonus, our intuitive AI will even give you suggestions on how to improve your cover letter as you write it. You’ll have the perfect cover letter done in minutes!

cover letter templates

#2. Put Contact Information in the Header

As with a resume, it’s important to start your cover letter with your contact details at the top. These should be in your cover letter’s header, separated neatly from the bulk of your text.

Contact Information on Cover Letter

Here, you want to include all the essential contact information , including:

  • Full Name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top.
  • Job Title. Match the professional title underneath your name to the exact job title of the position you’re applying for. Hiring managers often hire for several roles at once, so giving them this cue about what role you’re after helps things go smoother.
  • Email Address. Always use a professional and easy-to-spell email address. Ideally, it should combine your first and last names.
  • Phone Number. Add a number where the hiring manager can easily reach you.
  • Location. Add your city and state/country, no need for more details.
  • Relevant Links (optional). You can add links to websites or social media profiles that are relevant to your field. Examples include a LinkedIn profile , Github, or an online portfolio.

Then it’s time to add the recipient’s contact details, such as:

  • Hiring Manager's Name. If you can find the name of the hiring manager, add it.
  • Hiring Manager's Title. While there’s no harm in writing “hiring manager,” if they’re the head of the department, we recommend you use that title accordingly.
  • Company Name. Make sure to write the name of the company you're applying to.
  • Location. The city and state/country are usually enough information here, too.
  • Date of Writing (Optional). You can include the date you wrote your cover letter for an extra professional touch.

matching resume and cover letter

#3. Address the Hiring Manager

Once you’ve properly listed all the contact information, it’s time to start writing the content of the cover letter.

The first thing you need to do here is to address your cover letter directly to the hiring manager.

In fact, you want to address the hiring manager personally .

Forget the old “Dear Sir or Madam” or the impersonal “To Whom It May Concern.” You want to give your future boss a good impression and show them that you did your research before sending in your application.

No one wants to hire a job seeker who just spams 20+ companies and hopes something sticks with their generic approach

So, how do you find out who’s the hiring manager?

First, check the job ad. The hiring manager’s name might be listed somewhere in it.

If that doesn’t work, check the company’s LinkedIn page. You just need to look up the head of the relevant department you’re applying to, and you’re all set.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of Communication Specialist at Novorésumé. The hiring manager is probably the Head of Communications or the Chief Communications Officer.

Here’s what you should look for on LinkedIn:

linkedin search cco

And there you go! You have your hiring manager.

But let’s say you’re applying for a position as a server . In that case, you’d be looking for the “restaurant manager” or “food and beverage manager.”

If the results don’t come up with anything, try checking out the “Team” page on the company website; there’s a good chance you’ll at least find the right person there.

Make sure to address them as Mr. or Ms., followed by their last name. If you’re not sure about their gender or marital status, you can just stick to their full name, like so:

  • Dear Mr. Kurtuy,
  • Dear Andrei Kurtuy,

But what if you still can’t find the hiring manager’s name, no matter where you look?

No worries. You can direct your cover letter to the company, department, or team as a whole, or just skip the hiring manager’s name.

  • Dear [Department] Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Department] Team
  • Dear [Company Name]

Are you applying for a research position? Learn how to write an academic personal statement .

#4. Write an Eye-Catching Introduction

First impressions matter, especially when it comes to your job search.

Hiring managers get hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of applications. Chances are, they’re not going to be reading every single cover letter end-to-end.

So, it’s essential to catch their attention from the very first paragraph.

The biggest problem with most opening paragraphs is that they’re usually extremely generic. Here’s an example:

  • My name is Jonathan, and I’d like to work as a Sales Manager at XYZ Inc. I’ve worked as a Sales Manager at MadeUpCompany Inc. for 5+ years, so I believe that I’d be a good fit for the position.

See the issue here? This opening paragraph doesn’t say anything except the fact that you’ve worked the job before.

And do you know who else has similar work experience? All the other applicants you’re competing with.

Instead, you want to start with some of your top achievements to grab the reader’s attention. And to get the point across, the achievements should be as relevant as possible to the position.

Your opening paragraph should also show the hiring manager a bit about why you want this specific job. For example, mention how the job relates to your plans for the future or how it can help you grow professionally. This will show the hiring manager that you’re not just applying left and right—you’re actually enthusiastic about getting this particular role.

Now, let’s make our previous example shine:

Dear Mr. Smith,

My name’s Michael, and I’d like to help XYZ Inc. hit and exceed its sales goals as a Sales Manager. I’ve worked as a Sales Representative with Company X, another fin-tech company , for 3+ years, where I generated an average of $30,000+ in sales per month and beat the KPIs by around 40%. I believe that my previous industry experience, passion for finance , and excellence in sales make me the right candidate for the job.

The second candidate starts with what they can do for the company in the future and immediately lists an impressive and relevant achievement. Since they’re experienced in the same industry and interested in finance, the hiring manager can see they’re not just a random applicant.

From this introduction, it’s safe to say that the hiring manager would read the rest of this candidate’s cover letter.

#5. Use the Cover Letter Body for Details

The next part of your cover letter is where you can go into detail about what sets you apart as a qualified candidate for the job.

The main thing you need to remember here is that you shouldn’t make it all about yourself . Your cover letter is supposed to show the hiring manager how you relate to the job and the company you’re applying to.

No matter how cool you make yourself sound in your cover letter, if you don’t tailor it to match what the hiring manager is looking for, you’re not getting an interview.

To get this right, use the job ad as a reference when writing your cover letter. Make sure to highlight skills and achievements that match the job requirements, and you’re good to go.

Since this part of your cover letter is by far the longest, you should split it into at least two paragraphs.

Here’s what each paragraph should cover:

Explain Why You’re the Perfect Candidate for the Role

Before you can show the hiring manager that you’re exactly what they’ve been looking for, you need to know what it is they’re looking for.

Start by doing a bit of research. Learn what the most important skills and responsibilities of the role are according to the job ad, and focus on any relevant experience you have that matches them.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of a Facebook Advertiser. The top requirements on the job ad are:

  • Experience managing a Facebook ad budget of $10,000+ / month
  • Some skills in advertising on other platforms (Google Search + Twitter)
  • Excellent copywriting skills

So, in the body of your cover letter, you need to show how you meet these requirements. Here’s an example of what that can look like:

In my previous role as a Facebook Marketing Expert at XYZ Inc. I handled customer acquisition through ads, managing a monthly Facebook ad budget of $40,000+ . As the sole digital marketer at the company, I managed the ad creation and management process end-to-end. I created the ad copy and images, picked the targeting, ran optimization trials, and so on.

Other than Facebook advertising, I’ve also delved into other online PPC channels, including:

  • Google Search

Our example addresses all the necessary requirements and shows off the candidate’s relevant skills.

Are you a student applying for your first internship? Learn how to write an internship cover letter with our dedicated guide.

Explain Why You’re a Good Fit for the Company

As skilled and experienced as you may be, that’s not all the hiring manager is looking for.

They also want someone who’s a good fit for their company and who actually wants to work there.

Employees who don’t fit in with the company culture are likely to quit sooner or later. This ends up costing the company a ton of money, up to 50% of the employee’s annual salary , so hiring managers vet candidates very carefully to avoid this scenario.

So, you have to convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about working with them.

Start by doing some research about the company. You want to know things like:

  • What’s the company’s business model?
  • What’s the company’s product or service? Have you used it?
  • What’s the company’s culture like?

Chances are, you’ll find all the information you need either on the company website or on job-search websites like Jobscan or Glassdoor.

Then, pick your favorite thing about the company and talk about it in your cover letter.

But don’t just describe the company in its own words just to flatter them. Be super specific—the hiring manager can see through any fluff.

For example, if you’re passionate about their product and you like the company’s culture of innovation and independent work model, you can write something like:

I’ve personally used the XYZ Smartphone, and I believe that it’s the most innovative tech I’ve used in years. The features, such as Made-Up-Feature #1 and Made-Up-Feature #2, were real game changers for the device.

I really admire how Company XYZ strives for excellence in all its product lines, creating market-leading tech. As someone who thrives in a self-driven environment, I truly believe that I’ll be a great match for your Product Design team.

So, make sure to do your fair share of research and come up with good reasons why you're applying to that specific company.

Is the company you want to work for not hiring at the moment? Check out our guide to writing a letter of interest .

#6. Wrap It Up and Sign It

Finally, it’s time to conclude your cover letter.

In the final paragraph, you want to:

  • Wrap up any points you couldn't make in the previous paragraphs. Do you have anything left to say? If there’s any other information that could help the hiring manager make their decision, mention it here. If not, just recap your key selling points so far, such as key skills and expertise.
  • Express gratitude. Politely thanking the hiring manager for their time is always a good idea.
  • Finish the cover letter with a call to action. The very last sentence in your cover letter should be a call to action. This means you should ask the hiring manager to do something, like call you and discuss your application or arrange an interview.
  • Remember to sign your cover letter. Just add a formal closing line and sign your name at the bottom.

Here’s an example of how to end your cover letter :

I hope to help Company X make the most of their Facebook marketing initiatives. I'd love to further discuss how my previous success at XYZ Inc. can help you achieve your Facebook marketing goals. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at the provided email address or phone number so that we may arrange an interview.

Thank you for your consideration,

Alice Richards

Feel free to use one of these other popular closing lines for your cover letter:

  • Best Regards,
  • Kind Regards,

Cover Letter Writing Checklist

Once you’re done with your cover letter, it’s time to check if it meets all industry requirements. 

Give our handy cover letter writing checklist a look to make sure:

Does your cover letter heading include all essential information?

  • Professional Email
  • Phone Number
  • Relevant Links

Do you address the right person? 

  • The hiring manager in the company
  • Your future direct supervisor
  • The company/department in general

Does your introductory paragraph grab the reader's attention?

  • Did you mention some of your top achievements?
  • Did you use numbers and facts to back up your experience?
  • Did you convey enthusiasm for the specific role?

Do you show that you’re the right candidate for the job?

  • Did you identify the core requirements for the role?
  • Did you show how your experiences helped you fit the requirements perfectly?

Do you convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about the company you’re applying to?

  • Did you identify the top 3 things that you like about the company?
  • Did you avoid generic reasons for explaining your interest in the company?

Did you conclude your cover letter properly?

  • Did you recap your key selling points in the conclusion?
  • Did you end your cover letter with a call to action?
  • Did you use the right formal closing line and sign your name?

15 Cover Letter Tips

Now you’re all set to write your cover letter! 

Before you start typing, here are some cover letter tips to help take your cover letter to the next level:

  • Customize Your Cover Letter for Each Job. Make sure your cover letter is tailored to the job you're applying for. This shows you're not just sending generic applications left and right, and it tells the hiring manager you’re the right person for the job.
  • Showcase Your Skills. Talk about how your skills meet the company’s needs. And while your hard skills should be front and center, you shouldn’t underestimate your soft skills in your cover letter either.
  • Avoid Fluff. Don’t make any generic statements you can’t back up. The hiring manager can tell when you’re just throwing words around, and it doesn’t make your cover letter look good.
  • Use Specific Examples. Instead of saying you're great at something, give an actual example to back up your claim. Any data you can provide makes you sound more credible, so quantify your achievements. For example, give numbers such as percentages related to your performance and the timeframe it took to accomplish certain achievements.
  • Research the Company. Always take time to learn about the company you're applying to. Make sure to mention something about them in your cover letter to show the hiring manager that you're interested.
  • Follow the Application Instructions. If the job posting asks for something specific in your cover letter or requires a certain format, make sure you include it. Not following instructions can come off as unattentive or signal to the hiring manager that you’re not taking the job seriously.
  • Use the Right Template and Format. Choose the right cover letter format and adapt your cover letter’s look to the industry you’re applying for. For example, if you’re aiming for a job in Law or Finance, you should go for a cleaner, more professional look. But if you’re applying for a field that values innovation, like IT or Design, you have more room for creativity.
  • Express Your Enthusiasm. Let the hiring manager know why you're excited about the job. Your passion for the specific role or the field in general can be a big selling point, and show them that you’re genuinely interested, not just applying left and right.
  • Address Any Gaps. If there are any employment gaps in your resume , your cover letter is a great place to mention why. Your resume doesn’t give you enough space to elaborate on an employment gap, so addressing it here can set hiring managers at ease—life happens, and employers understand.
  • Avoid Quirky Emails. Your email address should be presentable. It’s hard for a hiring manager to take you seriously if your email address is “[email protected].” Just use a [email protected] format.
  • Check Your Contact Information. Typos in your email address or phone number can mean a missed opportunity. Double-check these before sending your application.
  • Mention if You Want to Relocate. If you’re looking for a job that lets you move somewhere else, specify this in your cover letter.
  • Keep It Brief. You want to keep your cover letter short and sweet. Hiring managers don’t have time to read a novel, so if you go over one page, they simply won’t read it at all.
  • Use a Professional Tone. Even though a conversational tone isn’t a bad thing, remember that it's still a formal document. Show professionalism in your cover letter by keeping slang, jargon, and emojis out of it.
  • Proofread Carefully. Typos and grammar mistakes are a huge deal-breaker. Use a tool like Grammarly or QuillBot to double-check your spelling and grammar, or even get a friend to check it for you.

15+ Cover Letter Examples

Need some inspiration? Check out some perfect cover letter examples for different experience levels and various professions.

5+ Cover Letter Examples by Experience

#1. college student cover letter example.

college or student cover letter example

Check out our full guide to writing a college student cover letter here.

#2. Middle Management Cover Letter Example

Middle Management Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a project manager cover letter here.

#3. Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a team leader cover letter here.

#4. Career Change Cover Letter Example

Career Change Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to a career change resume and cover letter here.

#5. Management Cover Letter Example

Management Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a management cover letter here.

#6. Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an executive resume here.

9+ Cover Letter Examples by Profession

#1. it cover letter example.

IT Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an IT cover letter here.

#2. Consultant Cover Letter Example

Consultant Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a consultant cover letter here.

#3. Human Resources Cover Letter

Human Resources Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a human resources cover letter here.

#4. Business Cover Letter Example

Business Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a business cover letter here.

#5. Sales Cover Letter Example

Sales Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a sales cover letter here.

#6. Social Worker Cover Letter

Social Worker Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a social worker cover letter here.

#7. Lawyer Cover Letter

Lawyer Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a lawyer cover letter here.

#8. Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing an administrative assistant cover letter here.

#9. Engineering Cover Letter Example

Engineering Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an engineer cover letter here.

#10. Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a receptionist cover letter here.

Need more inspiration? Check out these cover letter examples to learn what makes them stand out.

Plug & Play Cover Letter Template

Not sure how to start your cover letter? Don’t worry!

Just copy and paste our free cover letter template into the cover letter builder, and swap out the blanks for your details.

