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The Red Violin Reviews

movie review ebert red violin

Like the immaculate instrument it follows, "The Red Violin" is a piece of filmmaking fully refined by the hands of someone who believed in the material, and the effect it leaves us with is one of transcendence.

Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4 | Aug 15, 2013

movie review ebert red violin

Full Review | Original Score: B | Sep 7, 2011

movie review ebert red violin

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Aug 7, 2008

movie review ebert red violin

A surprisingly exciting and delicate epic.

Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4 | May 26, 2006

movie review ebert red violin

Franois Girard ... with co-writer Don McKellar and an able cast, has spun a yarn that crosses all manner of boundaries: geographic, artistic, and taste.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Oct 10, 2004

movie review ebert red violin

The story lines, while having little direct connection to historical events, are obviously grounded in musical and artistic legend.

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Oct 7, 2004

movie review ebert red violin

It is disconcerting to see {Jackson}...after watching his exceptional performances as crazy criminals in two Quentin Tarantino movies.

Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4 | Jul 2, 2004

Full Review | Original Score: 4/10 | Jun 8, 2004

movie review ebert red violin

entertains with fanciful fable and contains beautiful virtuoso violin solos (by Joshua Bell) and location shooting, but offers little substance

Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/5 | Jul 2, 2003

movie review ebert red violin

Derided by some contrarian critics for being "safe", this is an ambitious and at times uneven epic that stretches several continents and centuries . . .

Full Review | May 25, 2003

Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4 | May 20, 2003

movie review ebert red violin

Most musicians say that music is the one true universal medium that conveys the human condition to every corner of the globe…they are partially right. Films also have this same impact around the world...

Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4 | Jan 29, 2003

movie review ebert red violin

Full Review | Original Score: 4.5/5 | Nov 7, 2002

Full Review | Original Score: 3/4 | Aug 21, 2002

movie review ebert red violin

Full Review | Original Score: 4/5 | Aug 13, 2002

Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4 | Mar 19, 2002

movie review ebert red violin

A spiritually rich and musically sublime drama about the soulful dimensions of beauty.

Full Review | Mar 5, 2002

movie review ebert red violin

Full Review | Original Score: 1.5/4 | Jan 1, 2000

Full Review | Original Score: 3/4 | Jan 1, 2000

movie review ebert red violin

If you see it, it should be only for the wonderful solo violin of Joshua Bell.

Full Review | Original Score: C- | Jan 1, 2000

The Red Violin

movie review ebert red violin

Where to Watch

movie review ebert red violin

Carlo Cecchi (Nicolo Bussotti (Cremona)) Jean-Luc Bideau (Georges Poussin (Vienna)) Christoph Koncz (Kaspar Weiss (Vienna)) Jason Flemyng (Frederick Pope (Oxford)) Irene Grazioli (Anna Bussotti (Cremona)) Anita Laurenzi (Cesca (Cremona)) Tommaso Puntelli (Apprentice (Cremona)) Aldo Brugnini (Assistant (Cremona)) Samuele Amighetti (Boy (Cremona)) Clotilde Mollet (Antoinette Pussin (Vienna)) Rainer Egger (Brother Christophe (Vienna)) Wolfgang Böck (Brother Michael (Vienna)) Florentin Groll (Anton von Spielmann (Vienna)) Johannes Silberschneider (Father Richter (Vienna)) Arthur Denberg (Prince Mansfeld (Vienna)) Paul Koeker (Brother Gustav (Vienna)) Josef Mairginter (Brother Franz (Vienna)) Johan Gotsch (Funeral Monk (Vienna))

François Girard

A red-colored violin inspires passion, making its way through three centuries over several owners and countries, eventually ending up at an auction where it may find a new owner.

Recommendations

movie review ebert red violin

More about The Red Violin

The Red Violin , the latest from 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould director François Girard, is so relentlessly …

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Review: 'The Red Violin' strings viewers along

June 16, 1999 Web posted at: 4:01 p.m. EDT (2001 GMT)

Self-expression and Girard

Protégés to prodigies.

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Official 'Red Violin' site Lions Gate Films
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The Red Violin Review

Red Violin, The

09 Apr 1999

130 minutes

Red Violin, The

This intermittently diverting saga of a violin, painted red by its maker in grief-stricken circumstances, spans three continents in five languages and features actors of even more nationalities. As it's made by the director of the acclaimed Thirty-Two Short Films About Glenn Gould, it's no surprise then that it's about music taking on a power of its own.

It also concerns the link between art and suffering. Once Italian craftsman Nicolo Bussotti (Cecchi) gets shot of his "perfect" instrument, it winds up in a monastery where, a century later, it comes alive under the bow of a boy wonder. Inevitably, tragedy strikes and, another century on, the violin is transformed into an erotic stimulus for British wild-child virtuoso Frederick Pope (Jason Flemyng), which is where Scacchi comes in.

Its next stop is 1960s China where Mao decrees that all western "vices" shall meet with unmentionable punishment. In the film's most moving segment, Communist Party official Xiang Pei (Sylvia Chang) is forced to hide her beloved old instrument. Thirty years on, the knackered fiddle arrives at a Montreal instrument sale and specialist Charles Morritz (Jackson) sets out to prove that it's Bussotti's "lost" masterpiece.

Girard's narrative unravels by switching to and from the auction until we understand the motives of all the different bidders, and there's a refreshing last-minute sting in the tale. Jackson is oh-so-cool as usual, if not entirely convincing as an antiques expert, and there's enough emotionally involving content to offset the occasional lack of plot clarity.

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The Red Violin

Where to watch

The red violin.

1998 ‘Le Violon rouge’ Directed by François Girard

300 years of a remarkable musical instrument. Crafted by the Italian master Bussotti (Cecchi) in 1681, the red violin has traveled through Austria, England, China, and Canada, leaving both beauty and tragedy in its wake. In Montreal, Samuel L Jackson plays an appraiser going over its complex history.

Carlo Cecchi Irene Grazioli Anita Laurenzi Tommaso Puntelli Samuele Amighetti Jean-Luc Bideau Samuel L. Jackson Greta Scacchi Aldo Brugnini Christoph Koncz Clotilde Mollet Florentín Groll Johannes Silberschneider Rainer Egger Paul Koeker Wolfgang Böck Josef Mairginter Johan Gotsch Geza Hosszu-Legocky David Alberman Arthur Denberg Andrzej Matuszewiski Jason Flemyng Eva Marie Bryer Dimitri Andreas David Gant Stuart Yung Sai-Kit Sylvia Chang Zifeng Liu Show All… Hong Tao Xio Fei Han Tan Zeng-Wei Zhi Qing Zhou Zhi Qiao Kun Qi Cao Rei Yang Lidou Colm Feore Monique Mercure Don McKellar Ireneusz Bogajewicz Julian Richings Russell Yuen Sandra Oh Paula de Vasconcelos Rémy Girard Marie-Josée Gauthier Dany Laferrière Dorothée Berryman David La Haye Gregory Hlady Herman Meckler Sheena Macdonald Jody Shapiro James Bradford Joshua Bell Sylvia Stewart Wang Xiaoshuai

Director Director

François Girard

Producers Producers

Niv Fichman Daniel Iron Giannandrea Pecorelli

Writers Writers

Don McKellar François Girard

Editor Editor

Gaétan Huot

Cinematography Cinematography

Alain Dostie

Production Design Production Design

François Séguin

Art Direction Art Direction

Martyn John

Set Decoration Set Decoration

Visual effects visual effects.

