• Search Search Please fill out this field.

Write-Offs vs. Write-Downs: An Overview

How write-downs work, how write-offs work, write-off vs. write-down example, what is a charge-off, the bottom line.

  • Small Business
  • Small Business Taxes

Write-Off vs. Write-Down: What's the Difference in Accounting?

Both of these accounting techniques are ways for a business to indicate how an asset has declined in value

write down books

Lea Uradu, J.D. is a Maryland State Registered Tax Preparer, State Certified Notary Public, Certified VITA Tax Preparer, IRS Annual Filing Season Program Participant, and Tax Writer.

write down books

" Write-off " and " write-down " are both accounting terms. The difference between them is largely a matter of degree, but it's also be important to understand which one to use under what circumstances. Here is what you need to know.

Key Takeaways

  • A write-down reduces the value of an asset for tax and accounting purposes, but the asset still retains some value.
  • A write-off reduces the value of an asset to zero and negates any future value.
  • A write-off is typically a one-time event, entered in a company's books immediately when an asset has lost all usefulness or value, but write-downs can be entered incrementally over time.

A write-down is technique that accountants use to reduce the value of an asset to offset a loss or an expense. A write-down can become a write-off if the entire balance of the asset is eliminated and removed from the books altogether. Write-downs and write-offs in this sense are predominantly used by businesses. The term "write-off" can also apply to the deductions that individual taxpayers take to reduce their taxable income, but that is a different meaning, as explained below.

A write-down is recorded on a company's books as an adjustment to the existing inventory. A credit is applied to the equipment or whatever the inventory item is, and the total value is reduced accordingly.

A write-down can instead be reported as a cost of goods sold (COGS) if it's small. Otherwise, it must be listed as a line item on the income statement, affording lenders and investors an opportunity to consider the impact of devalued assets. Large write-downs can reduce owners' or stockholders' equity in the business.

Companies can also reduce a portion of an asset's value based on depreciation or amortization .

Writing an asset off in business is the same as claiming that it no longer serves a purpose and has no future value. The business is effectively declaring that the value of the asset is now zero. Once an asset has been written off in this manner, this valuation is permanent.

Old equipment can be written off even if it still has some potential functionality. For example, a company might upgrade its machines or purchase brand-new computers. The equipment that's being replaced can be written off in this case. Its economic value would be listed as $0.

A bad debt write-off can occur when a customer who has purchased a product or service on credit fails to pay the bill and is deemed to have defaulted on that debt. From the perspective of the business that debt is now uncollectible . When that happens, the accounts receivable on the company's balance sheet will written off by the amount of the bad debt, which reduces the accounts receivable balance by the amount of the write-off.

An adjustment to revenue must be made on the income statement to reflect the fact that the revenue once thought to be earned will not be collected if the company uses accrual accounting practices.

A negative write-off is essentially the opposite of a normal write-off in that it refers to a business decision to not pay back or settle the account of a person or organization that has overpaid.

It's up to the company to credit back the amount of a discount to the consumer when that customer pays full price for a product on credit terms, then is given a discount after a payment is made. It's considered to be a negative write-off if the company decides not to do this and keeps the overpayment instead. Negative write-offs can harm relationships with customers and also have negative legal implications.

Company X's warehouse, worth $500,000, is heavily damaged by fire, but it's still partially usable. Its value is written down by half to reflect the event. It's now worth $250,000.

Company X's warehouse burns to the ground. It can't be repaired or ever used again. Its former $500,000 value is written off. Its value is now $0.

What Is a Write-Off on Personal Income Taxes?

In the case of personal income taxes, the term "write-off" is often used as a synonym for tax deductions that the taxpayer can use to reduce the amount of income on which they will have to pay taxes. Common deductions include state and local income and sales taxes, property taxes, mortgage interest, and medical expenses over a certain threshold. Taxpayers have a choice of writing off these deductions individually, known as itemizing , or taking the standard deduction instead.

What Is Depreciation?

Depreciation is an accounting technique that allows a business to write down a portion of an asset's value over a period of time. Companies can use a variety of depreciation methods, including straight-line depreciation and accelerated depreciation . A simple example of straight-line depreciation would be a piece of machinery with an expected useful life of 10 years that the business depreciates at a rate of 10% a year until its value for accounting purposes is $0. Accelerated depreciation, as the name implies, allows a business to depreciate a greater percentage of an asset's value in the early years of its useful life. The Internal Revenue Service explains the various methods and when they can be used in its Publication 946: How to Depreciate Property.

What Is Amortization?

Amortization is an accounting technique much like depreciation. The difference is that while depreciation is used to reduce the value of physical assets like office equipment or a fleet of trucks, amortization applies to intangible assets like patents, trademarks, and goodwill .

A charge-off is an accounting term similar to a write-off but usually associated with loans and credit cards. For example, a bank might charge off debt from a credit cardholder that it believes to be uncollectible, reducing its value to zero. However, the debt doesn't necessarily end there, as the bank may sell it to a collection agency, which will continue attempts to collect it.

Write-downs and write-offs are two ways that businesses account in their financial statements for assets (including physical assets and outstanding credit balances) that have lost value. Write-offs are the more severe and final of the two, indicating that the company believes the asset to be worthless.

Internal Revenue Service. " Topic No. 501, Should I Itemize? "

Internal Revenue Service. " Publication 946: How to Depreciate Property ."

Equifax. " What Is a Charge-Off? "

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. " Can Debt Collectors Collect a Debt That's Several Years Old? "

  • Understanding Small Business Taxes: A Comprehensive Guide 1 of 21
  • Tax Implications of Different Business Structures 2 of 21
  • Accounting for Small Businesses: A Comprehensive Guide to Financial Management 3 of 21
  • How Becoming an LLC Could Save Taxes Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 4 of 21
  • Self-Employment Tax: Definition, How It Works, and How to File 5 of 21
  • Self-Employed Contributions Act (SECA) Tax: Overview and FAQs 6 of 21
  • Is Now the Time to Restructure Your Business? 7 of 21
  • Writing off the Expenses of Starting Your Own Business 8 of 21
  • 5 Tax Breaks Overlooked by Small Business Owners 9 of 21
  • 5 Ways Small Business Owners Can Reduce Their Taxable Income 10 of 21
  • Top 10 Home Business Tax Tips 11 of 21
  • Write-Off vs. Write-Down: What's the Difference in Accounting? 12 of 21
  • How to Make Estimated Tax Payments 13 of 21
  • Small Business Tax Obligations: Payroll Taxes 14 of 21
  • 7 Ways to Avoid Self-Employed Tax Penalties 15 of 21
  • Best Tax Software Programs for Small Business 16 of 21
  • 16 Tax Deductions and Benefits for the Self-Employed 17 of 21
  • The Small Business Health Care Tax Credit 18 of 21
  • Business Tax Credits: Meaning, How They Work, Example 19 of 21
  • 7 Insurance-Based Tax Deductions You May Be Missing 20 of 21
  • Indian Employment Credit (IEC): What It is, How It Works 21 of 21

write down books

  • Terms of Service
  • Editorial Policy
  • Privacy Policy
  • Your Privacy Choices

write down books

The Power of Writing It Down

You have something totally unique and immensely valuable to offer the world—and writing can help you unlock it. The problem is you've been sold the lie that you are not a writer . Finally, a book that proves you wrong .

write down books

About the book

Writing down your story is one of the most powerful tools you have at our disposal to see your life with clarity and become the most empowered version of you. So why is it so hard to consider yourself a writer? Where did you get the idea that, in order to write, you needed a publishing contract, a degree from a fancy university, or a cabin in the woods? Why is writing something you long to do but you don't give yourself permission ?

In The Power of Writing it Down award-winning author and acclaimed writing coach Allison Fallon refutes your long-held ideas of what it takes to be a "real" writer. She teaches a simple breakthrough strategy literally anyone can use to see the miracle buried in their life and understand how remarkable they've always been. Imagine a world where you never again questioned if your life had value and purpose. That world is within your reach and writing can help you get there.

Learn how to use writing to…

  • Understand your life 
  • Access your intuition and make big choices
  • Overcome the blocks that are getting in the your way
  • Feel more empowered to make changes
  • Heal from past pain and trauma
  • Relieve anxiety and depression
  • Contextualize life’s setbacks and minor frustrations
  • Live a more confident, balanced, and healthy life
  • …and so much more

Don't waste another year wondering what your life means or how much it matters. Join the hundreds of thousands who have already started to uncover deep meaning and purpose in their lives though the amazing power of writing it down.

Get Chapter 1 for Free

I hope these first few pages of the power of writing it down inspire you to share your story..

To jumpstart your writing journey –– and hold you over until your pre-ordered copy arrives –– I’m giving you early access to the first chapter of my new book, The Power of Writing it Down.

–– Allison Fallon, author and founder of Find Your Voice

Allison Fallon is an author, speaker, and founder of Find Your Voice, a company dedicated to training and inspiring anyone who wants to use writing for transformation. In addition to her books Packing Light and Indestructible, she has helped leaders of multinational corporations, stay-at-home moms, Olympic gold medalists, recovering addicts, political figures, CEOs, and prison inmates use the Find Your Voice method as a powerful tool to generate positive change in their lives. She has lived all over the country in the past decade but now lives in Pasadena, California, with her husband and daughter. See the latest at findyourvoice.com.

write down books

Copyright © 2020 Allison Fallon. All Rights Reserved

write down books

Order Your Copy

write down books

  • Sign up and get a free ebook!
  • Don't miss our ebook deals starting at $0.99!

Write It Down Make It Happen

Write It Down Make It Happen

Knowing what you want and getting it.

Trade Paperback

LIST PRICE $17.99

Buy from Other Retailers

  • Amazon logo
  • Bookshop logo

Table of Contents

  • Rave and Reviews

About The Book

About the author.

Henriette Anne Klauser

Henriette Anne Klauser, PhD, is the author of five books, including the bestselling  Writing on Both Sides of the Brain  and  Write It Down, Make It Happen . She lives in Edmonds, Washington.

Product Details

  • Publisher: Touchstone (January 3, 2001)
  • Length: 256 pages
  • ISBN13: 9780684850023

Browse Related Books

  • Self-Help > Personal Growth > Happiness
  • Self-Help > Personal Growth > Success
  • Self-Help > Motivational

Raves and Reviews

Mary LoVerde author of Stop Screaming at the Microwave Easy to read and packed with ideas that changed my life. Dr. Klauser's ideas work, and she shows you how to reap the benefits.