[Your Full Name]

[Your Profession]

[Your Phone Number]

[Your Email Address]

[Your Location]

[Your LinkedIn Profile URL (optional)]

[Your Personal Website URL (optional)]

[Recipient's Name, e.g., Jane Doe],

[Recipient's Position, e.g., Hiring Manager]

[Company Name, e.g., ABC Corporation]

[Company Address]

[City, State/Country]

Dear [Recipient's Name],

As a seasoned [Your Profession] with [Number of Years of Experience] years of industry experience, I am eager to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With my experience in [Your Industry/Sector] and the successes I've achieved throughout my education and career, I believe I can bring unique value and creativity to your team.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I've taken the lead on more than [Number of Projects/Assignments] projects, some valued up to $[Highest Project Value]. I pride myself on consistently exceeding client expectations and have successfully [Mention a Key Achievement] in just a [Amount of Time] through [Skill] and [Skill].

I've collaborated with various professionals, such as [List Roles], ensuring that all [projects/tasks] meet [relevant standards or objectives]. This hands-on experience, coupled with my dedication to understanding each [client's/customer's] vision, has equipped me to navigate and deliver on complex projects.

My key strengths include:

  • Improving [Achievement] by [%] over [Amount of Time] which resulted in [Quantified Result].
  • Optimizing [Work Process/Responsibility] which saved [Previous Employer] [Amount of Time/Budget/Other Metric] over [Weeks/Months/Years]
  • Spearheading team of [Number of People] to [Task] and achieving [Quantified Result].

Alongside this letter, I've attached my resume. My educational background, a [Your Degree] with a concentration in [Your Specialization], complements the practical skills that I'm particularly eager to share with [Company Name].

I'm excited about the possibility of contributing to [Something Notable About the Company or Its Mission]. I'd be grateful for the chance to delve deeper into how my expertise aligns with your needs.

Thank you for considering my application, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

The Heart of Your Job Search - Creating a Killer Resume

Your cover letter is only as good as your resume. If either one is weak, your entire application falls through.

After all, your cover letter is meant to complement your resume. Imagine going through all this effort to leave an amazing first impression in your cover letter, only for the hiring manager to never read it because your resume was mediocre.

But don’t worry; we’ve got you covered here, too.

Check out our dedicated guide on how to make a resume and learn everything you need to know to land your dream job!

Just pick one of our resume templates and start writing your own job-winning resume.

resume examples for cover letters

Key Takeaways

Now that we’ve walked you through all the steps of writing a cover letter, let’s summarize everything we’ve learned:

  • A cover letter is a 250 - 400 word document that’s meant to convince the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for the job.
  • Your job application should always include a cover letter alongside your resume.
  • To grab the hiring manager’s attention, write a strong opening paragraph. Mention who you are, why you’re applying, and a standout achievement to pique their interest.
  • Your cover letter should focus on why you’re the perfect candidate for the job and why you’re passionate about working in this specific company.
  • Use the body of your cover letter to provide details on your skills, achievements, and qualifications, as well as make sure to convey your enthusiasm throughout your whole cover letter.
  • Recap your key selling points towards the end of your cover letter, and end it with a formal closing line and your full name signed underneath.

At Novorésumé, we’re committed to helping you get the job you deserve every step of the way! 

Follow our career blog for more valuable advice, or check out some of our top guides, such as:

  • How to Make a Resume in 2024 | Beginner's Guide
  • How to Write a CV (Curriculum Vitae) in 2024 [31+ Examples]
  • 35+ Job Interview Questions and Answers [Full List]

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Jobscan > Cover Letter Writing Guide

How To Write A Cover Letter in 2024 (Expert Tips and Examples)

Here’s a comprehensive guide on how to write a cover letter that will get you noticed by recruiters.

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Trusted by:

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A survey revealed that 77% of recruiters prefer candidates who send in a cover letter, even if submitting it is optional. Additionally, 90% of executives consider cover letters invaluable when assessing job candidates.

So, if you think cover letters are no longer important and necessary in 2024, think again.

Here’s a comprehensive guide to help you write a cover letter that effectively sells your skills and professional experience, increases your chances of getting interviews, and gets your foot in the door.

Table of Contents

What is a cover letter and do you still need one in 2024?

A cover letter is a letter of introduction accompanying your resume that paints why you are the best person for the job, what you bring to the table, and how you can help move the company forward.

Is the cover letter dead? No! In fact, a recent study by ResumeLab revealed that 64% of job vacancies still require that you include a cover letter in your application and 83% of HR pros said that cover letters are important for their hiring decision.

The bottom line is that a cover letter is still a valuable piece of your job search collateral. Nail your cover letter and you could end up getting that dream job.

So what exactly do you need to accomplish in your cover letter?

What is the purpose of a cover letter?

According to 49% of HR managers , your cover letter is the second best way to call attention to your resume and distinguish yourself from other applicants.

So the main purpose of your cover letter is to compel the recruiter to read more about you on your resume and move you to the next part of the hiring process.

Further, according to award-winning resume expert Melanie Denny , your cover letter is your value proposition letter. It proves why you are the best candidate to address the company’s needs with the professional skills and qualifications to succeed in the job.

Here’s an example of a great cover letter:

cover-letter-writing-guide

Now let’s get into the details of what your cover letter needs to include.

Cover Letter Structure Checklist

Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to include in your cover letter.

  • Contact Details Name Address (or City, State with zip code) Phone number Email address
  • Greeting Whenever possible, address the hiring manager by name.
  • Opening Who are you? What are your relevant skills and accomplishments?
  • Body (1-2 paragraphs) What do you know about the company? Why are you applying for this job? What value can you bring to the company? Include measurable results when possible.
  • Closing Reiterate your interest. Add a Call to Action. Mention any attachments. Use a professional sign-off like “Best” or “Sincerely” before your full name.

Here’s an example for the visual learners out there:

cover-letter-writing-guide

Now that you know the basics of what to include in your cover letter, let’s go through the process from start to finish to see how you can write a cover letter that will make you stand out from the rest of the candidates.

How to write a cover letter in 9 steps

It can be intimidating to try to parse down all your best qualities into a few quick paragraphs for your cover letter.

Here are 9 steps you can take to make sure you’re headed in the right direction:

Step 1. Do your research

Before writing your cover letter, thoroughly read the job description and the requirements for the job.

Melanie Denny , award-winning resume expert, likens the job description to your cover letter cheat sheet. And when checking the job description, she says you need to consider the following:

  • What are the company’s priorities?
  • What are their goals for the role?
  • What outcomes and accomplishments in your previous roles match the goals?
  • What are the key phrases and verbiage the company uses?

This will help you customize your cover letter, angle yourself and your narrative to fit the role better, and impress the hiring manager.

Try reaching out to the recruiter, hiring manager, or someone working in the company if you want more in-depth information about the company and the position you are applying for.

Step 2. Customize your cover letter for every job

Make sure your cover letter matches the job you are applying for. Writing a generic cover letter is a missed opportunity as this will not appeal to the recruiter or hiring manager. According to research from ResumeGo , 81% of HR professionals value job-specific cover letters over generic ones. Jobseekers who had tailored cover letters received a 53% higher callback rate compared to those who had no cover letter.

Remember, your cover letter is your chance to prove that you are passionate about working for a given company, so take the time to write a tailored cover letter for each position . You can do this by mentioning your skills and experience that are directly related to what’s mentioned in the job description. If you’re applying for a data analyst role that requires expertise in Microsoft Power BI, cite an example of a Power BI dashboard you built and how it helped the company.

Read our full guide: How to Optimize Your Cover Letter

Step 3. Include all of your contact info

You should make it easy for the hiring manager to reach you. In your cover letter, list these three things:

  • Address (including zip code– for ATS purposes )
  • Phone number with area code
  • Email address
  • Name of the Hiring Manager
  • Name of the Company
  • Address of the Company

Traditionally, your contact information is included in the upper left corner of your cover letter if you’re writing in a document. If you’re writing an email, this can be included beneath your signature at the end of the message.

Cover Letter Header Example:

Jane Jobscan Seattle, WA 98101 (555) 555-5555 • [email protected] linkedin.com/in/jane-jobscan

February 25, 2024

Lavinia Smith Hiring Manager Media Raven, Inc. Plantersville, MS 38862

Step 4. Address your cover letter to a real person

According to Melanie Denny, resume expert and President of Resume-Evolution, addressing your cover letter to a real person and addressing them by their name feels more personal and shows recruiters and hiring managers that you took time and did the research.

You can usually find the hiring manager’s name by searching the company website or LinkedIn profile, or by calling the company and asking which hiring manager is assigned to the particular position.

Once you learn the name, a simple greeting of “John” or “Hello John” is all you need.

If you can’t find the hiring manager’s name, you can use any of the following:

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear (Department) Team
  • To whom it may concern

Read our full guide: How to Address a Cover Letter

Step 5. Write a strong opening statement

Melanie Denny suggests that you start your cover letter with a bang. This will hook the hiring manager’s interest and show them how you can be a valuable addition to the team.

Here are things you can do:

  • Open with a thought-provoking question
  • Make a big claim about what you can do for the company
  • Say something relevant and specific to the company

For example,

“I want to bring the marketing department of Media Raven Inc. to the next level and help the company exceed goals and reach more customers as Marketing Manager.”

Step 6. Prove how your professional background and skills help the company in the body of your cover letter

Take advantage of this real estate and prove to the prospective employer how your background, values, and professional experiences position you as the best fit for what the role requires.

This is especially important if you are switching careers. Highlight your relevant accomplishments in your cover letter, showcase your transferable skills, and explain how you can help the company address its challenges and succeed.

For example:

“As the Director of Marketing at ABC Company since 2018, I directed all phases of both the creative and technical elements of marketing initiatives, including data mining, brand creation, print/web collateral development, lead generation, channel partner cultivation, customer segmentation/profiling, as well as CRM and acquisition strategies.

Perhaps most importantly, I offer a history of proven results, as evidenced by the following marketing accomplishments for my current employer:

  • Captured a 28% expansion in customer base since 2018, achieved during a period of overall decline in the retail industry.
  • Led national marketing campaign (comprised of trade shows, media, and PR initiatives) for my company’s newly launched technology services division
  • Developed and executed SEO strategy that achieved and sustained top 3 rankings on Google (organic, nonpaid results) for key product search terms.
  • Oversaw the creation of a new company logo and rebranded 100+ products to cement a cohesive corporate identity and support new company direction.”

Just like when writing a resume, your cover letter should only include the most relevant and positive information about you. To home in on the right skills and qualifications to mention, try scanning your cover letter .

Read our full guide: What Do You Put in a Cover Letter?

Step 7. Write a strong closing statement and a call to action

Use the closing of your cover letter to:

  • Thank the hiring manager for their time
  • Mention any attachments (resume, portfolio, samples)
  • Invite to schedule an interview
  • Let the hiring manager know that you will follow up

Keep the closing professional and try not to sound too eager since that can come off as desperate. You must also keep in mind the tone and personality of the company you’re communicating with.

“Given the opportunity, I’m confident I can achieve similar groundbreaking marketing results for Media Raven, Inc.

Ms. Smith, I would welcome the chance to discuss your marketing objectives and how I can help you attain them. Feel free to call me at (555) 555-5555 or email me at [email protected] to arrange a meeting. I look forward to speaking with you.”

Read our full guide: How to End a Cover Letter With a Call to Action

Step 8. End with a professional closing salutation

To finish out the closing , use a formal signature. You can use “Sincerely,” “Best,” “Regards,” “Yours,” or any other professional signoff.

Use your first and last name as your signature. If you’re sending your cover letter in the body of an email, make sure it’s your personal email account that does not list your current work signature beneath the email. Your other option is to write the cover letter in a word document, save it as a PDF, and attach it to your email.

Step 9. Optimize your cover letter for the ATS

The Applicant Tracking System or the ATS is a software that companies use to screen applications and shrink their pool of applicants. Through the ATS database, a recruiter or hiring manager can just search for specific skills and keywords and the ATS will return a list of the top candidates who match the search criteria.

To optimize your cover letter for ATS, you need to:

  • Carefully read the job description
  • Take note of skills and resume keywords frequently mentioned
  • Incorporate these keywords into your cover letter

Read our full guide: How to Optimize Your Cover Letter to Beat the ATS

Does your cover letter pass the test?

Scan your cover letter to see how well it matches the job you're applying for. Optimize your cover letter and resume with Jobscan to get more interviews.

Computer with resume

How to Format Your Cover Letter

A cover letter is a letter, but that doesn’t mean you should just plop everything onto the page in a stream-of-consciousness flow. After all, cover letter formats determine the order in which the hiring manager learns about you, which can significantly influence their first impression. Use the format order below as a guideline for building the structure of your cover letter.

cover-letter-writing-guide

Notice how the topics flow like a conversation? When you first meet someone, you introduce yourself, tell them your name and a little about yourself, and then leave the conversation open for future meetings.

Your cover letter is just a like having a conversation with someone for the first time. Keeping that in mind will help you to keep things simple and focus on the right information.

Below are some examples of how to format your cover letter for different types of applications.

How to format your cover letter for a job

  • State your name
  • Explain your work history
  • Tell them what you can do for their company
  • Say goodbye

How to format your cover letter for an internship

  • Explain your coursework history and education
  • Explain what you can gain professionally

How to format your cover letter with no experience

  • Explain your skillset and character qualities that make you well-suited for the role
  • Outline entry-level achievements

You can also check out our cover letter templates to help you as you write your own cover letter.

Do you want to save time and receive instant feedback on your cover letter? Check out Jobscan’s cover letter tool .

Read more : How to Write a Resume for Today’s Job Market

Cover Letter Examples

Here are some examples to help you create a cover letter that will make you stand out and give a strong first impression.

1. Internship Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

2. Career Change Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

3. Operations Manager Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

4. Communications Professional Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

5. Software Engineer Cover Letter Example

cover-letter-writing-guide

Cover Letter Do’s and Don’ts

Aside from the basic steps of how to write a cover letter, there are some things you definitely need to make sure you avoid – and things you can’t skip! Follow these do’s and don’ts for writing a cover letter, and you’ll end up with a much better result.

  • Use a cover letter unless one was requested.
  • Attach a cover letter directly to your resume unless requested to do so.
  • Use the same boilerplate cover letter for multiple job applications.
  • Over-explain your work history, employment gaps, or qualifications – save it for the interview.
  • Badmouth any of your past employers.
  • Use the cover letter to complain or tell about your job search journey.
  • Use non-standard formatting like tables, columns, or graphics. (ATS can’t read those and your cover letter copy might not be scannable by the system.)
  • Use long paragraphs.
  • Customize a cover letter for every job application that asks for one.
  • Incorporate the top skills or keywords from the job description in your cover letter.
  • Include the company name and address, the job title, and point of contact’s name on your cover letter.
  • Incorporate relevant and compelling measurable results in your cover letter.
  • Explain, briefly, any dramatic shifts in a career (i.e. you are changing industries or job titles).
  • Use company information to relate your interest in the job.
  • Keep your cover letter concise.
  • Convey WHY you are right for the position.