Jamie Hallett André Ü Montambeault Mathieu Dupuis Robin Tremblay François Lord Frank D'Iorio Dominic Daigle Yves Laniel

Composer Composer

John Corigliano

Costume Design Costume Design

Renée April

Makeup Makeup

Nathalie Trépanier Micheline Trépanier Pat Hay Adolf Uhrmacher

Hairstyling Hairstyling

Suzanne Stokes-Munton Serge Morache

Rhombus Media New Line Cinema Mikado Film Sidecar Films & TV Téléfilm Canada CITY-TV Film4 Productions

Canada Italy UK

Primary Language

Spoken languages.

Chinese English French German Italian Spanish

Releases by Date

10 sep 1998, 26 nov 1998, 09 apr 1999, 22 may 1999, 06 nov 1999, 22 nov 1999, 05 may 2000, 24 jan 2000, releases by country.

  • Theatrical R
  • Theatrical 16

South Korea

  • Theatrical 15

131 mins   More at IMDb TMDb Report this page

Popular reviews

greasycig

Review by greasycig ★½ 2

how do you even fuck while still playing the violin

Lynn Betts

Review by Lynn Betts ★★★½

CHASE THE RAINBOW Round 3 - Red

The biggest issue, and impacting its runtime, is the repetitive nature of the recurring opening scene - totally needless - and the fact that it's essentially a series of vignettes and as so it's hard to be emotionally invested in any of the characters.

It's a fantastic story, and a picture of Montreal at a great time, when there were two functional airports. Old Montreal is also featured in the European-set segments. However, all in all it's a bit of a slog instead of an entirely epic trans-generational adventure and haunting folk tale in the art world - with better editing and direction it could have been amazing.

Those interested in rare instruments,…

Hmel

Review by Hmel ★★★½

This unique film took place across many centuries and countries, with various languages and employed a method of storytelling pleasantly conducive to one centering on the mysterious provenance of the titular instrument.

I actually appreciated the use of flashbacks as opposed to a linear narrative, as this helped ground me in the present day and made it easier to understand the importance of different scenes, which may have otherwise felt boring, had I not known where this was ultimately headed.

Taking nothing away from the story, some of these "chapters" actually looked kinda rough to me and felt more like a made for tv quality production as opposed to a film I would expect to see in a theater. The…

Gamze Yılmazcan

Review by Gamze Yılmazcan ★★★½ 1

“Music trancends all barriers. It connects us to one another, reminds us of who we are, speaks for us when words are not enough, reflects our heart’s emotions in their real and vulnerable way. It’s the window, the vehicle, towards the manifest of a heart’s truest form. Music is the barrier breaker. Music is freedom.”

UltimateMovieRankings

Review by UltimateMovieRankings ★★★½

Why I watched this one? Has a stout 7.8 IMDb rating. Won an Oscar for Best Score. Stars Samuel L. Jackson in a role originally meant for Morgan Freeman.

What is this one about? Movie covers 400 years of the life of a red violin. We get to see generations and generations use the same red violin. By the time it reaches modern time...the red violin is worth millions of dollars.

My thoughts on this one? I am not a huge music person. So watching a movie that deals with music is not something I do on a regular basis. I thought the story of how the violin moves from one family to another over so many years was interesting.…

Becca

Review by Becca ★★★½

War horse but what if it was good and also about a violin

Stringer Bell

Review by Stringer Bell ★★★ 5

Incredible score. Fantastic 1st act. The Kaspar Weiss and Poussin storyline really carries this film. Cool screenplay that somehow loses focus in the 2nd half. Still pretty decent for a late 90's Canadian flick. Overall, really confused about the sex scene where dude is riffing a whole violin composition while in crab kneeling sex position. He's clearly just built different.

Mousa ;)

Review by Mousa ;) ★★★★½ 2

The soul is like a violine string it . . makes music only when it is stretched.

فيلم يرسُم التاريخ للقطعة المُسماة " بالكمان الأحمر " عمل عظيم ويُخلدها عبر أربعة قرون وخمس دول ليزيد من تقديرك لهذه القطعه النادرة بداية من إيطاليا حتى النهاية في كندا وتقريبًا أفضل جزء بالنسبة لي في الفيلم كان في "شنقهاي الصين" ، وأجمل شيء في الفيلم هو طريقة تقديم وعرض كل دولة لجانب من جوانب القصة وتقديمها بالشكل الذي يتناسب مع الحضاره الخاصه بهذه الدوله وأن كل دولة قدمت الجانب الخاص بها بشكل ممُيز ايضاً مشاهد المزاد كانت رائعه ! في كل مره وخصوصاً المزاد الأخير مع سامويل جاكسون الي كان إضافة جميله للعمل ، صحيح الفيلم طويل لكن التنويع ف الثقافات واللغات…

Matt

Review by Matt ★★★★½

I still feel like this doesn’t get talked about enough. It’s really killer. And come on the score is absolute fire.

kurukshetra

Review by kurukshetra ★★★

Aptly titled; this movie really is all about a violin. More broadly speaking, it’s about the almost supernatural power of objects. Mere things  can have so much power over us. This movie does a good job of showing that we  give the power to the object; the object itself isn’t inherently powerful.

Anyway, enough about that. The real reason to watch this is the music . One of the best scores I’ve ever heard. Transcendent.

Samantha Glaraga

Review by Samantha Glaraga ★½ 1

Shoutout to my mom, once again, for showing me films I would never watch. 

This film cost $10,000,000 to make, and its opening weekend was only $84,000 

My favorite part was the guy who could only fuck while playing the violin

veronica

Review by veronica ★★★ 1

every movie made between the years of 1990 to 1999 must get insanely horny halfway through for NO REASON