Verna Noel Jones Rocky Mountain News Klauser's advice is eye-opening and contagious enough to make you pull out a notebook and pen, even as you read.

Resources and Downloads

High resolution images.

  • Book Cover Image (jpg): Write It Down Make It Happen Trade Paperback 9780684850023 (0.2 MB)

Get a FREE ebook by joining our mailing list today!

Plus, receive recommendations and exclusive offers on all of your favorite books and authors from Simon & Schuster.

You may also like: Thriller and Mystery Staff Picks

Invisible Girl

More to Explore

Limited Time eBook Deals

Limited Time eBook Deals

Check out this month's discounted reads.

Our Summer Reading Recommendations

Our Summer Reading Recommendations

Red-hot romances, poolside fiction, and blockbuster picks, oh my! Start reading the hottest books of the summer.

This Month's New Releases

This Month's New Releases

From heart-pounding thrillers to poignant memoirs and everything in between, check out what's new this month.

Tell us what you like and we'll recommend books you'll love.

WordReference Forums

  • Rules/Help/FAQ Help/FAQ
  • Members Current visitors
  • Interface Language

Follow along with the video below to see how to install our site as a web app on your home screen.

Note: This feature currently requires accessing the site using the built-in Safari browser.

  • English Only

Write down on or Write down in?

  • Thread starter CivX25
  • Start date Apr 15, 2021

CivX25

  • Apr 15, 2021

Hi, I'd like to know which preposition is the correct one in a sentence such as: "She wrote down the homework __ her notebook" I've looked for some example sentences online, but I coulent find any, apparently it's quite rare to use "write down" followed by the thing you're writing on/in... Thanks for the help in advance!  

Packard

Senior Member

Are you referencing writing on the page or in the notebook? Write down is a very common colocation in American English. It is sometimes said, "Take this down" meaning "write this down on a piece of paper".  

e2efour

On her notebook would mean to me on the outside of her notebook. I don't know what wrote down means unless it refers to the subject of the homework (what the homework was about).  

Packard said: Are you referencing writing on the page or in the notebook? Click to expand...

See also: in the notebook, on the notebook  

Şafak

I suspect your sentence doesn’t convey what you want to say. What is the intended meaning?  

Jennifer Weiss said: I suspect your sentence doesn’t convey what you want to say. What is the intended meaning? Click to expand...

The problem here is whether notebook means a laptop computer or a book in which you make notes. Only after reading the thread given by Packard did I realise that on her notebook was possible (although wrote is not the best verb).  

dojibear

In general we use "in" any kind of book (notebook, journal) to mean "on the pages of the book". That works with several verbs: "write down" or "read" or "look at", etc. Google Books Ngram Viewer  

She wrote something in the notebook.  

e2efour said: The problem here is whether notebook means a laptop computer or a book in which you make notes. Click to expand...

Many people might say I wrote my latest novel on my computer . But, as I said, a better verb might be typed. You certainly can't say wrote it in?? my computer.  

Why did we suddenly decide the op meant a laptop?  

e2efour said: Read the thread mentioned in #5. Click to expand...

Write a Book HQ

Write It Down, Make It Happen Book: A Guide to Achieving Your Goals

Write It Down, Make It Happen Book Guide

Affiliate Disclaimer

As an affiliate, we may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. We get commissions for purchases made through links on this website from Amazon and other third parties.

“Write it down, make it happen” is a book that has gained popularity among individuals seeking to achieve their goals. The book, written by Henriette Anne Klauser, highlights the importance of writing down one’s goals and aspirations. The author argues that writing down goals is the first step towards achieving them.

The book is divided into several chapters, each addressing different aspects of goal-setting and achievement. Klauser uses real-life examples to illustrate the power of writing down goals and how it can help individuals overcome obstacles and achieve success. The book is written in a clear and concise manner, making it easy to understand and apply the principles outlined.

Overall, “Write it down, make it happen” is a valuable resource for individuals seeking to improve their lives and achieve their goals. The book provides practical tips and advice on how to set and achieve goals, making it a must-read for anyone looking to make positive changes in their life.

The Power of Writing Down Your Goals

write down books

Writing down your goals is a powerful tool that can help you achieve success in various aspects of your life. In the book “Write It Down, Make It Happen,” Henriette Anne Klauser explains how the simple act of putting your goals on paper can help you unlock the power of your subconscious mind and activate the Reticular Activating System (RAS) in your brain.

Understanding the RAS

The RAS is a network of neurons located in the brainstem that acts as a filter for incoming information. It determines what information is important and what information can be ignored. When you write down your goals, you send a message to your RAS that these goals are important and should be given priority. This, in turn, helps you become more aware of opportunities and resources that can help you achieve your goals.

Unlocking the Subconscious

Writing down your goals also helps you tap into the power of your subconscious mind. Your subconscious mind is responsible for many of your automatic behaviors and habits. By writing down your goals, you are programming your subconscious mind to work towards achieving those goals. This can help you overcome obstacles and challenges that may have otherwise prevented you from achieving your goals.

In addition, writing down your goals can help you clarify your thoughts and intentions. It forces you to think about what you want and why you want it. This clarity can help you stay focused and motivated, even when faced with setbacks or distractions.

Overall, the power of writing down your goals cannot be underestimated. It can help you activate the RAS in your brain, tap into the power of your subconscious mind, and clarify your thoughts and intentions. By doing so, you can increase your chances of achieving success in all areas of your life.

Overcoming Resistance

write down books

Resistance is a natural part of the process of achieving goals, and it can take many forms. In “Write it Down, Make It Happen,” author Henriette Anne Klauser explores the concept of resistance and provides strategies for overcoming it.

Identifying Resistance

The first step in overcoming resistance is to identify it. Resistance can take many forms, including procrastination, self-doubt, fear, and distraction. By recognizing these behaviors, individuals can begin to develop strategies for overcoming them.

Resistance Has Meaning

According to Klauser, resistance has meaning. It is often a sign that an individual is on the right track, and that the goal they are pursuing is important to them. By acknowledging the meaning of resistance, individuals can begin to view it as a positive force rather than a negative one.

Letting Go and Moving Forward

One of the most powerful strategies for overcoming resistance is to let go of the past and focus on the present. This means letting go of negative self-talk, limiting beliefs, and past failures. By focusing on the present and taking small, actionable steps towards their goals, individuals can begin to build momentum and overcome resistance.

In conclusion, overcoming resistance is an important part of achieving goals. By identifying resistance, acknowledging its meaning, and letting go of the past, individuals can develop the resilience and persistence needed to achieve their goals.

Practical Steps to Make Dreams Happen

write down books

Achieving one’s dreams can be a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be. In her book, “Write it Down, Make it Happen,” Henriette Anne Klauser provides down-to-earth tips on how to turn dreams into reality. Here are some practical steps to make dreams happen:

Easy Exercises to Start

One of the easiest ways to start making dreams happen is to write them down. This can be as simple as jotting down a few sentences about what you want to achieve. Klauser suggests taking it a step further by writing out your dreams in detail, including how you will feel when you achieve them. This helps to solidify your goals and gives you a clear direction to work towards.

Another easy exercise is to create a vision board. This involves collecting images and words that represent your dreams and displaying them in a prominent place. By seeing your dreams every day, you are more likely to stay motivated and take action towards achieving them.

Tidbit Journal for Daily Success

Klauser recommends keeping a tidbit journal to track your progress towards your dreams. This can be a simple notebook where you write down small successes and accomplishments each day . By focusing on the positive steps you are taking, you are more likely to stay motivated and continue working towards your goals.

Writing Letters to God

Writing letters to God, or whatever higher power you believe in, can also be a powerful tool for making dreams happen. Klauser suggests writing out your dreams as if they have already come true and thanking your higher power for helping you achieve them. This helps to shift your mindset from one of lack to one of abundance and gratitude, which can attract more positive opportunities into your life.

By following these practical steps, anyone can turn their dreams into reality. It takes dedication and hard work, but with the right mindset and tools, anything is possible.

Success Stories and Inspiration

write down books

The book “Write it down, Make it Happen” is filled with numerous success stories that inspire readers to take action towards achieving their goals. Here are a few examples of ordinary people who achieved extraordinary outcomes by following the principles outlined in the book.

Ordinary People, Extraordinary Outcomes

One such story is about a woman named Sarah. She was a single mother who struggled to make ends meet. After reading the book, Sarah decided to write down her goal of starting her own business. She followed the steps outlined in the book and eventually opened her own successful bakery. Today, Sarah is a proud owner of a thriving business and has even expanded her bakery to multiple locations.

Another inspiring story is about a man named John. He was stuck in a dead-end job and was unhappy with his life. John decided to take action and wrote down his goal of starting his own business. He followed the advice in the book and eventually started a successful consulting firm. Today, John is a successful entrepreneur and is living a fulfilling life.

Creative Juices and Success

The book also emphasizes the importance of creativity in achieving success. One story that illustrates this point is about a woman named Lisa. She was an artist who struggled to make a living from her art. After reading the book, Lisa decided to take action and write down her goal of becoming a successful artist.

She followed the advice in the book and started a blog to showcase her work. Through her blog, Lisa was able to attract a large following and eventually landed a book deal. Today, Lisa is a successful artist and has even been featured in major art exhibitions.

In conclusion, the book “Write it down, Make it Happen” provides readers with practical advice and inspiring success stories that motivate them to take action towards achieving their goals. By following the principles outlined in the book, ordinary people can achieve extraordinary outcomes and write their own ticket to success.

Gratitude and Acknowledgment

The importance of giving thanks.

In “Write It Down, Make It Happen,” the author emphasizes the importance of gratitude and acknowledgment in achieving one’s goals. By regularly expressing gratitude, individuals can cultivate a positive mindset and attract more positivity into their lives. This can lead to greater success in achieving their desired outcomes.

The act of giving thanks is also an essential component of the law of attraction, which states that individuals can manifest their desires by focusing on positive thoughts and feelings. By expressing gratitude for what they already have, individuals can attract more abundance and prosperity into their lives.

Moreover, the author suggests that giving thanks can also lead to miracles. When individuals express gratitude, they open themselves up to receiving more blessings and opportunities. This can lead to unexpected and seemingly miraculous outcomes in their lives.