More Cover Letter Tips

  • When emailing your cover letter, be strategic with your subject line. Never leave the subject line blank, and double-check for specific instructions in the job posting. If possible, use the email subject line to sell yourself. For example: “Experienced Software Engineer Seeks Senior Level Mobile Position.”
  • Keep your cover letter brief and to the point. The hiring manager will be reading many cover letters. By carefully selecting your words and experiences to include, you can stand out from the crowd of applicants.
  • Be confident. Let the hiring manager know the reasons why you deserve this position, and make yourself believe them too!
  • Your cover letter should not be simply a rephrasing of your resume. Let your personality show and go into further detail about your most valuable skills and experiences.
  • Do your research on the company and position before writing the cover letter. It should be customized to that specific company’s values and needs. Hiring managers can spot a generic resume from a mile away.
  • Use the job posting as your guide for what topics, skills, and experience to focus on.
  • The best cover letters include keywords from the job posting. Applicant tracking systems may scan your cover letter along with your resume and will be using these keywords to sort through the applicants.
  • Check for spelling and grammar errors.
  • Send your cover letter as a PDF to avoid readability issues and to present the most professional application package.
  • Scan Your Cover Letter with Jobscan to make sure you’re checking all the boxes.

Optimize Your Cover Letter with Jobscan’s Cover Letter Scanner

In addition to resume scans, Jobscan Premium users can also scan their cover letters against a job description.

This generates a report of the top hard skills and soft skills found in the job description that should be included in your cover letter, plus additional checks for optimal length, contact information, measurable results, and more.

Here’s how it works:

Key Takeaways

Your cover letter gives recruiters, hiring managers, and prospective employers an overview of your professional qualifications and relevant accomplishments that position you as the best candidate for the job.

So you have to make your cover letter powerful and interesting enough to make the recruiter or hiring manager read your resume and move you to the next step of the hiring process.

Here are key pointers when writing your cover letter.

  • Make sure you’ve read the job description and done your research about the company.
  • Get to know the name of the recruiter or hiring manager so you can address your cover letter properly.
  • Include relevant and measurable accomplishments in the body of your cover letter to prove to the hiring manager that you have what it takes to succeed in the job.
  • Keep your cover letter short and concise.
  • Your cover letter is not a substitute for your resume so don’t just copy and paste whatever is in your resume into your cover letter.

One last important reminder!

Having a strong cover letter is not enough. You also need to create a killer resume to make sure you stand out and land job interviews.

Learn more about writing a cover letter

How to Address a Cover Letter-block

How to Address a Cover Letter

10 Tips for Writing a Cover Letter-block

10 Tips for Writing a Cover Letter

The Career Change Cover Letter: How to Get it Right-block

The Career Change Cover Letter: How to Get it Right

What Do You Put in a Cover Letter?-block

What Do You Put in a Cover Letter?

Is Your Cover Letter Robot-Approved?-block

Is Your Cover Letter Robot-Approved?

How to End a Cover Letter with a Call to Action-block

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Frequently asked questions, what are the different types of cover letters.

There are four types of cover letters.

  • Application cover letter An application cover letter is what you send to the recruiter or hiring manager along with your resume.
  • Prospecting cover letter You send this when you want to inquire prospective employers about open positions in their company or put yourself top-of-mind when they do decide to hire.
  • Networking cover letter You will send this to professionals in your network in hopes of getting referrals, introductions, job search advice, and job opportunities.
  • Career change cover letter This is what you send when you are switching careers or industries.

What tense should I use when writing a cover letter?

It can be appropriate to change tenses throughout your cover letter.

For example, you can explain who you are in the present tense and explain important aspects of your work history in the past tense. You can switch to future perfect tense when discussing the ways you would perform if given the position.

Think of it like this, “I am ABC, I did XYZ previously, and I look forward to doing EFG in this position.”

What to include in a cover letter

Our cover letter guidelines above explain how to write a cover letter more deeply, but in summary, you should always include your name, relevant work experience, and reasons why you are right for the job in your cover letter.

When not to include a cover letter

  • When the job posting clearly states not to include a cover letter
  • When you don’t have the time and energy to customize your cover letter. It’s better not to send a cover letter than to send a half-baked and mediocre one.
  • When you are applying online and there is no field to upload your cover letter.
  • When your cover letter has a lot of typos and errors.

What should you send first: a cover letter or a resume?

Typically, your cover letter and resume will be sent as a pair, but your cover letter is meant to be an introduction to your resume. If it is an email, use the cover letter in the body and attach your resume, otherwise, attach both.

Pro Tip: Be sure to review all instructions in the job description to follow the hiring manager’s requests.

How long should a cover letter be?

According to 70% of recruiters, a cover letter should not exceed 250 to 300 words.

Although there is no hard and fast rule about this, the ideal cover letter length should be around half a page to one full page in length to keep your message concise, clear, and easy to digest.

Should a cover letter be sent as a file attachment?

If it is not specified in the job posting, a cover letter can be sent either as an attachment (PDF is best) or in the body of an application email with your resume attached.

How to share a cover letter with a potential employer

There are several methods of sharing a cover letter with potential employers, depending on their application process.

Cover letters can be written on a document and turned into a PDF to be uploaded to a job application website or attached to an email along with your resume.

In other cases, your cover letter can simply be written in the email message to a hiring manager, with your resume attached.

How to title and save your cover letter

The key in every aspect of job applications is to make yourself an easy “yes” for your potential employer. That means making it easy for the hiring manager to keep track of your application materials for later review. With this in mind, make sure your full name and the phrase “cover letter” are included in the file label. Other helpful details might include the job title you’re applying for or the year of your application.

Here are a few examples:

  • Your Name_Cover Letter_Job Title.pdf
  • Cover Letter_Your Name_Job Title.pdf
  • Job Title_Your Name_Cover Letter.pdf
  • Your Name_Cover Letter_2024.pdf
  • Cover Letter_Your Name_2024.pdf

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How To Write A Cover Letter For A Job In 2023 (With Examples)

  • How To Write A Cover Letter
  • When Is A Cover Letter Necessary
  • Free Cover Letter Templates
  • Cover Letter Mistakes To Avoid
  • Cover Letter Tips
  • How To Sell Yourself In A Cover Letter

Find a Job You Really Want In

Cover letters aren’t required with every application, but the majority of managers pay more attention to a candidate who includes a cover letter. This is especially so if you make an effort to tailor your letter to the specific position. It’s important not to just change the names and job positions, but also to show how your professional experience fits with the job.

A good cover letter greatly increases your chance of getting an interview. If you’re looking to write a cover letter, rework a letter that you have, or just want to know what’s involved in the job application process, then keep reading.

Key Takeaways:

A cover letter should be a maximum of one page long, with three to five paragraphs.

Before writing your cover letter, it’s important to reread the job description and include keywords from it.

Do research to figure out who you are addressing, and make sure to keep your greeting gender neutral if you don’t know.

Tailoring your resume to each job can help you stand out from other candidates.

How To Write A Cover Letter For A Job in 2022 (With Examples)

What is a cover letter?

Why cover letters are important, how to write a cover letter, cover letter examples, cover letter template, do’s and don’ts in a cover letter, cover letter faq, expert opinion.

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A cover letter is a one-page document that describes your professional background, fitness for the role, and interest in the company. Cover letters are a way of introducing yourself to hiring managers in a more engaging way than resumes can.

While your resume spells out the “who, what, where, when” of your relevant experience, a cover letter fills in the “why” and “how.” A good cover letter not only expands on your resume’s accomplishments but also highlights the soft skills that make you an excellent person to work alongside.

While there are no official formatting guidelines for cover letters, hiring managers and recruiters do have certain expectations regarding structure, length, and content.

Writing a good cover letter is important because it is your chance to stand out from other potential candidates. Showing your personality while also matching the tone of the company will help recruiters to visualize how you could fit into the role.

Simply submitting a cover letter isn’t enough though. Each cover letter you write should be specifically tailored to the job you’re applying for (just like resumes). It’s essential that you show the reader that you’ve done your homework and understand exactly what function you’d be serving if hired. You do that by providing examples of past work experiences that directly relate to the responsibilities of the new job.

Cover letters are inherently unique based on who’s writing them and for what position. However, as a cover letter is a business letter, it has an expected format that it should follow. This is important because you want the hiring manager to be able to look over your cover letter quickly and understand your qualifications and interest in the position.

Here’s the standard way that a cover letter should be formatted and what to include:

The header. The header of your letter is where you should input all of the contact information for yourself and the hiring manager . Do you best to address it directly to the person who’ll be reading the letter — typically either the hiring manager or HR manager.

Traditionally, you should include both your name and address and the employer’s name and address. However, as the majority of applications are online, the employer’s address is often omitted. But a traditional cover letter’s heading would look like this:

Page Roman 444 Frog Rd. Marigold, TX, 10987 August 27th, 2021 Chris Morgan Marketing Manager New Media Company 833 Rune Rd. Marigold, TX, 10987

If you’re emailing your cover letter, you can simply include your name, telephone number, email address, and fewer address details (just your city and state will suffice). You can also include a zip code if you live in a big city with multiple zip codes.

Jessica Dancer jessica. dancer @email.email | (555)-444-3333 | Colombus, OH 43110

Be sure to use a professional-sounding email address that’s not associated with your current or past employer. It’s disrespectful to both your current employer and the company you’re applying to, and will likely hurt your chances of being invited for an interview.

The greeting or salutation. Traditionally, the best salutation would be to use Dear Mr./Ms. [Last Name]. Make sure that you know the person’s gender when doing this, however, as you don’t want to misgender the hiring manager. Using “Dear [First Name] [Last Name]” is becoming more popular for this reason, patriotically among younger workers.

Dear Mr. Morgan, Dear Mrs. Smith Dear Ms. Conner

Avoid using generic greetings such as “To whom it may concern” as it’ll look like you didn’t bother to personalize the letter (even if you did.) That particular phrase has become somewhat controversial as well, so if you need to put a generic address — if you can’t find the hiring manager’s name, for instance — use something else, such as:

Dear Hiring Manager Dear [Department] Manager Dear [Title of the Person You’d Report to if Hired] Dear [Department] Hiring Team

Opening paragraph. The opening of your professional cover letter should instantly grab the attention of your reader . Try to lead off with one of your most relevant and impressive accomplishments.

Open strong . Open with a statement other than your name or stating your interest in the position. Lead with an interesting experience or achievement that directly relates to the new position.

Convey your personal value. There are always other qualified applicants with similar skills, so it is key to express why you personally would bring value to the organization. Give specific details as to the value you brought in a previous position, and how that could transfer to the new role.

Show your enthusiasm. Recruiters want to hire candidates who are excited about the position. Express enthusiasm and convey why you are passionate about the role. This is another opportunity to share a quick personal anecdote related to the job.

Keep it short. All of these points in your opening paragraph shouldn’t be more than a sentence or two each. You don’t want your introduction to be too long, as you want the reader to be able to quickly go through your cover letter.

As a Content Writer with a passion for travel and literature, I was thrilled to see the Senior Content Writer position open up at BookFly. My past experience driving organic traffic by 23% YoY to the travel website, XTravel, would translate perfectly into the position’s stated goals from the job description.

First body paragraph. Here is where you should really sell yourself across several areas. Showcase how your personality traits, such as being honest or having the ability to work under pressure, make you a good fit.

Emphasize transferable skills. Explain how the skills you’ve cultivated make you the perfect fit for the role. This can include collaborative work you’ve done in the past, a leadership role you had that drove results, or interpersonal skills.

Revisit the job description. Make sure to pull relevant skills from the job description and put them in your cover letter. If the hiring manager spent the time to list those skills, they’re going to be looking for candidates that have them.

It also helps with applicant tracking systems that may sift through cover letters looking for keywords.

Don’t skimp on personality traits. These are especially important if you don’t have a lot of experience. Desirable skills such as ambition, dedication, and getting work done on time are good for both entry-level positions and if you’re making a career change.

I have a passion for content creation and a deep understanding of the content cycle, from ideation to promotion. My years in the digital publishing world have crafted my ability to drive killer CTR and resonate with an audience. Not only did CTR jump by 2.1% in the months after I was brought on board, but it had a knock-on effect on social media engagement, which rose by 8% in the same time frame. I believe good content has its roots in good data. This is why while at Media Company I created a content-marketing dashboard to highlight KPIs like those mentioned above. The dashboard allowed us to take advantage of wins more rapidly and avoid repeating losses.

Second body paragraph. Just as an employer wants to know why you’d want the role, they also want to know why you’d want to work at their company. Do your research and learn more about the core values of the company. Discuss how they align with your own.

Check the company’s website but also start to explore LinkedIn for greater insights. Employers want to make sure that you fit into the overall culture, and this is also something you should consider for yourself. However you feel you fit into the work culture, explain to the recruiter why. Paint a picture of how you’ll be better from the company, and how the company will also benefit.

I thrive in a fast-paced environment and excel at creating structures from scratch. I spearheaded our SEO efforts, developing workflows and systems to ramp up content production from zero. BookFly’s commitment to core values of “collaboration and imagination” aligns with my own preferred approach to tackling projects and dreaming of big ideas.

Closing. The closing of your letter is your final impression to the hiring manager, and therefore should clearly express your eagerness to take on the position. You don’t need to rehash all of the accomplishments and skills highlighted in previous sections. Consider this more of a statement of intent.

First, express gratitude that they took the time to consider you for the job by making it all the way through your letter. Then, quickly remind them of the benefits that you can bring to the role and company.

Finally, your closing should state a clear call-to-action (CTA) for the recruiter to take next, such as calling you to schedule an interview. Being confident and direct at the end of your cover letter helps to close the deal.

I look forward to learning more about how the Senior Content Writer operates within BookFly and the current content process. Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. Sincerely, Jessica Dancer

With thousands of cover letter templates on the internet, you want to make sure you choose the right one. Here’s a basic format of what a good cover letter will contain:

Jessica Dancer [email protected] | (555)-444-3333 | Colombus, OH 43110 Dear Mr. Morgan, As a Content Writer with a passion for travel and literature, I was thrilled to see the Senior Content Writer position open up at BookFly. My past experience driving organic traffic by 23% YoY to the travel website, XTravel, would translate perfectly into the position’s stated goals from the job description. I have a passion for content creation and a deep understanding of the content cycle, from ideation to promotion. My years in the digital publishing world have crafted my ability to drive killer CTR and resonate with an audience. Not only did CTR jump by 2.1% in the months after I was brought on board, but it had a knock-on effect on social media engagement, which rose by 8% in the same time frame. I believe good content has its roots in good data. This is why while at Media Company I created a content-marketing dashboard to highlight KPIs like those mentioned above. The dashboard allowed us to take advantage of wins more rapidly and avoid repeating losses. I thrive in a fast-paced environment and excel at creating structures from scratch. I spearheaded our SEO efforts, developing workflows and systems to ramp up content production from zero. BookFly’s commitment to core values of “collaboration and imagination” aligns with my own preferred approach to tackling projects and dreaming of big ideas. I look forward to learning more about how the Senior Content Writer operates within BookFly and the current content process. Thank you for taking the time to consider my application. Sincerely, Jessica Dancer

If you’re putting the cover letter in an email, you can omit putting the contact information at the top and instead include it below your signature. You want to make sure to include your name, phone number, and LinkedIn link, as well as a professional portfolio , if applicable.