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June 11, 1999 FILM REVIEW 'The Red Violin': That Old Fiddle Sure Got Around Related Articles The New York Times on the Web: Current Film Video Trailer From the Film Forum Join a Discussion on Current Film By STEPHEN HOLDEN film score can artistically make or break a movie, especially one -- like "The Red Violin" -- that aspires to a loftier-than-average cultural tone. Whenever the music swells in this extravagant time-traveling costume drama tracing the 300-year life of a priceless hand-crafted violin, "The Red Violin" begins to assume the intense emotional colors of John Corigliano's ravishing score. As Joshua Bell's solo violin pirouettes above the churning orchestrations, played by the London Philharmonia Orchestra under Esa-Pekka Salonen, the actors' expressions begin to seem profound, and an atmosphere of romantic exaltation co-opts the blunt, flat-footed dialogue. But then the music subsides, and the movie clatters back down to earth. Lions Gate Films Instrument of power: Jean-Luc Bideau, left, and Christoph Koncz in Francois Girard's film "The Red Violin." For "The Red Violin," directed by Francois Girard, who wrote the screenplay with Don McKellar, is something coarser than its music would have us believe. The story, which jumps around in time and place, belongs to the Thousand-and-One-Nights genre of fanciful yarn-spinning. Each episode is a gaudy historical tableau illustrating a particular society's relationship to European classical music. Over the course of three centuries, the violin makes its way from 17th-century Italy (Cremona) to 18th-century Austria (Vienna) to a tribe of mountain-dwelling gypsies, to 19th-century England (Oxford) to Communist China (Shanghai) and finally to contemporary Canada (Montreal). ADVERTISEMENT To give the story a final fillip of suspense, Charles Morritz (Samuel L. Jackson, badly miscast), a rude, unscrupulous New York-based violin restorer, plays a high-stakes cat-and-mouse game with the Montreal auction house that has hired him to restore the instrument. He has discovered that it is the legendary "red violin," made in 1681 by the fictional Nicolo Bussotti (Carlo Cecchi). The yarn begins at an auction in present-day Montreal where we watch the sale of a Stradivarius violin for nearly $2 million. Next up on the block is the newly restored red violin, which arrived at the auction house in a shipment of goods from China. As the bidding gets under way, the movie flashes back to late 17th-century Italy where we see the instrument being "born" in the workshop of Bussotti, a bullying master craftsman. We also meet his extremely pregnant wife, Anna (Irene Grazioli), and Cesca (Anita Laurenzi), the eagle-eyed old servant who, on the eve of Anna's giving birth, insists on reading her employer's tarot cards. The story is structured around Cesca's turning up of the cards one by one. Her enigmatic interpretation of each card predicts an episode not in the life of Anna or the son she hopes to bear but of the special, perfect violin Bussotti has made. The movie revels in cliches. One of the violin's first owners, Kaspar Weiss (Christoph Koncz), is an angelic prodigy who cuddles it in bed like a teddy bear and faints dead away (literally) during an audition. The movie's giddiest set piece observes the silly romantic posturings of England's greatest violinist, Frederick Pope (Jason Flemyng), who suggests a flouncing hybrid of Liszt, Paganini and Byron, and his George Sand-like lover, Victoria (Greta Scacchi). One scene, in which Victoria awkwardly slavers over Frederick's half-clothed body while he plays, is unintentionally farcical. Scenes set in Shanghai during Mao Tse-tung's Cultural Revolution, in which Western cultural artifacts are tossed into a bonfire, also come off as cartoonish distillations of history. And when the movie isn't dishing out this sort of instant history, it spends too much energy bending the narrative to create teasing little plot twists that aren't worth the effort. "The Red Violin" wants to make a grand statement about the mystical power (both celestial and demonic) of great music. But give or take some scattered musical moments, the frame in which that message is couched is too kitschy to let that vision catch fire. PRODUCTION NOTES: 'THE RED VIOLIN' Directed by Francois Girard; written, largely in English with some subtitling, by Don McKellar and Girard; director of photography, Alain Dostie; edited by Gaetan Huot; music composed by John Corigliano, with the London Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen and solo violin performed by Joshua Bell; production designer, Francois Seguin; produced by Niv Fichman; released by Lions Gate Films. RUNNING TIME: 130 minutes. RATING: This film is not rated. CAST: In Cremona: Carlo Cecchi (Nicolo Bussotti), Irene Grazioli (Anna Bussotti) and Anita Laurenzi (Cesca). In Vienna: Jean-Luc Bideau (George Poussin), Christoph Koncz (Kaspar Weiss), Clothilde Mollet (Antoinette Poussin), Rainer Egger (Brother Christophe) and Wolfgang Boeck (Brother Michael). In Oxford: Jason Flemyng (Frederick Pope), Greta Scacchi (Victoria), Eva Marie Bryer (Sara ) and David Gant (Conductor). In Shanghai: Sylvia Chang (Xiang Pei), Liu Zi Feng (Chou Yuan), Tao Hong (Comrade Chan Gong) and Han Xio Fei (Young Ming). In Montreal: Samuel L. Jackson (Charles Morritz), Colm Feore (Auctioneer), Monique Mercure (Madame Leroux), Don McKellar (Evan Williams) and Paula De Vasconcelos (Suzanne).

Jotted Lines

A Collection Of Essays

The Red Violin (1998 Movie): Summary & Analysis

Summary: .

The Red Violin was written by François Girard and Don McKellar. Girard also directed this international co-production between Canada, the UK and Italy, which was released in theatres in 1998. The film won an Oscar for Best Original Musical Score, and the Canadian equivalent in the following Genie Awards: Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay, amongst others. It also received numerous international awards and nominations like the Golden Globes (nominated for Best Foreign Language film), the Grammy Awards (nominated for Best Instrumental Composition) and the Tokyo International Film Festival (Best Artistic Contribution Award). This international recognition of The Red Violin reflects the global appeal of the film, which is the result of a co-produced feature with inherent qualities suitable for the international market. The story of The Red Violin spans centuries and many countries: thus, creating a narrative that interweaves several plot lines and addresses the universal theme of music appreciation. This is further emphasised by a composition by John Corigliano, which underscores the film and serves as a key framing device. The film was produced during the height of co-production activities between Canada and European partners. It is therefore representative of a new direction in Canadian cinema: namely, the focus on high-budget productions for international distribution in the global market. 

Treaty co-productions provide the means for pooling resources in the form of finances, government subsidies, labour and talent. As a result, co-produced films tend to have higher budgets as is evidenced in the production of The Red Violin, which remains one of the most expensive Canadian films ever made. Co-productions became a focal point in the 1990s for Canadian film funding agencies in order to increase feature film production, international distribution, revenues and cultural capital. The signing of over 50 international co-production treaties between the Canadian government and countries around the world were meant to ensure that a global focus in cultural production would result in the proliferation of Canada’s audiovisual industries. Indeed, Canadian co-productions increased dramatically during the 1990s and early 2000s until changing priorities of co-production partners in Europe toppled the Canadian agenda. From a political-economy perspective, The Red Violin’s production context therefore exemplifies the increasing commercialisation of publicly funded media and the internationalisation of a country’s cultural goods. Furthermore, the film’s musical score reflects the expansion of media production ecologies into adjacent cultural industries. For The Red Violin, producers collaborated from the outset with the Sony Corporation to reap profits from ancillary revenue streams through the co-release of the soundtrack. 

Co-productions tend to exhibit narrative structures that transcend time and space. In most instances this results from having to abide by official guidelines and treaty stipulations, which mandate that the involvement of talent and crew have to correspond in equal amounts to the financial participation of all co-producing parties. This also includes production, location shooting or post-production in the counties that partake in the co-production. The consequent mixing and matching has led to contrived narratives in films that garnered the label ‘Euro-puddings’. A common aspect of many co-productions therefore tends to be a lacking sense of place and cultural identity. This ‘uprootedness’ in co-produced narratives resonates in theories of globalisation, which link the disembedding of social relations from local contexts to processes of time-space distanciation (Giddens 1990). Whereas in premodern eras space was linked to an individual’s physical environment, today’s societies are transformed by their restructuring across time and space. Equally important is Mosco’s (2009) notion of spatialisation in global capitalism, which entails the process of overcoming the constraints of time and space in social life. This includes the global restructuring of media industries, integrated markets based on digital technologies, and the division of cultural labour, which reflect the transcendence of temporal and spatial relations in a global economy. Key examples of spatialisation also include co-productions, joint ventures, strategic alliances and emerging media ecologies, which integrate short-term or long-term project management across the cultural industries. 