To incorporate gratitude into their daily routine, the author suggests that individuals keep a gratitude journal. This involves writing down three things they are grateful for each day. By focusing on the positive aspects of their lives, individuals can shift their mindset and attract more positivity into their lives.

Overall, the act of giving thanks is a powerful tool for achieving one’s goals and cultivating a positive mindset. By incorporating gratitude into their daily routine, individuals can attract more abundance and prosperity into their lives and even experience miracles.

Latest posts

Achieving Your Word Count Goals with Daily Sprints: A Guide

Achieving Your Word Count Goals with Daily Sprints: A Guide

Many writers struggle with meeting their word count goals, whether it’s for a school assignment, a blog post, or a novel. It can be frustrating to stare at a blank page or screen and feel like you’re not making progress. However, there is a technique that can help you achieve your word count goals and…

Beat Burnout: Setting Reasonable Writing Expectations

Beat Burnout: Setting Reasonable Writing Expectations

Writing can be a fulfilling and rewarding experience, but it can also be exhausting and draining. Writing burnout is a real phenomenon that can affect anyone, from professional writers to students. When writers push themselves too hard, they can experience stress, lack of motivation, and even physical symptoms like headaches and fatigue. To avoid burnout,…

Dealing with Criticism and Rejection as an Author: Tips and Strategies

Dealing with Criticism and Rejection as an Author: Tips and Strategies

As an author, receiving criticism and rejection is an inevitable part of the writing process. It can be difficult to navigate the emotions that come with having your work scrutinized, but it’s important to remember that criticism and rejection are not personal attacks. Instead, they are opportunities for growth and improvement. One way to deal…

Natalie Goldberg

  • About Natalie
  • E-books & Audio
  • Natalie’s Books

Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within

Writing Down the Bones

With insight, humor, and practicality, Natalie Goldberg inspires writers and would-be writers to take the leap into writing skillfully and creatively. She offers suggestions, encouragement, and solid advice on many aspects of the writer’s craft: on writing from “first thoughts” (keep your hand moving, don’t cross out, just get it on paper), on listening (writing is ninety percent listening; the deeper you listen, the better you write), on using verbs (verbs provide the energy of the sentence), on overcoming doubts (doubt is torture; don’t listen to it)—even on choosing a restaurant in which to write.  Goldberg sees writing as a practice that helps writers comprehend the value of their lives. The advice in her book, provided in short, easy-to-read chapters with titles that reflect the author’s witty approach (“Writing Is Not a McDonald’s Hamburger,” “Man Eats Car,” “Be an Animal”), will inspire anyone who writes—or who longs to.

“The author’s style is refreshingly informal.  This book is highly recommended to readers who would like to develop their ability to write, and to those who would like to know how to use writing as a Zen-like activity to help them on their personal journeys toward self-discovery.” —New Age Retailer
“I’m convinced that none of the writers of my acquaintance can go another day without a copy of Natalie Goldberg’s magical manual, Writing Down the Bones .” —Linda Weltner,  The Boston Globe
“The secret of creativity, Natalie Goldberg makes clear, is to subtract rules for writing, not add them. It’s a process of ‘uneducation’ rather than education. Proof that she knows what she’s talking about is abundant in her own sentences. They flow with speed and grace and accuracy and simplicity. It looks easy to a reader, but writers know it is the hardest writing of all.” —Robert Pirsig, author of  Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Natalie Goldberg

Journals Unlimited logo

  • Login or Create Account

PERSONALIZE-IT!

Custom journals.

journals unlimited coupons

  • Jumbo Notepads
  • Write To Remember Journals
  • Anniversary Gifts
  • Mother’s Day Gifts
  • Father’s Day Gifts
  • Graduation Gifts
  • Wedding Gifts
  • New House Gifts
  • New Baby Gifts
  • Anniversary / Wedding
  • Aunt / Uncle
  • Baby & Kid
  • Bereavement / Funeral
  • Gourmet / Kitchen / Wine
  • Grandparents
  • Health / Wellness / Medical
  • Home & Garden
  • Hostess Gift
  • Housewarming
  • Just for FUN / Specialty
  • Military / USA
  • Organizational / Address Books
  • Outdoor / Sporting Enthusiasts
  • Relationships
  • Religious & Inspirational
  • School / Teacher / Student
  • Travel / Vacation

Life is an adventure. It’s not the destination we reach that’s most rewarding. It’s the journey along the way. So Write it Down! & Treasure the memory forever.

Journals Unlimited Barb Morina

Category: "Write It Down!" Series

Showing 1–12 of 134 results

Adventures, My Road Trip Journal

Adventures – My Road Trip Journal

Adventures, My Road Trip Journal

Adventures – My Road Trip Journal – Light Blue

Beer A Beer Journal

Beer – A Mini Beer Journal

Biking, A Cycling Journal

Biking – A Cycling Mini Journal

Bird Watching, My Bird Journal

Bird Watching – My Bird Journal

Bird Watching, My Bird Journal

Bird Watching – My Mini Bird Journal

Boating The Boater's Journal

Boating – The Boater’s Journal

Bon Voyage - My Cruise Journal

Bon Voyage – My Cruise Journal

Books I've Read, A Reader's Journal

Books I’ve Read – A Reader’s Journal

Books I've Read, A Reader's Journal

Books I’ve Read – A Reader’s Journal – Pumpkin

Books I've Read A Reader's Journal

Books I’ve Read – A Reader’s Mini Journal

Books I've Read A Reader's Journal

Books I’ve Read – A Reader’s Mini Journal – Pumpkin

© 2024 Journals Unlimited Inc. All Rights Reserved. Designed by IMD .

© 2021 Journals Unlimited Inc. All Rights Reserved. Designed by IMD .

Newsletter Signup

  • Name * First Last
  • Craft and Criticism
  • Fiction and Poetry
  • News and Culture
  • Lit Hub Radio
  • Reading Lists

write down books

  • Literary Criticism
  • Craft and Advice
  • In Conversation
  • On Translation
  • Short Story
  • From the Novel
  • Bookstores and Libraries
  • Film and TV
  • Art and Photography
  • Freeman’s
  • The Virtual Book Channel
  • Behind the Mic
  • Beyond the Page
  • The Cosmic Library
  • The Critic and Her Publics
  • Emergence Magazine
  • Fiction/Non/Fiction
  • First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing
  • Future Fables
  • The History of Literature
  • I’m a Writer But
  • Just the Right Book
  • Lit Century
  • The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
  • New Books Network
  • Tor Presents: Voyage Into Genre
  • Windham-Campbell Prizes Podcast
  • Write-minded
  • The Best of the Decade
  • Best Reviewed Books
  • BookMarks Daily Giveaway
  • The Daily Thrill
  • CrimeReads Daily Giveaway

write down books

Write While Lying Down: On Finding Rest in Creative Labor

Holly haworth tries to shelter the muse from economic reality.

“Write while lying in bed,” I tell my creative-writing students. I am trying to get their attention, sure, and the suggestion carries a rebellious flair.

What I know that they don’t yet is that the weight of the work we have to do as artists, in a world in which time is money, can press so heavily upon us that, well, we need to lie down sometimes.

I’ve said that my students don’t know this yet, but I can see already engrained in them the years of writing in school to earn not money but the grade they want—the grade they now feel they need, so they can go on to a career that earns them enough money. I can see the worry knitted into their young brows. How deeply their creative process is already entrenched in concerns of an economy of one kind or another.

What I know that they don’t quite yet is that we have to find creative ways, even, of accessing our creative selves in a world in which grind culture gnaws always at our minds. Finding rest or refuge in our writing is a necessary skill for resilience, our shield against burnout, our sustenance for going the long haul. Telling my students is a way of reminding myself: the page can be a space of pleasure and play. Writing can be a restorative act that fortifies you for all the other work you will, no doubt, be compelled to do.

It’s a good utopian touchstone, anyway, this angle of repose, even if on most days, if we are being honest, the work won’t look or feel that way. That’s what I know, too.

In a culture obsessed with productivity and industry, many of us writers and artists have found ourselves pressured to argue the merit of what we do as bona fide work, especially those of us who try in some way to make a living at it. We know that it can be grueling, that it requires incredible energy, that it takes all of what we have to give. But in a culture that views writing and art-making as a kind of loafing around, we also have to do the work of earning respect, the validation that what we do is , actually, work.

Like a lot of writers, I suspect, I have often felt my work belittled and misunderstood by those whose work is more obviously industrious and profitable. I would guess that most of us have known the difficulty not only of getting words on the page but also justifying what we’re doing to others. And, of course, there is the grim reality of feeling that we must turn out words as commodity in order to survive.

And so we are accustomed to thinking and speaking in terms of daily word counts and page quotas, deadlines, and payments. Language people that we are, we have learned to use words from the business world both as a way to honor our own work as such and to prove to others that this writing stuff is real work. That is all very understandable.

The problem is that our language is powerful. We ourselves forget that while this is all very hard work for which we should, yes, be compensated, there is also something else at work in us, in the best of moments—something unspoken and beyond all that. There is something else that we are up to here. “Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,” wrote the 13th-century Persian poet Rumi, “There is a field. I’ll meet you there. / When the soul lies down in that grass, / The world is too full to talk about.”

There is no language in this field where we lie down, and yet it sparks our verses.

The blank page is that field where we go to lie down, a field where our thoughts can stretch out, where we meet—in the best of moments—a world so full we have no words, and yet our words begin to bubble up as if from a wellspring, our thoughts begin to flower.

It takes so much work to get to the field these days. Grind culture and the attention economy grips our shoulder so tightly, dings in our ears, pushes notifications on us wherever we try to go.

That’s why we have to protect the work of writing as something that happens in a different kind of workspace, a private place. If not a place where we literally lie down—even if actually a desk, like the one where I sit now, or only a blank page and us, on a bus or the train—it is a place where we can hear the trickling stream of our memory, see the light of our lives shifting with the seasons and years, a place where go to reflect and dream, to see the world in its motion or stillness. It is a place where in some way we are able to slow time long enough to see a single moment, to have a single and complete thought. In Thoreau’s 1851 journal, I find this: “Only thought which is expressed by the mind in repose as it were lying on its back & contemplating the heavens—is adequately & fully expressed—”

The poet William Stafford wrote that, “The stance to take, reading or writing, is neutral, ready, susceptible to the now; such a stance is contrary to anything tense or determined or ‘well-trained.’ Only the golden thread knows where it is going, and the role for a writer or reader is one of following, not imposing.”