Dear hiring manager: I am writing about the position of veterinary receptionist at Pet Care Clinic posted on indeed.com. I am a certified dog trainer with both Petsmart and Petco, allowing me insight into animal behavior. I’m also an aspiring novelist , making me a fast, experienced typist as well as adept with Microsoft Word and Apple Pages. Since I’ve worked at pet stores for several years, I am familiar with different kinds of animal and animal care, as well as building a rapport with pet owners. While I enjoy working with animals and my coworkers, I would like to move into a business where I can continue to learn and build on my experience. I would also like to work for a smaller business. Veterinary medicine has always interested me, and I very much enjoy learning new things. I’m eager to learn more about it in order to help customers make the best choices for their pets. I’ve always enjoyed working with animals, even before I was able to get a job that allowed me to. I grew up with dogs and cats, so I’m comfortable and familiar with their behavior. Being a pet owner myself, I’m able to understand what customers are looking for in a veterinary clinic and tailor the experience to their needs. Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you. Sincerely, Michelle Bolivar Email: [email protected] Phone: (555) 545-9706
[your contact information] [date] Dear [Hiring Manager], I’m writing to apply for the open [position] at [company] that you posted [place job ad was found]. I believe that my [relevant experience] would be an excellent fit with [company name]. I have long been interested in [specific industry/department], and particularly your company because [why you’re interested in the company/awards they have won/accomplishments]. That experience and [relevant skills] that I’ve cultivated as a [current position] for [time worked in position or industry] will be an asset to the company as it’ll make me effective [at the job/particular aspect of the job]. The [responsibilities required in the job description] will be a [challenge/interesting task] and I look forward to making use of my [relevant skills]. I excel at [working with a team/working alone] and I want to use my expertise to further [company’s] success. I am excited about the possibilities this position holds, and I believe that my qualifications ensure I’d be an asset to your team. I look forward to being able to further discuss the details of the position and my qualifications with you in an interview. Please let me know if you require further information from me. Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you. Sincerely, [Your name] [Your contact information (if it’s an email)

Knowing the proper format of a cover letter is the most important factor, of course, but there are some additional dos and don’ts that if you follow can make your cover letter better. It’s during the editing process, it’s important to go over and make sure that you haven’t made any common mistakes that’ll hurt your chances.

Here are 10 dos and don’ts for writing a good cover letter:

Do’s:

Do start by scanning the original job posting for keywords you can include in your letter.

Do be proud of your accomplishments and make sure to highlight them.

Do clearly express why you would be an asset to the organization.

Do tailor your cover letter to every hiring manager and position that you apply for.

Do try to find unique experiences, but make sure to always discuss measurable and relevant results.

Don’ts:

Don’t feel the need to lie about your skills or accomplishments. One of the worst mistakes to make is being caught in a lie.

Don’t copy and paste a template and only change your name and job titles. Recruiters will not see the value in a plug-in-play cover letter that has been used by multiple applicants.

Don’t forget to be direct and include a call to action.

Don’t make your cover letter too long. Similar to your resume, you want the reader to sum up who you are and get a quick explanation of why you’re a good fit.

Don’t forget to proofread. Grammatical errors on a cover letter and resume are a quick way to get your packet in the “no pile”.

What do you write in a cover letter?

In a cover letter, you should mostly write about impressive accomplishments from past jobs or academic experiences that relate to the job you’re applying for.

What is the purpose of cover letter?

The purpose of a cover letter is to help a hiring manager see why your background makes you suitable for the role in question. While a resume lists achievements, educational background , and skills , it doesn’t give the reader an idea of your actual expertise or personality.

A cover letter allows you to share your approach to work, as well as your ability to communicate your value effectively. A good cover letter makes it easy for a reader to think “I could imagine this person working for us.”

How do you write a simple cover letter?

To write a simple cover letter, start with the header and greeting we outlined above. Next, state your interest in the position (give the exact job title as listed in the job description) and mention your years of industry/job experience.

To keep your cover letter simple, you can now briefly mention in 1-2 sentences or 3-4 bullet points what parts of your background are most important for the hiring manager.

Finally, thank the reader for considering your application, and sign off as usual (e.g., “Sincerely, [full name]”).

What is the best way to start a cover letter?

The best way to start a cover letter is with an accomplishment that speaks directly to your ability to provide value for the company. Other good strategies include describing your long-standing passion for the field, mentioning an important reference at the company, or referring specifically to challenges the company is currently facing.

Do you introduce yourself in a cover letter?

No, you do not introduce yourself in a cover letter. By that we mean you do not say “My name is so-and-so” — you simply jump into your background and why you’re interested in the position.

Your name can be found at the bottom of the cover letter, as well as the header, your email address, and your resume, so there’s no need to force it awkwardly into your cover letter’s opening.

How do you end a cover letter?

To end a cover letter, thank the reader for their time and/or consideration, express enthusiasm for further correspondence and conversation, and sign off with a standard closing like “Sincerely.”

How long should a cover letter be?

A cover letter should be a maximum of one page long, with three to five paragraphs. Half a page is the shortest that your cover letter should be.

Harvard Business Review — How to Write a Cover Letter

University of Washington — Writing the Cover Letter

What’s a quick cover letter tip?

what to write in a job application cover letter

Michael Akbar Vice President Certified Professional Career Coach

Use your six seconds to show the employer in a tailored cover letter and resume that you understand their pain and will make their lives better if put in the position.

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Chris Kolmar is a co-founder of Zippia and the editor-in-chief of the Zippia career advice blog. He has hired over 50 people in his career, been hired five times, and wants to help you land your next job. His research has been featured on the New York Times, Thrillist, VOX, The Atlantic, and a host of local news. More recently, he's been quoted on USA Today, BusinessInsider, and CNBC.

Matt Warzel a President of a resume writing firm (MJW Careers, LLC) with 15+ years of recruitment, outplacement, career coaching and resume writing experience. Matt is also a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR) with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Marketing Focus) from John Carroll University.

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4 Cover Letter Examples (Plus Tips on How to Write Yours)

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We love having examples. It’s so much easier to decorate a cake, build a model, or yes, even write a cover letter when you know what the end product could look like. So that’s what we’re going to give you—all the cover letter examples and tips you need to make yours shine (unfortunately we’re not experts in cake decorating or model building). 

You'll see that writing a cover letter is all about highlighting your relevant skills, professional experience, and accomplishments, while emphasizing your interest for the role in an engaging manner.

Want to get right down to business? Skip ahead to:

1. The traditional cover letter example

2. the impact cover letter example, 3. the writing sample cover letter example, 4. the career change cover letter example, bonus cover letter examples, a few more cover letter tips, why bother with a cover letter at all.

We bet when you see a job listing that says “ cover letter optional ,” you breathe a sigh of relief, gleefully submit your resume, and move on. But you’re truly doing yourself a disservice by not including a cover letter (or by writing one that’s super generic or formulaic).

“When you’re writing a resume you’re oftentimes confined by space, by resume speak, by keywords—you’re up against a lot of technical requirements,” says Melody Godfred, a career coach and the founder of Write in Color who’s read thousands of cover letters over the course of her career. “In a cover letter you have an opportunity to craft a narrative that aligns you not only with the position you’re applying to but also the company you’re applying to.”

Whether you’re writing a cover letter for a data scientist or marketing manager position, an internship or a senior-level role, a startup or a Fortune 500 company, you’re going to want to tailor it to the role, company, and culture. A strong, customized cover letter will help you explain your value proposition and stand out from the stack of applicants. 

If there’s a gap in your resume , you have the opportunity to explain why it’s there. If you’re changing careers, you have the chance to describe why you’re making the switch. If your resume is pretty dull, a cover letter helps you show some personality . And yes, cover letters still get read.

Deep in the job search, or just browsing? These open jobs on The Muse could be your ideal next step »

What do I write in a cover letter? The 3 basic elements

You'll notice from our cover letter examples that the body of your text can vary a lot depending on factors like the position you're applying for, your career stage, and the type of cover letter requested by the hiring manager. For instance, a writing sample cover letter is different from a traditional professional cover letter (we'll get there soon.)

However, there is some information that you can't leave out. It's important to highlight your most relevant experience, skills, and qualifications for the role in any type of cover letter. Plus, make sure to write an engaging first paragraph to grab the reader's attention, and an effective final paragraph, ideally followed by a call to action, in order to leave a lasting positive impression.

You could say that cover letters are a little like puzzles. When you put each component in its proper place (and remove any parts that don’t fit), you create a complete picture. Even though that picture is always different, the types of pieces are basically the same. We've broken down these three key elements for you:

1. An engaging opener

How you start a cover letter is everything. Your opening lines influence whether someone keeps reading—and you want them to, right? “Starting with something that immediately connects you to the company is essential—something that tells the company that this is not a generic cover letter,” Godfred says. “You have to say something that tells the employer, ‘I wrote this just for you.’”

It can be a childhood memory tying you back to the company’s mission. It can be a story about the time you fell in love with the company’s product. It can be an anecdote from another job or experience showing how hard of a worker you are. Whatever you decide to open with, make it memorable.

2. A clear pitch

Use the next few paragraphs of your cover letter to “hit them with the strongest results you have that are aligned with the opportunity,” Godfred says. Ryan Kahn , Muse career coach and founder of The Hired Group , calls this your pitch. In other words, the part where you’re “selling yourself for the position and why you’re qualified for it.”

Additionally, Godfred says, “If you’re someone who’s transitioning careers, and you need to explain that transition, you do it there.”

This section should have a balance of soft and hard skills . Talk about your experience using Salesforce or doing SEO work, but also highlight your ability to lead teams and communicate effectively.

“Companies are embracing authenticity, they’re embracing humanity, they’re looking for people who are going to fit their culture,” says Godfred. “So what are your values? What do you stand for? These values should be as much a part of your cover letter as the super specialized hard skills.

3. A great closing line

Your closing line could include your next steps or a call to action, Kahn says, such as “ I welcome the opportunity to speak with you more about how I can contribute to the team ,” or, “ I would love to schedule a time for us to discuss this role and my experience. ” But more importantly, “You want to make sure that you’re gracious and thanking them,” he says. While seemingly cliché , it never hurts to end on a simple, “ Thank you for your consideration. ”

Does that sound a bit overwhelming? Don’t panic! We’ve got examples of four types of cover letters below: a traditional cover letter , an impact cover letter , a writing sample cover letter , and a career change cover letter . So let’s take a look at these examples, why they work, and how you can use them to craft your own.

A traditional cover letter is similar to what you’d come up with using position-based cover letter templates . It moves in reverse chronological order through your career history, highlighting parts of your past jobs that make you well suited for this position.

You might want to use this type of cover letter if:

  • You’re applying to a more formal company (like a law firm or major healthcare company ) or a more conventional role (like a lawyer or accountant).
  • You want to play it safe and conservative with your application materials.

What does the job description say?

Imagine you’re applying to a paralegal job opening at a law firm. The job description might include:

Responsibilities

  • Draft routine legal documents for review and use by attorneys
  • Coordinate and organize materials and presentations for legal proceedings
  • Research legal and related issues and report findings and conclusions to team
  • Provide overall legal administrative support to the legal team
  • Maintain calendars and ensure timely filings

Requirements

  • Bachelor’s degree or equivalent of relevant education and work experience
  • Strong communication skills (oral and written)
  • Strong organizational , multitasking, and prioritization skills
  • Proficiency with Microsoft Office Suite and LexisNexis
  • Trustworthy, positive, energetic, and optimistic attitude with a willingness to roll up your sleeves

The cover letter example

Here’s an example of a traditional cover letter you could write for this role—keeping things strictly professional but without sounding too boring or jargon-y:

Dear Ms. Jessica Sanchez,

In my five-year career as a paralegal, I have honed my legal research and writing skills, and the attorneys I’ve worked with have complimented me on my command of case law and litigation support. Spiegel Law Firm’s 20 years in practice proves that the firm has strong values and excellent attorneys, and I’d be eager to join such a talented team.

I currently serve as a paralegal for Chandler, Chandler, and Greene, where I work closely with the partners on a number of high-priority cases. During my time here, I implemented a new calendar system that ensures timely filing of court papers. This system has prevented missed deadlines and allowed for better organization of internal and client meetings.

Previously, as a paralegal for the Neuerburg Law Firm, I received praise for my overall support of the legal team and my positive attitude. While working there, I came up with and implemented a plan for digitizing their old files while still ensuring security and privacy. This led to more efficiency when preparing for client meetings and legal proceedings.

My further qualifications include a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University, a paralegal certificate, and training in LexisNexis, Westlaw, and Microsoft Office Suite.

I would love the opportunity to discuss how I can contribute to your legal team. Thank you in advance for your consideration, and I look forward to hearing from you.

Chase Broadstein [email protected] (222) 222-2222

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Why this works

This cover letter example is short, sweet, and to the point. It shows the candidate has a knack for getting things done in a thorough and timely manner and a track record for helping out wherever needed. The opening lines also express a genuine interest in this specific firm. Plus, there are some important keywords in there like “calendar system,” “bachelor’s degree,” “paralegal certificate,” and “LexisNexis.”

The impact cover letter puts your accomplishments front and center rather than organizing your paragraphs by past roles. You might use a cover letter like this if:

  • You’re applying for roles where you’re expected to deliver on certain goals or results (for example, if the jobs involve sales quotas or marketing metrics).
  • You haven’t followed a straightforward career path and your past job titles don’t show the extent of your qualifications.
  • You want your personality to stand out a bit more than it might in a traditional cover letter.