These dynamics are apparent in the production context of The Red Violin, as well as in its themes, narrative development and key framing devices. More specifically, The Red Violin has two main narratives: a tarot reading set in the past and a future auction in Montreal, which act as framing devices for four stories that unfold in a predominantly linear fashion in Italy, Austria, England and China between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries. Another key framing mechanism is Corigliano’s musical score, which ties all narrative strands together through serving as a transitioning device as well as setting the overall tone for the film. As The Red Violin is a journey through several cultures, Girard and McKellar kept the dialogue in the native languages of the countries the stories are set in: therefore, shifting from Italian, German, English, Chinese to French. To address official co-production guidelines, Girard also used locations across Europe, China and Canada to shoot the film. 

The film begins in Cremona, Italy, in 1681, where the violin-maker Nicolo Bussotti is building a new instrument in anticipation of the birth of his first child. His wife Anna consults a tarot reader to quell her anxiety about the future. But in spite of a promising future, and the prediction of a long life, she dies during childbirth. Nicolo bereft and filled with grief mixes Anna’s blood into the varnish of the violin; thus, imbuing it with her soul. These events set the following plot lines in motion: the violin travels across Europe and finds a temporary home at a monastery near seventeenth-century Vienna, where it is played by the talented but frail orphan Kaspar Weiss. When Kaspar is faced with being separated from his beloved violin, he collapses during a rehearsal. After his death, the violin changes hands for many decades until it finds its way to Oxford, England. Here it becomes the focal point for a passionate but fated love affair between the musician Frederick Pope and a writer. 

Each of the stories represents a different life cycle as played out by the characters, who are obsessed with the violin. Beginning in childhood, as embodied by Kaspar, the following events in Oxford mark the transition into young adulthood. The violin’s arrival in China completes the cycle as, metaphorically, the stage of maturity, and political consciousness, is reached. In the hands of Xiang Pei, the violin becomes embroiled in upheavals of the cultural revolution and needs to be hidden in a secret place – the attic of the music teacher Chou Yan. The violin is discovered only three decades later, upon which it is sent to Montreal by a present-day Chinese government for appraisal and to be auctioned off. Throughout the film, scenes are intercut with flashbacks of the tarot reading, which predicts the violin’s journey – and the affect of Anna’s soul on the main characters – over the course of 300 years. The final tarot card, signifying rebirth, initiates the last story, set in a Montreal auction house. This story, which is foreshadowed throughout the film in the form of flash-forwards, concludes all narrative strands in the present. Representatives tied to previous plots, such as the monks from an Austrian monastery, an agent of the Pope foundation and Pei’s son, are all present to bid on the violin. However, in a final twist the violin ends up in the hands of the appraiser Charles Morritz, who switches the real violin for a copy. He intends to give the violin to his musically gifted daughter; thus, potentially setting a new cycle in motion. 

In spite of several plotlines, flashbacks and flashforwards, the narrative of The Red Violin unfolds in a logical and easy-to-follow fashion. The narrative arc is maintained through the musical score as well as through the framing devices of the tarot reading and the Montreal auction. However, due to multiple storylines and changing locations the film’s characters remain underdeveloped. And in spite of historical references, the stories appear to be uprooted rather than linked to cultural identities. This schematic referencing of time and place therefore transcends geographical boundaries and becomes reminiscent of what Appardurai (1990) has referred to in his globalisation theory as the existence of ‘multiple worlds’ which are comprised of historically situated ‘imaginations of people’ tied to economic, political and cultural spheres. Globalisation processes are thus marked by disjunctures, in which different configurations such as ‘ethnoscapes’ and the distribution of mobile individuals are no longer confined to actual geographies. In The Red Violin references to geographical destinations are therefore less relevant than the interconnection between cultures through their shared experience – in this case their encounter with the violin. 

As a result, The Red Violin’s narrative appears to unfold nowhere or anywhere, since a sense of place and cultural identity is never truly established. Moreover, as Longfellow (2001) points out, the obsession the film’s characters express for the violin embodies a form of ‘commodity fetishism’ where the object is exalted to such an extent that it mediates and transforms all social relations. The final story about the Montreal auction, at which all descendants of former characters congregate, further emphasises the market as a binding and unifying force for the film’s multiple storylines. As an international co-production The Red Violin therefore exemplifies the confluence of globalisation and increasing commercialisation of cultural goods, in its production context as well as in its diegetic and non-diegetic story worlds. 

The Red Violin represents a key stage in the development of Canadian cinema, which became increasingly international during the 1990s. Through the development of co-production treaties with partners around the world, Canada’s cultural agencies sought to generate revenues and increase the global profile of its cultural industries. However, this global focus came at the cost of the local arts and public media sectors, which, after a series of budgets cutbacks, were forced to adopt a more commercially driven agenda. In addition, co-production has proven to be an unreliable production technology for Canadian filmmakers, who had to face a challenging situation in the late 2000s when filmmakers in Europe shifted their attention towards pan-European collaborations and co-ventures with the USA, leading to a rapid decline of Canadian co-productions (Baltruschat 2010). 

In the case of The Red Violin, co-production mandates became manifest in the film’s production context as well as in its narrative development. Within the context of Canada’s cultural globalisation in the 1990s, the film epitomises how co-production facilitates the integration of a country’s film industry in the global market. It also reveals that a growing focus on international production and distribution channels often coincides with the commercialisation of publicly funded cultural goods. 

Doris Baltruschat

Cast & Crew:

[Country: Canada, Italy and UK. Production Company: Rhombus Media, Mikado Film. Director: François Girard. Screenwriters: François Girard and Don McKellar. Producer: Niv Fichman. Cinematographer: Alain Dostie. Music: John Corigliano. Cast: Jean-Luc Bideau (Georges Poussin, Vienna), Carlo Cecchi (Nicolo Bussotti, Cremona), Sylvia Chang (Xiang Pei, Shanghai), Samuel L. Jackson (Charles Morritz, Montreal), Greta Scacchi (Victoria Byrd, Oxford).] 

Further Reading 

Arjun Appadurai, ‘Disjuncture and Differences in the Global Cultural Economy’, in Mike Featherstone (ed.), Global Culture. Nationalism, Globalization and Modernity, London, Sage, 1990, pp. 295–310. 

Doris Baltruschat, ‘International Film and TV Co-productions: A Canadian Case Study’, in Simon Cottle (ed.), Media Organization and Production, London, Sage, 2003, pp. 181–207. 

Doris Baltruschat, Global Media Ecologies: Networked Production in Film and Television, New York, London, Routledge, 2010. 

Anthony Giddens, The Consequences of Modernity, Stanford, CA, Stanford University Press, 1990. 