Contrary to anything tense or determined. This is a state of receptivity, a stance that looks relaxed.

In Lewis Hyde’s 1979 book The Gift: Imagination and the Erotic Life of Property (later editions had the subtitle Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World ), Hyde wrote that the artist who involves her art in the marketplace “must develop a more subjective feel” for what he called “the two economies”: the ancient system in which art was a gift, as well as a system such as ours in which all things are ruled by money. Though we are living in a hyper-capitalistic society, our writing inhabits (at least) two worlds. The artist must get a feel for “his own rituals for both keeping them apart and bringing them together.” She must be able to deal with her work as a commodity and “be able to forget all that and turn to serve his gifts on their own terms.”

Something else rules in this other space, there are other terms in operation—long spoken of as spirits, Muses, ancestors, all the poets and storytellers of the past. The sky, in which our vision might be immersed were we to be lying down in a field or meadow or on a mountaintop or remote strand of beach or riverbank or park bench or rooftop just now, has long been associated by cultures around the world with thought, imagination, and the divine: a common space to which we all have access.

As artists, when we gaze at the wide sky of stars or the passing clouds, we are working, yes, but we are also in some sense gifted with this work. We understand that time moves differently here, that the words do not always flow at the rate we wish, on the schedule we set, don’t always bend to our annual fiscal goals, and that sometimes they flow like great starry rivers, sometimes they rain down on us.

If lying down is not the literal position we take when writing—it very rarely is—I choose to stamp this image on my psyche as a symbol of how I must serve the gift on its terms, as something different than simply work. The image of lying down is a humble position, and I like to imagine the words and stories pouring over me, a gift I earned but also didn’t, something I don’t ever have to earn but that I can go to immerse myself in.

Writing is an act I want to stake a boundary around. Hyde calls it the “protected gift-sphere.” This sphere may not be a light-filled study and probably will not be a dream-shack in the deep woods. It’s fantasies and concepts like these that capitalists use to paint writers as loafers, or worse, that make people believe they have to be privileged to write. The protected gift-sphere may be a desk and a chair, the floor, a front stoop, the seat of a taxi. Or it may indeed be a bed, when we crawl into it tired and frayed from a hard day’s work.

Then also, it may look like nothing but lazy repose. John McPhee described in a New Yorker article ten years ago how he lay on his back on a picnic table for a fortnight, attempting to sort out the hoard of reporting and research he’d amassed for his book The Pine Barrens , vexing himself over the structure. To anyone passing this would have looked like a man lying on a picnic table. But with writers, we should know better. Much of the work is invisible and requires rest, is done best, maybe, when our parasympathetic nervous systems are engaged.

I confess now that I have written some of the most difficult passages of my book-in-progress while lying on a blanket on the creekbank in the woods behind my house, my eyes absorbing the most stunning light in the trees, the sound of the creek shushing over its stones and coaxing my words from me. I have unlocked stuck words on my yoga mat, in puppy pose, my notebook splayed before me, my elbows propped on either side, my pen flowing easily, finally, across the page, more fluid thanks to the blood rushing to my head, thanks to gravity, one of my trusted Muses. I have jostled free sentence after sentence while taking long hikes in the mountains, and walking, for many, is also a way of resting, of dipping into the sky.

Call these creekbank, yoga-mat, trail-walking stances my prayers to whatever wild, abundant, restful forces draw the words from me. In a culture in which back pain and headaches are a kind of virtue-signaling that you are working hard, I am learning to accept that sometimes I just might not look so virtuous. Some passerby in a suit might make a silly passive-aggressive joke like working hard or hardly working? in this culture where we’ve all learned to shame and police one another about productivity, in which we’re conditioned to believe that anything that looks like play, rest, or pleasure can’t possibly be work.

Hyde draws a distinction between work and labor that I have found useful. “Work is what we do by the hour,” he writes. “Labor, on the other hand, sets its own pace.” Because of that, it “is usually accompanied by idleness, leisure, even sleep. … When I speak of labor, then, I intend to refer to something dictated by the course of life rather than by its society, something that is often urgent but that nevertheless has its own interior rhythm, something more bound up with feeling, more interior, than work.”

My emphasis is on the phrase that conveys urgency, because we know how this labor can grip us, too, how the Muses don’t always visit between the hours of 9 and 5, and nor do we shutter our doors or ears to them on Saturday or Sunday. They can ring the bell at the counter at any moment, and we must appear from the back room to serve them. We know, in truth, that we are always laboring.

Stafford’s golden threads, as he called them, are what we pursue across the land and seas even while we are on “vacation.” That’s the way it is for us, to be ever occupied, always making notes, noting details, keeping journals, paying attention to conversations, keeping our eyes open, finding inspiration, to be ever OPEN, as the signs on shop windows say. Mary Oliver hid pencils in the nooks of trees in her woods, kept paper scraps in her pockets, in case a poem were to strike her when she intended to be only musing at natural wonders. Even our dreams can be fodder, and so we also labor to dream and know that it is part of what we do.

When I think of the artist laboring, I think often of Frida Kahlo, who painted her most incredible paintings while lying on her back in bed. She painted that way, as we know, because of the terrible injuries she had sustained in a bus accident, which became a source of chronic pain.

And so I think, too, of the very serious necessity of finding a sense of rest in our creative labors at a time when debilitating chronic pain and illnesses are increasing. These afflictions are much more common among women and people of color, who bear a disproportionate burden of work of all kinds, who face more violence and who still earn lower pay in the workplace. In her book Rest is Resistance, Tricia Hersey argues that rest pushes back against the white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. “Naps provide a portal to imagine, invent, and heal,” she said in an interview. “Our dream space has been stolen, and we want it back.” It’s a very intentional kind of rest, a mindful play, a crucial repose that we take. It is our job as writers to dream better worlds, and to dream we must lie down.

Hyde makes clear the truly harrowing reality of a money-driven and work-obsessed culture. He writes:

As those who must worry about the livelihood of artists are fond of saying, “You cannot play ‘The Minute Waltz’ in less than a minute.” Worse (or perhaps better) you cannot write “The Minute Waltz” in less than… what? A day, a week, a year —however long it takes. There is no technology, no time-saving device that can alter the rhythms of creative labor. When the worth of labor is expressed in terms of exchange value, creativity is automatically devalued every time there is an advance in the technology of work.

That was in 1979. Forty-five years later, AI can likely write a minute waltz in less than a minute, and more students are using ChatGPT to pass classes so they can have more time not for leisure but for higher productivity. It has become more efficient to consign art to the robots. What once was considered a gift is now pure commodity, and this is tied, too, to climate collapse. Hyde wrote back then that in an “age of monopoly capitalism,” gift wealth is converted to market wealth also as “forests, wildlife, and fossil fuels” are sold “and converted into private fortunes.”

The gift of art can provide rest from the brutal and ceaseless conversion of all the world’s gifts into commodities. The implications are quite serious, and Báyò Akómoláfé has said that, “When we rest, the earth heals.” The value of writing is beyond all calculation for its power to re-imagine and envision better futures and alternative realities, and to show us the world in which we’re living. For Hyde, art gives to society “a storehouse of works that can serve as agents for transformation.” It creates nothing short of “a sense of an inhabitable world—an awareness, that is, of our solidarity with whatever we take to be the source of our gifts, be it the community or the race, nature, or the gods.”

And so, I tell my students, write while lying down. I tell myself, as I labor with all my heart and might on my first book, which I am writing under the incredible stresses and strain of supporting myself with a pauper’s teaching salary. I don’t fool myself that I can actually attain such a state of rest all that often. But the idea of writing in repose, writing as refuge and sanctuary away from the din and grind, is one I hold dear and close. “Often I am permitted to return to a meadow,” wrote the poet Robert Duncan in a poem we know well. “It is so near to the heart, / an eternal pasture folded in all thought.” The meadow is “only a dream of the grass blowing / east against the source of the sun / in an hour before the sun’s going down.”

There, my phone doesn’t ring or ding because I’ve turned it off. There, email doesn’t reach me. There, I am pulled into a current of thought and feeling so rejuvenating, all the worries of bills and expenses fly from my mind. They take wing, a flock of sparrows diving and wheeling in the golden light that burnishes the field and sets my vision blazing. I am richer here than the world will ever know.

I will meet you there, where our souls can lie down in the grass, where the world is too full to talk about. 

Holly Haworth

Holly Haworth

Previous article, next article.

write down books

  • RSS - Posts

Literary Hub

Created by Grove Atlantic and Electric Literature

Sign Up For Our Newsletters

How to Pitch Lit Hub

Advertisers: Contact Us

Privacy Policy

Support Lit Hub - Become A Member

Become a Lit Hub Supporting Member : Because Books Matter

For the past decade, Literary Hub has brought you the best of the book world for free—no paywall. But our future relies on you. In return for a donation, you’ll get an ad-free reading experience , exclusive editors’ picks, book giveaways, and our coveted Joan Didion Lit Hub tote bag . Most importantly, you’ll keep independent book coverage alive and thriving on the internet.

write down books

Become a member for as low as $5/month

  • Skip to main content
  • Keyboard shortcuts for audio player

Author Interviews

How the art world excludes you and what you can do about it.

Elizabeth Blair 2018 square

Elizabeth Blair

write down books

In her new book Get the Picture, journalist Bianca Bosker explores why connecting with art sometimes feels harder than it has to be. Above, a visitor takes in paintings at The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in London in 2010. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

In her new book Get the Picture, journalist Bianca Bosker explores why connecting with art sometimes feels harder than it has to be. Above, a visitor takes in paintings at The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in London in 2010.

When Bianca Bosker told people in the art world she'd be writing a tell-all about their confounding, exclusive ecosystem, "bad idea," they responded.

"They didn't come right out and threaten my safety or anything," she writes in Get the Picture , "My reputation, well-being, and livelihood as a journalist —that, however, was another story." Judging from the book's recent reviews , she need not worry too much.