What does the job description say

Imagine you’ve come across an opening for an email marketing manager . Part of the job description states:

  • Manage email marketing strategy and calendar, including copywriting, optimization, monitoring, analyzing, and reporting on campaigns
  • Improve campaign success through conversion optimization, A/B testing, and other experiments
  • Collaborate with the design team to ensure brand guidelines are followed in emails
  • Partner and collaborate cross-functionally with sales, product, product marketing, and data teams
  • 3+ years in email marketing
  • Experience with Constant Contact, Google Analytics, HTML, CSS, Photoshop, and Microsoft Excel, a plus
  • Excellent communication skills (oral and written) and an eye for copyediting
  • Strong interpersonal , relationship-building, and stakeholder management skills
  • Excellent project management, problem-solving , and time management skills, with the ability to multitask effectively

Here’s an example of an impact cover letter where the writer’s hard skills and successes stand out:

Dear Russ Roman,

I have a problem. See, my inbox currently (and embarrassingly) hosts 1,500 unread emails—including newsletters from at least 50 different brands.

But this problem only fuels my passion for creating emails that are worth opening. Because from my perspective, as someone who can barely get through their own stack of mail, that’s a true win.

I’ve been following Vitabe for years, and can proudly say that I open every single email you send to me. I’m a sucker for a good subject line—“Take a Vitamin-ute—We’ll A-B-C You Soon” being my favorite—and the way your email content feels both fun and expert-backed really speaks to me. This is why I’m thrilled to submit my application for a role as email marketing manager at your company.

I have over four years of experience working in the email marketing space. In my current role at Westside Bank, I was able to implement new email campaigns centered around reengaging churned clients. By analyzing data around the types of clients who churn and the engagement of our current email subscribers, as well as A/B testing headlines and newsletter layouts, we were able to increase email subscribers by 15% and convert 30% of those subscribers to purchase our product, a significant increase from the previous year. 

I also launched a “Your Credit Matters” newsletter focused on educating our clients on how they spend and manage their credit—which became our highest performing campaign in terms of open-rates and click-through to date.

Previously, as a member of the marketing team at Dream Diary Mattresses, I collaborated with the sales and product team to understand how I could best support them in hitting their quarterly goals. One specific project involving creating personalized emails for customers drew more people to come back to our site after 30 days than direct paid ad campaigns, leading to a 112% increase in revenue from the last quarter.

I take the content I write and the calendars I manage seriously, editing and refining beyond detail-oriented and into meticulous territory, and I feel my experience and drive would greatly help Vitabe further develop their email program for success.

Thank you very much for your time and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you.

Lad Miller [email protected] (987) 654-3210

This sample cover letter concisely highlights the applicant’s most significant, relevant achievements. By adding context to how their projects were created, monitored, and completed, they’re able to show just how results-driven they are and how they’ve successfully leveraged some of the skills the company is looking for.

One thing worth noting: This person didn’t include keywords such as Constant Contact, Google Analytics, HTML, CSS, Photoshop, or Microsoft Excel—all of which are listed in the job description. But those skills are most likely in their resume already, and leaving them out gives them the space to discuss specific projects and tell a story not visible on other parts of their job application.

For roles where written communication is key, such as PR, copywriting , or journalism jobs, your cover letter will likely be the first writing sample your future employer sees. So it’s just as important to show your skill set in action through eloquent writing.

  • Writing or editing is a key component of the role you’re applying to.
  • You want to show off your creativity.

Here’s part of a job description for a staff writer position:

  • Pitch and write articles, reporting on timely issues and trends
  • Collaborate with editorial and other teams to launch each digital issue and other special projects on schedule
  • Evaluate content performance and digital trends on a daily basis to constantly adjust pitches and packaging
  • Utilize CMS tools, strategically select photos and videos, and request original graphics to optimize all written content for maximum engagement
  • At least 2-3 years of experience creating content at a digital-first outlet
  • Strong writing and reporting skills, and the ability to write clearly and quickly
  • Familiarity working in a CMS and with analytics tools such as Google Analytics
  • Deadline-driven, strategic thinker with a knack for crafting click-y headlines
  • Strong collaborator who thrives in fast-paced environments

Have fun with this one, but triple-check for spelling and grammar mistakes, and make sure you’re showing off your best writing. Here's the cover letter sample:

Dear Tai Chen,

Since I could walk, I’ve been dancing. And since I could read, I’ve been glued to Arabesque Weekly. At one point, you featured one of my local heroes—a ballerina who struggled with an injury early in her career and went on to become a principal dancer at Pacific Northwest Ballet—and I plastered the article above my childhood bed. It’s still there today.

That article—and so many others you’ve published—taught me that dancing was about more than just pirouettes and arabesques and that the right kind of writer can shed light on aspects of the art that make it surprising, impactful, and universal. I can be that writer.

As an editorial assistant at TheImprovGroup.com for the past two and a half years, my main responsibility was to get all of our content ready to go live on the site. This included fact-checking, proofreading, adding in HTML where necessary, and finding photos, videos, and GIFs that would complement the content and optimize audience engagement. 

As I tinkered with each post, I became intimately familiar with our internal CMS. Reviewing every single article we published and following reactions and engagement helped me gain a deep understanding of what makes a piece really land with our audience.

But by far my favorite aspect of this role has been writing. Each week, I pitch and write at least one article, from 250-word news items to 900-word advice pieces to even longer profiles, features, and personal essays. I love the challenge of developing pitches that align with the trends we see in the data, reflect with the company’s brand and mission, and allow me to flex my creative muscles.

Collaborating with my team to form the best content library we can has been a dream come true. I would be so excited to use my experience to help Arabesque Weekly achieve its goals. And I hope to one day write a story that another little dance lover tapes to their wall forever.

It would be an honor to be a part of your editorial team, and I look forward to the possibility of discussing the opportunity with you.

Hoping to be your next staff writer,

Marlee Wood [email protected] (555) 666-4433

This candidate is clearly passionate about this specific publication and leads with a unique personal anecdote tied to the company’s mission that demonstrates their ability to tell stories in a compelling way. There are relevant keywords and phrases, sure, but they’re not just thrown in there. Their voice comes through in every sentence, proving this person knows how to communicate effectively and creatively.

Cover letters can play a big part in helping career changers prove their qualifications—especially when it’s unclear how their skills transfer over to this new field.

You might write a career change cover letter if:

  • You want to highlight the transferable skills you have that relate to the job description.
  • You want to explain why you’re making the switch and what’s driving you toward this specific industry, company, or position.

Imagine you’re someone who has experience supporting a sales team as an administrative assistant , and you’re now looking to become a sales representative. You come across a job posting that includes:

  • Develop new sales techniques and strategies to build pipeline and hit team goals
  • Coordinate with other teams to increase lead-generation efforts
  • Assist in the processing of new business, including contacting customers to finalize sales and service transactions
  • 1-3 years of successful sales experience
  • Strong communication skills
  • Ability to thrive in a fast-paced, ever-changing environment
  • Ability to work independently to plan, set priorities, and effectively organize work
  • Proven ability to be persuasive, persistent, and confident in closing a sale

Typically, this type of cover letter should include a compelling narrative about your career change and how you can transfer your past experiences to this new role. Here’s how you might translate your past experience over to this new (and exciting) prospect:

Dear Maria Russo,

The head of sales at Sunshine Inc. was in a bind. She needed six client meetings scheduled, 18 service transactions processed, and a summary of the team’s new lead generation campaign drafted before getting on a flight to Austin—in three hours. So she turned to her cool-headed, sales-savvy administrative assistant for help. That assistant was me. Not only did I execute everything on her to-do list, I did it all before her plane left the ground.

For three years, I worked in lockstep with a busy, growth-oriented sales leader to support the business development team. As the sole administrative assistant in the department, I balanced a swath of competing priorities, ranging from coordinating meetings and inputting data to contacting customers, finalizing transactions, and creating promotional materials. This role helped me develop a comprehensive understanding of the sales cycle, sales strategy, and pipeline growth.

Like many others, my career path hasn’t been entirely straightforward. After leaving Crabapple Media, I enrolled in a local coding bootcamp. Six months later, I emerged with a certificate in computer programming and a certainty that I did not want to be a coder. But education is never wasted. I’m now an aspiring sales representative with experience supporting a thriving sales team and extensive knowledge of the tech space.

Here’s a little bit more about how my experience would translate into this role:

  • At Crabapple Media, I assisted in coordinating three annual sales strategy rollouts, yielding an average increase in pipeline of 26% YoY.
  • At Sunshine Inc., I supported 12 independent team members in their lead-generation efforts. I also assisted in processing an average of 300 sales transactions every quarter.
  • I thrive in busy, ever-changing environments that require me to communicate clearly and concisely. Supporting a high-volume team and a busy executive helped me to hone these skills—I typically sent more than 200 emails a day!

I would, of course, love to schedule a time for us to discuss this role and my experience, and I truly want to thank you for considering me.

All the best,

Olu Abiola [email protected] (123) 456-789

The opener draws you in and makes you want to learn more. It toots the person’s horn, but in a way that’s substantiated. Then, the next couple sections explain their experience in the sales space and other relevant qualifications, before eventually tying that back to why they’re applying to this specific job. 

Similar to the impact cover letter, the author lists some of the more important qualities they bring to the table, doing a bit of keyword inclusion and resume gap explaining along the way.

To further guide you, check out some more cover letter examples:

  • Pain point cover letter example
  • Internship cover letter example
  • Recent graduate cover letter example
  • (Another) career changer cover letter example
  • Stay-at-home parent returning to work cover letter example
  • Sales cover letter example
  • Email marketing manager cover letter example
  • No job description or position cover letter example (a.k.a., a letter of intent or interest)
  • Example cover letter with no experience

Let’s break down one of our example cover letters real quick

All three professional cover letter examples have some key elements that make them great and able to grab the hiring manager's attention. Check out this handy infographic that breaks down our impact cover letter:

infographic of impact cover letter example pointing out different elements of cover letter

Here are a few more tips to help the cover letter process:

Start with a “brain dump” 

If you’re staring at a blank page, Godfred always recommends that her clients start by getting all their ideas on the page without paying attention to length. Then “ask yourself how you can cut half of it,” she says. You’ll likely find that repeated information and very generic phrases are the first to go. (If it’s still too long, here are some tips for getting your cover letter down to one page .)

Don’t just repeat your resume

You only have so much space to get your point across, so focus on the information that isn’t stated elsewhere rather than simply regurgitating your resume. A good cover letter should complement your resume, so use the opportunity to elaborate your skills and qualifications further, as well as your accomplishments and why you're a good fit for that position.

Focus on quality over quantity 

Target the jobs you’re most closely drawn to and qualified for and give them all your energy, rather than trying to churn out hundreds of cover letters, Kahn says. You may not be able to apply to as many jobs, but you’ll have a better response rate.

Remember the ATS 

Much like your resume, an applicant tracking systems, or ATS , will be sifting through your cover letter. So you’ll want to scatter relevant keywords from the job description throughout your pitch where it makes sense.

Don’t stress over formatting 

You may see flashy cover letter examples across the internet, but for the most part, it just isn’t necessary. An ATS can’t read text that has been formatted beyond using bold, italics, underline, and color, so keep your font and layout simple—especially if you’re submitting your cover letter through an online portal.

Don't forget your contact information

Include your contact information on every page, including your name, phone number, and email. “Imagine you come across a cover letter and you print it out with a bunch of applications to review and it doesn’t have the person’s contact information on it,” Godfred says. “You never want to put yourself in a situation where you’re the right person and they can’t find you.”

Edit your cover letter before submitting

Never submit a cover letter right after you finish writing it—there could be critical errors that you didn't notice while typing. Take some time away from your text, then revisit it like you're reading someone else's letter. Be sure to double-check all the information you've included, paying special attention to:

  • The company's name
  • The hiring manager's name
  • The job title
  • Your contact information
  • Basic grammar and spelling

You're ready to go

If you've come this far, you're equipped with all the information you need to craft a great cover letter. Hopefully these cover letter examples help as you go to tackle your own. Remember: This is just one small step in the process! Take your time, but learn to move on when you’ve given it your all.

Amanda Cardoso contributed to the latest version of this article.

what to write in a job application cover letter

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  • Crafting Catchy Cover...

Crafting Catchy Cover Letters: A How-To Guide

10 min read · Updated on May 16, 2024

Marsha Hebert

Today, more than ever, having a catchy cover letter in your job-search toolkit is a must.

A lot of job seekers ask, “Do I really need a cover letter?” The answer is a resounding “Yes!” More often than not, writing a catchy cover letter is something people simply don't do because the overwhelming thought is that employers don't read them. That couldn't be further from the truth. 

On top of that, adding a catchy cover letter to your application can enhance the skills, achievements, and qualifications you include on your resume. Most importantly, though, a great cover letter makes you more human, more real, to the hiring manager reading your application. 

What's most critical is that your cover letter be engaging. Avoid using the same old boring content that everyone else is using. Instead, craft a catchy cover letter that grabs their attention. This is your how-to guide for doing that!

Cookie-cutter isn't the way to go

Everyone has seen cover letters that start like this, 

To Whom It May Concern:

I am writing to express my interest in the [POSITION TITLE] that I saw advertised for [COMPANY NAME].

It's a complete yawn-fest. It's boring. It's overdone. 

Since your cover letter is the first chance you get to make a solid introduction to a new employer, spice it up a bit. Use some humor, indicate that you're passionate about the job you're pursuing, and inject some of your personality to entice hiring managers to actually read what you have to say. 

What is a good opening line for a cover letter?

The main idea behind a great, catchy cover letter is that you want to tell a story. This doesn't mean you should regurgitate what's contained in your resume – no one wants to read the same things twice. It all starts at the beginning. The way you start your cover letter can make or break you.

Do you want the hiring manager to have a “Bleh” moment and toss your cover letter to the side?

Wouldn't you rather they be caught off-guard by your creativity and keep reading?

The best way to shake things up is to go off-script and write something that actually catches their attention. Here are some examples:

Show your passion: “Not too long ago, I came to the realization that my life's goals included giving back to my community through story-telling. After a lot of research, I discovered that a great way to do that was to go into Public Relations and Marketing to help connect consumers with companies to meet needs.”

Show some love: “I recently read an article about how [COMPANY NAME] was involved in improving our community by engaging employees in outreach events that…”

Prove your worth: “When I read about the job opening for [POSITION TITLE] at [COMPANY NAME], I knew I had to apply because I'd already saved my current company over $100K in logistics costs and I knew that I could do that for you, too.”

Highlight your personality: “A few years ago, I was exploring the mountain roads outside of Denver, and a stranded chicken jumped in my car – it's a funny story, I even have pictures. From that moment, I knew working with rescue animals was where I wanted my future to go.”

Now that you have their attention – write the body of your catchy cover letter

One thing to remember is that the introduction of your cover letter isn't supposed to be a monologue – keep that old adage that less is more in mind. The first paragraph of your cover letter is only meant to be a couple of sentences – just enough to pique the hiring manager's interest so they keep reading. Let's face it; it's not every day that some random chicken jumps in your car. That may be just the thing that entices the interviewer to call you in – so they can hear the story. 