Brenda Longfellow, ‘The Red Violin, commodity fetishism and globalization’, Canadian Journal of Film Studies, 10 (2), 2001, pp. 6–20. 

Toby Miller, Nitin Govil, John McMurria and Richard Maxwell, Global Hollywood, London, BFI, 2001. 

N. Morawetz, J. Hardy, C. Haslam and K. Randle, ‘Finance, policy and industrial dynamics – The rise of co-productions in the film industry’, Industry and Innovation, 14 (4), 2007, pp. 421–43.

Vincent Mosco, The Political Economy of Communication: Rethinking and Renewal, (2nd ed.), London, Sage, 2009. 

Graham Murdock, ‘Trading Places: The Cultural Economy of Co-production’, in Sofia Blind and Gerd Hallenberger (eds), European Co-productions in Television and Film, Heidelberg, Germany, Universitätsverlag C, Winter, 1996, pp. 103–14. 

Source Credits:

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Films, Edited by Sarah Barrow, Sabine Haenni and John White, first published in 2015.

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The Red Violin

Film details, brief synopsis, cast & crew, françois girard, judity kalser, florentin groll, don mckellar, marie-josee gauthier, carlo cecchi, technical specs.

A magical red violin passes around the world from owner to owner. It originates in Italy, where its maker's wife dies in childbirth; next it surfaces in the eighteenth century as the instrument of a child prodigy. In the nineteenth century, we find ourselves in England, where the violin's owner, a composer, is having a passionate affair. Finally, it is taken to 20th century China, where it must be hidden to prevent its destruction by Maoists.

movie review ebert red violin

Greta Scacchi

Piero ferraris, henryk piotrowski, rostas tiborne, jean-luc bideau, ireneusz bogajewicz, christoph koncz, rostas jozsefne, sylvia chang, andrzej matuszewski, herman meckler, marcello bassano, andrea rieder, wolfgang bock, horvatime r ibolya, tan zeng wei, carmen piculeata, zhou zhi qing, gianluca zanolli, johannes pramschler, rostas ferenene, markus pedoth, david alberman, wang xiaoshuai, rupert oberhuber, gertrud heiss, david la haye, lorenz mase, helene kerschbaumer, marion san nicolo, monique mercure, daniel zgaga, michael paal, benjamin steinmair, tommaso puntelli, edward glowacki, eva marie bryer, michael riccobona, johannes silberschneider, johan gotsch.

movie review ebert red violin

Samuel L. Jackson

Hannes knollse sen, jason flemyng, rostas miklos, jeno farkas, ginaluca serafini, josef mairginter, dorothee berryman, aldo brugnini, rémy girard, antal szalai, adriano helt, istvan feher, dany laferriere, kalman mohacsi, andrea turso, emilio vettori, russell yuen, barbara ortner, gregory hlady, henryk siwak, steve morris, matteo zanolli, anita laurenzi sagnotti, trojan kwiek, rezmoves m klosne, geza hosszu-legocky, julian richings, matthia schiechtl, dimitri andreas, paula devasconcelos, kalman bakos, manuel chizzal, michaela pattis, paul koekler, matteo cuccato, marvin mill, osvaldo gabrieli, arthur denberg, stefano festini, liu zi feng, samuele amighetti, han xio fei, alessandro gabrieli, rostas szabina, elisabeth erlacher, bettina ties, anna masoner, rostas jozsef, clotilde mollet, rainer egger, andrea radivo, laszlo feher, irene grazioli, jeno ravasz, wolfgang ainberger, peter alves, sara angarad, fabienne april, renee april, jasmin asaria, patrik attenhofer, henir aubertin, jean-francois aubin, giancarlo aymerich, zhong wei bao, peter beare, ginette belanger, joshua bell, dedi bellotti, patrice bengle, stefano biscaro, kevin bishop, franz blaha, marija blumel, mick boleyn, lesley bond, lucie bouliane, deirdre bowen, paul bradburn, cecile braemer, giacinto bretti, robin brooks, vivian bryant, tommaso calevi, desmond campbell, sabrina cappolecchia, leonardo caracciolo, marie-france cardinal, andre caron, michel j caron, andy carter, marianne carter, marietta carter-narcisse, jean-marc casanova, denis caspar, graham caulfield, nadia cavalli, giulio cestari, christine chen, david chettleborough, kwok wah cheung, daniel chretien, eva chrzanowski, michela cingolani, francesco coccia, ronnie cogan, carmela compagnone, fiona cootes, john corigliano, luigi cosatti, marie-helene cote, rebecca cotterill, philippe courtois, marie-helene coutu, sarah crawford, simon crawford-collins, alana cymerman, julie cyrenne, peter czucka, buck deachman, quentin debayser, jean-maurice deernsted, dougal dekeller, nadine demuele, marc desourdy, massimiliano dessena, bobby dhillon, francesco di giacomo, gerhard dohr, peter dorflinger, alain dostie, sebastien ducas, kathy ducker, sylvaine dufaux, mick duffield, manfred ebner, christian eder, mark english, sandra exelby, sergio faina, isabelle faivre-duboz, massimiliano ferri, niv fichman, michael fleischner, riccardo folgore, julian forer, normand fortin, stephane frechette, waltraud freitag, dominick french, emita frigato, rita frozano, katrin fuchs, thomas fuchs, luc gagnier, martine gagnon, maria galante, helene gallizzi, sebastian gardiner, sophie gardiner, francois gascon, caroline gaukroger, olivier gerard, olvier gerard, jamie glassman, massimiliano gloria, rejean goderre, matthias gohl, rose goodhart, alan grayley, christine grenier, gernot griedl, jacques yves gucia, duncan hague, harald haimbock, sun wen hao, hilary haynes, peter hedges, clare holland, manfred holzer, jill hornby, phil hounam, gaetan huot, trent hurry, franco iannone, daniel iron, irene iversen, jan jamison, david-harkness jerrett, kimber lee jerrett, martyn john, laura johnsson, jennifer jonas, corinne joudiou, pixner karl, iona kenrick, andrea kenyon, michael-friedrich kraxner, peter kreiller, michael kreuzer, sandro kumric, claude la haye, marie lahaye, pierre-guy lapointe, stéphane laroche, nikla leder, daniel leduc, stephane lefebvre, meinir jones lewis, claudette lilly, sarah lloyd, stephen lloyd, rebecca loncraine, jean-sebastien lord, wang zun lu, monica ludescher, luciano magagnini, marion mailhot, bob marshak, fritz martan, david mckeown, samantha mealing, sylvie-anne meek, andreane melancon, ferdinando merolla, zhuang yang min, xie mingxiao, bernard minoret, liz mitchie, best original score, miscellaneous notes.

The Country of Canada

Nominated for the 1999 Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

Winner of eight 1999 Jutra Awards including best film, best direction, best screenplay, best editing, best sound, best production design, best cinematography, and best score.

Winner of eight 1998 Genie awards including best film, best screenplay, best direction, best cinematography, best production design/art direction, best original score, best costume design and best overall sound. Nominated for a further two awards.