Bosker's motivation for writing the book was partly frustration. "I didn't know how to have a meaningful experience of art and that bothered me," she tells me, "But also like I think the art fiends that I got to know, it's not just that they look at art differently. They behave sort of like they've accessed this trapdoor in their brains and I envied that."

Get the Picture by Bianca Bosker

Other journalists might have relied on research and interviews. Bosker went gonzo. She spent five years immersed in the New York art scene, working as a gallery assistant and helping artists in their studios. After getting a license to be a security guard with the state of New York, she got a guard job at the Guggenheim.

Bosker didn't necessarily set out to write a takedown of the art world, though the result is pretty much just that. She writes about the time a performance artist sat on her face. And recounts a conversation with a dealer who said her mere presence (he didn't like her clothes) was "lowering my coolness." It's unvarnished, awkward and eye-opening.

Borderline hostile

"Working at galleries, I became initiated into the way that the art world wields strategic snobbery to keep people out. And I think it's deliberate and I think it's unnecessary," says Bosker.

Take the wall texts you often see at art museums. While they might be well-intentioned, Bosker believes they're part of an over-emphasis on context .

"For the last 100 years or so, we've been told that what really matters about an artwork is the idea behind it." Bosker says that "art connoisseurs" were very interested in "where an artist went to school, who owns her work, what gallery had shown it, who he slept with" and was surprised by "how little [time they] actually spent discussing the work itself."

Of those wall labels, "I thought they were annoying, like borderline hostile ... they just drove me crazy."

At a recent visit to the Guggenheim, we saw one that included the phrase:

"...practice explores the liminal spaces of human consciousness..."

Bosker shudders. "If I had a dollar for every time someone in the art world used the word 'liminal,'" she laughs. One artist she worked with told her, "'Reading the wall labels is like you're trying to have a conversation with the artwork, but someone keeps interrupting.'"

As a museum guard, Bosker occasionally took the matter into her own hands.

"I would actually try and stand in front of the wall labels so that people wouldn't just fall back on the approved interpretations. They would challenge themselves and really wrestle with their own eye, which is so strong," she says.

Small galleries deliberately keep out the 'schmoes '

If museums make some people feel unwelcome, Bosker learned that small, contemporary art galleries can be even worse. One that we visited in downtown Manhattan was hard to find. That's typical, Bosker explains.

She says a lot of galleries "deliberately ... hide themselves from the general public ... I worked for someone who referred to general public as 'Joe Schmoes' and I think there are a lot of ways to keep out the schmoes, and where you put your gallery is a big one."

Now, to be fair, those galleries are in the business of selling art.

write down books

Gallery owner Robert Dimin likes that Bianca Bosker is unmasking "our opaque art world" with her new book Get the Picture . DIMIN hide caption

Rob Dimin, another gallery owner Bosker worked for, does not refer to the general public as "schmoes" but he does like that his new gallery is tucked away. It's on the second floor of a building with just a small plaque by the entrance.

Dimin's last gallery was a storefront. "You [were] more likely to get people that had no intention or idea about the art or really interested in the art, just maybe kind of stumbling in," he says, "There [were] moments when we were on the street level that people would come in and just have phone conversations on rainy days because it was an open space."

People walking into a gallery to get out of the rain aren't usually interested in buying art. But Dimin admits that the art world is "opaque" and he's glad Bosker is unmasking it. There are parts of it even he doesn't understand.

"Even as an art dealer, it sometimes is confusing," he says, "Like, why is X, Y and Z artists getting acquired by every museum and having these museum shows? What is challenging for a person like me who's been in this business for 10 years, I can only imagine a person not within the industry having more challenges."

How to have a meaningful experience with art

Intentionally confusing, elitist, cloistered. While Bosker's new book likens the art world to a "country club," she says her feelings about art itself haven't been diminished.

"Seeing artists in their studios agonize over the correct color blue, over ... the physics of making something stick, lay and stay, really convinced me that everything we need to have a meaningful experience with art is right in front of us," says Bosker.

write down books

Bianca Bosker takes a close look at a work by Julianne Swartz at the gallery Bienvenu Steinberg & J in New York. Bosker says it's OK to "walk around a sculpture ... just don't touch it." Elizabeth Blair/NPR hide caption

Bianca Bosker takes a close look at a work by Julianne Swartz at the gallery Bienvenu Steinberg & J in New York. Bosker says it's OK to "walk around a sculpture ... just don't touch it."

Here are a few tips she has for readers looking to evade the snobbery:

"My philosophy had always been when I went to a museum ... a scorched earth approach to viewing. I was like, 'You have to see everything. That is how you get your money's worth.'" Bosker says "museum fatigue" is real and compares it to eating everything at an all you can eat buffet. "No wonder you feel a little ill at the end of it."

"If you find one work and you just spend your entire half hour, hour, hour and a half at that piece, you've done it. And I think that that can be oftentimes an even more meaningful experience."

Find five things

Don't 'get' art? You might be looking at it wrong

Don't 'get' art? You might be looking at it wrong

"An artist that I spent time with encouraged me to, in front of an artwork, challenge yourself to notice five things. And those five things don't have to be grandiose, like: 'This is a commentary on masculinity in the Internet age.' It could just be, you know, like this yellow makes me want to touch it." Taking the time to notice those things will help viewers think about the choices an artist has made, Bosker believes.

"I think being around art ultimately helps us widen and expand our definition of what beauty is. And I think beauty ... is that moment when our mind jumps the curb. It can feel uncomfortable, but it also is something that draws us to it. ... It's something that all of us need more of in our life. And art can be the gateway to finding more of it. It doesn't have to happen with the traditionally beautiful artwork."

Get as close to the source as possible

"What we see when we go to a museum is not necessarily the best that culture has to offer. ... It's the result of many decisions by flawed human beings. And one way to get around that is to widen your horizons. ... Go to see art at art schools, go see art at the gallery in a garage and just kind of go close to the source."

This story was edited for audio and digital by Rose Friedman. The web page was produced by Beth Novey.

  • contemporary art

A powerful free writing tool from Reedsy Write and export a beautifully professionally typeset book

Write and typeset a beautiful book.

The Reedsy Book Editor - A powerful book production tool.

How to find editors, book designers and marketers on the Reedsy marketplace.

A beautiful production tool that takes care of the formatting and conversion, before you have even finished writing.

Simply, beautifully

The Reedsy Book Editor allows for powerful collaborative writing

With a professional

Work with a professional book editor directly on your manuscript

Export to PDF & ePub

Flawless ebook formatting and print typesetting

“But I’m happy with MS word.” – is not an excuse

Do your book a favor and use a tool built for book production, a simpler way to write.

A beautiful interface built for distraction-free writing. Our formatting toolbar makes it easy to apply styles as you write. When it comes to typesetting, consistency is key. Learn more about how to format your book here .

The Reedsy Book Editor writing interface, with a simple style guide toolbar

Collaborative editing

Say goodbye to managing chapter revisions with your editor and co-authors by email. Work together on your manuscript in real-time, tracking changes, editing prose and making comments. (Coming soon)

Distribution ready

Exported files are ready for instant distribution to ebookstores, distributors and POD services such as Smashwords, IngramSpark, Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing, Apple iBooks and Kobo Writing Life.

Professionally formatted epub and print files ready for distribution

Professional assistance

Finished your draft and looking for an editor? Luckily, we have a marketplace for that! Bring in expert assistance, and work with them directly on your manuscript. Effortlessly.

Powerful features that will transform the author-editor relationship

Import doc files and our online writing tool will respect your sections and formatting

Track changes

These advanced features are coming soon! For more information, check out our FAQ

Professional themes, perfect for ebooks and print

Authors and publishers no longer need to rely on expensive typesetting processes. Now you can produce a beautiful book in seconds, for free!

Select a theme to preview

write down books

Print and distribute with Blurb

Prepare your manuscript with Reedsy, then print and distribute to the world with Blurb

write down books

Enter your email address to get started

Create your free Reedsy account to browse hundreds of professional profiles.

Up arrow icon to go back to the top of the page

  • Small Business Loans
  • Working Capital Loans
  • Short Term Business Loans
  • Equipment Financing and Leasing
  • Types of Funding Solutions
  • Customer Reviews
  • Meet Our Customers
  • Sponsorships
  • How We Work
  • Search for: Search Button

National Funding

  • Financial Health

What Is a Write-Down in Accounting?

  • by Sonya Stinson Sonya Stinson is a New ... more
  • April 19, 2021
  • 2  Minute Read
  • Home > Blog > Financial Health > What Is a Write-Down in Accounting?

write down books

The time might come when your business assets lose value because they’re aging or outdated.

This is a common scenario, especially for businesses that sell products in the retail or wholesale markets. If you find yourself in this scenario, you can write down the value of your inventory.

But what is a write-down, exactly, and what does it mean for your business?

What Is a Write-Down?

In accounting lingo, a write-down is the reduction of the value of an asset. The amount of the write-down is the difference between the book value listed on the balance sheet and how much you could recover from it now that the asset’s value has been reduced. The write-down will lower your net income and your owner’s equity in your business.

Besides inventory and equipment, other business assets could lose their value and be written down, such as buildings, accounts receivable, and goodwill, an intangible asset whose value comes into play when one business acquires another.

What Does a Write-Down Look Like?

There are many situations in which an inventory write-down makes sense, the Corporate Finance Institute notes. For example, your inventory could lose value when its goods get close to the end of their life span, if some of your items get damaged in production or transit, if part of your inventory is stolen, or if some of it accumulates wear and tear when used as in-store displays.

Let’s say you run a small clothing boutique and your total inventory has a book value of $200,000. But because some out-of-season and returned items need to be marked down, the market value of your inventory drops to $150,000. A write-down will note that $50,000 value reduction in your books.

Similarly, aging but still useable delivery trucks or last-year’s-model office machines could have their depreciating market values recorded as write-downs.

How Do I Report a Write-Down?

Calculator and black pen with accounting report and financial statement on desk. Accounting business concept.

The way you document a write-down in your accounting records depends on the size of the value loss, certified public accountant Harold Averkamp notes in his blog. If your loss is relatively small, you could include it as part of your cost of goods sold .

If your loss is substantial, though, you must record it on a separate line on your income statement. You’ll also need to record the inventory write-down and the corresponding reduction in owner or stockholder equity on your company’s balance sheet.

What’s the Difference Between a Write-Down and a Write-Off?