The second paragraph of your catchy cover letter

The next part of your catchy cover letter should be a paragraph that transitions into how your introduction will make you a great part of their team. Without repeating all the great things you've written in your cover letter, highlight some of the skills and achievements from your career thus far to prove to them you have what it takes to be a valuable part of their team. 

The third paragraph of your catchy cover letter

You can actually write this third part as a paragraph or use bulleted achievement statements (like you'll see in the template later in this article). The idea here is to showcase your most impressive career achievements and your primary strengths. 

It's a good call to opt for bullets for this part of your catchy cover letter because if the hiring manager is skimming through your cover letter, it'll be easy for them to see what you bring to the table. Don't go crazy, though, and add a bunch of bulleted achievement statements. Stick to between three and five because you don't want the cover letter to go over one page. 

The closing of your catchy cover letter

Your last paragraph should close out the cover letter by reiterating your passion for the job and requesting an interview; this is called a call to action. After all, the whole point of writing a catchy cover letter is to get them to call you for a face-to-face meeting so you can win the job. 

The end of your cover letter is also a great place to explain faux pas in your resume or give details about why you're changing careers . You can even use this part to detail your desire to travel for work or indicate that you're relocating for this job. 

Here's what a catchy cover letter looks like

We know, instructions on how to do something is one thing, but seeing it all come together in an example is something even better. So, with that, here is a catchy cover letter example:

Contact Information

[Name][Company][Address]

Dear [Name],

Would [COMPANY NAME] benefit from having someone on their team who has generated $30K in revenue, increased blog traffic by 14%, and tripled social media ROI – all in one year? Then, I'm your person. Given my background in [EXPERIENCE RELATED TO FIELD] and [EXPERIENCE RELATED TO FIELD], I know I can repeat those results for you and feel that I would make additional significant contributions to the [POSITION TITLE] you currently have available.

Throughout my entire career, I have demonstrated consistent success [SOMETHING YOU HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO] to achieve high-reaching standards and goals. During my time with [COMPANY YOU CURRENTLY WORK FOR], I've built a reputation for [MAJOR ACHIEVEMENT]. On top of that, people often come to me from different departments because I'm known as someone who can [PICK A SKILL FROM THE JOB DESCRIPTION TO INJECT HERE]. 

Additional career experience and achievements include:

Achievement/accomplishment

I think it's a great idea for us to get further acquainted, and would truly value a moment of your time to discuss how my background aligns with your needs. If you agree we may have the basis for a mutually beneficial partnership; please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience. I'd love to learn more about your team and the [POSITION TITLE] opening.  

I appreciate the time you're taking to review my application, and until we meet, I hope you have a great day!

[Your Name]

Related reading: You can find some career-specific cover letter examples here .

Why this template works

This catchy cover letter starts by discussing quantifiable achievements , which hiring managers drool over. Whenever you can deliver tangible results, the new employer will immediately know what you have to offer. 

Also, the fact that this letter indicates the results are repeatable shows that the applicant has done their research, understands the market, and is confident in their abilities. It helps the employer get the sense that the writer is genuinely passionate about their job. 

There isn't a hiring manager alive who wants to hire someone who is simply interested in earning a paycheck. Employers want employees who are dedicated and care about doing a good job. 

The closing of the cover letter template is proactive, inviting further discussion and reinforcing the applicant's desire to work for the company. 

Tailor your cover letter

You've probably heard about applicant tracking systems , also known as ATS, that companies use to weed out job seekers. Did you know that the ATS also scans cover letters? 

These systems are programmed to search for the right keywords – relevant phrases from the job description – to ensure that you are a good match. So, your catchy cover letter has to get past the ATS before it can impress the hiring manager. 

Did you notice the placeholders in the template? They're there for a reason.

As you read the job description for the position you want to apply to, you'll need to update your catchy cover letter with language that resonates with the new job. Let's say the new company wants someone who can work as a member of a cross-functional team. The last sentence of the second paragraph of the template would be a great place to include that phraseology. 

“On top of that, people often come to me from different departments because I'm known as someone who can bring harmony to processes by working as a member of a cross-functional team.”  

Just like that, you've tailored a bit of your cover letter . 

Catchy cover letter final tips and advice

Since the goal of your cover letter is to work with your resume to land your dream job – one of the most important aspects of anyone's life – it's critical to get it right. Let's talk about a few more things you need to know to craft a catchy cover letter that makes a strong impression and helps you win interviews. 

Use a professional letter format. You're not writing a letter to Grandma to thank her for the gift she got you, so make sure it's professional. Avoid using slang or overly casual expressions. Also, don't pack your cover letter with a lot of jargon that may or may not be understood outside of your current work circle. 

Keep it Short and Simple (K.I.S.S.). Remember the one-page rule. You're not trying to tell the hiring manager everything you've ever done in your career, instead, you're trying to pique their interest so they have a reason to call you to ask you more questions. 

Revise, edit, and do it again. Did you know that the average typed document has an average error rate of 8% ? Proofread your work, then get a friend to proofread it. After that, read it out loud to make sure it all sounds good. Cover letters, and resumes, too, for that matter, should have a 0% error rate.

Follow up. Prove that you're really interested in the position by following up with the employer if you don't hear back from them. 

Learn more: Read 10 of the Worst Cover Letter Mistakes to Avoid to round out your knowledge about having a stand-out cover letter.

Stand out from the crowd, win the interview

It may take a bit of time, but writing a catchy cover letter that lands you an interview is definitely worth the effort. When you follow the tips and strategies in this how-to guide, you'll be able to effectively highlight your skills and achievements in a way that gets the attention of a hiring manager and intrigues them to the point of calling you for an interview.

If you feel like your cover letter is falling short, or you're sending it out and not hearing back from companies, let TopResume check it out for you. While we're at it, we can give your resume a once-over, too. Upload them both for a free review from a resume-writing expert. 

Recommended reading: 

8 Tips to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market

Perfect Cover Letter Salutations: Start Strong

Resume vs Cover Letter: How They're Different

Related Articles:

How to Maximize Your Resume Action Words to Wow the Employer

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Cashier Skills: Add to Improve Your Resume!

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How to write a great cover letter

A cover letter is your chance to introduce yourself to a potential employer and spark their interest in reading your resume.

When you’re prepping job applications, a cover letter might seem like an afterthought compared to your resume. But your cover letter is worth just as much attention . That doesn’t mean it needs to be overly detailed – in fact, a simple single page is best.

Here are the key points to know about cover letters, plus the steps to follow to write one.

What is a cover letter?

A cover letter is a short letter that accompanies your resume when you apply for a role. It’s often the first point of contact you make with a potential employer, hiring manager or recruiter for a job application.

It’s a way to give the employer a sense of who you are, highlighting your skills and experience, before they read the information in your resume. Just as if you were meeting someone for the first time, you’d introduce yourself first before getting into the detail.

Sometimes, a short email can take the place of a cover letter, but the way you write it is much the same.

Take a look at this article comparing an average cover letter to a great one to help you see how to craft yours well.

How does a cover letter compare to your resume?

Your resume and cover letter complement each other but do slightly different things. Your resume summarises the key details of your skills, work experience and education. Resumes are best formatted with bullet points and broken into sections with subheadings, across about two pages.

A cover letter is shorter and sharper: a single page is best. It’s also more of a conversation opener – you’re speaking to the person responsible for the role you’re applying for, expressing your interest in the job and showing them why you’re a good fit for it.

The language in a cover letter is more personal. For example, a social worker’s resume might include, Redeveloped community youth program, increasing participation by 20 per cent. But in a cover letter you can write in the first person, which might read as, I’m a dedicated and driven social worker, with a strong commitment to supporting disadvantaged youth. It’s a chance to describe your skills and experiences in a way that also gives some insight into you and your career.

How to write your cover letter

  • Start with a brief introduction about yourself and why you’re writing. Mention the job you’re applying for and your interest in it.
  • Give a snapshot of the relevant skills, experience and qualifications you have that relate to the job. Think about the key two or three points in your resume and explaining these in a way that links them to why you’d be great for the role.
  • Give examples of your skills or mention how you’ve used them – you might need to do this in more detail if the job ad requests that you address selection criteria.
  • Note that your resume is attached. To finish, you can say that you’d welcome the opportunity to meet to discuss the role, or that you’re happy to provide more information, before signing off.

How to make your cover letter stand out

A cover letter should be engaging – you want to capture the interest of the person reading it so that they turn to your resume to find out more.

It’s also about showing the employer how your skills and experience are a good match for the role. That’s why you should always create a cover letter especially for the role you’re applying for – it shouldn’t be a generic letter. These tips can help you tailor your cover letter to the job.

A good cover letter can also demonstrate your written communication skills. Write for the environment you’re applying to: if it’s a more informal workplace or a creative type of work, don’t be afraid to inject some personal style into your writing to stand out.

Reading the 5 things employers wish they could say about cover letters and what recruiters look for in cover letters can also help you to write one that will impress.

Quick tips for improving your cover letter

  • Use clear, concise language. It’s best to avoid complicated or flowery wording.
  • Avoid overly long sentences. Try reading it aloud to see if there are any you struggle with.
  • Always tailor your cover letter to the job. An application is all about showing how you’re a good fit for the role on offer, and you don’t want your cover letter to seem reused.
  • Rather than writing ‘To whom it may concern’ or ‘Dear Sir or Madam’, find out who to address your letter to; you could phone the company to ask. It’s more personal that way and shows you’ve taken initiative.
  • Triple check your spelling and grammar. Try printing your letter out then coming back to it fresh, or get someone with a keen eye to look over it for you.
  • Keep your letter to around 250-350 words on a single page.
  • Take a look at these examples of cover letters written by successful job seekers .

Writing your cover letter might feel intimidating at first when you’re facing a blank page. But by following these steps and tips, you can focus on crafting a cover letter that captures what you can bring to the role and makes a winning impression to the employer.

  • Why your personal brand is so important now – and how to build it
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How To Write a Cover Letter in 3 Easy Paragraphs

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Application Materials Career Center Career Services Interviewing Job Search

Although you might have written a resume before, cover letters can be a bigger mystery. The good news is: by following a simple, three-paragraph process, you can quickly write a cover letter that will get attention and likely lead to a job interview!

What Is a Cover Letter?

Imagine you’re handing your resume to someone in person. Maybe you’re at a job or career fair, going into an employer’s office, or even handing it to an acquaintance so that they can get it to the hiring manager. You wouldn’t just give that person your resume, turn, and walk away without saying a word. You would probably take the time to  introduce yourself  and explain why you’re giving that person your resume, how you found out about the job, and why you think you’re qualified for it.

That’s the  purpose of a cover letter .

The cover letter is a more personalized introduction than your resume. It’s a message that represents what you would otherwise say in person, face-to-face. It should be uniquely written for each company and position, follow a standard; one-page business letter format, and consist of three to four paragraphs. If possible, it should also include the hiring manager’s name.

The cover letter usually accompanies a resume. It allows you to expand on the  information in the resume  or explain something that might appear as a red flag or barrier to employment. However, just as important is that the cover letter allows the recruiter to assess your written communication skills!

Why Do I Need a Cover Letter?

Cover letters aren’t always required for a job application. Often, they’re listed as an optional document. Most applicants  won’t  submit a cover letter because of this (let’s face it, job applications can take a lot of time!). However, this also means that submitting a cover letter is an extra step that will help you to stand out from the other applicants — and show how interested you are in the position!

How Do I Write a Cover Letter?

Here’s how to write a cover letter in three easy paragraphs:

Paragraph 1 (About You)

This is where you briefly introduce yourself, what position you’re interested in, and how you discovered it (i.e., job posting site, flyer, social media). If someone recommended you for the position, drop their name in the very first sentence and include their title and affiliation.

Also be enthusiastic! List three of your most important or impressive qualifications from your resume to explain why you’re applying for the position. You may also wish to include the degree or program you’re currently studying.

Example: I’m applying for your Human Resource Specialist position found on LinkedIn, as recommended by John Smith, your Office of Human Resource Manager. I would be a valuable addition to your team, with my five years of administrative experience, BAS in Organizational Management, and Microsoft Office certification.

Paragraph 2 (About the Company)

Answer the question “Why do you want to work here?” by researching the company and writing about at least one way that you resonate with its culture, values, or mission. You can get great information by visiting the company’s website (check the About Us or Mission/Vision pages) or by looking them up in the news category of your favorite search engine. Emphasize how your experience meets the company’s needs and why it would be a privilege to work for them.

Example: Congratulations on your team participating in a local Habitat for Humanity build. I would love to work for an organization that is so committed to improving our local communities. I’ve personally participated in four Habitat for Humanity builds; the skills I’ve learned, coupled with the knowledge I gained, have inspired me to seek out other, similar volunteer opportunities within our community.

Paragraph 3 (Thank You and Closing)

Be sure to thank the employer/hiring manager, provide contact information, and mention that you look forward to hearing from them. Express enthusiasm about an upcoming interview!

Example: Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to discussing my professional experience in greater detail in an upcoming interview. You can reach me at [phone number] or [email address].

Is There a Cover Letter Template I Can Use?

Microsoft Word has many attractive and pre-formatted cover letter templates you can use. Simply open Microsoft Word, click new, and then search for “cover letter” to browse all the options.

A search of templates in Microsoft Word showing 10 options for cover letter, with the first one selected.

You can also use this cover letter template sample for reference:

A sample cover letter template displaying the proper formatting and suggestions of what to include in each paragraph (the first paragraph about the applicant, the second about the company, and the third as a thank you and an interview request).

Who Can Help Me Write a Cover Letter?

Eastern Florida State College’s Career Services team is here to assist! Did you know you can  schedule meetings with an EFSC Career Services Coordinator  to get help writing a cover letter?

Whether you have questions about your career path, job hunting, or interview preparation, you can contact your campus’ Career Services Center for personalized assistance or  check our our upcoming events . We look forward to helping you succeed this semester and beyond!

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what to write in a job application cover letter

Writing a Cover Letter That Opens Doors: Tips from Tech Recruiters

Crafting a compelling cover letter can make a significant difference in your job application process, particularly in the tech industry. While your resume provides the technical details of your career, your cover letter offers a unique opportunity to showcase your personality, passion, and the value you bring to the role. Let's dive into expert advice from tech recruiters on how to write a cover letter that stands out.

1. Start with a Strong Opening

The first impression is crucial. Your opening should grab the recruiter's attention and make them want to read more. Avoid generic phrases like "I am writing to apply for..." Instead, start with something engaging and relevant.

"Imagine a world where technology bridges gaps in education, making learning accessible to everyone. As a passionate software engineer with a background in edtech, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute to your mission at XYZ Company."

Why It Works:

This opening sets the stage for your application by aligning your passion with the company's mission, showing that you are not just looking for any job, but this specific job.