Released in United States Summer November 6, 1998

Expanded Release in United States June 25, 1999

Released in United States on Video December 14, 1999

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States October 1998

Released in United States November 1998

Released in United States 1999

Released in United States January 1999

Released in United States March 1999

Released in United States April 1999

Released in United States June 1999

Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival (in competition) October 31 - November 8, 1998.

Shown at Venice Film Festival (Nights and Stars) August 26 - September 8, 1998.

Shown at Montreal International Festival of New Cinema and New Media (closing night) October 15-24, 1998.

Shown at London Film Festival November 5-19, 1998.

Shown at Filmfest DC in Washington, DC April 21 - May 2, 1999.

Shown at Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema (opening night) April 29 - May 9, 1999.

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Gala) May 13 - June 6, 1999.

Shown at Nortel Palm Springs International Film Festival January 7-18, 1999.

Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 4-14, 1999.

Shown at Palm Beach International Film Festival (Opening Night) April 9-18, 1999.

Shown at Newport International Film Festival June 1-6, 1999.

Completed shooting July 6, 1997.

Began shooting February 15, 1997.

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival (in competition) October 31 - November 8, 1998.)

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (Nights and Stars) August 26 - September 8, 1998.)

Released in United States October 1998 (Shown at Montreal International Festival of New Cinema and New Media (closing night) October 15-24, 1998.)

Released in United States November 1998 (Shown at London Film Festival November 5-19, 1998.)

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at Filmfest DC in Washington, DC April 21 - May 2, 1999.)

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema (opening night) April 29 - May 9, 1999.)

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Gala) May 13 - June 6, 1999.)

Released in United States January 1999 (Shown at Nortel Palm Springs International Film Festival January 7-18, 1999.)

Released in United States March 1999 (Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 4-14, 1999.)

Released in United States April 1999 (Shown at Palm Beach International Film Festival (Opening Night) April 9-18, 1999.)

Released in United States June 1999 (Shown at Newport International Film Festival June 1-6, 1999.)

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The Red Violin

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  • "While it's possible to view this movie like a short-story collection (...) to do so would deny the pleasure of experiencing this beautifully crafted, intricately designed story the way it was intended" Los Angeles Times
  • "There really is a little something here for everyone: music and culture, politics and passion, crime and intrigue, history and even the backstage intrigue of the auction business" Roger Ebert : Chicago Sun-Times
  • "Wants to make a grand statement about the mystical power of great music. But give or take some scattered musical moments, the frame in which that message is couched is too kitschy to let that vision catch fire."  Stephen Holden : The New York Times
  • "Carefully crafted, lushly romantic" Caren Weiner Campbell : Entertainment Weekly
  • "The filmmakers have created a pretentious extended 'Twilight Zone' episode with obscenely high production values" Lisa Alspector : Chicago Reader
  • "Some will say this film is overly ambitious, but what the hell. The man put five years of his life into making this epic mystery. We can surely give it two hours of ours"  Bob Graham : SFGATE
  • "Although not all of the movements are fleshed out to their full potential, The Red Violin still attains a certain symphonic grandeur that deserves to be applauded." Mark Caro : Chicago Tribune
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Isabella Rossellini reflects on Roger Ebert saying David Lynch exploited her in Blue Velvet : 'I was an adult'

The veteran actress discussed how even a single negative sentence in a review can "[stay] inside you forever."

Emlyn Travis is a news writer at  Entertainment Weekly  with over five years of experience covering the latest in entertainment. A proud Kingston University alum, Emlyn has written about music, fandom, film, television, and awards for multiple outlets including MTV News,  Teen Vogue , Bustle, BuzzFeed,  Paper Magazine , Dazed, and NME. She joined EW in August 2022.

Nearly 40 years ago, Isabella Rossellini delivered a breakout performance as a tormented lounge singer in David Lynch 's dark thriller Blue Velvet . Though the film has come to be regarded as a modern classic, it's had its share of detractors over the years, including the late critic Roger Ebert — and now Rossellini is responding to the Pulitzer winner's infamous one-star review .

In a recent interview with IndieWire , the veteran actress said, "I didn't read the reviews at the time [ Blue Velvet ] came out. I try not to read reviews. They're always depressing. There's always something that, even if [the review is] good, there is always one sentence that is negative and stays inside you forever."

That certainly seemed to be true of Ebert's Blue Velvet review. "I remember I was told that Roger Ebert said that [Lynch] exploited me," Rossellini said, "and I was surprised, because I was an adult. I was 31 or 32. I chose to play the character."

De Laurentis Group/Courtesy Everett 

Ebert, who died in 2013 , wrote in his 1986 review that Rossellini is "asked to do things in this film that require real nerve," including being "degraded, slapped around, humiliated and undressed in front of the camera." He added that "when you ask an actress to endure those experiences, you should keep your side of the bargain by putting her in an important film."

Blue Velvet stars Rossellini as Dorothy Vallens, who is held captive both mentally and physically by an unhinged gangster named Frank Booth (Dennis Hopper). Over the course of the film, her character is stripped nude, raped, and beaten. Rossellini, who won an Independent Spirit Award for her performance, said it was important that Lynch's script had the correct tone when navigating such heavy topics.

"When I read the script I understood it could've been controversial and difficult, I did say to David, 'You don't have to say the lines, but I would like to rehearse with you all the scenes and paraphrase the lines,'" she recalled. "I wanted to make sure that what you're seeing is a person who has maybe a kind of Stockholm syndrome, and we rehearsed for a full day. I felt reassured that what I saw in the character, the way I wanted to play, he had agreed."

Rossellini added that she's glad Lynch made the film.

"I think my character was the first time we did an abused woman, a portrait of an abused woman, but also she camouflaged herself behind what she was asked to be, which was sexy and beautiful and singing, and she obeys the order, and is also victimized [by] it," she explained. "That's the complexity of Blue Velvet , but also the great talent of David Lynch. I thought he did a fantastic film. I love Blue Velvet ."

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Isabella Rossellini Refutes Roger Ebert’s Claim That David Lynch ‘Exploited Me’ in ‘Blue Velvet’: ‘I Was an Adult. I Chose to Play the Character’

By Zack Sharf

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BLUE VELVET, Isabella Rossellini, 1986, © De Laurentiis Entertainment Group/courtesy Everett Collection

One of the most infamous reviews for David Lynch ‘s “ Blue Velvet ” to publish when the film opened in 1986 came courtesy of Roger Ebert , who gave the movie one star . Then the most prominent critic in the United States, Ebert criticized how Lynch’s casting of Isabella Rossellini in a role where she gets “humiliated.”

“[Rossellini] is asked to do things in this film that require real nerve … She is degraded, slapped around, humiliated and undressed in front of the camera,” Ebert wrote. “And when you ask an actress to endure those experiences, you should keep your side of the bargain by putting her in an important film.”

“I didn’t read the reviews at the time [‘Blue Velvet’] came out. I try not to read reviews,” Rossellini recently told IndieWire when asked about Ebert’s infamous pan. “They’re always depressing. There’s always something that, even if [the review is] good, there is always one sentence that is negative and stays inside you forever. But I remember I was told that Roger Ebert said that [Lynch] exploited me, and I was surprised, because I was an adult. I was 31 or 32. I chose to play the character.”