It’s understandable if, when you started reading this article, your immediate question after “What is a write-down?” was “How is it different from a write-off?” Both are business expenses, and both reduce net income.

Here’s the key distinction: A write-down adjusts an asset’s value, but a write-off indicates that it no longer has any value. A write-down can become a write-off if the value of the asset continues to deteriorate. Once an asset becomes worthless, it’s removed from the ledger.

If you still have questions about the inventory write-down and whether it’s something your business needs, consult with an accountant.

Tags: Accounting for Small Business , Featured Post , Write-Down

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

write down books

Bottom Line vs. Top Line: What’s the Difference for Small Business Owners?

Net income vs. net revenue: what’s the difference, how to run a successful electrical business, what is a break-even analysis.

National Funding Logo

You are leaving NationalFunding.com

You are now leaving the National Funding website, and are being connected to a third party website. Please note that National Funding is not responsible for the information, content, or product(s) found on third party websites.

write down books

  • Office Products
  • Office & School Supplies
  • Notebooks & Writing Pads
  • Hardcover Executive Notebooks

Amazon prime logo

Enjoy fast, free delivery, exclusive deals, and award-winning movies & TV shows with Prime Try Prime and start saving today with fast, free delivery

Amazon Prime includes:

Fast, FREE Delivery is available to Prime members. To join, select "Try Amazon Prime and start saving today with Fast, FREE Delivery" below the Add to Cart button.

  • Cardmembers earn 5% Back at Amazon.com with a Prime Credit Card.
  • Unlimited Free Two-Day Delivery
  • Streaming of thousands of movies and TV shows with limited ads on Prime Video.
  • A Kindle book to borrow for free each month - with no due dates
  • Listen to over 2 million songs and hundreds of playlists
  • Unlimited photo storage with anywhere access

Important:  Your credit card will NOT be charged when you start your free trial or if you cancel during the trial period. If you're happy with Amazon Prime, do nothing. At the end of the free trial, your membership will automatically upgrade to a monthly membership.

One-time purchase: $9.95 $9.95 FREE delivery: Thursday, Feb 22 on orders over $35.00 shipped by Amazon. Ships from: Amazon Sold by: Zerbert

  • Free returns are available for the shipping address you chose. You can return the item for any reason in new and unused condition: no shipping charges
  • Learn more about free returns.
  • Go to your orders and start the return
  • Select the return method

Choose how often it's delivered

Skip or cancel any time, unlock 5% savings, added to cart, other sellers on amazon.

write down books

Image Unavailable

Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Online Accounts, My Password Journal, Mini-Size 3”x5.5”, Kraft Hard Cover, Made in USA

  • To view this video download Flash Player

Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Online Accounts, My Password Journal, Mini-Size 3”x5.5”, Kraft Hard Cover, Made in USA

Purchase options and add-ons, about this item.

  • The “Write it Down!” Series by Journals Unlimited features the world’s largest collection of over 65 themed and guided journal titles with something for every age, interest, occasion, or hobby. We all have unique thoughts, life experiences, and events, worth remembering. Whatever your age or passion, keeping a journal is a great way capture and recall your thoughts and ideas. Each individually unique keepsake journal makes it easy and fun to record your precious thoughts and memories.
  • WRITING PROMPTS guide you to capture the things that really matter. Our design makes you want to “Write it Down!”.
  • PRINTED IN THE USA means quality craftsmanship. “Writing it Down!” since 1997.
  • RECYCLED, heavy-duty 70 lb, acid-free, ivory paper, and soy-based ink.
  • NATURAL KRAFT COVER features a long-lasting durable hard cover design with a hand-crafted look.
  • Keep track of all of your user names and passwords in one convenient place. Tabbed alphabet pages help keep locations of websites organized and easy to find! Did you know you should never use the same password for multiple accounts? If someone hacks into one account, they will be able to access all of your accounts. Do not use your pet names, children’s names, or birth date. Use a series of letters, symbols, numbers, and upper case. You will be glad you did!

Consider a similar item

write down books

Frequently bought together

Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Online Accounts, My Password Journal, Mini-Size 3”x5.5”, Kraft Hard Cover, Made i

Top rated similar items

Clever Fox Password Book with tabs. Internet Address and Password Organizer Logbook with alphabetical tabs. Small Pocket Size

Important information

To report an issue with this product or seller, click here .

Compare with similar items

From the brand.

Its whats inside that counts!

Journals for all your Travels

Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Guided Journal, Gardening, The Gardener's Journal, Fu...

Journals for all your Hobbies

Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Guided Journal, Hiking, A Hiker's Journal, Full-size ...

Journals for the Outdoors

Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Guided Journal, When I'm Gone, My Info, Wishes & Thou...

Journals for your Information

Product description.

Journals Unlimited Logo

Looking for specific info?

Product information, technical details, additional information, warranty & support, customer reviews.

Customer Reviews, including Product Star Ratings help customers to learn more about the product and decide whether it is the right product for them.

To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. It also analyzed reviews to verify trustworthiness.

Customers say

Customers like the organization, sturdiness, ease of use, and quality of the blank book. They mention that it makes organizing passwords easy, lasts for years, and is very well made. Some appreciate the value. Opinions are mixed on size.

AI-generated from the text of customer reviews

Customers like the organization of the blank book. They say it's a great little book to store passwords, and it'll make it easy to manage your passwords. Customers also appreciate the abc tabs on the side, which make it easier to find your password. Overall, customers are happy with the organization and functionality of the product.

"Nice journal design for tracking websites, accounts, & passwords . Very handy. This is my second journal by this company...." Read more

"Nice size and makes organizing passwords easy ...." Read more

"...It's small and fits in my purse. I love that you can write in 3 websites with their passwords instead of one...." Read more

"I love this! I use it everyday. It has made it so much easier to manage my passwords it’s the perfect size to throw in my work bag or purse." Read more

Customers are impressed with the sturdiness of the blank book. They say it's well-made and lasts for years.

"...This little book is well-made , it came quickly and was well packaged. However it is a little small to suit my purpose...." Read more

"...I love this little book, it is sturdy and the wire binding makes it easy to write on backs of pages." Read more

"...I like how it lies flat & is sturdy . Double the size & it would be ok." Read more

"Love how portable it is, it's made very well , only issue I have is that it's hard to get to the alphabetic area you may want to view / use...." Read more

Customers find the blank book easy to use. They mention it's very handy and perfect for those "confidential" items.

"Nice journal design for tracking websites, accounts, & passwords. Very handy . This is my second journal by this company...." Read more

"... Very handy and I will use it.....a LOT." Read more

"...I like its format, easy to read, easy to use and it offers a line for notes on each listing...." Read more

"These small journals meet my every need. They are easy to use . They also make great gifts." Read more

Customers are satisfied with the quality of the blank book. They mention that it is sturdy and lightweight, and fits great in their backpack. Some say that it does the job of logging accounts and that it works great with large amounts to enter items.

" Good little book but only if you don’t have security questions but great for user name and passwords only." Read more

"This worked out fine for my additional book . Sturdy and lightweight fits great in my backpack." Read more

"It does the job of logging accounts . It would definitely be improved with letter tabs." Read more

" Best little book in town ." Read more

Customers appreciate the value of the blank book. They say it is a good value for the price.

"...their bird watchers and campers journals also, they are all worth every penny ." Read more

"...For the price this is a reasonable purchase ." Read more

" Great value and easy to use!" Read more

" Good value ..." Read more

Customers like the appearance of the blank book. They appreciate that it is sturdy and can lie flat.

"...I like how it lies flat & is sturdy. Double the size & it would be ok." Read more

"...fact that it will easily fit in a pocket or purse, and that the pages lay flat , but I had to get a slightly larger password book -- mostly wider --..." Read more

"Just what I whated. A password book that lays flat when opened ...." Read more

Customers are satisfied with the pages of the blank book. They mention that it has plenty of pages and has many spaces to write down all the information they need.

"...It is small, portable, and many spaces to write down all the information you need...." Read more

"This is perfect! Fits in my purse and plenty of pages for all my online accounts now and for years to come." Read more

"...have lots of room for more entries . Very well made" Read more

Customers are mixed about the size of the journal. Some mention that they love the compact size, it makes organizing passwords easy, and it's easy to keep in their purses. However, others say that the product size is tiny and the pages are too small to see.

"...it is but it is the smallest one I have found and therefore very portable when traveling (or for storage while not in use)...." Read more

"...It is small , portable, and many spaces to write down all the information you need...." Read more

"...However it is a little small to suit my purpose . I did not return it but I don’t use it nor what I order it again it is just too small." Read more

" Nice size and makes organizing passwords easy...." Read more

Reviews with images

Customer Image

  • Sort reviews by Top reviews Most recent Top reviews

Top reviews from the United States

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. please try again later..

write down books

  • Amazon Newsletter
  • About Amazon
  • Accessibility
  • Sustainability
  • Press Center
  • Investor Relations
  • Amazon Devices
  • Amazon Science
  • Start Selling with Amazon
  • Sell apps on Amazon
  • Supply to Amazon
  • Protect & Build Your Brand
  • Become an Affiliate
  • Become a Delivery Driver
  • Start a Package Delivery Business
  • Advertise Your Products
  • Self-Publish with Us
  • Host an Amazon Hub
  • › See More Ways to Make Money
  • Amazon Visa
  • Amazon Store Card
  • Amazon Secured Card
  • Amazon Business Card
  • Shop with Points
  • Credit Card Marketplace
  • Reload Your Balance
  • Amazon Currency Converter
  • Your Account
  • Your Orders
  • Shipping Rates & Policies
  • Amazon Prime
  • Returns & Replacements
  • Manage Your Content and Devices
  • Recalls and Product Safety Alerts
  • Conditions of Use
  • Privacy Notice
  • Your Ads Privacy Choices

Advertisement

Supported by

editors’ choice

9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

  • Share full article

It’s too early to know the full story behind the mass shooting at yesterday’s Super Bowl parade in Kansas City, but for the back story — the broader context of America’s love affair with guns and the resulting steady drumbeat of horrific incidents — you might look to two of our recommended books this week: Dominic Erdozain’s “One Nation Under Guns” and Jonathan M. Metzl’s “What We’ve Become,” which take cleareyed but different approaches to the country’s gun culture and its intractable challenges.