2. Tailor Your Letter to the Job Description

Tech recruiters emphasize the importance of customization. A tailored cover letter demonstrates that you've done your homework and are genuinely interested in the position.

"I was thrilled to see the opening for a Data Analyst at ABC Tech. With my experience in leveraging Python and SQL to drive data-driven decisions, I am confident in my ability to contribute to your team's success."

By directly addressing the job requirements and mentioning specific skills, you show that you understand what the role entails and how you can meet those needs.

3. Highlight Relevant Achievements

Tech recruiters are looking for candidates who can demonstrate their impact. Highlighting your accomplishments with quantifiable results can make your cover letter more compelling.

"In my previous role at DEF Inc., I optimized the data processing pipeline, reducing processing time by 30% and improving data accuracy by 20%. This improvement not only enhanced our data quality but also saved the company $50,000 annually."

Specific achievements with measurable results provide concrete evidence of your capabilities and contributions.

4. Show Enthusiasm for the Company and Role

Expressing genuine enthusiasm for the company and the role can set you apart from other candidates. Research the company's projects, culture, and values, and reflect that in your cover letter.

"I am particularly drawn to XYZ Company's commitment to innovative healthcare solutions. Your recent project on AI-driven diagnostics is groundbreaking, and I am eager to bring my expertise in machine learning to help advance this initiative."

This approach shows that you are not just looking for any job, but are specifically interested in contributing to the company's innovative projects.

5. Demonstrate Cultural Fit

Tech companies often place a strong emphasis on cultural fit. Mentioning aspects of the company's culture that resonate with you can help you stand out.

"ABC Tech's emphasis on continuous learning and collaboration aligns perfectly with my personal values. I believe that my proactive approach to professional development and my collaborative nature would thrive in your team environment."

This highlights your alignment with the company's values and culture, making you a more attractive candidate.

6. Address Potential Concerns Proactively

If there are any potential red flags in your application, such as a career gap or a lack of direct experience in a specific area, address them head-on in your cover letter.

"After taking a career break to care for a family member, I am now eager to return to the workforce. During this time, I completed several online courses on cloud computing and earned my AWS certification, ensuring my skills remain up-to-date."

Proactively addressing potential concerns shows honesty and a proactive approach to overcoming challenges.

7. Close with a Strong Call to Action

End your cover letter with a confident call to action, inviting the recruiter to take the next step.

"I am excited about the possibility of contributing to XYZ Company and would welcome the opportunity to discuss how my skills and experiences align with your needs. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of working together."

A strong closing reinforces your enthusiasm and encourages the recruiter to move forward with your application.

QA Engineering

Careerist's Role in Crafting Compelling Cover Letters

At Careerist, we understand the importance of a well-crafted cover letter in the job application process. Our programs are designed to help students articulate their value effectively. Here's how we support our students:

1. Personalized Coaching

Our 1:1 career coaching sessions help students tailor their cover letters to specific job descriptions, ensuring they highlight the most relevant skills and experiences.

2. Real-World Insights

Through partnerships with industry professionals, Careerist provides insights into what tech recruiters are looking for, helping students align their applications with industry expectations.

3. Practical Training

Our hands-on training programs ensure that students not only learn technical skills but also understand how to communicate their value effectively in their cover letters.

Example Cover Letters

Example 1: software engineer.

XYZ Company

Imagine a world where technology bridges gaps in education, making learning accessible to everyone. As a passionate software engineer with a background in edtech, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute to your mission at XYZ Company. Your commitment to innovative solutions that improve educational outcomes resonates deeply with my personal and professional goals.

I was thrilled to see the opening for a Software Engineer on your team. With my experience in developing scalable applications using Python and JavaScript, I am confident in my ability to contribute to your innovative projects. At my previous role at DEF Inc., I optimized the data processing pipeline, reducing processing time by 30% and improving data accuracy by 20%. This improvement not only enhanced our data quality but also saved the company $50,000 annually.

I am particularly drawn to XYZ Company's commitment to continuous learning and collaboration. Your recent project on AI-driven diagnostics is groundbreaking, and I am eager to bring my expertise in machine learning to help advance this initiative. Additionally, I believe that my proactive approach to professional development and my collaborative nature would thrive in your team environment.

I am excited about the possibility of contributing to XYZ Company and would welcome the opportunity to discuss how my skills and experiences align with your needs. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of working together.

Sincerely,[ Your Name]

Example 2: Data Analyst

Data is the new oil, and I am passionate about turning raw data into actionable insights that drive business decisions. As a seasoned Data Analyst, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute to ABC Tech's mission of leveraging data to create innovative solutions.

I was thrilled to see the opening for a Data Analyst at ABC Tech. With my experience in leveraging Python and SQL to drive data-driven decisions, I am confident in my ability to contribute to your team's success. In my previous role at DEF Inc., I developed a predictive model that increased sales forecast accuracy by 25%, leading to more informed business strategies and increased revenue.

ABC Tech's emphasis on data-driven innovation and its collaborative culture aligns perfectly with my professional values. I am particularly impressed with your recent project on predictive analytics for customer behavior, and I am eager to bring my expertise to further enhance these initiatives.

After taking a career break to care for a family member, I am now eager to return to the workforce. During this time, I completed several online courses on cloud computing and earned my AWS certification, ensuring my skills remain up-to-date.

I am excited about the possibility of contributing to ABC Tech and would welcome the opportunity to discuss how my skills and experiences align with your needs. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of working together.

Example 3: UX Designer

User experience is at the heart of impactful digital solutions, and I am passionate about creating designs that enhance user satisfaction and drive business success. As a dedicated UX Designer, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute to LMN Corp's mission of delivering exceptional user experiences.

I was thrilled to see the opening for a UX Designer at LMN Corp. With my experience in user-centered design, I am confident in my ability to contribute to your innovative projects. At my previous role at XYZ Agency, I led the redesign of a major client’s e-commerce platform, resulting in a 40% increase in user engagement and a 25% boost in conversion rates.

LMN Corp's emphasis on continuous learning and collaboration aligns perfectly with my personal values. Your recent project on integrating AI to personalize user experiences is groundbreaking, and I am eager to bring my expertise in user research and design thinking to help advance this initiative.

ABC Tech's emphasis on continuous learning and collaboration aligns perfectly with my personal values. I believe that my proactive approach to professional development and my collaborative nature would thrive in your team environment.

I am excited about the possibility of contributing to LMN Corp and would welcome the opportunity to discuss how my skills and experiences align with your needs. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of working together.

Writing a cover letter that opens doors in the tech industry requires a combination of research, personalization, and a clear demonstration of your value. By following the tips from tech recruiters and leveraging the support offered by Careerist, you can craft a compelling cover letter that sets you apart from the competition. Remember, your cover letter is your opportunity to tell your story and show why you are the perfect fit for the role. So, take the time to make it count!

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3 Keys to Writing Cover Letters That Stand Out

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what to write in a job application cover letter

3 Keys to Writing Cover Letters That Stand Out was originally published on Vault .

It's a myth that high quality job openings are few and far between thanks to Covid. The truth is, despite the economic uncertainty created by the pandemic, there are many great openings out there. And to get them—or, at least, have a chance at getting them—you first need to capture the attention of hiring managers. And the best way to do that is to write compelling cover letters. So here are the three keys to writing cover letters that stand out.

1. Convey your personality, quirks and all.

Showcasing your uniqueness and allowing your personality to shine through in your cover letters can magnetize hiring managers, sending instant messages that you might be the candidate they're looking for. The secret to achieving this is to use specific details, rather than vague ones.

For example, the following was recently used by an applicant when applying for a Head of Marketing position (shortly after sending this, the candidate was interviewed and then hired):

“I have a passion for data and analytics. I enjoy spending (a little too much time) geeking out in Google analytics, advertising platforms, and BI tools (Tableau and Looker), digging deep into data to identify opportunities that can be leveraged to drive growth and inform testing strategies for campaigns, websites, and products.”

Now compare the above to the below (which has less personality and fewer details, and thus would likely not stand out):

“I am well versed in data analytics, and I am experienced with Google analytics, BI Tools, and other advertising platforms. I have a proven ability to inform testing strategies for campaigns for websites and products.”

Here's another example of cover letter phrasing that captures the attention of hiring managers:

“I'm rather obsessed with personal organization. I read three organizational blogs on my own time, and I've organized my desktop folders into color-coded sub-categories. My friends laugh at me for saying things like, ‘An organized space equals an organized mind,' but I don't like wasting time looking for things.” 

Now compare that to this less specific phrasing:

“I have a proven track record of being organized, and I have a passion for it. I have a proven knack for keeping files organized on an ongoing basis, and I have put organizational processes and procedures in place for my department. The bottom line is organization is always my highest priority.” 

2. Prove your level of dedication to your profession.

Another way to stand out is to illustrate specific things about your dedication to your field. In the following example, a candidate showcases her dedication to her profession, proves that she spends a lot of time thinking about driving results in her field, and shows that she takes concrete steps in order to be a high quality contributor in her field. All of which goes a long way when it comes time for hiring managers to decide which candidates to interview. 

“I believe that a good marketing strategy requires seeking out the latest trends and staying one step ahead of the competition. I've attended the Traction conference two years in a row and completed the 2018 Reforge Growth Series, a highly credible and exclusive course that only accepts 10 percent of applicants and is built by leaders from Hubspot, Uber, and other firms. Through these professional developments, I've opened my mind to uncommon marketing methods, and I pride myself on thinking outside the box to develop strategies that create sustainable, low-cost customer acquisition loops that lead to long-term positive ROI.” 

Now compare the above to the below, which is less detailed and includes less specific phrasing:

“I have the skills and requirements for this position, and I believe I would complete every task asked of me to the highest standard expected. My background and experience make me an excellent fit for this position for many reasons. I am very interested in marketing, and I think I would be a great asset to the team.”

3. Include concrete, quantitative results that show your value.

In any written application, you'll need to showcase some form of quantitative results to stand out. Note that even if you don't have a lot of shiny results in your career yet (or even any relevant experience—which is okay!), you can still use words to capture someone's attention with what you have done. And if you do have a record of achieving quantifiable results, then by all means include them, like in the below:

“I developed several Google ad campaigns that were worth more than $500,000 and that resulted in high-level customers. Also, through testing and optimization, I increased newsletter sign-ups by more than 200 percent.”

Now compare that to this bland sentence:

“I have experience in Google ad campaigns, as well as experience in testing and optimization.”

A final note

When trying to convey your personality, get across your dedication, or communicate your value, there's a big difference between saying you're a good fit for the job and actually showing it.

So, when writing your cover letters, try to hold these words in mind: I know you (the hiring managers) don't know me, so let me show you exactly why I'm completely invested, committed, and passionate about doing this specific type of work. And let me show you the specific reasons why hiring me, over all other candidates, would be beneficial to you.

If you hold all this in mind, the right details and words will flow right out of you—and into your cover letters.

Natalie Fisher is best known for helping professionals land their ideal roles and achieve explosive salary growth (even with little experience). If you want to dive deeper on the topic of your career mindset and become a person who knows exactly how to land their dream job offer, listen to her on the podcast Get a Six Figure Job You Love .

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13 Sample Job Application Email Templates to Make the Best First Impression

Sample job application email templates to save time and improve your chances of landing your dream job and making a strong impression on employers.

Table of Contents

In today's digital world, the job application process has evolved too. Now, there is no need for frequent visits to companies to apply for a job; you can do it from your home.

Even companies are more comfortable recruiting new hires with ease of online that is why these job portals gained so much success in a short time.

But, to do that, you must know how to craft an effective email, a crisp and captivating cover letter, and a resume. But before that, you have to find a job opportunity that suits your needs.

How to find lucrative job opportunities?

To get a job, one must know how to look for it. Here are some ways to find the job that you desire.

  • Job portals: Job portals are essential for today's job search because they offer many employment opportunities in one place. They save you time and effort by enabling you to filter job openings that fit your credentials, abilities, and preferences. Furthermore, you can also do a custom search by location, wage, and keywords.
  • Company's career page: A company's career page is a specific area on the website that details job openings, hiring procedures, and other career-related topics. It also provides a form to fill out and submit to apply.
  • Search engine operators: Search engine operators can be used to refine job search results and find more relevant job postings. To search for a specific job opportunity, enter the title, location, date posted, type of employment, company type, and employer.

Now that we have gone through some ways you can look for a job opportunity, let's look at some other essential aspects.

What to include in a job application

You need to include certain things in your job application if you want your application to be considered. These are:

  • Cover letter: A cover letter forms an integral part of a job application. It helps the hiring manager to understand your skills and what you can bring to the team. Also, employers prefer job applications that include a cover letter.
  • Resume: This document briefly overviews the applicant's abilities and academic accomplishments. It also illustrates the applicant's professional background.
  • Work profile: Work Profile is a personality test that gauges a person's work personality based on their interpersonal and emotional tendencies at work and their values and objectives.

How to write effective emails which will grasp recruiters' attention?

Recruiters receive a large number of job-related emails regularly. So, it becomes crucial that your email stands out from the others to grab the recruiter's attention. Let's look at some tips and tricks that you can use to make your email personalized and captivating.

  • Subject line : No matter how good of an email you have written, the recruiter will delete it without even looking at the contents if the subject line is bland and uninspiring. So, writing a creative and captivating subject is a must. You can take help of AI subject line generation tools for creative writing
  • Salutation : Always include a salutation at the beginning.
  • Introduction: Always introduce yourself in the first sentence itself.
  • Cover letter : Write a crisp and clear cover letter, and if you are writing a detailed cover letter, it is advisable to include it in the body of the email. Make sure your cover letter does not take much space in the main body. You can take help of an AI paraphrase tool ; these tools offer “Fluency/Short” rewriting modes using which you can easily make your cover letter text concise.
  • Concluding the email : It is always best to reiterate your interest in the desired position, mention the attached documents, and your availability for the next steps.
  • Mention referrals : If you are referred to the job by someone the recruiter is acquainted with, always mention the person's name in the body of the email, as it will help develop initial trust in the headhunter for you.

Sample job application email templates to make a strong impression on employers

We have compiled a list of sample emails for you that will help you write compelling job emails. Let's take a look at them.

1. Simple and direct sample job application email

Sub: Application for [job title]

Respected Sir/Madam,

I am [your name] and interested in applying for the position of [job title] on your website/ [name of job portal] . My qualifications and skills are relevant and at par with the job requirements.

I have graduated from [college and university name] and have over three years of experience in [field's name] at [company's name] .

I have attached my current resume and I look forward to hearing from you about it.

Thanking you,

[Your name]

2. Creative and personalized sample job application email template

Sub: Applying for the position of [job title]

Dear Sir/Madam,

I hope you are well and reading my email. My name is [your name] , and I'm writing to express interest in the [job title] position.