“When I read the script I understood it could’ve been controversial and difficult,” the actor later added, noting that she never had any reservations about taking on the role. “I did say to David, ‘You don’t have to say the lines, but I would like to rehearse with you all the scenes and paraphrase the lines.’ I wanted to make sure that what you’re seeing is a person who has maybe a kind of Stockholm syndrome, and we rehearsed for a full day. I felt reassured that what I saw in the character, the way I wanted to play, he had agreed.”

“I’m glad ‘Blue Velvet’ was directed by  David Lynch ,” Rossellini told IndieWire . “It’s one of his best films. He’s such a great author. I think my character was the first time we did an abused woman, a portrait of an abused woman, but also she camouflaged herself behind what she was asked to be, which was sexy and beautiful and singing, and she obeys the order, and is also victimized it. That’s the complexity of ‘Blue Velvet’ but also the great talent of David Lynch. I thought he did a fantastic film. I love ‘Blue Velvet.’”

Rossellini is currently making the press rounds thanks to her supporting role in Alice Rohrwacher’s “La Chimera,” opening in theaters March 29 from Neon.

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movie review ebert red violin

Based on Georgia Hunter’s novel of the same name, a fictionalization of a true story, Hulu’s “We Were the Lucky Ones” is a harrowing tale of resilience and family in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds. The improbable story concerns the Polish-Jewish Kurc family, who, beginning with Passover in 1937 until Passover in 1947, will endure unspeakable hardships that will test their resolve. 

Taking place over eight episodes, the miniseries, from showrunner Erica Lipez (“The Morning Show”), is composed of a vast ensemble. But the story is primarily told through the eyes of Halina ( Joey King ) and her pianist brother Addy ( Logan Lerman ). Their well-off mother and father own a successful shop in Radom, Poland, whose wealthy German clientele appear to be diminishing as the rise of Nazism becomes impossible to ignore, prompting some families to leave Radom for Palestine. 

Nevertheless, their spirits are high as they enter Passover. Addy, a composer and electrical engineer, is returning from Paris; their daughter Mila ( Hadas Yaron ) is pregnant with her daughter Felicia (Artemisia Pagliano); photographer and law student Jakob (Amit Rahav) is bringing his longtime girlfriend Bella (Eva Feiler) home; Genek ( Henry Lloyd-Hughes ), the eldest, has just begun dating Herta ( Moran Rosenblatt ). Of the family, the restless Halina is entering Passover with the most question marks; she’s weighing whether to take the conservative path toward marriage with Adam ( Sam Woolf ) or seek adventure abroad. 

Nothing in “We Were the Lucky Ones” happens suddenly. Similar to the family, the miniseries works through the slowly escalating events with an air of hopeful caution. As the years wear on, however, the warning signs are too much to ignore. Poland becomes nearly impossible to leave—though Addy makes it out by way of France, while Genek and Herta are sent to Serbia—and before long the German-controlled Radom becomes a kind of prison while the Soviets occupied portion of Poland becomes a brief shelter for those attempting to escape. By the middle of the series the entire family, much like the Jewish diaspora, are scattered to the wind, allowing the miniseries to encompass every corner of the conflict—from South America to Africa to much of Western Europe and the Soviet Union. 

That large canvas often recalls Barry Jenkins ’ “ The Underground Railroad ,” there’s even a scene that appears to be winking to Caesar and Cora’s escape in that series. Jenkins’ adaptation of Colson Whitehead ’s same-titled novel consistently reminded one that no matter what part of America Cora ventured through she was never safe from the vicious violence of chattel slavery. The plight experienced by the Kurcs, like many other Jewish families, grapples with the same obstacles. No matter where they go, war and antisemitism follow. And yet, they must persist. If they do not carry on, if they do not find some way to survive, then they’re seemingly losing their grip on the memories of those who did not make it. 

While the script can get bogged down in the kind of expository dialogue meant to catch the viewer up rather than pushing the story forward, the sturdy direction by Amit Gupta, Neasa Hardiman , and Thomas Kail keep one engaged. Tangible period detail intermingled with exhaustive costuming imbues the historical drama palpability, even if the photography is too darkly lit. Still, the tension is fully felt. In one scene, Mila and Felicia are hauled off to quite literally dig their own graves. The cross cutting between Mila giving her daughter instructions toward possible survival is a nerve-wracking scene that speaks to the unrelenting dread and devastation that looms over the entire miniseries.       

It’s difficult to go too deep into each character’s journey, if only because such avenues will lead to spoilers. But suffice to say that King, in a more mature role than in her hit “Kissing Booth” franchise, is a notable highlight. She never plays the character’s many tragedies too broad, retaining a difficult measure of grit and tenacity that rarely dims even as the odds grow bleak. Yaron as Mila is also adept at translating the internal turmoil of a resourceful mother always on the precipice of cracking under the immense pressure of protecting her child. And Lloyd-Hughes as Genek, who undergoes the greatest change—altering from suave playboy into a hardened realist—is particularly potent in a physically grueling turn.   

Despite the rolling tragedies, “We Were the Lucky Ones” does somehow end on a hopeful, albeit ruminative note. The survivors do not merely feel joy for living; there is an unmistakable sadness to knowing what can never exist again that hangs over these final moments. There were, of course, many families like the Krucs, and the series takes well to remain in the bandwidth of that symbolism, even if you can often see the heartstrings being pulled. The clear crafting of those obvious emotions doesn't make the tears engendered by the ending any less earned and real. “We Were the Lucky Ones” is a defiant and harrowing, soul shattering story—one that gives the full range of the horrors that occur when you’ve been displaced, unmoored, and dehumanized.   

Entire season screened for review .  Premieres on Hulu on March 28th.

Robert Daniels

Robert Daniels

Robert Daniels is an Associate Editor at RogerEbert.com. Based in Chicago, he is a member of the Chicago Film Critics Association (CFCA) and Critics Choice Association (CCA) and regularly contributes to the  New York Times ,  IndieWire , and  Screen Daily . He has covered film festivals ranging from Cannes to Sundance to Toronto. He has also written for the Criterion Collection, the  Los Angeles Times , and  Rolling Stone  about Black American pop culture and issues of representation.

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VIDEO

  1. Siskel & Ebert / Red Heat / 1988

  2. Menuhin Plays Violin Solos from Sleeping Beauty, Tchaikovsky

  3. THE RED VIOLIN MOVIE REVIEW #651

  4. Siskel & Ebert / Red Dawn / 1984

  5. The Red Violin

  6. Ralitsa Tcholakova, Corigliano

COMMENTS

  1. The Red Violin movie review & film summary (1999)

    Directed by. Francois Girard. There is a kind of ideal beauty that reduces us all to yearning for perfection. "The Red Violin'' is about that yearning. It traces the story of a violin ("the single most perfect acoustical machine I've ever seen,'' says a restorer) from its maker in 17th century Italy to an auction room in modern Montreal.

  2. FILM REVIEW; That Old Fiddle Sure Got Around

    To give the story a final fillip of suspense, Charles Morritz (Samuel L. Jackson, badly miscast), a rude, unscrupulous New York-based violin restorer, plays a high-stakes cat-and-mouse game with ...