Also up this week, we recommend a couple of big biographies, of the choreographer Martha Graham and the Marxist revolutionary Frantz Fanon, along with a memoir of undocumented immigration and a true-crime history about a 1931 murder that exposed a network of political corruption. In poetry, we recommend Mary Jo Bang’s latest collection, and in fiction we like new novels by Paul Theroux and the British writer Dolly Alderton. Happy reading. — Gregory Cowles

ONE NATION UNDER GUNS: How Gun Culture Distorts Our History and Threatens Our Democracy Dominic Erdozain

This galvanizing polemic by a historian appalled at American gun violence scrutinizes the historical record to show where contemporary interpretations of the Second Amendment have departed from the framers’ apparent intentions, with disastrous results.

write down books

“Considers guns from cultural, legal and historical perspectives. ... So comprehensive and assured that the moment I finished it, I immediately went back to the beginning and read it again.”

From Rachel Louise Snyder’s review

Crown | $28

WHAT WE’VE BECOME: Living and Dying in a Country of Arms Jonathan M. Metzl

Homing in on a mass shooting at a Nashville Waffle House in 2018, Metzl, a psychiatrist and sociologist, argues that America’s gun violence epidemic requires us to address racial and political tensions deeply embedded in our history.

write down books

“Casts a wide net. ... How, he asks, have public health experts failed to effect changes in policy, given their thousands of studies devoted to the myriad ways firearms increase risk and danger?”

Norton | $29.99

THE REBEL’S CLINIC: The Revolutionary Lives of Frantz Fanon Adam Shatz

This absorbing biography of the Black psychiatrist, writer and revolutionary Frantz Fanon highlights a side of him that’s often eclipsed by his image as a zealous partisan — that of the caring doctor, who ran a secret clinic for Algerian rebels.

write down books

“Part of what gives ‘The Rebel’s Clinic’ its intellectual heft is Shatz’s willingness to write into such tensions…. Portrays a man whose penchant for ‘rhetorical extremity’ could obscure how horrified he was by the brutality he had seen.”

From Jennifer Szalai’s review

Farrar, Straus & Giroux | $32

GOOD MATERIAL Dolly Alderton

Alderton’s novel, about a 35-year-old struggling to make sense of a breakup, delivers the most delightful aspects of romantic comedy — snappy dialogue, realistic relationship dynamics, funny meet-cutes and misunderstandings — and leaves behind clichéd gender roles and the traditional marriage plot.

write down books

“Alderton excels at portraying nonromantic intimate relationships with tenderness and authenticity.”

From Katie J.M. Baker review

Knopf | $28

ERRAND INTO THE MAZE: The Life and Works of Martha Graham Deborah Jowitt

In the hands of a veteran dance critic, this rigorous biography excels at describing the flamboyant choreographer’s work and distinct style. About the messy life between performances, Jowitt is comparatively mild.

write down books

“A study in balance and grace. ... A distinguished biography: its description rich, its author’s rigor unquestionable.”

From Alexandra Jacobs’s review

Farrar, Straus & Giroux | $35

THE BISHOP AND THE BUTTERFLY: Murder, Politics and the End of the Jazz Age Michael Wolraich

The 1931 murder of “Broadway Butterfly” Vivian Gordon exposed an explosive story of graft, corruption and entrapment that went all the way to the top of the state. Wolraich brings a journalist’s eye and a novelist’s elegance to this story of Jazz Age New York.

write down books

“A disquieting reminder of how tragedy can be used to effect change, but also how it is often leveraged for advancement.”

From Lesley M.M. Blume’s review

Union Square | $28.99

MY SIDE OF THE RIVER: A Memoir Elizabeth Camarillo Gutierrez

When Gutierrez was 4, her parents moved the family from Mexico to Arizona in hopes of giving their children better opportunities than they would have had in their “violent little narco town.” In this moving, timely memoir, she considers the ripple effects of that decision.

write down books

“A testament to the abiding allure — and often daunting reality — of the American dream.”

From Julia Scheeres’s review

St. Martin’s | $29

BURMA SAHIB Paul Theroux

This novel explores George Orwell’s years in colonial Burma, where he trained and worked as a police officer in the 1920s. Theroux’s Orwell is uneasy about his job and repelled by the British ruling class. But these experiences, the book suggests, made Orwell into the sharp thinker he became.

write down books

“The Burma that he conjures in these pages is wonderfully present in lush and dense prose. ... Theroux is now in his early 80s and this novel is one of his finest, in a long and redoubtable oeuvre.”

From William Boyd’s review

Mariner | $30

A FILM IN WHICH I PLAY EVERYONE Mary Jo Bang

The poems in Bang’s latest collection, her ninth, are full of pleasure, color, sound and light — but also torment.

write down books

“The work of miniaturizing a life is painstaking, and Bang’s poems have a characteristic clockwork precision — they tick and spin like mechanical music boxes.”

From Elisa Gabbert’s poetry column

Graywolf | Paperback, $17

Explore More in Books

Want to know about the best books to read and the latest news start here..

In Lucy Sante’s new memoir, “I Heard Her Call My Name,” the author reflects on her life and embarking on a gender transition  in her late 60s.

For people of all ages in Pasadena, Calif., Vroman’s Bookstore, founded in 1894, has been a mainstay in a world of rapid change. Now, its longtime owner says he’s ready to turn over the reins .

The graphic novel series “Aya” explores the pains and pleasures of everyday life in a working-class neighborhood  in West Africa with a modern African woman hero.

Like many Nigerians, the novelist Stephen Buoro has been deeply influenced by the exquisite bedlam of Lagos, a megacity of extremes. Here, he defines the books that make sense of the chaos .

Do you want to be a better reader?   Here’s some helpful advice to show you how to get the most out of your literary endeavor .

Each week, top authors and critics join the Book Review’s podcast to talk about the latest news in the literary world. Listen here .

write down books

Create a form in Word that users can complete or print

In Word, you can create a form that others can fill out and save or print.  To do this, you will start with baseline content in a document, potentially via a form template.  Then you can add content controls for elements such as check boxes, text boxes, date pickers, and drop-down lists. Optionally, these content controls can be linked to database information.  Following are the recommended action steps in sequence.  

Show the Developer tab

In Word, be sure you have the Developer tab displayed in the ribbon.  (See how here:  Show the developer tab .)

Open a template or a blank document on which to base the form

You can start with a template or just start from scratch with a blank document.

Start with a form template

Go to File > New .

In the  Search for online templates  field, type  Forms or the kind of form you want. Then press Enter .

In the displayed results, right-click any item, then select  Create. 

Start with a blank document 

Select Blank document .

Add content to the form

Go to the  Developer  tab Controls section where you can choose controls to add to your document or form. Hover over any icon therein to see what control type it represents. The various control types are described below. You can set properties on a control once it has been inserted.

To delete a content control, right-click it, then select Remove content control  in the pop-up menu. 

Note:  You can print a form that was created via content controls. However, the boxes around the content controls will not print.

Insert a text control

The rich text content control enables users to format text (e.g., bold, italic) and type multiple paragraphs. To limit these capabilities, use the plain text content control . 

Click or tap where you want to insert the control.

Rich text control button

To learn about setting specific properties on these controls, see Set or change properties for content controls .

Insert a picture control

A picture control is most often used for templates, but you can also add a picture control to a form.

Picture control button

Insert a building block control

Use a building block control  when you want users to choose a specific block of text. These are helpful when you need to add different boilerplate text depending on the document's specific purpose. You can create rich text content controls for each version of the boilerplate text, and then use a building block control as the container for the rich text content controls.

building block gallery control

Select Developer and content controls for the building block.

Developer tab showing content controls

Insert a combo box or a drop-down list

In a combo box, users can select from a list of choices that you provide or they can type in their own information. In a drop-down list, users can only select from the list of choices.

combo box button

Select the content control, and then select Properties .

To create a list of choices, select Add under Drop-Down List Properties .

Type a choice in Display Name , such as Yes , No , or Maybe .

Repeat this step until all of the choices are in the drop-down list.

Fill in any other properties that you want.

Note:  If you select the Contents cannot be edited check box, users won’t be able to click a choice.

Insert a date picker

Click or tap where you want to insert the date picker control.

Date picker button

Insert a check box

Click or tap where you want to insert the check box control.

Check box button

Use the legacy form controls

Legacy form controls are for compatibility with older versions of Word and consist of legacy form and Active X controls.

Click or tap where you want to insert a legacy control.

Legacy control button

Select the Legacy Form control or Active X Control that you want to include.

Set or change properties for content controls

Each content control has properties that you can set or change. For example, the Date Picker control offers options for the format you want to use to display the date.

Select the content control that you want to change.

Go to Developer > Properties .

Controls Properties  button

Change the properties that you want.

Add protection to a form

If you want to limit how much others can edit or format a form, use the Restrict Editing command:

Open the form that you want to lock or protect.

Select Developer > Restrict Editing .

Restrict editing button

After selecting restrictions, select Yes, Start Enforcing Protection .

Restrict editing panel

Advanced Tip:

If you want to protect only parts of the document, separate the document into sections and only protect the sections you want.

To do this, choose Select Sections in the Restrict Editing panel. For more info on sections, see Insert a section break .

Sections selector on Resrict sections panel

If the developer tab isn't displayed in the ribbon, see Show the Developer tab .

Open a template or use a blank document

To create a form in Word that others can fill out, start with a template or document and add content controls. Content controls include things like check boxes, text boxes, and drop-down lists. If you’re familiar with databases, these content controls can even be linked to data.

Go to File > New from Template .

New from template option

In Search, type form .

Double-click the template you want to use.

Select File > Save As , and pick a location to save the form.

In Save As , type a file name and then select Save .

Start with a blank document

Go to File > New Document .

New document option

Go to File > Save As .

Go to Developer , and then choose the controls that you want to add to the document or form. To remove a content control, select the control and press Delete. You can set Options on controls once inserted. From Options, you can add entry and exit macros to run when users interact with the controls, as well as list items for combo boxes, .

Adding content controls to your form

In the document, click or tap where you want to add a content control.

On Developer , select Text Box , Check Box , or Combo Box .

Developer tab with content controls

To set specific properties for the control, select Options , and set .

Repeat steps 1 through 3 for each control that you want to add.

Set options

Options let you set common settings, as well as control specific settings. Select a control and then select Options to set up or make changes.

Set common properties.