I have always been pleased by your company's dedication to innovation and excellence as [professional title] . Your mission and vision align with the values I hold dear, both personally and professionally, and I am thrilled about the chance to join your team.

The prospect of joining your team and assisting in the expansion and success of the business excites me. For your review, I've included my resume in this email, and if you require any more details, just let me know.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the opportunity of discussing my qualifications further.

[Your Name]

3. Sample job application email for referral from a connection

Sub: Job application for the position of [job title]

My name is [your name], and I'm writing to apply for the [job title] position. I have been researching your company for the past few months and have only heard positive things about your organization.

I have been referred to you by Mr./Ms. [Referrer's name] , who is working for [Referrer's company name] as [designation's name] . They also highly regard your company and have especially recommended me to you.

I have a work experience of over [years] at [company's name] . Therefore, I have the experience necessary to work for your esteemed organization.

I have also attached my resume and await your valuable response.

Yours sincerely,

4. Follow-up after submission of a job application email

Sub: Following up on my application for [job title] at [Company Name]

My name is [your name] . I applied for the job of [job title] at your company, to which I have assured a response in two weeks, but it has been over a month now, and I would like to know my application status.

I'm still interested in working for your esteemed organization and can fulfil my responsibilities aptly.

If you have any further queries or need additional information, please let me know. Once again, thank you for your time and will eagerly await your response.

5. Follow-up email after a job interview

Sub: Thank you for the opportunity

Dear [interviewer's name] ,

Thank you for taking the time to interview me. It was a great experience, and I'm grateful for talking to you. The details you provided regarding the post's responsibilities have made me even more confident that I can complete my work on time and without any issues.

There are a few questions, though, that I didn't get the opportunity to ask you yesterday due to the time limitation. So I hope you will be okay if I write them in this email.

[Question(s) by the candidate]

Also, when can I hear from you about the position?

Please get in touch with me if you have any questions.

6. Response to a job rejection/reply to the rejection email

Sub: Regarding the position of [job title]

Dear [hiring manager's name] ,

Thank you for taking the time to interview me and for the opportunity to work in your company. While I am disheartened for not being able to work for your reputed organization, I am thankful for getting back to me with your final decision. I immensely enjoyed the time with you and others.

I have one small request. Please give me your feedback. It will immensely help me with my job search. Thank you for your time and consideration. I wish you and the team all the best.

7. Email template for the withdrawal of job application

Sub: Request to withdraw my job application

Respected [recipient's name] ,

Thank you for taking the time to interview me for the position of [job title] at your reputed company. I greatly appreciate the opportunity to work with [company's name] . However, with a heavy heart, I would like to withdraw my application. It was a hard decision, but I had to take it owing to [state the reason] . I hope you will understand.

You will find a perfect candidate for the position.

8. Thank you note after interview

Sub: Thank you for your time

Hi [interviewer's name] ,

I wholeheartedly thank you for taking out time to interview me. I thoroughly enjoyed our conversation and was thrilled to learn more about the position of [job title] and its responsibilities.

I cannot wait to be a part of such an incredible team and esteemed organization. I look forward to hearing about the next steps in the hiring process. Please feel free to contact me in case of any queries.

9. Request for informational interview

Sub: Informational interview request

Dear [recipient's name] ,

My name is [your name] . I hope you are doing well. I have come across your profile on LinkedIn, and I'm incredibly interested in your work and would like to know more about you and your company.

I hope you'll let's catch up to talk more in-depth about [insert what you would like to discuss] . If you are too busy, I can wait or even talk on the phone for 10 to 15 minutes. So please let me know what will be convenient for you. I will eagerly wait for your reply.

I appreciate your time, and thank you in advance.

10. Request for job shadowing opportunity

Sub: Request for job shadowing

My name is [your name] , and currently, I am a student at [college/university name] . I am passionate about a career in [mention the field of profession] and would like to explore it more to understand the area better. I found your email through [website/or recipient's colleague] . If you are willing to allow students to shadow you, I would appreciate the opportunity to observe you, to talk more about the field.

I hope I am not intruding. If you have any queries, please contact me at [phone number] .

Thank you for your time,

11. Email to understand the process/next steps/update from HR

Sub: Request to know the next steps

Dear [name of the employer] ,

Thank you for interviewing me. It was a great pleasure to learn the workings and responsibilities of your esteemed organization.

I would like to know more about [mention what you want to know about] and would appreciate it if you could provide me with more precious time. Also, please advise what I have to do next.

I look forward to hearing from you.

12. Email sample for fresher

Sub: Application for the post of [job title]

My name is [your name], and I have found your job opening in/on [mention here] . I graduated with distinction from [name of college/university/institution] in [course name] . Therefore, I have the required knowledge and skills needed for the job.

Please find the attached resume. I will eagerly wait for your reply.

Faithfully,

13. Email sample for experience

Sub: Requesting for experience certificate

This is to bring to your attention that I served as [designation] at [company name] from [joining date] till [relieving date] . It was an exceptional experience, and I have learned a lot as a member of your team. The experience has helped me in growing personally and professionally. I have learned some great value too.

Please issue my experience certificate, as it will help me professionally in the future.

Job application email templates can be extremely helpful in saving time and ensuring that your message is professional and effective. Using a template as a guide, you can easily customize your email to the specific job and company you are applying to, and avoid common mistakes that can hurt your chances of getting hired.

However, it's important to remember that job application emails should still be personalized and unique to you. While templates can provide a structure and format, you should always tailor your message to your experience, skills, and goals.

With the right approach, job application emails can be a powerful tool for landing your dream job.

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IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Cover Letter in 2021

    what to write in a job application cover letter

  2. 500+ Cover Letter Examples to Inspire You (Updated for 2023)

    what to write in a job application cover letter

  3. 30+ Cover Letter Examples Applying For A Job Image

    what to write in a job application cover letter

  4. Job Application Letter Examples

    what to write in a job application cover letter

  5. Job Application Letter Format & Samples

    what to write in a job application cover letter

  6. Free Cover Letter Examples for Job Seekers in 2020

    what to write in a job application cover letter

VIDEO

  1. How To Write A Cover Letter For A Job Application

  2. Cover letter writing tips for freelancing marketplace

  3. Application for job Joining Letter

  4. How to write a cover letter ? Cover letter kaise banai

  5. Cover letter for job application || how to write a cover letter for job application || #coverletter

  6. 5 Tips for Writing a Cover Letter in 2024! #CVMaker

COMMENTS

  1. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    What is a cover letter? A cover letter, also known as an application letter, is a three- to four-paragraph memo to employers explaining your interest in the job and company and your fitness for the role.It's typically submitted along with your resume in a job application. This letter should highlight your skills, experience and achievements concerning the position you seek.

  2. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job in 2024

    Respectfully, Kind regards, Best regards, Yours truly, Then, make two spaces below the salutation, and type your full name. For some professional (but optional) flair, sign your cover letter either with a scan of your signature or by using software like DocuSign. 8. Check your cover letter's content and formatting.

  3. How to Write a Great Cover Letter in 2024 (+ Examples)

    1. Personalization. Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role. 2.

  4. How To Write the Perfect Cover Letter (With Template and Example)

    Cover letter template Use this template to help you write your own ideal cover letter: [Your name] [Your phone number] [Your email address] [The date] [Hiring manager's name and title] [Company name] [Company address] Dear [hiring manager], My [years of experience] in [industry] plus my [skill or quality] make me an ideal fit for [position] at [company]. I admire [company's] [mission or goals ...

  5. How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

    How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter #1. Choose the Right Cover Letter Template #2. Put Contact Information in the Header #3. Address the Hiring Manager #4. Write an Eye-Catching Introduction #5. Use the Cover Letter Body for Details #6. Wrap It Up and Sign It Cover Letter Writing Checklist 15 Cover Letter Tips 15+ Cover Letter Examples 5 ...

  6. How to Write a Cover Letter (Examples and Tips)

    Step 3: Address your cover letter to the hiring manager—preferably by name. The most traditional way to address a cover letter is to use the person's first and last name, including "Mr." or "Ms." (for example, "Dear Ms. Jane Smith" or just "Dear Ms. Smith").

  7. How to Write A Cover Letter in 2022 (6 Tips

    The cover letter is a tool to help introduce yourself in a memorable, personal way during a job application. A well-crafted cover letter goes over information on your resume and expands this information for the reader, taking them on a guided journey of some of your greatest career and life achievements.. Its purpose is to elaborate on the information contained in your resume while infusing ...

  8. Cover Letter Samples and Templates

    A cover letter should include the following parts: Header. Salutation. Introduction. Body paragraph. Closing paragraph. Letter ending and signature. The following cover letter samples and examples will show you how to write a cover letter for many employment circumstances. Browse cover letters by job title for inspiration.

  9. How to Write a Cover Letter: Guide + Examples

    Avoid addressing the recipient with "Dear Sir or Madam," which is outdated and impersonal. It's always best to address them by their title and name. For example: Good cover letter greeting examples: "Dear hiring manager,". "Dear [XYZ Company] team,". "Dear Customer Acquisition Hiring Manager,". Weak cover letter greeting examples:

  10. How to Write a Cover Letter for Any Job [2024 Guide]

    Here's how to write a successful cover letter: 1. Stick to the Proper Cover Letter Format. Your cover letter should follow the best practices for writing business letters. Keep your cover letter short and to the point—in fact, your entire cover letter shouldn't be longer than 350 words.

  11. How to Write a Cover Letter in 2024: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Here are 9 steps you can take to make sure you're headed in the right direction: Step 1. Do your research. Before writing your cover letter, thoroughly read the job description and the requirements for the job. Melanie Denny, award-winning resume expert, likens the job description to your cover letter cheat sheet.

  12. How To Write A Cover Letter For A Job In 2023 (With Examples)

    New Media Company. 833 Rune Rd. Marigold, TX, 10987. If you're emailing your cover letter, you can simply include your name, telephone number, email address, and fewer address details (just your city and state will suffice). You can also include a zip code if you live in a big city with multiple zip codes.

  13. How to Write a Cover Letter: Examples & Guide [2024]

    Write a clear and professional subject line that includes the job title and your name. Compose a brief message in the body of the email, introducing yourself and stating the position you are applying for. Attach your cover letter and resume to the email, making sure they are properly named and labeled.

  14. 4 Cover Letter Examples + Tips on How to Write Yours

    We've got examples of four types of cover letters below: a traditional cover letter, an impact cover letter, a writing sample cover letter, and a career change cover letter. So let's take a look at these examples, why they work, and how you can use them to craft your own. 1. The traditional cover letter example.

  15. How to Write a Cover Letter in 2024

    Use double cover letter spacing between paragraphs and 1-1.15 between lines. Title your cover letter by JobTitle—CoverLetter—YourName. Let your cover letter layout stay intact en route to the recruiter by saving the file in PDF. Fit all the information included in the letter on one page.

  16. How to write the perfect cover letter (With examples)

    To start your cover letter, introduce yourself. This means including your full name, your specific interest in the position and the reasons you've chosen to apply. If you got a referral to the job from another party, ensure to mention this in the first paragraph. 2. Mention your skills and qualifications.

  17. 5 Short Cover Letter Examples (And How to Write Your Own)

    How to write a short cover letter for a job application. To write an effective short cover letter, you need to summarize your relevant experience, skill set, and achievements as quickly as possible. Follow these tips to create a brief cover letter that wins over hiring managers. 1. Don't use this overused opening line

  18. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job Application

    Be positive and enthusiastic. Give your cover letter for a job a positive, enthusiastic tone. Use future tense to show how you will use your skills and experience to benefit the company you're applying to and show how keen you are to take on a new role and new challenges. If you are lacking experience in some areas, don't highlight it.

  19. Job Application Letter: Examples, What to Include & Writing Tips

    A job application letter explains why you're applying for this position and what makes you qualified. An application letter closely resembles the function of a cover letter. It demonstrates your relevant qualifications for the position and convinces the employer to call you for an interview. This article will guide you on how to write an application letter for employment and feature samples of ...

  20. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job Application (2024)

    Draft your job application cover by following these instructions: 1. Begin with your header. At the top of your document, type your full name, your address and contact details, followed by the date of application. This serves as a quick reference point to the reader and can assist with their filing process.

  21. How to Write a Cover Letter for Job Applications: Example

    Here's how to write a cover letter for a job application: 1. Start with a Professional Cover Letter Header. Let's start with the basics: your contact information and that of the hiring manager. Cover letters follow the business letter format, which means that those details need to go in the top left corner of the page.

  22. How To Format a Cover Letter (With Outline and Examples)

    Follow these guidelines: Make your cover letter single-spaced. Add a space between each section: contact information, salutation, opening paragraph, middle paragraph, closing paragraph and complimentary closing. (There's no need to indent any of your paragraphs.)

  23. Crafting Catchy Cover Letters: A How-To Guide

    More often than not, writing a catchy cover letter is something people simply don't do because the overwhelming thought is that employers don't read them. That couldn't be further from the truth. On top of that, adding a catchy cover letter to your application can enhance the skills, achievements, and qualifications you include on your resume.

  24. How to write a cover letter

    How to write your cover letter. Start with a brief introduction about yourself and why you're writing. Mention the job you're applying for and your interest in it. Give a snapshot of the relevant skills, experience and qualifications you have that relate to the job. Think about the key two or three points in your resume and explaining these ...

  25. How To Write a Cover Letter: A Guide for Job Seekers

    Cover letters aren't always required for a job application. Often, they're listed as an optional document. Most applicants won't submit a cover letter because of this (let's face it, job applications can take a lot of time!). However, this also means that submitting a cover letter is an extra step that will help you to stand out from ...

  26. Writing a Cover Letter That Opens Doors: Tips from Tech Recruiters

    Crafting a compelling cover letter can make a significant difference in your job application process, particularly in the tech industry. While your resume provides the technical details of your career, your cover letter offers a unique opportunity to showcase your personality, passion, and the value you bring to the role.

  27. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

    Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you're applying for an assistant job that ...

  28. PDF Writing an Effective Cover Letter

    a job. If you do not change your cover letter with each job application, you will be less likely to convince a potential employer that you really want the job. When do you send a cover letter? If you are applying for a job by mailing, emailing, or faxing a resume, you should always send a cover letter. Pay close attention to the job posting to ...

  29. 3 Keys to Writing Cover Letters That Stand Out

    And to get them—or, at least, have a chance at getting them—you first need to capture the attention of hiring managers. And the best way to do that is to write compelling cover letters. So here are the three keys to writing cover letters that stand out. 1. Convey your personality, quirks and all.

  30. 13 Sample Job Application Email Templates

    Also, employers prefer job applications that include a cover letter. Resume: This document briefly overviews the applicant's abilities and academic accomplishments. It also illustrates the applicant's professional background. ... Cover letter: Write a crisp and clear cover letter, and if you are writing a detailed cover letter, it is advisable ...