  3. The Red Violin

    Movie Info. The intricate history of a beautiful antique violin is traced from its creation in Cremona, Italy, in 1681, where a legendary violin maker (Carlo Cecchi) paints it with his dead wife's ...

  4. The Red Violin

    The Red Violin (French: Le Violon Rouge) is a 1998 drama film directed by François Girard and starring Samuel L. Jackson, Carlo Cecchi and Sylvia Chang.It spans four centuries and five countries as it tells the story of a mysterious red-coloured violin and its many owners. The instrument, made in Cremona in 1681 with a future forecast by tarot cards, makes its way to Montreal in 1997, where ...

  5. FILM; Trauma and Tragedy Follow Many a Fine Fiddle

    In 1996, Maria Grevesmuhl, a professor at the conservatory in Bremen, Germany, and the owner of a 1694 Strad, was pushed down a flight of steps by a mugger with designs on her fiddle. The violin ...

  6. The Red Violin

    Rotten Tomatoes, home of the Tomatometer, is the most trusted measurement of quality for Movies & TV. The definitive site for Reviews, Trailers, Showtimes, and Tickets

  7. The Red Violin (1998)

    A red-colored violin inspires passion, making its way through three centuries over several owners and countries, eventually ending up at an auction where it may find a new owner.

  8. The Red Violin

    10. smiyamot. Nov 29, 2015. I thought this was a novel approach to a movie, to see the lives of the owners of a musical instrument over the centuries. I was amazed at the critics low score. Maybe showing the many owners made the movie too choppy and didn't allow for a more in depth look at each.

  9. The Red Violin

    Film; Reviews; Sep 7, 1998 12:00am PT The Red Violin (English, Italian, German, French and Mandarin dialogue.) By David Stratton. Plus Icon. David Stratton Latest; Finding Joy 21 years ago

  10. Review: 'The Red Violin' strings viewers along

    This film has its sweetly musical passages, but a lot of the notes stand out as clinkers. "The Red Violin" has a little bit of everything: Violence, nudity, laughable sex and an enraged woman ...

  11. The Red Violin Review

    Once Italian craftsman Nicolo Bussotti gets shot of his "perfect" violin, we follow it through the hands of various owners in various countries throughout the world including Britain, China and Canada

  12. The Red Violin (1998)

    The Red Violin: Directed by François Girard. With Carlo Cecchi, Irene Grazioli, Anita Laurenzi, Tommaso Puntelli. A red-colored violin inspires passion, making its way through three centuries over several owners and countries, eventually ending up at an auction where it may find a new owner.

  13. ‎The Red Violin (1998) directed by François Girard • Reviews, film

    Synopsis. 300 years of a remarkable musical instrument. Crafted by the Italian master Bussotti (Cecchi) in 1681, the red violin has traveled through Austria, England, China, and Canada, leaving both beauty and tragedy in its wake. In Montreal, Samuel L Jackson plays an appraiser going over its complex history.

  14. The Red Violin (1998)

    Jess-24 6 December 1998. this movie, like a book of short stories, can hook you once and annoy you the next. The segments follow a violin for 3 centuries obviously shooting for a wide range of settings, thus a wide range of stories and characters. But they are all much different.

  15. 'The Red Violin': That Old Fiddle Sure Got Around

    film score can artistically make or break a movie, especially one -- like "The Red Violin" -- that aspires to a loftier-than-average cultural tone. Whenever the music swells in this extravagant time-traveling costume drama tracing the 300-year life of a priceless hand-crafted violin, "The Red Violin" begins to assume the intense emotional ...

  16. The Red Violin (1998 Movie): Summary & Analysis

    Summary: The Red Violin was written by François Girard and Don McKellar. Girard also directed this international co-production between Canada, the UK and Italy, which was released in theatres in 1998. The film won an Oscar for Best Original Musical Score, and the Canadian equivalent in the following Genie Awards: Best Picture, Best Director and.

  17. The Red Violin (1998)

    Duration. 2h 11m. A magical red violin passes around the world from owner to owner. It originates in Italy, where its maker's wife dies in childbirth; next it surfaces in the eighteenth century as the instrument of a child prodigy. In the nineteenth century, we find ourselves in England, where the violin's owner,...

  18. The Red Violin (1998)

    This film centres on a red violin created in 1681 by Cremonese master violinmaker, Nicolo Bussotti, for the forthcoming birth of his child. The film tells the subsequent fate of the violin in episodes, linked together by a fortune telling, read by the servant woman Cesca, for Nicolo´s pregnant wife, Anna. Instead of predicting the future of ...

  19. The Red Violin critic reviews

    Metacritic aggregates music, game, tv, and movie reviews from the leading critics. Only Metacritic.com uses METASCORES, which let you know at a glance how each item was reviewed. X Register The Red Violin ... The Red Violin Critic Reviews. Add My Rating Critic Reviews User Reviews Cast & Crew Details 57 ...

  20. The Red Violin (1998)

    The Red Violin is a film directed by François Girard with Samuel L. Jackson, Greta Scacchi, Jason Flemyng, Colm Feore .... Year: 1998. Original title: Le Violon rouge (The Red Violin). Synopsis: This fictional movie, using flashbacks, spans over four centuries from the late 17th century to the end of the 20th century. It also spans three continents, Europe, Asia and North America.

  21. The Red Violin

    Director François Girard. Year 1998. Run Time 131min. Genre Drama. Girard and McKellar's The Red Violin tells the tale of a very special instrument — a perfectly crafted 17th-century violin finished with a mysterious red glaze. The final masterpiece of a virtuoso craftsman, the violin sits in a Montreal auction house waiting to be sold.

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    Isabella Rossellini reflects on Roger Ebert saying David Lynch exploited her in Blue Velvet: 'I was an adult'. The veteran actress discussed how even a single negative sentence in a review can ...

  23. The Red Violin (1998)

    The Red Violin (1998) on IMDb: Movies, TV, Celebs, and more... Menu. Movies. ... Roger Ebert [Roger Ebert] New York Times [David Schoenbaum] New York Times [Stephen Holden] ... Political Film Review [Michael Haas] PopMatters [Bill Gibron] PopMatters [Shaun Huston]

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    One of the most infamous reviews for David Lynch's "Blue Velvet" to publish when the film opened in 1986 came courtesy of Roger Ebert, who gave the movie one star.Then the most prominent ...

  25. We Were the Lucky Ones movie review (2024)

    Nevertheless, their spirits are high as they enter Passover. Addy, a composer and electrical engineer, is returning from Paris; their daughter Mila (Hadas Yaron) is pregnant with her daughter Felicia (Artemisia Pagliano); photographer and law student Jakob (Amit Rahav) is bringing his longtime girlfriend Bella (Eva Feiler) home; Genek (Henry Lloyd-Hughes), the eldest, has just begun dating ...

  26. Isabella Rossellini Responds to Roger Ebert's 'Blue Velvet' Review

    Isabella Rossellini Speaks on Roger Ebert's Claim That David Lynch "Degraded" Her in 'Blue Velvet' Thirty-eight years after the late critic's one-star review, the actress has expressed ...