Select Macro to Run on lets you choose a recorded or custom macro to run on Entry or Exit from the field.

Bookmark Set a unique name or bookmark for each control.

Calculate on exit This forces Word to run or refresh any calculations, such as total price when the user exits the field.

Add Help Text Give hints or instructions for each field.

OK Saves settings and exits the panel.

Cancel Forgets changes and exits the panel.

Set specific properties for a Text box

Type Select form Regular text, Number, Date, Current Date, Current Time, or Calculation.

Default text sets optional instructional text that's displayed in the text box before the user types in the field. Set Text box enabled to allow the user to enter text into the field.

Maximum length sets the length of text that a user can enter. The default is Unlimited .

Text format can set whether text automatically formats to Uppercase , Lowercase , First capital, or Title case .

Text box enabled Lets the user enter text into a field. If there is default text, user text replaces it.

Set specific properties for a Check box .

Default Value Choose between Not checked or checked as default.

Checkbox size Set a size Exactly or Auto to change size as needed.

Check box enabled Lets the user check or clear the text box.

Set specific properties for a Combo box

Drop-down item Type in strings for the list box items. Press + or Enter to add an item to the list.

Items in drop-down list Shows your current list. Select an item and use the up or down arrows to change the order, Press - to remove a selected item.

Drop-down enabled Lets the user open the combo box and make selections.

Protect the form

Go to Developer > Protect Form .

Protect form button on the Developer tab

Note:  To unprotect the form and continue editing, select Protect Form again.

Save and close the form.

Test the form (optional)

If you want, you can test the form before you distribute it.

Protect the form.

Reopen the form, fill it out as the user would, and then save a copy.

Creating fillable forms isn’t available in Word for the web.

You can create the form with the desktop version of Word with the instructions in Create a fillable form .

When you save the document and reopen it in Word for the web, you’ll see the changes you made.

Facebook

Need more help?

Want more options.

Explore subscription benefits, browse training courses, learn how to secure your device, and more.

write down books

Microsoft 365 subscription benefits

write down books

Microsoft 365 training

write down books

Microsoft security

write down books

Accessibility center

Communities help you ask and answer questions, give feedback, and hear from experts with rich knowledge.

write down books

Ask the Microsoft Community

write down books

Microsoft Tech Community

write down books

Windows Insiders

Microsoft 365 Insiders

Was this information helpful?

Thank you for your feedback.

Write It Down Books

Write It Down Books

Get organized & brighten your day with Digital Notebooks, Planners and Free Downloads for Noteshelf and Goodnotes.

Protected: Free Digital Stickers

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

' src=

  • Already have a WordPress.com account? Log in now.
  • Subscribe Subscribed
  • Copy shortlink
  • Report this content
  • View post in Reader
  • Manage subscriptions
  • Collapse this bar

IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Book: A Step-by-Step Guide

    write down books

  2. How To Write A Book: 30 Different Authors Share Their Advice

    write down books

  3. Write This Down

    write down books

  4. How to Write a Book by Starting With a Concept

    write down books

  5. How to Write a Book and Get it Published

    write down books

  6. Writing your book

    write down books

COMMENTS

  1. Write It Down Books

    Write It Down Books - Get organized & brighten your day with Digital Notebooks, Planners and Free Downloads for Noteshelf and Goodnotes. WELCOME Hi, I'm Erika! I want you to love digital planning and note taking like I do. Check out my Free Downloads page with Free Trials and Free Templates. Want to learn more?

  2. Write It Down, Make It Happen: Knowing What You Want And Getting It

    Write It Down, Make It Happen: Knowing What You Want And Getting It: Klauser, Henriette Anne: 8601421563673: Amazon.com: Books Books › Business & Money › Job Hunting & Careers Enjoy fast, free delivery, exclusive deals, and award-winning movies & TV shows with Prime Try Prime and start saving today with fast, free delivery Kindle $14.99

  3. Write It Down Make It Happen: Knowing What You Want and Getting It

    Write It Down Make It Happen: Knowing What You Want and Getting It 1st Edition, Kindle Edition by Henriette Anne Klauser (Author) Format: Kindle Edition 4.6 1,013 ratings

  4. The Power of Writing It Down: A Simple Habit to Unlock

    Read 235 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Discover the power of (finally) getting unstuck, claiming your clarity, and becoming the p…

  5. Write-Down: Definition in Accounting, When It's Needed and Impact

    A write-down is an accounting term for the reduction in the book value of an asset when its fair market value (FMV) has fallen below the carrying book value, and thus becomes an impaired...

  6. Write-Off vs. Write-Down: What's the Difference in Accounting?

    A write-down is recorded on a company's books as an adjustment to the existing inventory. A credit is applied to the equipment or whatever the inventory item is, and the total value is...

  7. The Power of Writing It Down by Allison Fallon

    Allison Fallon is an author, speaker, and founder of Find Your Voice, a company dedicated to training and inspiring anyone who wants to use writing for transformation. In addition to her books Packing Light and Indestructible, she has helped leaders of multinational corporations, stay-at-home moms, Olympic gold medalists, recovering addicts, political figures, CEOs, and prison inmates use the ...

  8. Write It Down, Make It Happen: Knowing What You Want An…

    Turn your dreams into reality by taking matters into your own hands. In Write It Down, Make It Happen, Henriette Anne Klauser, Ph.D., explains how simply writing down your goals in life is the first step toward achieving them. Writing can even help you understand what you want. In this book, you will read stories about ordinary people who witnessed miracles large and small unfold in their ...

  9. To Write Down Books

    The Lincoln Lawyer (The Lincoln Lawyer, #1; Harry Bosch Universe, #15) by. Michael Connelly (Goodreads Author) (shelved 1 time as to-write-down) avg rating 4.20 — 233,436 ratings — published 2005. Want to Read. Rate this book. 1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars.

  10. Write It Down Make It Happen

    Writing can even help you understand what you want. In this book, you will read stories about ordinary people who witnessed miracles large and small unfold in their lives after they performed the basic act of putting their dreams on paper. Klauser's down-to-earth tips and easy exercises are sure to get your creative juices flowing.

  11. Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Guided Journal, Books I've

    The "Write it Down!" Series by Journals Unlimited features the world's largest collection of over 65 themed and guided journal titles with something for every age, interest, occasion, or hobby. We all have unique thoughts, life experiences, and events, worth remembering.

  12. Write down on or Write down in?

    #1 Hi, I'd like to know which preposition is the correct one in a sentence such as: "She wrote down the homework __ her notebook" I've looked for some example sentences online, but I coulent find any, apparently it's quite rare to use "write down" followed by the thing you're writing on/in... Thanks for the help in advance! Packard Senior Member

  13. Write It Down, Make It Happen Book: A Guide to Achieving Your Goals

    The book, written by Henriette Anne Klauser, highlights the importance of writing down one's goals and aspirations. The author argues that writing down goals is the first step towards achieving them. The book is divided into several chapters, each addressing different aspects of goal-setting and achievement. Klauser uses real-life examples to ...

  14. Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within

    Goldberg sees writing as a practice that helps writers comprehend the value of their lives. The advice in her book, provided in short, easy-to-read chapters with titles that reflect the author's witty approach ("Writing Is Not a McDonald's Hamburger," "Man Eats Car," "Be an Animal"), will inspire anyone who writes—or who longs ...

  15. "Write It Down!" Series

    "Write It Down!" Series | Journals Unlimited, Inc Category: "Write It Down!" Series Showing 1-12 of 134 results Adventures - My Road Trip Journal Rated 5.00 out of 5 $ 24.95 Select options Adventures - My Road Trip Journal - Light Blue Rated 4.67 out of 5 $ 24.95 Add to cart Beer - A Mini Beer Journal Rated 5.00 out of 5 $ 9.95 Add to cart

  16. Write While Lying Down: On Finding Rest in Creative Labor

    In Lewis Hyde's 1979 book The Gift: Imagination and the Erotic Life of Property (later editions had the subtitle Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World), Hyde wrote that the artist who involves her art in the marketplace "must develop a more subjective feel" for what he called "the two economies": the ancient system in which art was a gift, as well as a system such as ours in ...

  17. How the art world excludes you and what you can do about it

    First of all, can we stop using the word "liminal"? Bianca Bosker spent five years doing in-depth research for Get the Picture — an irreverent book about "strategic snobbery" in the art world.

  18. The Reedsy Book Editor: A FREE Online Writing Tool

    A beautiful interface built for distraction-free writing. Our formatting toolbar makes it easy to apply styles as you write. When it comes to typesetting, consistency is key. Learn more about how to format your book here. Collaborative editing Say goodbye to managing chapter revisions with your editor and co-authors by email.

  19. WriteDown: Write Books, Novels

    WriteDown: Write Books, Novels is a Free, Simple, Light and Compact app to write your random thoughts, script or book chapter anytime and anywhere. The app helps you to organize your...

  20. What Is a Write-Down in Accounting?

    In accounting lingo, a write-down is the reduction of the value of an asset. The amount of the write-down is the difference between the book value listed on the balance sheet and how much you could recover from it now that the asset's value has been reduced. The write-down will lower your net income and your owner's equity in your business.

  21. Fact check: Biden makes three false claims about his handling of ...

    President Joe Biden gave a press conference on Thursday night after the release of a report from the special counsel, Robert Hur, who announced that Biden would not face charges over his handling ...

  22. Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Online Accounts, My

    Amazon.com : Write it Down series by Journals Unlimited, Online Accounts, My Password Journal, Mini-Size 3"x5.5", Kraft Hard Cover, Made in USA : Password Journal : Office Products Office Products › Office & School Supplies › Paper › Notebooks & Writing Pads › Hardcover Executive Notebooks

  23. 9 New Books We Recommend This Week

    In Lucy Sante's new memoir, "I Heard Her Call My Name," the author reflects on her life and embarking on a gender transition in her late 60s.. For people of all ages in Pasadena, Calif ...

  24. Create a form in Word that users can complete or print

    Show the Developer tab. If the developer tab isn't displayed in the ribbon, see Show the Developer tab.. Open a template or use a blank document. To create a form in Word that others can fill out, start with a template or document and add content controls.

  25. Free Digital Stickers

    Write It Down Books. Get organized & brighten your day with Digital Notebooks, Planners and Free Downloads for Noteshelf and Goodnotes.